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Full text of "Sponsor"







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■■BO] HI . 









NATIONAL BROADCASTING COM PAW. fe. 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
iO ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, H, Y 









- 



1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor54spon 



r I 3 - 

« g S H C f» t S 



new y 



K 20 N Y 



? magazine radio ami tv advertisers use 

JAN MB 




NEC GENERAL LIBRAE 

hen Upstart and Flount 

nailed down the account 

Of SNARL, "The Top Canine Fare," 





We can crack the Midwest with 

an Omaha test . . . 
There's a station out there that's 




Moral 



EVERY GOOD TIME-BUYER 
KNOWS KOWH HAS THE: 

• Largest total audience of any Omaha station, 
8 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday through Saturday! 
(Hooper, Oct., 1951, thru Nov., 1953.) 

• Largest share of audience, of any independent 
station in America! (Nov., 1953.) 



Said Flount, "Here's a thought 
that'll get the stuff bought — 
The chance that we have's 
really rare! 




Our program needs tone — we'll buy 

KOWH alone . . . 
Every guy and his dog tunes to them! 




KOWH 
AVERAGE HOOPER 



CHBJ 




PAT WEAVER 
A PROFILE 



page 31 



General Manager, Todd Storx; Represented Nationally By The BOILING CO. 



How the CIO uses 
radio to prove it 
doesn't have horns 

page 34 




The tv panel show: 
costs, audiences 

page 36 




Is radio being 
sold too cheaply? 

page 39 




Cancer scare; 
Is cigarette copy 
making it worse? 

age 40 




p 



VITAPIX: A TV 
REVOLUTION? 

page 42 

What's wrong with 
printed media 
rating services 

page 44 



I 




A.T.&T. has no wire for hire 
but we ask you, 
do you dig TD-2? 

Ml live network programs now come to tele* ision W00D1 WD 
\ia a brand-spankm 1 new A.T.&T. ( *TD-2" microwave relav 
link from the main line at South Bend to Grand Rapids. 

Iii case you re not hep on your n*la\ Bystems, t \ pe "TD-2 
is the Cadilla< of them all much hetter than co-axial 
cable and the more inexpensive ""ID"" links. That'-, especiall] 
importanl now. with color at our front door— brother, 
reall) important! 

\\ I K )D- l'\ was tf 1 1 — t to order and Met this improved Ben i« <• 
in these parts, jusl as it was first to go to full 1<MI0 foot 
towel height last month and will he first to go to full power 
next month (right now our interim KM). 000 watts picture 18 
greatest in all of television WOODLAND). 

\\(M)D-T\ i> first with INS facsimile new> service in Michigan, 
and first to take deliver] on color adapting equipment for 
its transmitter. When you spend a buck on WOOD-TV, you get 
lots more than that in advertising \alue and service. 

Schedule \our advertising on \\()()D-T\. (irand Rapids' only 
television station. The Western Michigan station with top 
technical equipment, top local and network programming — 
and the top market to go with them.* 

•Primarj service, too, to Western Michigan's mosl populated 
area including Muskegon. Lansing, Rattle Creek and 
Kalamazoo. 




WOOD -TV 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 



Reaches more people who have more and buy more 





NBC Radio offers 

weekenders 

8 new programs 



Yogurt sales rise 
after air switch 



Wine battle to be 
fought in air 



Cold Seal, Calgon, 
Pan Am buy tv 



New Lewis radio 
show has 3 signed 



NBC Radio's bid for weekend domination, begun with "Weekend" and "Big 
Preview" in October, was hypoed this past weekend with 7 new shows, 
including 3 "longies" : "Road Show," 4 hours Saturday, called first 
coast-to-coast network program designed specifically for motoris' 
"Never Walk Alone," 45 minutes Sunday, religious; "Collector's Item," 
2 hours Sunday, educational. Others include revived "Breakfast in 
"Hollywood," "Heritage over the Land," "Show Tunes," "Sunday at Home." 
Eighth show, "People," starts 23 January. For what else to expect 
from NBC, s ee SPONSOR'S profile on Pat W eaver, starting page 31. 

-SR- 

Since Dannon Co. (makers of yogurt) dropped newspapers some 9 months 
ago, switched 80% of budget to air media, sales have risen 30% over 
previous year. WOR-AM-TV gets entire air slice for 8-10 radio com- 
mercials, 20-25 tv announcements weekly. Zlowe is Dannon agency. 

-SR- 

1954 will see battle for leadership in sweet wine field fought mostly 
in air. Monarch Wine (Manischewitz) , $2 million spender, will de- 
vote 3/4ths 1954 budget to spot radio, tv through Emil Mogul Co. 
Wine Corp. of America (Mogen David wine), whose 1953 budget totaled 
$1.4 million, and Quality Importers, distributors of Welch Wine, on 
which $1.2 million was spent, will pu t m ost of their 1954 budgets 
into air media, network and spot. Mogen David's sponsoring "Dollar a 
Second" (Du Mont via Weiss & Geller) ; Welch has "Dotty Mack Show," 
also on Du Mont, via Monroe Greenthal. 

-SR- 

Some new tv sp o nsors: Gold Seal Co., makers of Glass Wax (which Arthur 
Godfrey built up via radio) will sponsor Jo Stafford (through Camp- 
bell-Mithun) in weekly 15-minute show on CBS TV, Tuesday, 7:45-8:00 
p.m., starting 2 February. Calgon, Inc., Pittsburgh manufacturer of 
Calgon water softeners, will finance 15-minute segment on Bob Crosby's 
across-board daytime half-hour on CBS TV (3:30-4 p.m.) starting 10 
February. Agency: Ketchum, McLeod & Grove, Pittsburgh. Pan American 
Airways (JWT) has taken NBC TV's "Meet the Press" (Sunday, 6:00-6:30 
p.m.) on alternate weeks. Revere Copper & Brass (St. Georges & Keyes) 
shares sponsorship. 

-SR- 

Among active radio sponsors is Van Camp Sea Food Co., California. 
Firm this month began alternate-week sponsorship of Edgar Bergen- 
Charlie McCarthy, CBS Radio, Sundays 9:30-10:00 p.m. It also bank- 
rolls 15-minute segment of new hour-long "Robert Q. Lewis Show" 11:00 
a.m. -12 noon Saturday, CBS Radio. Agency: Brisacher, Wheeler & Staff, 
San Francisco. Two ot her sponsors buying into this show: Milner 
Products for Pine-Sol, via Gordon Best, Chicago; Mutual of Omaha, 
through Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha. 



SPONSOR. Volume 8. No. 1. 11 January. 1954. Published biweekly by SPONSOR PuWkitloMjnr . .1 3110 Elm At. «£»■"■"■ ^ ^ZlJ- - , . „' J.- 

culation Offlcea 40 E. 48th St. New York 17. 18 a year In V. S. SO eUewhere. Entare4 as lecond clau matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md. poatofllre under Act I March 1879 



ICI I'OKI TO SPONSORS fur II January 1951 



NBC Radio "3 

Plan" has 2 

sponsors 



SPONSOR looks 
at cigarette ads 



Hooper "duplex" 
used for radio 



Finding prizes 
now an industry 



19 tv stations 
return C.P.'s 



NBC Radio's "Three Plan" now has 2 sponsors: Hudnut Sales Co. (via 
K&E) , using 4 participations weekly on "Fibber McGee & Molly," 
"Second Chance" and "It Pays to Be Married," all 15-minute across- 
board shows, and Lewis-Howe Co. for Turns (Ruthrauff & Ryan). 

-SR- 

Few big industries have been put in position where their product is 
as suspect as tobacco industry's is today. SPONSOR'S article, "The 
cancer scare: is cigarette copy making it worse?" shows how this came 
about, what $4 billion industry is doing about it. Air media con- 
cerned because they got some $56 million from industry in '53. 

-SR- 

Hooper uses "duplex" phone coincidental for radio only, coincidental- 
diary for tv. SPONSOR'S correction on this reached printer too late 
to be made because of holiday rush. Article, "What's wrong with the 
air-rating services," published 28 December 1953. "Duplex" means 
respondents asked not only "What are you listening to now?" but also 
"What were you listening to 15 minutes ago?" This gives some audi- 
ence flow figures. 

-SR- 

Radio-tv giveaway prizes totaled $10 to $15 million last year and 
are increasing, says Richard S. Robbins, who heads own New York firm 
specializing in supplying stations, networks, producers with prizes. 
Robbins says 4 firms dominate field. They get prizes from sponsors 
whose "pay" is free mention on air as prize givers. Robbins empha- 
sizes business has no connection with firms which charge sponsors fee 
to obtain free plugs — a growing practice opposed by stations and 
agencies a l ike. To supply $3 1/2 million worth of free prizes to his 
clients last year, Robbins got $150,000 in fees. He "services" 9 
network giveaway shows, 30 local tv shows, 500 local radio shows. 

-SR- 

During last quarter of 1953, 19 television station permitees returned 
their construction permits to FCC. Three were vhf permits ; 16 were 
for uhf operation. Most C.P. holders returned authorizations "for 
economic reasons," but some were canceled by FCC. Commission told 
grantees, in effect, to either build station within specified time (8 
months from date of grant is allowed, but 30 to 90 day extensions 
frequently are granted) or return C.P. (See list of C.P.'s relin- 
quished on page 55. ) 



l_ 



>«•!<• national spot radio and tv business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Cener.il Electric Co. 

Schenectady, NY 
Marc.ilus Mfg Co. E.ist 

Patcrson, NJ 

Modqlin Co, LA 
Norwich Ph.um.ic.il Co, 
Norwich, Conn 

S C (ohnson & Son. 
Racine, Wis 



Tv receivers 
Marc.il Paper prod 



Plastic household prods 
Flavcttcs • pi II to cut 
down tobacco, food 

appetite i 
Pride furniture wa« 
and free dusting 
cloth offer 



Maxon. NY 

Calkins, Holdcn. Car- 
lock. MrClinton & 
Smith. NY 
Roy S Durstine. LA 
Benton & Bowles. NY 



Necdham, Louis & 
Brorby, Chi 



125 radio stns in mkts where 

new tv stns arc opening 
NY, Phila 



23 tv mkts 
20 radio mkts 



20 top tv mkts 



Radio: 60-sec anncts: 5 to 10 anncts a 

wk per stn ; 18 Jan; 6 wks 
Radio: 60-scc anncts, daytime partic . 

mid-Jan; 13 wks 

Tv: 60-. 20-scc anncts; mid-Jan; 18 wks 
Radio: 60-scc anncts. chn brks; March; 
13 wks 

Tv: 60-, 20-scc anncts; 19 Jan; 13 wks 



SPONSOR 




a half-hour of wholesome fun 
for the young'uns 

MONDAY thru FRIDAY 5 *o 




classic two-reel slapstick comedies 

of the keystone era with narration 

keyed to the kids. 
"Jolly" Jack Gleason handles the narration, 

the moppets, and the commercials. 
Twenty-five children on set emphasize the commercial impact. 



rating: 2.6 on first pulse 



mail: 3,214 in first 10 days 



note: Follows "Junior Frolics" top local station show in Metropolitan New York market. 



COST: $500 per program 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

WEED and Co. 



wa tV ch 



n e I 




11 JANUARY 1954 




advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



SPONSOR talks to the new NBC president, discusses his plans and ideas for 
the future, appraises his past accomplishments 



Pal Hearer: a business profile 

SPONSOR talks to the new NBC president, discu 
the future, appraises his past accomplishments 

t lit uses radio in prove it doesn't have horns 

An analysis of why a labor union decided to reach the non-labor public as 
well as its own members and how it went about planning its new public rela- 
tions approach. Nearly $1 million will go into air media in 1954 

The television panel show: costs, aadienees 

Why are there so many panel shows on the air? SPONSOR studies the ques- 
tion, presents a detailed picture of how different kinds of clients use panel shows 

f.v radio foo elt«»ap? 

Radio's cost is compared with that of other media in a provocative chart. A 
full length report will follow in a subsequent issue 

Cancer scare; is cigarette eopy making it worse? 

Radio and tv's $70 million stake in cigarette advertising may be affected by 
recent drop in cigarette sales. SPONSOR queries the tobacco industry to find 
out what it will do about health copy 

Vifapi.v pofetifiaf: Ir film revolution 

The only station-owned film syndicator in tv may mean the beginning of film 
networks and the end of Hollywood's hoarding of big-name films 

II hat's u-rofir; with printer! media raf ittg services? 

Part 15 of SPONSOR'S All-Media Evaluation Study discusses the differences 
between broadcast ratings and print measurement services and covers in detail 
what advertisers should know about the latter 

ffou- radio-tv got foeaf tletergent distribution 

Los Angeles firm used only air media to get beachhead in the supermarkets 
with its new liquid detergent. Result: 50% distribution in 30 days 



31 



31 



3H 



3fi 



40 



42 



44 



47 



COMING 



Comparing air rating services market by market 

The 16th article in SPONSOR'S All-Media study is based partly on a study by 

Ward Dorrell, research director of John Blair & Co. The article will list markets _, 

covered by rating services and cover supplementary services ••> Jan. 

Film section: programing 

SPONSOR presents the first part of a two-part series covering the tv film field 

from A to Z. (The second part will deal with film commercials.) Film buyers 

will find a complete listing of available tv films, a directory of producers and 

sellers, tips on what to Icok for in tv film programs and how to buy, the 1953 

developments and 1954 trends, the latest dope in color and re-runs, the mean- m , 

:ng of competition between syndicators and tv networks, pricing formulas m9 Jan. 



Volume 8 Number 
II January 1954 



l 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 


6 


49TH & MADISON 


10 


AGENCY AD LIBS 


14 


NEW AND RENEW 


19 


MR. SPONSOR, Albert A. Cott 


22 


P. S. 


25 


NEW TV STATIONS 


55 


AGENCY PROFILE, Peter Hilton 


50 


FILM TOP 20 


56 


FILM NOTES 


60 


TV COMPARAGRAPH 


62 


RADIO RESULTS 


7C 


SPONSOR ASKS 


74 


ROUND-UP 


76 


NEWSMAKERS 


102 


SPONSOR SPEAKS 


104 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Editorial Director: Ray Lapica 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jaff< 
Department Editor: Lila Lederman 
Assistant Editors: Evelyn Konrad, Joan B. 
Marks, Keith Trantow 
Contributing Editor: Bob Foreman 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coope 
(Western Manager), Wallace Engelhard 
(Midwest Manager), Homer Griffith (South 
west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Productio-i 
Manager), Ed Higgins 

Vice-President-Business Mgr.: Bernard Piatt 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Sarz (Sub 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearman 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Puhllfhed biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 
combined with IV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation «r 
Adrertlllng Office! : 48th A Madlion (40 E 49th Pt 
New York 17. N. T Telephone: MTrray Hill 8-277 
Chicago Office: lfil E Grind Are. Phone 81 'perl. 
7-9863. Dillif Office: Inti-rurbin Building. 1500 JirkK 

I'lione: Rindolph 73S1 Weil Coiit Office: 6087 Sin 
let Boulevard. Ix>» Angelei. Telephone: Hollywood 4-808 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave . Baltimore 11. Md. Sul 
•crlptlons: United States IS ■ year. Canada and forrlf 
I Single coplei 50c Printed In S A Addreii a 

; ..ndence to 40 E 49lh St. New York 17. N ] 
IfOmf Hill 8-S771 Copyright 1953 SPONSOR PUf 
LICATI0N8 INC. 





KWKH is first 



by more 
than 202.9% 
in average 
daily listeners! 



AVERAGE DAILY LISTENERS 



Any way you look at it, KWKH is the 
Number 1 radio value in the big Arkansas- 
Louisiana-Texas area. 

KWKH gets 202.9', more Average Daily 
Listeners than Shreveport's second station 
yet costs only 60 f < more dollars '. 

These audience figures are from the new 
Standard Station Audience Report the more 
conservative of the two recent audience surveys 
made in this area. 

Write direct or ask your Branham man for all 
the proof of KWKH's tremendous superiority. 



KWKH 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



A Shrcvepnrt Time Station 

Texas 



SHREVEPORTf LOUISIANA 



The Branham Co. 
Representatives 



V 



Arkan 



Henrv Clav, General Manager 
Fred Watkins, Commercial .Manager 



TO THE 

ADVERTISING 

INDUSTRY: 



On January I, 1954, KBIG rates Increased 
an average of 12%. 

KBIG Rate Card No. I was issued before 
we went on the air in June 1952. We 
believed then that our 10.000 watt-740 KC 
signal from Catalina Island would saturate 
all Southern California. We also believed 
the Southern California community would 
like our formula of "Music You Like, Just 
Enough News and the Right Time, All Day 
Long." We couldn t prove this then. 
Now we can. 

You advertisers made KBIG a commercial 
success from its third month. The public 
has responded to KBIG with ever-increasing 
loyalty, indicated by constantly increasing 
ratings, mail response and sales success stories. 

For the last two months, KBIG commercia 
time has been sold out. It is our policy 
to keep one-fourth to one-fifth of our 
time non-commercial, whatever the tempta- 
tion to turn a quick dollar. Within the 
commercial time allotment, advertising 
content is restricted to a maximum of 
three minutes in each quarter-hour period. 
There is no multiple spotting in excess 
of one minute. 

This means that KBIG delivers an audience 
of increasing QUALITY as well as quantity. 
Isn't such advertising worth 12% more? We 
think you'll agree that it is. Your sales 
message reaches an audience in the right 
mood, an audience unbored and unirritated 
by over-commercialism. 

For Coverage, Impact and Dollar Value, 
KBIG a "The Giant Economy Package of 
Southern California Radio." 



10,000 WATTS 
AT740 



KBIG 



STUDIOS IN AVALON 
AND HOLLYWOOD 





GIANT 

ECONOMY 

PACKAGE OF 

SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 

RADIO 



The Catalina Station 

John Poole Broadcasting Co. 
KBIC . KBIF . KBID TV . KBIC-TV 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
HOIIywood 3-3205 
Not. Rep. Robert Meeker Associates, Inc. 






Joan Kufmciii. \ U . 4yer, Sew ) <>rh, says that 
ruling* alone cunt tell the story of radio. "Take, 
tor example, one ut our clients who's promoting 
use oj a utility In housewives." Joan told SPONSOR. 
"For him, I bought participations in a local daytime 
rooking show with an outrageous cost-per-\.000. 
However, as this advertiser will be first to show, 
his mail response from the program has been five 
times larger than the program's ratings would 
seem to justify." Furthermore, says Joan, a time- 
buyer must integrate radio into the over-all campaign 
strategy cost-per-i.000 is no cure-all. 



Alexander D. C'oan. Calkins & Holdert, Car- 
lack. McClinton & Smith. New York, has been travel- 
ing almost continuously since fall. The purpose: to 
review and revise air schedules for Stokely-l an Camp. 
"This is the largest single promotion in all media 
on a local basis where canned foods are concerned," 
"Dud" explained. By visiting local markets. "Duif 
has developed a personal contact with local brokers 
as well as station personnel which assures the 
sponsor of maximum dealer cooperation and station 
merchandising for his client's advertising inieslment. 



Iltiruld Dari.v. Erwin, Wasey & < <>■. Veto York. 
says that some clients have an arbitrary maximum 
co\t-per-\.000 in mind when they decide to use 
radio. "But that isn't the most efficient yard- 
stick," Hal explains. "It doesn't take into account 
such factors as audiem e < (imposition, the psycho- 
logical factor of getting the right people at the right 
time." And, he adds, when the\ do use a cost-per- 
1.000 yardstick tor tv, these advertisers use it far 
more liberally, on a market-by-market basis. "\o one 
factor is enough to determine choice of a medium." 



Hubert \\ nil hurst. Kenyon & Eckhardt, N<-» 
York, bins time tor Welch Crape Juice. National 
Brewing Co., (base Sational Hank. "About two- 
thirds ol our ail budget tor ( hast goes into tv. one- 
third into radio." he explains. His choice of local 
\cu York programing tor the bank teas based not 
nisi on cost-per- 1,000, but upon the type of audience 
rem luil. /v a commercial bank. Chase is interested 
in attracting people to its services its commercials 
are aimed primarily at men. Therefore, Hob placed 
them during early morning hours. 



SPONSOR 







Impartial survey proves 




JP@@JL. 




is the 
top radio personality 
in the 
GREENSBORO broadcasting area 



Contact Hollingbery, our national 
representative . . . get the facts from 
"The Pulse of Greensboro" report. You wi 
learn that day by day Bob Poole attracts 
more listeners than any other local 
personality every quarter hour he broadcasts 
for WBIG. His high rating is maintained 
even when he competes with two nationally 
famous network shows in late afternoon. 




In 28th Year of Broadcasting 



CBS AFFILIATE 5000 WATTS 



11 JANUARY 1954 



WMCT's new 1088 ft. towei 

and 100,000 watts maximum poweij 




Memphis' and the Mid- South s tallest TV tower 



now delivers the . . . 



• highest grade signal service 

• clearest picture in this flffffFlffl 

from Memphis, Tennessee 



With the operation of WMCT's new tower, on preferred "low-band " Chan 
nel_5, a vast new area in the Mid-South will be afforded clearer pictures and 
improved signal reception. 

The previous "fringe" area has been pushed back from a 65 mile mark out to 
a general radius of approximately 135 miles. 

This represents a 100% or more increase in coverage for WMCT— and 
means more people will see and hear your selling story better, with the highest 
quality reception from Memphis provided by any other Mid-South station. 

>. flCY. 

*• / TENN - SHADED AREA IK TERMS OF PEOPLE AND BUYING POWER 

fmss.*h' \ 

( The figures to the right reflect only In I »• i o t x -wr\*\ 

' the shaded area as shown in the i£p J Population 1,834,700 

on the page to the left. They do not / 

include population, retail sales, or ef- [ Retail sales $1,460,688,000 

fective buying power of urban Mem- \ 

phis and the territory within 65 I ., . 

miles of Memphis, all of which are I trteCTIve 

of course covered with high grade \ buying power $1,291,398,000 , 

primary service by WMCT. 

WMCT sssa 

Memphis TV S.o.ion W «C WMCF WMCT 

Now 100,000 Watts 

Also affiliated with ABC and DUMONT 
Owned and operated by National Representatives 

The Commercial Appeal The Branham Co. 




Want to see 
your sales 

SKY HIGH? 




x anchor 
your 
advertising 

^CKAC 



I . Huge coverage 2 

out of '! French radio 

homes in Quebec. 

2. Hundreds of 

thousands of 

Faithful listeners da> 

and night as 

reported bj M H M. 

3. Selling power 

ond n> none 

T 500 1 box tops 

last year 



CBS Outlet in Montreal 

Key Station of the 

TRANS-QUEBEC radio group 

CKAC 

MONTREAL 

730 on the dial • 10 kilowatts 

Representatives 

Adam J. Young Jr. New York, Chicago 

Omer Renaud & Co. Toronto 




i 



MADISON 

sponsor im rt Ui fhi <<lttor. 

Address 4" l 19 St., New York 17. 

BANKS ON RADIO 

We are a happ) Bubst riber of spon- 
sor l»ut I would appreciate receiving 
an extra < :op) <>f the article on the use 

ul radio bv all 1 1 bank- in Kingston 
■\\ h\ all 1 1 bank- in Kingston use 
radio," 30 November 1953, page 32]. 
H. I.. lb ( I ELLO 

/(/i ertising Manager 
Bank of Ameri< u 
San Francisco 20 



O \ limited ....... I. < 

November 1953 Usui 
apiece. 



r of extra copies <>f the 1" 

are ..* ...I ..I. I. Price i- 50c 



RADIO TV DIRECTORY 

I found your New ^ ork director) so 
hand) it occurs to mo that our travel- 
ing staff members would also find it 
extreme!) \aluable and am wondering 
if you could spare a dozen copies. 

Please accept my best wishes for the 
continued success of the wonderful 
work \ ou are doing. 

Fr\\< es E. Riley 
Manager of Information 
NARTB, Washington, D. C. 



\ ou put out a booklet. I believe, 
covering agencies in New York. How 
do I go about getting one? We'd sure 
appreciate a copy. 

W. C. >U vKTLKY 

Station Manager 
WBZ-TV 
Boston 34 



-'■ONMW- ■ Ka.lio and T\ Director* " i- free 
jl.-eril.er-. 



MEDIA STUDY 

Would you please note m\ order for 
a cop) of \«>ur 20-part Media Evalua- 
tion series which, I understand, you 
will be publishing in book form next 
\ ear. 

S. D. Rose 

Supen isor of Media 

) oung & Rubicam, Ltd. 

Montreal 

• SPONSOR i- publishing the complete Media 
Evaluation Stud] it. l..><>k form ihia ..jr. ltv*er- 
vajiona ..r. acceptable ....*. I.* arrhlna; to to i .... 
I" St. 



ly, in a two-installment article by Ray 
Lapica on the methods of purchasing 
media. These articles appeared in your 
issues of June 1 and June 15 of this 
year "How to choose media." I and II. 
I wonder if you would be kind 
t nougb to send us one cop) each of 
those two i-sues. 

I H \D HORTON 

I)' Arc\ Advertising Co. 
Atlanta 5 

• V limited number of extra r«|iir. of the 1 
June and I". June Issues are available at "><»■ carh. 



\\ e are extreme!) interested, belated- 



TV OVER-COMMERCIAL? 

Having a considerable part of our 
advertising budget in television, it is 
quite natural for us to give more than 
the average amount of attention to the 
medium and its use. I would agree 
with Mr. Sigurd l.armon that over- 
< ommercialism is present, if not ram- 
pant, in television '"I- t\ over-com- 

mercialized?" 14 December L953, page 

I would also Ba) that it i- the fault 
of all three — broadcasters, agent ies 
;ind advertisers. I don't blame an) of 
the three groups for feeling the influ- 
ence of the high cost of television on 
their policies. Being neither a broad- 
caster nor an agenov. I would not pre- 
sume to offer solutions to their prob- 
lems: but as an advertiser I can tell 
you how I think television should be 
used. First of all. let me offer the 
reasons wh) I think all three groups 
are at fault. 

\ broadcaster has a substantial in- 
vestment in a television station. Per- 
sonnel requirements and. accordingly, 
operating costs arc much higher than 
those of radio stations. Revenues must 
be high to produce profits which the 
broadcaster rightful!) is entitled to. 
Thus, there is a great deal of double- 
spotting in addition to sponsored I.D.- 
in man) station and < hainhreaks. Right 
there, the result is a succession of five 
commercials at ever) stationbreak. . . . 
This is good for the station's pocket- 
book but makes the audience vcrv tired 
of commercials. Incidentally, it doesn't 
help the advertiser. Commercials on 
parade, like soldier-, lose identity. All 
-mis of devices arc used b) stations to 
permit tin- double spotting, lor ex- 
ample, local programs arc "backed up" 
..i -tatted 2<> seconds earlv so that 50 
seconds ma) lie available after them 
and still meet the network on time. 
Some stations cul introductions ami 
• redits on network and local programs 
1.. -ell more stationbreak time. . . . 



10 



SPONSOR 



1 



LMISINO." 



Ever/one 
likes their 

HOME 
FOLKS! 




htO W 



-BUT IN ALBUQU^ 



IN 



BL t>teol" 



Remember when, at that last convention you attended, the 
conversation took its usual turn — ended up with all the 
boys doing a little bragging about their home town? 

It never fails, does it! Everyone likes their home folks — 
feels more comfortable when they're around them; shares 
their interests, their likes and dislikes more closelv! 



\\ ell. that's the reason w hj the 8W in;: hafl been to independ- 
ent, local radio 100' » of the time . . . why more and more 
advertisers get tbe best results from using stations with 
their finger on their home town- pulse. Sure. you can get 
the same results . . . ju«t ;i»k anj one of the nation's leading 
independents they're listed below for your convenience. 



THESE STATIONS CATER TO THEIR HOME TOWNS TASTES: 



WCUE 


— Akron, Ohio 


WMIL 


— Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


KREM 


— Spokane, Washington 


WCOP 


— Boston, Mass. 


WKDA 


— Nashville, Tennessee 


WTXL 


— Springfield. Mass. 


WDOK 


— Cleveland, Ohio 


WAVZ 


— New Haven, Conn. 


KSTN 


— Stockton, California 


KMYR 


— Denver, Colorado 


WTIX 


— New Orleans, La. 


KSTL 


- — St. Louis. Missouri 


KCBC 


— Des Moines, Iowa 


KBYE 


— Oklahoma City, Okla. 


WOLF 


— Syracuse, New York 


WIKY 


— Evansville, Indiana 


KOWH 


■ — Omaha, Nebraska 


KFMJ 


— Tulsa. Oklahoma 


KNUZ 


— Houston, Texas 


KXL 


— Portland. Oregon 


KWBB 


— Wichita. Kansas 


WXLW 


— Indianapolis, Indiana 


KITE 


— San Antonio. Texas 


WNEB 


— W on ester. Mass. 


WJXN 


— Jackson, Mississippi 


KSON 


— San Diego, California 


CKXL 


— Calgary. Alberta. Canada 


KLMS 


— Lincoln, Nebraska 


KYA 


— San Francisco. California 


CKNW 


— \ ancouver. B. C, Canada 


WKYW 


— Louisville, Kentucky 


KEAR 


— San Mateo, California 


CKY 


— \^ innipeg. Manitoba. Canada 


WMIN 


— Minneapolis — St. Paul, Minn. 


KOL 


— Seattle, Washington 




_ t iMlO* « 



They are all members of AIMS — Association of Independent Metropolitan 
Stations — each the outstanding independent station in a city. 



Aim for BULL'S-EYE results. ..with the AIMS GROUP 




*OllTA»» S 



use all the 
IMPACT of 



UJVEC- 



in the Great 
Norfolk Area! 

NORFOLK 
HAMPTON 
PORTSMOUTH 
NEWPORT NEWS 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
WARWICK 
WILLIAMSBURG 
SMITHFIELD 



selling power PLUS in ihe greol 
Norfolk Metropoliton Areo where only 
WVEC-TV is NBC . . . beaming ^r 
soles message r.ght to the core of th.s 

dynam ; • . 



only WVEC-TV 

is a basic 



O©0 




It has been often said thai television 
will price itself out of business. Never- 
theless, while prices increase, cost-per- 
1,000 of audience is <>n tin- decrease. 
Ii i- far more likel) that television 
misfit "commercial" itself oul <>f I usi- 
. . . \\ hen people walk awa) 
i i < n 1 1 < ommen ials, cost-per-sale will in- 
crease and this will not be the fault of 
the Btation rate- but <>f the commer- 
cials. 

Over-coi ercialism in television is 

also parti) tin* fault <>f agencies, espe- 
ciall) those who use hard sell in an 
effort to produce quick results for ad- 
vertisers. . . . Agencies should exer- 
i ise restraint ami encourage it h itli 
their < lients. . . . Hard pitching, hard 
sell is more often than not offensive. . . . 

\nain. the agenc) recognizes the fact 
that its client is in an expensive me- 
dium. It expends itself to make that 
medium produce super results for him. 
It ver) often results in "pulling the 
strings too tight." It over-sells and 
thus huilds sales resistance rather than 
acceptance. . . . 

Ihe advertiser's fault comes from 
his realization, too. that he is in an 
expensive medium. He demand- im- 
mediate results, in excess of those he 
would expect from less expensive me- 
dia. Because television is a very pow- 
erful medium, the advertiser is entitled 
\>- superior results. He will get them. 
too, if he doesn't force it too hard. . . . 

Perhaps it all goes back to the 
broadcaster. Other media reject ob- 
jectionable copy. In some newspapers 
reverse plates must be screened. Col- 
umn widths are limited b\ height. Ex- 
aggerated claims ma) not be published 
nor is exaggeration permitted in the 
manner in which reasonable claims are 
presented. \\ e have a fair code of 
ethics set out b) the INfARTB. It could 
be improved, but first of all it should 
be adhered to. Most broadcasters are 
doing ver) well financially. The) can 
eliminate- double-spotting and excess 
i ommercial time and still do ver) nice- 
1\. There is nothing that says the in- 
vestor in a television station should get 
his mone) back in the first year. \nd 
a slow dime i- -till better than a fast 
nickel. 

Good programing with strong spon- 
sor or product identification will hold 
television audiences and ultimate!) sell 

more g I- than good programing 

with hard-sell techniques; and if you 
make the < ommen ials -holt, the audi- 
ence will be reluctant to go awa\ and 



n-k the chance of missing part of the 
program. 

I.. Rudolf Gkce.nschatz 

Public Relations & Business 

Development 

First Federal Savings X- Loan 

of Miami 



FARM ISSUE 

In the- October I') i-sue of s|>o\sok 
you ran a ver) fine article entitled 
"Farm radio and t\ : l'J.~>.V 

We would be \er\ appreciative if we 

could obtain one or two copies. . . . 
John F. BONSIB, Se<retary 
Bonsib Advertising 
Fort Wayne, hid. 

• Mr. Bonsib refer* la SPONSOR*! annual farm 
loone. No reprint! of the alticlqa arr available. 
Extra eopiea of ih.- i--u«- eoal ."»<>« apiece). 



TIMEBUYERS' XMAS 

\ our article on "What timebuyers 
want for Christmas" 14 December 
1953. page 34] was interesting. It's 
nice to receive Christmas presents; it's 
also nice to give them. 

\\ ill) that thought in mind don't you 
think it's about time the timebuyers 
started giving Christmas presents to 
the salesmen? 

Who ver\ often makes a "hero" out 
of a timebuyer? The salesman. 

Who can always be counted upon for 
little inside bits of information so im- 
portant to timebuyers? Ihe salesman. 

Who is always there to service and 
help in an) wa\ he can? The salesman. 

Who is always there to act as an 
agreeable, affable host? The salesman. 

W ho can the timebuyer not do with- 
out? The salesman! 

keep up the good work. I hope the 
new \ear will bring \ou continuing 
success. Right now I ha\e to close this 
letter. My men need my help in wrap- 
ping presents for the timebuvers. 

Lawrence L. Wynh 

Sales Manager 

If ABI). Xru York 



TV BASICS 

\\ e would appreciate receiving about 
si\ more copies of "Tv Basics."' You 
can probabl) understand that in 
launching a new station such as 
\\ \II\-T\ this type of material is ex- 
IremeK welcome. 

Frank \1. De\ inei 

/ ice President 

II Ml \ Broadcasting 

St. Paul- Minneapolis 
• 'l\ Boole** 1 eaot .ici<- apleee. Qnaortitj price- 
on r«*i|ur*t. 



12 



SPONSOR 



1 



Another WOW-TV FIRST' 







T^^^ 1 "** 



SP °" S l Edison 2 1. W53 

SU*?*"" itted and receivea 

- TV successfully televxsx ^ 

^^ 'first" « ltn J^ember 22nd *° r . DrBgP et" 
color • „ Tuesday, UB sho v;ing 0I qta tion 

reCeP "n's Greetings" a-£ 5 24rt Sta 

"Tor ««» """frf aavrti"^ lsl 

; trr^^ « ^ u- «• •. ».-•* and 

o« set up sev _-, uanage^ Wf 
Director of f ^?' Nebraska 

FIRST IN TELEVISION 

FIRST with MAXIMUM POWER 



FIRST with 





TV 



OMAHA, 
NEBRASKA 



Rep. By BLAIR-TV . .. 100,000 WATTS • NBC • DUMONT 

A Meredith Station 

11 JANUARY 1954 



13 




THE 
SWANEE 
RIVER 
BOYS 

• 

Nationally-known 

SINGING 
TALENT 

HAVE NOW JOINED 
THE STAFF OF 





by Bob Foreman 

Beauregard Bream, chairman of the Plans Board of Snook, 
Crappie & Bream, Inc. the Madison Avenue advertising 
agency, addressed the Adcrafters Club of Hohokus, N. J., 
last week and I was fortunate enough to have a transcript 
smuggled to me through the Hudson Tubes. The title of this 
phillippic was "Funn) As A Crutch." an expression I haven't 
heard -ince George Earnshaw was winning them for Connie 
Mack and one that effectively disguised his subject which 
turned out to he — misplaced humor in advertising. 

Since this topic i> dear to my own cold little heart. I -hall 
endeavor to steal the best parts of Beau's talk and warp them 
to my devices. I shall eliminate all hut one reference to print 
advertising and discuss witticism as it applies to broadcast 
copy. 

Let's start out with the premise, however jaundiced it may 
seem, that 99', of all the copywriters in the world can't 
write humor. Maybe the percentage is even higher. Roving 
down the centuries from Mark Twain to S. J. Perelman. I 
find it difficult to recall more than one advertising campaign. 
in any medium, in which the humor was even vaguely humor- 
ous or the advertising even vaguely compelling. 

The -ingle campaign that does stand out in my mind and 
one that I constantly relish i> the Kd Zem fishing and hunting 
-cries for Nash cars which runs in the sports magazines. Here 
the wit is funny, the word- relevant, and the message which 
results of intere-t to prospective car buyers. 

Over on the -ide of radio and television, my only recollec- 
tions are heavilv tinged with horror. The minor exceptions 
to this are not campaigns per se but are one-shot commercials 
adroitly integrated with the -how format and sandwiched in 
between two other straight commercials as insurance la ) that 
the public w ill actual!) get the sales message and I !> ) that the 
public be fully aware that the sponsor is kidding but really 
ha- something of value to offer. Outstanding among this last 
categor) were land arc in the case ot J. Benny ) the fine mid- 
dle commercials on the Fibber McGee -bow and the -killful 
dual-media middle- in the Jack Benin programs. Here the 
calibre of hninor i- on a par with the -bou itself which i- 
praise indeed. One of the big reasons i- that these middle- 
whimsies arc approached structurally from a -dipt >tand- 
poinl rather than a- inserts. \nd. mosl important, of course, 

{Please turn to ixipr 72 i 



fMm^- 



i 




Big Mike is the physical trademark of KFAB 
Nebraska's most-listened-to-station 



NEW 

YEAR! 



rtw Wholesaler 











. 



1 



TPA 
sales- builder 




^fr rollicking comedy / taut drama 
jfr tender romance / exciting adventure 
spine-tingling mystery and intrigue 




A successful, tested program . . . 
first run in over 150 markets 

Your* Star Showcase, with Edward Arnold as host, is a proved 
program — with a fresh, audience-building format. Even in mar- 
kets where it appeared as The General Electric Theatre, it is new 
to more people than the number who saw the first run. And the 
addition of Arnold assures even larger audiences. 

Your* Star Showcase offers local and regional advertisers 52 
different, top quality, network-calibre programs with a proved, 
impressive audience record. The series boasts ratingsl of 20.3 in 
Chicago . . . 30.5 in San Antonio . . . 22.9 in Cleveland . . . 32.6 in 
Kalamazoo . . . 47.4 in Charlotte, etc. 

Your* Star Showcase is a series to which the phrase "presents 
with pride" truly applies. It is great drama. It is a weekly parade 
of marquee names . . . sparkling scripts . . . tight direction . . . 
lavish production. 

On all counts, Your* Star Showcase can be th< showcase for your 
product. Call, write or wire for the complete story. 



'Advertiser or brand name. 



tl'idcodrr. Fchrunrv, ItSi 



television programs of mmmerica, inc. 

729 SEVENTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. • 1041 N. FORMOSA AVENUE, H0UYW00D 44, CAUf. 









BU newscasts 
make "big" advertisers 
out of little ones! 



Station KWBB at Wichita, Kansas, believes in drawing more flies with 
a honey of a deal. 

In an effort to sell three important 15-minute newscasts on a long- 
range basis, the station offered sponsorship for all three to a trio of 
non-competitive advertisers — at regular card rates. 

KWBB credits each sponsor in the opening and closing, gives 
each a commercial during each newscast. 

Thus, for the price of one program alone, an advertiser can reach 
two additional audiences. 

Milt Hall, General Manager, thinks this is an effective answer for the 
prospect who isn't content with a nibble but who can't otherwise afford 
to take a big bite. 



Manager Hall couples t li<- 3-for-l ap- 
peal with qualit) of news. Be says: 

"Fine AP coverage is a mighty important 
factor in selling a newscast and keeping it 
sold. When you offer AP, you use a power- 
ful argument." 



If your station is not vet using 

Associated I'ress service, your A I' 

Field Representative can give you 

complete 

information. 

Or write — 



Those who know famous brands... 

know the most famous brand in news is JP 




18 



SPONSOR 



1 



New and renew 



mmi 



11 JANUARY 1954 



1. 



/Veil? on Radio IKetivorks 



2. 



SPONSOR 



Assemblies of Cod, 

Springfield, Mo 
Brisfol-Myers, NY 

Brisfol-Myers, NY 

Carnation Co 

Credit Union Natl Assn, 

Madison, Wis 
Ceneral Foods (Sanka), NY 

Milner Prods (Pine-Sol) 

Jackson. Miss. 
Mutual of Omaha. Omaha, 

Neb 
Mutual of Omaha, Omaha. 

Neb 
Niagara Mfg & Distr Co, 

Adamsville, Pa 
Owens-Corning Fiberglas, 

Toledo, 
Van Camp Sea Food, 

Terminal Island, Cal 
Van Camp Sea Food Co, 

Terminal Island, Cal 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



W. F. Bennett. Chi 

Doherty, Clifford. Steers 
& Shenfield. NY 

Doherty, Clifford, Steers 
& Shenfield, NY 

Erwin, Wasey, LA 

JWT, Chi 

Y&R, NY 

Cordon Best, Chi 

Bozell & Jacobs. Omaha 

Bozell & Jacobs. Omaha 

Olian & Bronner, Chi 

Fuller & Smith & Ross, 

Cleve 
Brisacher, Wheeler & 

Staff, SF 
Brisacher, Wheeler & 

Staff, SF 



ABC 350 
CBS 204 
CBS 203 
ABC 291 
MBS 560 
CBS 84 
CBS 122 
CBS 

MBS 485 
MBS 300 
CBS 203 
CBS 200 
CBS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Revival Time; Sun 10:30-11 pm; 20 Dec; 52 wks 

Nora Drake; M-F 2:30-45 pm : alt days; 5 Jan; 52 

wks 
Arthur Godfrey Digest: Fri 9-9:15 pm seg; 15 

Jan; no. wks not set 
When a Cirl Marries; M-F 10:45-11 am; 4 |an; 

52 wks 
Lome Crecnc; Sun 4:55-5 pm; T 9:55-10 pm, 3 

Jan; 52 wks 
Robert Trout & the News; M, W 10 30-35 pm; 

4 Jan; 52 wks 
Robert Q Lewis Show; Sat 11 am-12 n; 15-min 

seg; 2 Jan; no wks not set 
Robert Q. Lewis Show; Sat 11 am-12 n: 15-min 

seg; 2 Jan; no. wks not set 
On the Line with Considine; Sun 6:30-45 pm; 24 

Jan; 52 wks 
Cabriel Heatter; T 7:30-45 pm; 5 Jan; 52 wks 

Arthur Codfrey Digest: Fri 8:30-9 pm seg; 15 

Jan; no. wks not set 
Edgar Bergcn-Charlie McCarthy; alt Sun 9:30-10 

pm; 10 Jan; no. wks not set 
Robert Q. Lewis Show; Sat 11 am-12 n: 15-min 

seg; 2 Jan; no. wks not set 



Renewed on Radio Networks 

SPONSOR I AGENCY 



STATIONS 



Cities Service Petroleum, 

NY 
Ceneral Foods, NY 

Liggett & Myers (Chester- 
fields), NY 
P. Lorillard, NY 

P. Lorillard, NY 
Metropolitan Life Ins, NY 
Philco Corp, Phila 

Stewart Warner Corp, Chi 

Sun Oil Co, Phila 

William Wrigley Jr Co, Chi 

William Wrigley Jr Co, Chi 



Ellington & Co. NY NBC 115 

FC&B, NY CBS 123 

Cunningham & Walsh, NY ABC 332 

Y&R, NY ABC 332 

Lennen & Newell, NY ABC 328 

Y&R. NY CBS 32 

Hutchins Adv. Phila ABC 330 

Macfarland, Aveyard, Chi NBC 195 

R&R, NY NBC 34 

Arthur Meyerhoff, Chi CBS 195 

R&R, NY CBS 196 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Cities Service Band of America: M 9:30-10 pm; 

18 Jan; 52 wks 
Renfro Valley Sunday Morning Cathcring; Sun 

8:30-9:15 am; 3 Jan; 52 wks 
Les Criffith & the News; M-F 7:55-8 pm; 4 Jan: 

52 wks 
Monday Morning Headlines; Sun 6-6:15 pm; 3 

Jan; 52 wks 
Taylor Grant News; Sun 9:15-30 pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 
Allen Jackson: M-F 6-5:15 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
Breakfast Club; M-F 9:45-10 am seg; 28 Dec: 

52 wks 
John Cameron Swayzc; T, Th. F 9:30-35 pm; 19 

Jan; 13 wks 
Sunoco 3-Star Extra: M-F 6:45-7 pm; 11 Jan; 

52 wks 
Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: T 9-9:30 pm; 5 Jan; 

52 wks 
Cene Autry; Sun 6-6:30 pm; 20 Dec; 52 wks 



(See page 2 for New National Spot Radio and TV Businpss) 



3. 



\ational Rroadeast Sales Executives 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



Charles C. Alsup 

Frank Amy 

Harry Arthur 

W. H. "Bud" Averill 

John H. Bachem 

James Caleb Beach 

Bryce Benedict 

Jack Black 

Doug Brown 

John Burr 

Kenneth B. Craig 
John A. Davis 
Earl C. Donegan Jr 
Jack Duffield 
William E. Ellwell 
Irv Feld 



Arrow Prodns, acct exec west of Mississippi 

WPIX. NY, sis serv asst 

WSMB. New Orleans, La. prog dir 

KWK. St Louis, acct exec 

Du Mont, NY, natl sis mgr 

Tv Road Shows, pres 

KFH, Wichita, acct exec 

WTAR. Norfolk, Va, asst sis mgr 

Biow Co. NY, acct exec 

KCO-TV, SF, prom & mdsg exec 

WBBM-TV, Chi, mgr opers 
WETV, Macon, Ca, dir opers 
Everywoman's Mag, NY, adv slsmn 
KTTV, La, mdsg mgr 
WTIX. New Orleans, gen mgr 
MPTV, NY, eastern sis mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 



MPTV. Hywd. acct exec 

Same, sis serv mgr 

KNOE. KNOE-TV, Monroe. La. prog dir 

KSTM-TV. St Louis, acct exec 

Same, gen mgr 

ABC TV. LA. dir progs and prodn, western div 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Headley-Reed. NY. sis stf 

KIEM-TV. Eureka Cal; KBES-TV. Medford. Ore. 

natl adv mgr 
CBS. Hywd. dir bus affairs, net progs 
MPTV Eastern Sis Div. Atlanta, acct exec 
MPTV Eastern Sis Div. NY. acct exec 
Same, acct exec 

Headley-Reed. New Orleans, mgr 
MPTV Feature Film Div. southwest sis mgr. hq in 

Dallas 







(Continued next page) 

► In next issue: ISetv and Renewed on Television (Network); Advertising Agency Personnel 
Changes; Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes (reps, neticork affiliation, po.cer incfpaspsJ^u 

11 JANUARY 1954 GENERAL LIBRARY 

10 ROCKEFELLER PLA2A, MEW YORK 



Numbi ;ames 

■ w and Re- 
new category 

Jack Shefrin (3) 

Pete Rodgers (3) 

Renedvt (3) 

t\fo KaJmw. ' \i 



N. Y 



19 



11 JANUARY 1954 



Xeti ami renew 



3, 






Motional Broadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 

Annette Francis 
John E H.illorjn 
John F H.)rdcsty 

Cuy Herbert 
Robert B Hoag 
Robert E Holt 
David I. Hopkins 
Henry Howard 
Erik Isgrig 

Claude A |ohnstone 
Wayne Kearl 
Charles King 
Ewald Kockntz 
Edward L Kocnig |r 
C |. Krcidler 
David Laslcy 
Stewart Lewis 
Don Lilly 
Stuart MacKay 
Paul A. Maguire 
Thomas McAvity 
Roland McClure 
Robert R Nelson 
Frank O Donncll 
Kenneth R. Ovendcn 
John H. Pindcll 
Charles Reeder 
Phil A. Reilly 
Roger Rice 
Pete Rodgers 
Marvin L. Rosene 
Alex Rosenman 
Carl Schuelc 

|ohn E. Scott 
John A. Shay 
)ack Shefrin 
Bob Shipley 
Ed Simmel 
Edgar C. Sisson 
Emerson S. Smith 

Carl M. Stanton 
Alfred R. Stern 
Robert B. Strickland 
H. Malcolm Stuart 
Irvin Paul Sulds 
Robert ). Sullivan 
Maurice Unger 
Frederick von Hofen 
Cordon M Wiggin 
Frederic W. Wile )r 
Mclvin B. Wright 
Joseph A. Zulwin 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Ziv Tv, Cinci, adv stf 

NBC Radio. NY. adv. prom dept 

BAB. NY. dir local prom 

All-Canada Radio Facils Ltd. gen mgr 

CBS Tv Spot Sis. NY, sis exec 

WTVI. St Louis, prodn mgr 

Emerson Radio b Phono. NY. dir sis & adv 

CBS Radio. NY, bus affairs dept 

Zenith Radio. Chi. dir adv 

Ed Wolff & Assoc. Rochester, acct exec 

KCMB-TV. Honolulu, asst gen mgr 

WKAL. Rome. NY, gen mgr 

WCBS. Miami. Fla. prog dir 

Vitapix Corp, NY. gen sis mgr 

Children's Activities mag. Chi. adv, mdsg mgr 

Du Mont. Chi. central div sis mgr 

WLW. Chi. acct exec 

KOLE Port Arthur, Tex, sis stf 

All-Canada Radio Facils. Ltd. asst gen mgr 

Henry I. Christ.il. NY, radio acct exec 

NBC TV Net, NY, natl prog dir 

KERC. Eugene. Ore, prom stf 

WARD. Johnstown, Pa, mgr 

RCA Victor Custom Record Div, NY, publicity 

WEEI. Boston, staff anncr 

KINC. Seattle, acct exec 

WCOL, Columbus, acting mgr 

Own apparel business, Bellcvuc. Wash 

KINC, Seattle, sis mgr 

Atlas Tv, NY, dir sis 

WLOL. Mpls. gen mgr 

WCAN, WCAN-TV, Milw, gen mgr 

Crant Co LA, acct exec 

Elmer E. Scott Co, Louisville, pres 

WTVJ, Miami, opers mgr 

John Kaye Adv. Kans City, radio-tv dir. acct exec 

Assoc Press. Shreveport. exec rep 

KJEO. Fresno, sis mgr 

N. W. Ayer, NY, chg radio-tv progs 

Baker Assoc Adv. Salt Lake City, radio-tv dir 

NBC Film Div, NY, dir 

NBC, NY, staff asst to vp film div 

Film exec, Atlanta, Ca 

ABC Radio, NY, acct exec 

AB-PT theatre tv consultant 

WOR. NY, prom mgr 

Ziv Tv. mgr West Coast opers 

KINC, Seattle, acct exec 

MPTV, Boston, sis rep 

NBC. NY. vp for prodn 

KCMB. Honolulu, mdsg dir 

Zenith Radio, regl mgr Wash. Bait, Phila area 



NEW AFFILIATION 



WOR, WOR-TV, NY, asst prom mgr 

NBC Film Div. NY, asst mgr adv & prom 

Westinghousc Radio Stns. eastern sis mgr, hq ii 

NY 
Same, vp 

KFMB-TV. San Diego, comml mgr of tv 
WSTV. Steubcnville. 0, prog & prodn mgr 
CBS-Columbia. NY. dir sis 
Same, dir bus affairs 
Same, vp chg adv 
WBBF. Rochester, sis stf 
Same, mgr 

MBS. NY, stn rels contact rep 
Storcr Bdcstg Co. dir prog 
Same, vp chg sis & adv 
KDYL. Salt Lake City, acct exec 
CBS Radio Spot Sis. SF. acct exec 
H-R Reps. Chi. acct exec 
KREL Baytown Tex, asst mgr 
Same, gen mgr 

NBC Spot Sis, NY, radio acct exec 
NBC Tv Net Progs Div. NY, head 
KNX & CPRN, LA. prog prom mgr 
WARD-TV. gen mgr 
Same, adv & orom mgr 
Same, dir progs 

KHQ-TV. Spokane, tv comml mgr 
Same, mgr 

KOMO-TV, Seattle, acct exec 
KING-TV, acct exec 
Same, vp 

KSTP. Mpls. radio sis mgr 
WTVI. Belleville-St Louis. NY bus mgr 
Western Radio Sis LA. head 'new offices, 15 

N. Highland. Hywd> 
WKLO. WKLO-TV. Louisville, gen sis mgr 
Same, vp chg opers 
WRNY. Rochester, gen mgr 
KENT. Shreveport. La. acct exec 
United Tv Progs, southern sis rep 
NBC Film Div. NY, assoc dir 
KALL & Intermtn Net, Salt Lake City, dir pron 

& mdsg 
Same, chg of div 

Same, asst to exec vp 'Robert W. Sarnoffi 
Guild Films. NY. southern sis rep 
Du Mont. NY. acct exec 
Theatre Net Tv. NY, exec 
WOR, WOR-TV NY. sis prom mgr 
Same, vp 
Same, sis mgr 

MPTV Eastern Sis Div. Boston area acct exec 
Same. Hywd. vp chg tv net prog div 
Same, mgr 
Hoffman Radio Corp. district mgr Midwest state 



!%etv Firms, JSetv Offices, Changes of Address 



new Portland hq 937 



Blitz Adv, Portland & Seattle, Wash, 
SW Jackson St 

Clapp's Baby Fds, purch by Duffy-Mott Co from Amer Home 
Fds 

Diamond & Sherwood Advtg. new ad agency. 821 Market St, 
SF; formed by Jim Diamond, who had own agency: and 
Clint Sherwood, ex-prog dir. KSAN. SF 

Dine and Kalmus. new public rels firm, hq NY. 4 W. 58th 
St, branches Chi. Miami. Wash DC. Boston. Hywd: formed 
by Josef C. Dine, ex-dir of public rels, Ziv; Allan H. 
Kalmus. ex-dir Lever Bros press bureau 

Henry Cerstenkorn Co. new address 4860 Wilshire Blvd. LA 



Mitchell J. Hamilburg Agency, hq Hywd. new NY office 

444 Madison Ave 
Hutchins Adv, Toronto, new address 33-35 Haydcn St 
KGTV. Des Moines, new address 223 Insurance Exch Bldg 
Phillips H. Lord Inc purchased by Gen Tcleradio: Mr. Lor 

to be retained as consultant by Gen Tcleradio 
Havro Tv Co. new tv film prodn firm at 520 Fifth Ave. NY 

formed by Arthur Rosenblum and Ruth Cade 
Louis D. Straus, new public rels firm. Times Tower, Tim 

Sq. NY. formed by Louis D. Straus, ex-public rels. public 

ity dir, Amer Safety Razor Corp 
Yambert, Inc, formerly Yambert-Prochnow, new address 663| 

Sunset Blvd. Hywd 



V umbers niter names 

trier to \ r» and Re- 
new category 

J. r\ Hardest) 

llnrr\ trtfitir (3) 

/ / . Koenig (3) 

V. /.. Rosene I I | 

Jose} ( . Dine I I I 

R<> he, I E. Holt (3) 

John II. It,,, hew I |) 

John 1 Shay (3) ^ 

K. R. Ovenden (3) W 

I). J. Hopkins (3) 



20 






m, 



Du Mont-equipped stations have formed a habit of 
making television history for coverage, low 
operating costs and dependability. K-NUZ TV, Houston, 
Texas, now joins the ranks of Du Mont-equipped stations 
Power for power, K-NUZ TV will enjoy the finest performance 
through Du Mont's superior UHF television transmitter design. 

At the Du Mont plant it's full-speed ahead on the production of UHF 
and VHF television transmitters and associated equipment- as fast 
as quality production will permit. The demand for Du Mont quality 
transmitting equipment is constantly increasing as engineers 
everywhere acclaim the dependable performance 
inherent in all Du Mont equipment. 



TELEVISION TRANSMITTER DIVISION 

ALLEN B. DUMONT LABORATORIES, INC. 

Ctift " \ , /. 






a 



nS" 



V 



mmm 



m 



pre-telecast promotion andU 




the largest, livest, 

local-beamed shows 

in Houston... with top entertainers 

and performers plus an array of Du Mont network programs • 

and $750,000 facilities to back up the know-how . . . offered to 

advertisers on a fair and square basis! 

number of UHF sets in market before telecasting of K-ISUZ TV test pattern 

MAY. I 953 9,996 \ 

JULY ' 1953 17 ' 306 ( ♦ . and still growing! 

SEPTEMBER, 1953 30.168 ( , e . . ^F^^ m t , „ , «■ ,•!.„,„,. i 

\ (Signed Strttements from Houston Distributors) 

NOVEMBER, 1953 43,593 ) 

(after only 14 clays of Telecasting) 




Buy now on the SQUARE DEAL RATE CARD 

and be charged only rates that can 

be justified by actual sets in the market. 





3539 Cullen Blvd. / Houston 



merchandising. . . 



AN AU DUNCE 

...... > ......-,,■,?,. 





K-INEWS Backed by a newspaper-trained photographer and 

the K-nuz TV Mobile Unit, dynamic BILL CRAWFORD presents 
a live, action-packed newscast unparalleled in the Gulf Coast area. 
(The K-nuz TV Mobile Unit — a complete TV studio on wheels- — 
also beams both video and audio to the station for general 
telecasts.) 

ALERT TIMEBIYERS NOTE: K-1NEWS with BILL CRAW- 

FORD is available in either 5 
or 10-minute slots, Monday thru 
Friday. 

RHYTHM ROUNDUP MGM and Decca recording arti-t-. 

Laura Lee and Dickie McBride and the Ranch Hands; and the 
"Billboard" top-rated Western personality, BIFF COLLIE, the 
rip-roaringest air-salesman to ever hit Houston, give out with 
music from the city and the saddle, Monday thru Friday. Turn 
your product over to these cyclones of mirth and melody, then 
watch the sales curve sweep up! 



be a 39'er 

ask for availabilities NOW 
on these power-packed 

local shows _ 



WHAT'S COOKIN'? A show with all the known element- f..r successful 
selling — the time of day i- rif:ht ... the -citing i- right. The featured 
personality i- a local woman with r i< li l\ background and preeminent 
recognition as a Home Economist. W II. M \ RUTHERFORD has a re 
m.H k.ilil.- record in Texas television nol onhj f'>r selling bnl also for mer- 
chandising. Monday thru Friday. K-nuz TV i- cooking with \\ ilm.i Rather- 
ford . . . HOW ABOUT YOU??.' 

PAUL'S PLACE Talent . . . time . . . teenager- in one terrific package 
— the strongest, livest local .-how in town. Paul Berlin is tops . . . rating- 
wise and talent-wise. Jan Stewart was starred in Bollywood TV, and * ■ 
featured vocalist with Harry James and his orchestra. Paul and J. in offer 
a potent one-two knockout for the hard-to-get teenager-. The] arc .1 "real 
gone" team that can pull for yon in the nation's I3th market! 

WINDOW SHOPPING Here is a distinctive, expressive friend Mitzi 
Wayne visiting with Houston women, telling them oi the wonderful and 
the curious to lie found in the -hop- around the city. The viewers' calls 
light up the switchboard .ifter the show closes . . . wanting to know where 
Mitzi found that lamp. etc. Let Mitzi Wayne throw light and life into 
your Houston sales with "Window Shopping", Monday thru Friday! 

TONIGHT Visiting -tar- of Hollywood, figure- from the -port- world 

. . . whatever made the news today . . . that's the -tuff of "Tonight". 
Monday thru Friday. BILL ANTHONY has hi- finger- right on the pulse 
of this billion dollar market as proved by the complete -ell-out of lii- 
radio time. No worry about tomorrow'- -,il>-- when Hill \nthony h.i- 
your message on "Tonight"! 



call, wire or write Forjoe TV 




or Dave Morris^ vice pres.-gvn. mgr. 



(3tartw£39 



• Phone KE-6666 



\ 



K-NUZ TV 



proudly announces 

Forjoe Tv, inc 

exclusive national representatives 



Si. 



o. 






A*, 



%-» 



'*. 






'"Sr. 



O, 



*>. 



Q 'S, 



Oy 



, write offices 
coll, «*< 0t 



v York 

Chicag 

Ang 



eles 






cisco 




IMete developments on SPONSOR stories 

See: "Year-end report" 

I.SSlie: 28 December 1953, page 27 

Subject: What the tv film industry is doing 
about color video 

The tv film industry didn't wait for the 17 Decembei approval b) 
the FCC of the present standards for color television. During I' 
a number of clients, producers and syndicators took tin- plunge into 
rainbow-hued film as a form of capital investment, hoping for a pay- 
off in 1954 or 1955. 

This fact came to light as the result of an industry-wide surve) 
conducted by SPONSOR for its forthcoming (25 January) report on 
television films. 

Pall Mall, Colgate and M&M Candy — to name just a few— began 
shooting part of their film commercials during 1953 in color s<, thai 
they'd be ready when C-Day arrived. Other advertisers began build- 
ing up a backlog of "stock" color footage of tv-sold products. Amer- 
ican Tobacco, for example, commissioned Screen Gems last summei 
to shoot nearly 47,000 feet of Technicolor at ATs southern fa< lories 
for ultimate use in video commercials for Lucky Strike. 

Program film producers and syndicators are still fairh cautious in 
the main about color, since it calls for a heavy investment on their 
part. But several program film makers took the plunge last year. 
Color production has already started on Janet Dean, Duffy's Tavern 
and Paris Precinct, three half-hour packages released through Mo- 
tion Pictures for Television. Kling Studios' King Calico and Bert 
& Elmer are in color, as are all of the episodes to date of United 
Artists' Cowboy G-Men. 

For awhile, many segments of the film industry were concerned 
about how well existing color film processes — Technicolor, Ansco, 
Eastman, DuPont — would look on color tv. However, the RCA "fast 
pull-down" color film projector, according to most video experts, 
does a good job of televising any of the present brands of color film. 
This RCA projector, incidentally, will probably represent some 90 ( i 
of the network and station color film telecasting installations in the 
next couple of years. "Sponsors can shoot their films in any of the 
standard brands of color and be assured that they can be televised," 
an RCA executive at the Camden equipment headquarters stated. 

The biggest hurdle: color film costs. They're not cheap. 

"Color adds anywhere from 25 to 40% on top of the regular 
costs of the average black and white film commercial," Walter 
Lowendahl. executive vice president of Transfilm, Inc., calculates. 
"There aren't enough color transmitters or receivers to make this 
anything more than experimental right now." 

The cost problem is similar in tv film programs. Ed Madden. \ ire 
president of MPTV. revealed: "The first 13 episodes of Janet Dean 
were shot in black and white. The second 13 were in color. Outside 
of that, the two series are similar. But color costs 25% more." 

Nearly all of this cost increase is taken up in the price of color 
negative stock, color developing, and color printing. An executive 
of the Eastern Motion Picture Division of Eastman Kodak estimates 
that tv color film will represent a per-foot cost — apart from produc- 
tion, talent and other charges — that will run at the rate of three 
times as much as black and white film. The actual figures: six d 
a foot versus two cents, even in great quantitv. 

The biggest question mark in the color tv film business, as film 
men themselves see it, is RCA's recently revealed video tape recorder. 
Oddly enough, few film men see RCA's gadget as supplanting black 
and white film for a long time to come (except in making kine- 
scopes), but most of them feel that the mere existence of the \ TR 
will make film obsolescent in long-range color planning. 



300-POUND SALES FORCE' 




i f,i-l [iio\ ing f.it man Mfho I .ill- 

on 53,000 T\ homes ii linutes 

five day- a week . . . and In- sells with 
the speed of light ' I hat'l why s ( ,,, n ^.rs 
keep r»-ri.-w inr the I \< K McELROY 

Mlott which sin ovei KNBH, Holly- 
wood ... 12:15-1:00 p.m. Monday thru 

r r ulay. 



KEYS OPEN DOOR TO FOOD SALES! 




A top-rated cooking show and an out- 
standing TV food merchandisii ig 
now give qualified sponsors a selling 
combination that move- produi I- Fast 
KEY TO NIK KIM HEN (the 
t.ikr- youi Bales message into 30.000 
Los \ngeles homes dailv. KNHH kh> 
VALUE WEEK (the plan) provides 
in-store displays, newspaper ads and 
on-the-air promotion to 2,400,000 
viewers. Food sponsors can"t mi-- on 
KNBH! 



WHAT A PARTY 




BII.I. ST1 I I V'S "Parlor Party" really 
pulls in the gals — a ) ■ 
The 2:00-3 :00 p.m. Monday thru Friday- 
program leads all other loral daytime 
' KB cumula- 
tive audience of 5.7 ... just $125 puts 
Bill and his gang to work for your 
product. For additional information on 
this and other KMUI "best bays," con- 
\ BH. Hollywood, or your nearest 
NBC Spot Sales Office right now. 



11 JANUARY 1954 



25 




What an opportunity: Radio's number-one salesman is now on New York's 
first station — WABC. Martin Block is in a class by himself! And has been tor 18 
long years! No other disc jockey can match his fanatical following, or phenomenal 
sales successes; his afternoon program ranks consistently first or second in popular- 
ity. Now he's bringing his unique appeal to a 64^0 larger audience . . . thanks to 
WABC's impressive coverage (nearly 6,000,000 families in 89 counties). And you'll 
be surprised to find out how little Block costs to buy! Get the facts, figures, full in- 
formation. Call SUsquehanna 7-5000, right away. 



26 



SPONSOR 



1 




Monday thru Friday 2:35-6:45 p.m. 
Saturday 10-12 noon, 6-7:30 p.m. 

WABC-770 



NEW YORK, N. Y 



11 JANUARY 1954 



27 




Laraen a ihr name and WEMP 
is the station, Miluxmkeeana 
know ilnit combination mentis 
the l>rst in radio. 

And so do these national advertisers: 
Robert Hall, Oxydol, Bayer Aspirin, 
Borden's, Omar, Household Finance, 
Squirt, North American Airlines, Blue- 
tone Oil and a dozen more. 
Join them and find out how WEMP de- 
livers up to twice the Milwaukee audi- 
ence per dollar of Milwaukee network 
stations.* 

CALL HEADLEY-REED! 

B.iscd on latest available Pulse ratings 
and SR & DS rates 



WEMPWEMP-FM 

MILWAUKEE 

HUGH IOICE. JR.. Gtn. Mqr. 
HEADIEYREED. Nail. Rep. 

HOURS OF MUSIC. NEWS, SPORTS 




iWJlllW 



Albert A. Cott 

V.P. and Sales Manager 
Cott Beverage Corp., New Haven, Conn. 

li the Cott Beverage Corp. had not had 25 carloads of non-deposit 
thiow-awa) hottles at its Manchester plant in 1951. the firm might 
not have begun distributing dietetic beverages in New England. B\ 
1953 sugarless pop was responsible for two million cases out of the 
firms total beverage sales of 15 million cases. 

For 25 years a general soft drink manufacturer. Cott Beverage 
Corp. int the market with its new sugarfree pop at the lime when tile 
soft drink industry was discovering the untapped potential of diet- 
conscious soft drink consumers. 

"There's little if am overlap between sugarfree drink consumers 
and the established soft drink public." Albert Cott. v. p. and sales 
manager of the soft drink manufacturer, told sponsor. "Therefore, 
we use the same slogan for general pop and the sugarfree in all 
media: "Its Cott to be good/' 

This slogan, developed b\ Cott's agency, Dowd, Redfield \ John- 
stone, precedes distribution via newspaper ads and radio announce- 
ments as the beverage firm moves into new territories. Once dis- 
tribution in a particular area is established, the firm adds television 
to its budget for stronger brand identification. 

Cott s 8500,000 ad budget in 1953 broke down as follows between 
the major media: 00' i in newspapers: 40' < in spot radio and tv. 
with slight!) more than half of the monev in spot tv. 

Cott's first advertising campaign for sugarfree pop in 1951 con- 
centrated upon appeal to diabetics. However, consumer response 
to the beverage showed that it could be sold to all diet-conscious 
persons. 

"In radio, for example," Cott told sponsor, "we stress both the 
sugarfree qualities and the flavor. Above all, the air copj stresses 
the good taste which takes sugarless pop out of the medicinal 
i ategorj . ' i See ""I he sugarless pop re\ olution," 2 No\ ember 1953. i 

Vs one of the three brothers who own and operate the Cott Bever- 
age ( nip.. \1 Cott is sales manager for the Id bottling plants that 
produce both soft drinks and sugarless pop. 

Al Cott is seriousl) thinking of switching from the >oft drink to 
iIm sugarfree beverage for a brief diet. However, the bulk of bev- 
erages stored in his refrigerator al his New Haven home are the 
regular Cott Beverage bottles. His two boys, aged 12 and eight, 
arc regular -oft drink consumers. 



28 



SPONSOR 



How Are You Fixed For Sales? 




Ginny Wood, gracious hostess <>• 
WSPD-TVs "Woman's Window", 
has the sparkling enthusiasm and 
experience it takes to increase \<>ur 
sales in the- WSPD-TV billion dol- 
lar market. 

"Woman's Window" is directed to 
WSPD-TVs women \ iewers, featur- 
ing interviews with interesting v.o- 
men who make Toledo tick. Toledo 
women know Ginny, and her fan 
mail proves they are enthusiastic 
about her. 



Ginny Wood 



Sales Increase With Proper Planning 





Ginny carefully works out nuworld cheese pre- 
sentation with Marion Mills of Arthur Towle 
Agency. 



Using props, Ginny actively demonstrates 
sponsors' products — everything from loot) to 
house paint. 



Get your share of sales in WSPD-TVs billion dollar market. 
Contact your nearest Katz agency or call ADams 3175 in Toledo. 




Storer Broadcasting Company 
TOM HARKER. NAT. SALES DIR . 118 E. 57th STREET. NEW YORK 



11 JANUARY 1954 



AM-TV 

TOLEDO, OHIO 



Represented Nationally 
by KATZ 



(& 




29 





46% at 9:00 A.M. 
for BOB BEAN and 
"What's Cookin' ". 








PHIL AGRESTA'S 
"Carolina Newj" 
ha» 59%. 



Jimminy" 



the offer- 
or JIMMY 
SON, "By 




"Anything Goes" for 
49% on Monday 
nights with GIL 
STAMPER. 



35% for JEANNE 
ALEXANDER and 
"Jeanne's Journal" 
Saturday AM's. 



LEWIS MARTIN'S 
HPL packs a 39% in 
the afternoon and a 
52% by "Starlite 
Salute" 



A 61% share for 
ALAN NEWCOMB'S 
Sunday evening 
"Evensong". 



DOUG MAYES gets 
to 62% Saturdays 
with "Farm Market 
Reporter". 





45% gather daily 
at ARTHUR SMITH'S 
"Corner Store". 



GRADY COLE... for 
22 years "Mr. Radio" 
in the South with a 
52% share of 
audience. 



CLYDE McLEAN'S 
NEWS has 57% of 
the 6:00 P.M. traffic. 





Many on the street 
and 51% at home for 
FLETCHER AUSTIN'S 
"Streetman". 



BOB RAIFORD'S 
"Robert D." race 
plahers attract 38%. 



Late in the evening 
FRED KIRBY'S "Hill- 
billy Star Time" 
reaches 55%. 



JACK KNELL whose 
newscasts command 
62% of the available 
ears at 12:35 P.M. 







Meet WBT's criteria, each with hit 

own individual "take" of the 

audience, according to The Pulse, Inc., 

March 1953 . . . from 35% to 62% 

thares of audience, each personality 

leading all other competition. 



Each of WBT's Pulse-powerful personalities is a criterion 
of excellence in nearly 400,000 North Carolina and 
South Carolina radio homes. Creating a daily diversity of 
broadcast banter, information, syncopation and public service, 
they couple their individual personalities with the 31-year 
personality of WBT's 50,000 watts— to provide unmatched 
coverage and penetration in the Carolinas market 




CHARLOTTE 



EFFERSON OTANDARD 



Broadcasting Company 



Represented Nationally by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



11 JANUARY 1954 






where ho\ boon 



and tvhoro ho 
wants in </o 



New NBC president won '52 Sylvania Award t<>> "Today." 
His i<li us also: "Slum <■> Shows," tl>> magazhu concept 



by Miles David 



& ylvester Laflin "Pat"" Weaver Jr. is a Renaissance Man 
of the electronic age. He gobbles up the implications of 
electronic technology in the manner of a multi-faceted 
i5th-centunite absorbing resurrected manuscripts from 
old Greece. His interests, like those of the 15th-cen- 
turyites who went from besieging cities to writing sonnets 
in the course of an afternoon, are broad. 

Weaver's sense of history — he says the study of classic 
civilizations was his favorite college subject and he dipped 
into history books to name his son after Roman emperor 
Trajan — keeps him jumping back and forth in time as he 
projects new uses of electronic technology. 

For several vears Weaver has been talking about a vast 
plan in which a thousand tv cameras might be stationed 
permanently around the world at the crossroads of impor- 
tant activity — feeding pictures back to a storage point 
where an electronic brain would index and store them. 
The pictures from a thousand cameras would go into con- 
temporary programs and a historic file for the programing 
of decades on. 

During the period he was busy painting this picture. 
Weaver was also at work building a television program 
called Today. Today does everything in miniature that 
Weaver envisions for his communications complex of the 



future. It funnels news from a thousand sources, often 
visually, to a central point in the R( \ I \hibit Hall. then 
passes the facts on to a far-flung audience. \t the -ami' 
time it is a flexible advertising bu) and a resounding < om- 
mercial success. In two vears on the air Today has gone 
from a pioneering curiosity to a program which last year 
grossed over $5 million in billings for NBC and attracted 
weeklv audiences of 14.o00.000 people who could have 
been exposed to a total of 90 advertising products in the 
course of the year. 

Mingling of the prophetic with the pr» ti< al is i hara< ter> 
istic of Weaver's projects. 

He fought for the "magazine" concept of tv program- 
ing as a means of giving the network • ontrol over it- own 
shows and hence a better chance to program for the needs 
of all population segments. But it also turned out to be a 
wa\ of helping spread costs so that moi - sors could 
afford tv: and. conversely a waj of broadening television's 
base so that it was not as dependent on a few I 
spenders. 

He developed the rotating -tar < om epl to attra< t < omica 
who at a point in tv"- history did not want to be tied down 
weeklv. But rotation has since proved a mean- of keeping 
stars and their material fresh. 



11 JANUARY 1954 



31 



It was in recognition ol Weaver's qualities as a developei 
of programs and programing concepts that Brig. General 
I). is 1.1 Sarnoff, chairman of the board of RCA and NBC, 
named him president ol NB( late last yeai (see statement 
to sponsor bj Gen. Sarnoff, below • . 

Weaver is ahead) hard at work applying lii- Bense of 
history, and practical programing, to administration "I the 
radio and television networks which last yeai together 

ssed about $100 million. Two of his major objectives 
,iir in beat that 1100 million mark in 1954 and restore 
ili. \i;i radio network (" number one ovei CBS. 

"NBC must return t" preeminence in radio, he told 
sponsor a few days ago. His method? NBC Radio will 
continue to mold its format to the magazine style of NBC 
l\. This would mean creation ol more -how- like If <•(■/>■ 
end, NBC Radio participation program whose sales plan 
i- patterned aftei tv's Todaj . 

Weavei Feels the magazine or editorial format will sell 
radio i" a widei range ol advertisers bv I i making avail- 



Gen. Sarnoff, Weaver, Bob Sarnoff together on day new executive team was 
named. It was new exec. v. p. Bob Sarnoff who persuaded Weaver to join NBC 




M hat Gen. Sarnoff told SPONSOR about Pat Weaver: 

"Pat Wt a happy combination oj the attitudes, talents, 

and expt tin presidency of NBC. Il> has 

youth, and he has breadth and depth of t cperience. Ht has 

, i, , utivt ■ apat itu s in both radio 
nml television, and he has created, written and produced 
many oj tht most successful programs. II > has also worked 
the oi '"•' with both sponsor and ad\ 

Pat has imagination and courage. Under his 
direction NBC has already led the way in creating many of 
the >i' w which ha I tht gt nt ral 

pattern oj opt in tht broadcasting industry." 









able short chunks of time for those who can onlv afford 
short chunks; (2) allowing advertisers to get in and get 
out quickl) il that's what the) need. Eliminating single 
sponsorship ol shows isn't his intention, however. 

"We have Keen trying to make television sensitive to the 
needs of an\ advertiser in the country," he says. "Radio 
never did this and it was a great mistake. Radio is set up 
in terms "I a 'you do it our wax system which makes the 

advertiser adjust to radio." Weaver now want- to see 
radio adjust to the advertise] and become available an) 

w a\ lie want- tO buj it. 

Weavei realizes some NBC affiliates spit fire when the) 
heai about the new sales approach but he feels he can gel 
them on hi- -ide mice the) realize what the potential is in 
billings. 

"Radio and television," he says, "should have a much 
larger share of the amount now spent on national advertis- 



ing. Rroad< a-t media should be able to get 50'/< of the 
seven billion- -pent annually for advertising." (Harold E. 
Fellows, \ \R 1 1! president, predicts that together radio and 
t\ will gross about one billion in 1954.) 

Radio and television are complementary media which 
must work together, rather than take a dog-eat-dog atti- 
tude, says Weaver. When people tell him radio and tv are 
as much competitors with one another as they are with 
printed media, he fume-. This attitude has kept radio from 
being handled as well a- it should, he says. 

Weavei - view: 'The two media should be integrated in 
planning. Popular -hows are popular in both media. Fan 
magazines and newspapers all over the country talk about 
television. It is the rage of the country — its stars and 
show-. It - a disservice to radio not to make available the 
same -how- on radio as on tv." The audio of mam t\ 
-how- should and will be on radio, he thinks. 

Weaver turn- to technological prophecv to tell \<>u why. 
"In the future no one will think of making a tv set that 
does not have a knob which turns the video off. They don't 
bother making that installation now because of the extra 
cost. But it is inevitable that people will want to listen to 
blind sets — even with variety programs like Berle. Once 
you've wat< bed a show a lot you can tell what it looks like 
and picture it in your own mind. People will want to play 
their t\ sets like background music.' 

Weaver has also predicted that people will come to listen 
to the audio of t\ shows on radio to find out when the\ 
should turn their t\ sets on to net something visualb in- 
teresting. 

Thus W eaver feels that on the operating and programing 
le\els radio and tv are essential!) the same medium — one 
merelv adding sight to the characteristics of the other. 
But he does not feel radio and tv should be sold together 
as a package, he told sponsor, i He has stated in the past. 
however, that he feels radio and tv eventualK will be sold 
together. It's probable he thinks the same advertiser will 
eventualK sponsor the same program in both radio and tv 
at the same time. Example today : simulcasts like the 
1 oice oj Firestone on NBC Radio and T\ . i 

Weaver's belief in the strength of radio ties in with all 
this. He has said and written [Variety, 16 July 19521 
that if tv had been invented before radio, someone would 
then ha\e gone ahead and invented radio. Reason: because 
tv requires full attention and is so dominant that the owner 
of a set wants to find a way of getting similar entertain- 
ment and information benefits without having to devote his 
full attention. That is. radio. 

Radio has changed -ince t\ came along, he said, citing: 
the movement from group listening in living rooms to per- 
sonal -et listening; radio- lo s of place as the dominant 
national medium. "We have to a>k." he says, "how much 
even non-tv homes are affected b) t\. I he non-tv families 
read about tv : the) see it in neighbors" homes." 

Wound NBC headquarters it'- -aid that Weaver has 
been spending 7095 of his time on radio problems -ince 
In- took over the NBC presidency. 

"Network radio must not be allowed to die."' he told 

SPONSOR. If it dor-, radio will become "fragmentized" 

into unit- not capable of providing reallv significant 

programs. 

"Fragmentized" i-. 1>\ the way, apparent!) a favorite 

' Please turn to page 1<H) i 



32 



SPONSOR 




WEAVER HAS GOOD SE\SE OF HUMOR, but he's up 
against some stiff competition in this bunch. In addition to Bob Sar- 
noff (pipe in hand) group comprises these comedians: Ed Wynn, Ken 



Murray, Bob Hope, Sid Caesar. Weavers leading with his glasses at 
far right. Bob Sarnoff, Pa* Weaver worked together frequently during 
first years of big-star tv. This picture was taken on set of comedy show 



iiiiliiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiNin iiiiii;iiiiiiiii!ii;i:!iiiiiiiiniii!' imiiiiiiiiiuillilllliniiiiiiniiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiliniillllllliiiillllinilllNl^ 



Under Weaver's administration basic pattern of NBC TV programing 
was formed. Below: Weaver watches Joan Davis sign for film show 
along with Carl Stanton who succeeds Sarnoff at Film Division 



Pat Weaver leans over Sid Caesar's shoulder during break in first re- 
hearsals for "Show of Shows." Writers and producer Hal Janis are 
solving problem. Pat is production veteran, got into radio in '32 




11 JANUARY 1954 



33 



How 010 uses 

radio to prove "unions 

don't have horns" 



Network radio newscast is designed to hit 

non-union audience as well as members. 

Most of p.r. budget is going to radio, tv 



M his year, the CIO has given its 
public relations program a big hypo — 
to the tune of a SI, 000,000 national ad 
budget. It's the first time that the CIO 
has had a national budget — and vir- 
tually all of it will go into radio and tv. 
Out of the total appropriation, about 
$600,000 will be devoted to the organi- 
zation's new five-a-week network radio 
program, John W . \ undercook ami the 
News, which was launched in Septem- 



ber 1953 on ABC (Monday through 
Friday, 7-7:15 p.m. EST). 

Still in the planning stage is a half- 
hour tv series slated to start early in 
1954 for which the CIO has a projected 
budget of $300,000 to $400,000 (prac- 
tically the rest of the above-mentioned 
million dollar budget). Also in the 
news, public-affairs realm, the tv pro- 
gram will probably run monthly or 
every four weeks, or might wind up as 



CIO President Walter P. Reuther urged start of national p.r. effort. He's shown with Vander- 
cook who was chosen by group Henry C. Fleisher, ClO's p.r. director (right), headed up 





34 



''■John W. Vandcraxik and the X eir ?" on abc radio 



JOHN W. VANDEP.COOK SHAVED OFF HIS BEAP 



an experimental 13-week series with 
more funds to be allocated if it proves 
successful. 

The CIO feels tv is essentiallv a more 
difficult medium to employ than radio 
and therefore offers a greater challenge 
to the union, especially in view of its 
limited budget. It is. therefore, pro- 
ceeding with great care, conducting ex- 
tensive surveys and studies, exhaustive- 
1\ discussing the matter with union offi- 
cers, with an eye to developing the best 
possible tv use for the money. 

The CIO considers that the time has 
come to "convince the public that we 
don't have horns." in the words of a 
CIO spokesman. It wants to dispel the 
idea held by some that "all unions do 
is go on strike" b\ informing people 
of the functions and ser\ ices of the 
union and how it aids the community. 

/ andercook and the \eus is the 
CIO s first venture into network ra- 
dio on a regular basis. The CIO felt 
that cultured, velvety-voiced \ ander- 
cook. a liberal commentator who ex- 
pounds in a quiet manner, was in just 
the ke\ the) wanted. Commercials, too, 
are pitched at a subdued level. 

The program is aimed primarily at 

SPONSOR 






iij.l. W. V..d„«„k 



LISTEN TO THE CIO. RADIO PROGRAM 

7 rt.kd.y «».oit| ■• tba AIC ««l»iik |joii^7r~ 

._ The, CIO Pr.«»«<» '*~'-»7 

an 5^" n->6 *4*mt V *- «J 

■yi^znaDzzi 



o th. AIC M.lwo.k 



#* radio 



€ §yn€Mwni€ proervm 





'E CIO NEWSCASTER ON ABC RADIO. SUPPORT FOR PROGRAM BY CIO UNIONS IS SHOWN BY MERCHANDISING THEY HAVE GIVEN IT 



the general public rather than the 
CIO's own membership. Based on the 
theme "what is good for America is 
good for organized labor," the pro- 
gram's general objectives as described 
by President Walter P. Reuther are: 

1. "To point out that CIO members 
make progress only as the community 
progresses and not at the community's 
expense. 

2. "To serve the public by keeping 
it acquainted with the news of the da\ 
and how it affects the lives of each." 

CIO members number approximately 
6,000,000, belong to 35 international 
unions, primarily mass production in- 
dustries: steel, auto, clothing, electrical 
workers among them. 

I The other national union organiza- 
tion. A.F. of L., boasts about 8,000,- 
000 members. Its voice on the air is 
Frank Edwards, who has been news- 
casting for A.F. of L. on Mutual since 
January 1950: see SPONSOR, 21 April 
1952 issue. Edwards, in contrast to 
Vandercook, does a hard-sell for labor 
on current issues, lashes out like a cru- 
sader. The AFL invests about $700,- 
000 a year on the show.) 



The \ undercook show has been on 
the air only four months. But response 
i- "highly satisfactory," according to 
CIO agency, Henry J. Kaufman & As- 
sociates in Washington, D. C. Vander- 
cook's return to the air I he had not 
been broadcasting regularly for several 
years) produced a large and pleased 
public reaction via mail. Requests for 
copies of the broadcasts now pour in 
regularly, reports the agency. 

Owners and managers of stations 

iiHmiHiiiffiinHmiiitiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiinuinii 

case history 



carrying the show have also voiced 

their approval. At the outset, the CIO 
ran into some reluctance on the part 
of station managers here and there to 
accept the program. One such manager 
took the program only because he 
didn't want to lose the revenue. This 
same manager has since -aid he is 
"proud" of airing the show due to fa- 
vorable public reaction. 

Pride in the show was also notice- 
able among CIO members at the un- 



ion's national convention in Cleveland 
last November, reports Robert S. Mau- 
rer, tv director at Kaufman. There 
was the feeling that it is creating a 
better climate for I l () workers in the 
community, he -aid. and a desire on 
the part of members that it run on even 
more stations. 

Commercials are drafted to inform 
the public about the CIO, it- attitudes 
and objectives, fhej are written bj a 
team comprised of Henrj C. Flasher, 
CIO PubHcit) Director; Ubert Zack, 
I leisher's assistant; Robert S. Maurer; 
and Mired II. Edelson, I [0 act ounl 
e\e. utive it Kaufman. Much < are and 
thought i- expended t !>al- 

.ni' ed diet" of mess - < !ommer< ials 
fall within the follow i: - 

1. Program commercials, explaining 
w In the CIO i- "ii the air w ith a I 

,c I Ii.- ( l< i simpl) believes it 

i- • ontributing to a well-informed puh- 
li< opinion the foundation of freedom 
in a democra- \ 

2. Orgai ommercials, ex- 
plaining how CIO or it- member unions 
function. 

Community tcriice commercials, 
i Please turn to / 



11 JANUARY 1954 



35 




Programing profiles 

1'iirt I of a continuing 1954 series 



High visibility of sponsor name on panel box 
or backdrop is one big plus panels offer, since 
sponsor identification is aided. When Stopette 
presents "What's My Line?" on CBS TV, spon- 
sor is no secret. "Twenty Questions" on DTN 
plumps for Curads. R. J. Reynolds highlights 
Cavaliers on CBS TV's "I've Got a Secret" 



36 



The I v panel show 

This programing profile and others 
to follow in future issues will cover 



Average program costs, costs of individual programs 
Kind of audience this show type attracts 
Results from sponsoring shows of the type 
How clients handle commercials in the shows 
Who are sponsors? How long on air? 



by Lila Lederman 

Casting an amused eye at the proliferating ranks of tv panel shows, 
one wag recently quipped that there soon will be a shoiv called What's 
Your Panel? — in which contestants guess what panel program various 
Broadway names appear on. 

But panel shows are an important form of programing for more 
reasons than the numbers in ivhich they are found on the networks. 
They are suitable for sponsorship by virtually every type ef client, for 
one thing; for another they can be produced with a reasonable budget. 

This report on panel shows is designed to fill you in on their char- 
acteristics and costs. It should answer most of your questions if you're 
an agency man considering recommendation of a panel show to a client; 
or if you're an advertiser interested in comparative programing values. 
It was prepared over a period of months through research embracing 
dozens of firms, including agencies, sponsors, researchers. 



_/Jt this writing there are 14 spon- 
sored panel programs on network tv 
I including one network co-op, Who 
Said That?). A total of 17 network 
sponsors bankroll the shows. Five of 
the shows, or one-third, are sponsored 
on an alternate-week basis. Of the 17 
sponsors, seven came on the panel- 
wagon in 1953, most of them just this 
past fall. 

("Panels."' as here defined, include 
an) show with a panel outside the 
realm of political discussion or news 
forums. Thej embrace both the parlor- 
game varierj and panel-discussions of 

a light nature which ^t 1 1-- elements of 
competition and humor. Most feature 
well-known names as panelists.) 



The number of panel shows coming 
on in a short time gives rise to the 
question: Are they just a fad which 
will soon fade? One veteran program- 
ing expert put it this way: "'Panels are 
not likel) to die out in popularity be- 
cause most of them not only have the 
solid, lasting appeal of a quiz show, 
but over and above that offer a real- 
life drama of interplay between well- 
known personalities." Most program- 
ing men had this philosophy: "The 
time to worry about an excess of panel 
shows is when the public shows it is 
tired of them by twisting their dials." 

► Cost and circulation 

\\ hat is the attraction these pro- 

SPONSOR 




Some of the current tv panels originated on 
radio. "Leave It to the Girls," ABC TV, and 
"Juvenile Jury," CBS TV, are two examples; 
"Twenty Questions," Du Mont, is another. 
All three coincidentally have drug sponsors, 
respectively Ex-Lax, Geritol, Bauer & Black 



grams have for so many sponsors? 
Briefly, they offer just what most spon- 
sors want in a program — good circula- 
tion at a low cost. As noted above they 
are riding a high wave of viewer popu- 
laritv that shows no sign of slackening. 
The big names, glamour, humor, ex- 
citement and intellectual badinage 
carefully programed into most of the 
panels no doubt have something to do 
with this. (Panel-champ What's My 
Line? on CBS TV won a 1953 Syl- 
vania award because it affords such 
"spontaneous amusement" and "is 
blessed with an excellent moderator 
and a literate group of panelists.") 

The talent-and-production cost of a 
dozen of the panel shows on this season 
averages out to $7,700 each: individ- 
ually, these shows range from $2,500 
to $14,000 (see chart). Making the 
whole thing easier on the budget, over 
half of the panel show advertisers (8 
out of 17) sponsor the programs on 
an alternate-week basis. 

As indicated, audiences are healthy, 
too. According to Nielsen, "average 
homes reached" for seven of the pan- 
els* during the first two weeks of 
April 1953 was 3.255,000 (top-rated 
(Article continues next page) 

♦The seven shows used by Nielsen for above 
figures: The Name's the Same, Quick As A F'^J}- 
ABC TV; Twenty Questions, Life Begins at 80, 
Down You Go, Du Mont: What's My Line, lie 
Got a Secret, CBS TV. These were selected as a 
representative group of panels. 



These 14 tv panel shows sponsored on networks 



NAME. NETWORK. DAY. 
AND TIME 



8P0N80R AND 
NCY 



PRODUCER 



l-TIOH 



Down You Go 

Du Mont. Fri 10:30-11 pm 



Carter Prods vi.i 
Ted Bat. v NY 

Hclenc Curl 

Ruthr.iuH Ry in 
Chi 

I co-sponsors! 



low-. C Cowan 



$6,000 



Word game quix Or Ber- 
lin C»jn» moderator Pan- 
■I Tom Oilman Carmrlita 
Pope. Fran Coughlm Rob 

lit t '■ 



I've Got a Secret 

CBS TV, Wed 9:30-10 pm 



R | Reynolds 

tCavalltrs) via 

William Esty. NY 



Coodson (i Tod 
man 



$8,000 



Cuests with special iccom 

pltshmints Or unu'.ual IJCtt 

in past try to iturap panel 
with Ih Cirry 

Moore. M C fayne Mead- 
ow Faye Emerson and guest 
panelists 



Judge for Yourself 

NBC TV, Tu 10-10:30 pm 



P. Lonllard via 
Lcnnen & Newell. 
NY 



Coodson & Tod 
man 



$22,500 



Fred Allen hoi! Two pan 
els one of showbiz ex 

o!h< r of amateur 
judges, rate vanity acts 
Amateurs win prizes if rat 
ingi coincide with experts 



Juvenile Jury 

CBS TV, Sun 4-4:30 pm 



Pharmaceuticals, 
Inc.. via 
Edward Klcttcr. 
NY 



Barry. Enight & 
Friendly 



$4,500 



lack Barry moderates panel 
of 5 youngstcri who dis- 
cuss problems posed by 
youthful cl 



Leave It to the Girls 

ABC TV, Sat 7:30-8 pm 



Ex-Lax via 

Warwick & Lcg- 
Icr, NY 



Rountree-Prcs- J-jjQQ 



Spirited discussion centered 
around Battle of Sexes 
Magg, McNellii femcee. 
pinil Elois* McElhone. 
Florence Pntchelt regulars 
plus two female guests Al- 
so one male to defend h,s 
MX againit allack 



Life Begins at 80 

Du Mont, Fri 9-9:30 pm 



Serutan Co. via 
Edward Klettcr. 
NY 



■T8JST' $2,500 



Five octagenanan panelists 
air views on diverse sub 
iccts fake part in a quiz 
Jack Barry moderates Two 
"foothght favorites' trt 
guests each week 



Pantomime Quiz 

Du Mont, alt Tu 8:30-9 pm 



Benson & Hedges 
(Parliaments! via 
Benton & Bowles 
NY 



Mike Stokcy $8,700 



Charade game with two 
teams of panelists • i 
a Quii Trophy Cup Pro- 
ducer Mike Stokcy also em- 
cees. Permanent team mem- 
bers include |ohn Barry- 
more Jr Robert Alda 



Peter Potter Show 

ABC TV, Sun 9:30-10:30 pm 



Hazel Bishop via 
Raymond Spector, 
NY 



D | Peter Potter plays pre- 

P fl nnn released records panel of 

Peter Potter OJiUUU 4 Hollywood ' names " votes 

on whether record will be 

a hit or not 



Quick as a Flash 

ABC TV, alt Th 8-8:30 pm 



Thor Corp. via 
Henri, Hurst & 
McDonald. Chi 



Moss & Lewis 



$8,500 



Panel must identify drama- 
tized events Bud Collyer 
emcees Panel Faye Emer- 
son |immy Nelson dum- 
my, regulars: plus two 
guests. 



The Name's the Same 

ABC TV, Tu 10:30-11 pm 



C. A. Swanson & 

Sons via 

Tatham-Laird. 

Chi 
American Chicle via 

Dancer-Fitzgcr- 

ald-Sample. NY 
'alternate week 

sponsors) 



Coodson (r Tod 
man 



Robert Q Lewis emcees as 
panelists loan Alexander. 
.- r-fin "'" Stern Ccne Raybu'n 

SlibUl ,ry *° determine contest- 

ants names which arc iden- 
tical to those of famous 
people 



This is Show Business 

CBS TV, Tu 9-9:30 pm 



Carter Prods, via 
Ted Bates. NY 

Schick Inc. via 
Kudner. NY 

(alternate week 
sponsors' 



Irving Mans- 
field 



$14000 



Show business problems 
come under erudite and 
witty discussion by Sam 
Levenson Ccorge S Ku< 
man and female guest pan- 
elist Clifton Fadiman mod- 
crates. 



Twenty Questions 

Du Mont, Mon 8-8:30 pm 



Bauer & Black 
<Curads> via 
Leo Burnett Chi 



Gary Stevens 



$10,000 



The old parlor game |av 
Jackson emcees regulars 
Florence Rinard. Fred Van 
Deventer. Herb Polcsic. Dick 
Harrison, plus gu 
the questions 



What's My Line? 

CBS TV, Sun 10:30-11 pm 



Jules Montcnier via 

Earle Ludgin. Chi 
Remington Rand via 

Young & Rubi- 

cam. NY 
(alternate week 

sponsors) 



Coodson & Tod- 
man 



$9,500 



Occupat.on-gucssmg is the 
chief occupation of intrepid 
panelists Arlcnc Francis 
Bennett Ccrf. Dorothy Kil- 
esllen. Start Allen Host 
is |ohn Daly. 



Who Said That? 

NBC TV, Mon 10:30-11 pm 



Co-op in about 40 

markets 
Pure Oil (in 32 of 

the 40) via 

Leo Burnett 



Ann Cillis 



$4,200 



Moderator Walter • 
asks 4 name' panelists to 
identify quotations from 
week s news Newsman Bill 
Henry is anchor man Typi- 
cal guests |une Lockhart 
Croucho Marx H V. Kal- 
tenborn. 



Average cost: $8,528,57 





-V 



\«'i«- panels born Uist near 

Proof that panels are a virile, mush- 
rooming force is fact that several new 
ones bowed on the tv networks during 
1953. "I II Duy That" (I.J, at present 
sustaining, went on CBS TV for See- 
man Brothers in June. "Quick As A 
Flash" (lower I.J, ABC TV, appeared in 
March for Thor. "Peter Potter Show" 
(bclowj turned up for Hazel Bishop 
on ABC TV in October. It's aimed at 
young audience of juke-box fanciers. 




// lint's \l\ Line.'' reached about 7,- 
I H N U)00 homes at that time) . The "av- 
erage Nielsen rating" of these shows 
for the same April period was 18.8. 

As for "average cost-per-1,000 
homes reached" of the seven panels in 
the period referred to above, Nielsen 
((.me- ii|i with S9. .")."> (ranging from a 
Iom of $4.29 to a high of 120.37). At 
the beginning of this past December 
L953, U hat's My Lines cost per 1,000 
homes was S5.34, according to Earle 
Ludgin, Chicago. 

*■ Sponsor identification 

Sponsor identification is also fa- 
vorable. Trendex in its June-Julv 
L953 report records the following S.I. 
Indexes for a representative five of the 
panels: // hat's \l\ Line, ',',',.<>', ; I've 
dot a Secret, 71.2'<: Twenty Ques- 
tions. (h',.\'<: Name's the Sana'. 
68.095 : n»un You Go, 65.091 . These 
average oul to 71.8%. In the same re- 
port, a representative group of eight 
drama shows had an average S.I. Index 
id 70.2 1 i . This, even though over half 
of the dramas had the advantage of 
lia\ in", the name ol the ad\ ei riser in 
the title of the program: Ford Theatre, 
(,/ Theatre, Kraft Theatre, Schlitz 
Playhouse of Stars, l.u\ I ideo Theatre. 



The panels, however, have a different 
plus that is undoubtedlv a powerful 
assist in name remembrance: continu- 
ing or frequent visibility of sponsor 
name on panel box or backdrop. 

»- Panel history 

Though it was way back in May 



1938 that the granddadd\ of all pan- 
< I-. Information Please, started titillat- 
ing radio listeners on the old Blue Net- 
work, it wasn't till 1950 that the tv 
panel fever reall\ started to burn. True, 
Buch radio pancl-cla-sies as Leave It to 
the Girls and Juvenile Jury were al- 
read) on t\ : also video had spawned 
This Is Shou Business and Who Said 
'Unity l!ut it was when What's My 
Line? invaded the tv scene in April 
1950 and started to pull down dazzling 
ratings for sponsor Jules Montenier 
that everybodj sat up and took notice. 

What happens with an\ successful 
-lion format (e.g.j the case of / Love 
Lucy and the situation comedies) hap- 
pened with the panels. The let's-get-a- 
panel-too parade began. 

01 course, not every show could gel 
so redoubtable a combination as 
What's My Line?'s John Daly, Dorothj 
Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf, Arlene Frances 
and Hal Block I since replaced bv Steve 
Allen). But that didn't stop What's 
1/v Line? creators Goodson & Todman 
(champ panel-makers with five now to 
their credit i and other producers from 
toddling out every panel format thev 
could think of; nor did it stop the birth 
or resurrection on tv of almost even 
old radio-originated panel that ever 
hit the air. 

Juvenile Jury, for instance, had had 
a short run on NBC TV back in 1947; 
off tv for four years, it was revived on 
that network in June 1951 under spon- 
sorship of Minnestoa Mining and Man- 
i Please turn to page 80) 



"Judge for Yourself" (NBC TV) stars Fred Allen, is actually atypical of panels. It combines 
variety acts with panel and Allen's humor; costs much more than the average panel, too 




38 



SPONSOR 



;. 



The chart at right is one 
page from It Alt's newest 
radio presentation. 
Developed for advertisers, 
agencies, the presentation 
was among last accom- 
plishments of Bill Ryan 
before he left IS A It 1 Jannarv 



people reached 
per dollar spent 



1012 




391 


337 


213 



RADIO 



TV 



MAGAZINES* NEWSPAPERS* 



Is radio too cheap? 



Radio — media men agree — delivers the 
biggest audience per dollar. Does this mean radio is too cheap? 



M. he chart above poses a provocative media question: Is 
radio too cheap? 

Few media men question the fact — dramatically high- 
lighted in the graph taken from a BAB presentation above 
— that radio delivers more people proportionately than 
other major national media. 

This suggests two questions: Why is radio cheap, and 
is radio too cheap? 

An attempt to get answers to these questions will be 
presented by sponsor in a report to be published in the 
25 January issue. 

Behind the answers will be the opinions of advertisers, 
media men at agencies and radio industry veterans. SPON- 

II JANUARY 1954 



SOR is seeking the straightforward statist] al calculations 
and information the) use in their own analysis <>f media. 

sponsor found that everyone has In- own theorj ol why 
radio is cheap. Some sa) radio suffers from some kind of 
an inferiority complex and li.it>'- \<< boost rates a- mo li as 
a timid worker hesitates to approach the boss for a r.ii-.-. 

Others assert radio has too much competition within 
radio. The quick rise in number of station- after World 
Wai II from 1.000 to 2,500 is regarded by many as the 
>n for much of the fiei npetition. 

Historical background, the competitive picture and ( ost- 
audience factors will figure in SPONSOR'S report in the 
next issue. 



* * * 



39 



The cancer scare: Is 
cigaretic copy making it worse? 

Radio and tv's 870 million stake in cigarette advertising, more than all 
other media combined, can be affected by downward sales trend 



J f tli.- i igarette business has ever ap- 
proached .* cross-roads — tin- i- it. 
I ..i the first time in two decades, 
irette -air- an- slanting downward. 
According t" Business H cek's authori- 
tative study, domestic Miles in 1953 
uric 2'. below 1952 and some esti- 
mates put tin- drop as high as .V , . 
Considering the growth in U.S. popu- 



lation, per capita smoking has gone 
<iuw n even more. 

Ordinarih a 2' '< . or even 5%, drop 
in an industry's -ales would not be 
anything to worry about. But place 
these figures against a background of 
recent indications there may be some 
connection between cigarette smoking 
and lung cancer and you've got a pic- 



ture of American smokers becoming 
more health conscious. 

Nobody, least of all the tohaccomen. 
know- exactly what this health con- 
sciousness will eventually do to the 
(igarette business. But one thing is 
sure: If it affects cigarettes, it affects 
advertising; and if it affects advertis- 
ing, it affects radio and tv. 



Recent newspaper, magaiine headlines about research linking cancer 
with cigarette smoking have given tobacco industry a fright, may be 



the cause of first dip in cigarette sales in two decades. Industry 
maintains link has not been proved, but will set up own research 



Doctors Debate Effect of Cigarets on Cancer 



hcthe rdga ret ! attack, he said, a nd die b efore hejthat heavy cigaret smoking 1 



Icould develo 



been blarn 



riii-: 



ITOBACCO STOCKS HIT 

BY CANCER REPORTS 



Some Drop to Lows for Ye?r 

After Medical WarYiings, but 

Industry Spokesman Scoffs 





Can the Poisons in Cigarettes* 
Ke Jwded'SjfmB'B*^^ 

S To Lung Cancer 
Deaths Is Seen 



LUNG CANCER TESTS 
PLANNED BY STATE 



Fatalities Go I p in Ratio 
to Inrn-a-r in Smoking, 
British Doctors V 




1 Cigaret Makers Denounce Doctors' 
Claim Linking Smoking to Cancer 
i 



-LUNG CANCER RISE 
IS LAID TO SMOKING 



By a W»t. I. Si lit .: j. 



\olds 



Four Medical Reports Agree 
' r .That Cigarette^Also^ause^ 



^Syr-^-v 



1 



The advertising investment of the 
tobacco and allied industries is a hand- 
some proportion of the total. In 1952, 
according to PIB's gross time and 
space figures, investment in national 
media hit $61 million (excluding na- 
tional spot radio and tv). This made 
the "smoking materials" industry the 
fourth largest advertiser in national 
media, topped only by the food, toilet 
goods and automotive industries. For 
the first 10 months of this vear gross 
space and time billings in national me- 
dia has been running at the annual 
rate of $68.5 million (excluding na- 
tional spot radio and tv i . 

By far the greatest part of cigarette 
advertising goes into the broadcast me- 
dia. SPONSOR estimates that the top 
six cigarette brands — which account 
for about 85' '< of all cigarette sales in 
the U.S. — spent about $80 million in 
all consumer advertising last year. 
Over 70% of this goes for radio and 
television, both spot and network. 

Since all cigarette brands spend 
nearly $100 million in advertising, the 
radio and tv stake in the cigarette busi- 
ness is close to $70 million. 

Despite this huge cash outlay for 



problem 



advertising, it averages out to less than 
half a cent a pack, which is a graphic 
measure of the size of the cigarette 
business as well as an answer to those 
who say that the heavy cigarette adver- 
tising adds to the cost of smoking. 

The dip in cigarette sales has 
touched off a renewed wave of warn- 
ings that the industry is cutting its 
own throat by its advertising. In the 
past many of the warnings have been 
pious admonitions that it's not proper 
to attack a competitor. For the most 
part these slaps on the wrist have been 
muffled by the slam-bang roar of cig- 
arette advertising and ignored by the 
hard-boiled practitioners of hard sell. 

In the wake of recent statements by 
medical researchers linking smoking 
with some bodilv ills, however, a note 
of urgency has crept into the warn- 
ings. The gist of it is: By stressing 
the health angle in cigarette advertis- 
ing, the industry 7 is only confirming 
the public's fear that smoking is harm- 
ful. And one of these days. John Q. 
Public will go on the water wagon, 
or whatever kind of wagon it is that 
(Please turn to page 86) 

11 JANUARY 1954 



1. I . S. cigarette sales drop >»„ but rernnlmr si-.r 
bears brunt of decrease with 13.3% dip 



„„.. Billion* of Ciaaitttn 

REGULAR SIZE: 

< JlllM'l 

I. uck v Strike . . 
Chesterfield . . . 
Philip Morris . . . 

Old Gold 23.5 

Kool 

Raleigh |,i 

TOTAI :tl |.» 273.0 






M«« "I Ma/k.l 



II.". 



117. 

14.9 

17.0 
0.0 



1&6 

II. I 

2.] 



16.8 
liS 

n. i 



13.3% 70.7 



70.: 



£ n Most of .77.1% Increase in l»iii</ size suit's tine 
to conversions of 70 huh. brands to 115 mm. 



Bill inns of Cigarettes 

Brand | 952 |( Her Cent Change 

KING SIZE: 

Pall Mall 12.5 48.0 1J> 

Herb Taroj Ion 12.5 14.0 12.0 

Chesterfield ... 11.0 L3.5 18.2 

Philip Morris. . . 7<> 

Raleigh 6.0 

Old Gold 

Cavalier 1.5 2.5 66.7 

I ;ii mil i 2.0 2.0 0.0 

Dunhill 1.0 1.5 50.0 

Embassy 7 1.0 42.9 

Regent 8 .5 

Wings .7 .5 —28.6 

Marvel 6 .. 16.7 

TOTAL 73.3 100..1 37.1 "„ 



Shar.- of Marfc.t 
1953 



2.8 



.1 

.'• 
.; 

.2 
.1 

.1 

.1 



12 V, 

■ 

1.8 
1.6 

.9 

.'. 

.1 
.3 

.1 
.1 
.1 



I8..> 



25.9 



Q m Filter sales are up 132.5% but tire still a small 
pereentaye of total cigarette market 

Billions of Cigarttt- Share of Market 

Brand 10,52 1953 Prr Cfnt Change , 95 j |45 j 

FILTER TIP: 

Viceroy 2.7 6.0 122 

Parliament .... 1.9 3.0 57.9 ."> .8 

Kent T 4 3.0 328.6< 2 .8 

L & M .35 .1 

TOTAL 5^ 12.3 132.1 "„ 1.1 3.2 

All others L5 12 .4 

TOTAL tax paid 39 1.« 3«7.0 2.0*;, 100.0 100.0 

I. Went to kirn; ■ 1 April 2 -iuced kinc 

size 6 April. 4. Compa- ampirwl with 9 months 

A eek ' 



41 







Thesi' industry leaders comprise \ it it pi x board and executive staff 



Guiding Vitapix Corp.'s affairs are these members of the board 
of directors (from I. to r., standing): John Williamson, partner 
in Ditmar & Co., San Antonio, Tex. (investment bankers), a 
newly-elected member of Vitapix' board who advises the or- 
ganization on financial affairs; C. Howard Lane, president of 
KOIN-TV, Portland, Ore.; Kenyon Brown, president of KWFT- 
TV, Wichita Falls, Tex.; J. Leonard Reinsch, managing director 
of WSB-TV, Atlanta, and WHIO-TV, Dayton, Ohio; Robert 
H. Wormhoudt, executive vice president of Vitapix; Horace 
L. Lohnes, partner in Dow, Lohnes & Albertson, Washington, 



D. C. (law firm), and Richard A. Borel, director of WBNS-TV, 
Columbus, Ohio. Seated (I. to r.): Paul A. O'Bryan, attorney 
with Dow, Lohnes & Albertson, and assistant secretary and 
treasurer of Vitapix; Edward L. Koenig Jr., vice president of 
sales and advertising for Vitapix; John E. Fetier, president of 
WKZO-TV, Kalamazoo, Mich., and chairman of the board for 
Vitapix; Joseph E. Baudino, executive vice president of West- 
inghouse Radio Stations, Inc., Washington (WBZ-TV, Boston, 
and WPTZ, Philadelphia), and Frank E. Mullen, president of 
Vitapix. To date, Vitapix has 32 station members, stockholders 



hi 



Will Vitapix create 

I v film revolution ? 



Station-owned svnilioator has 112 stations, socks 

<»0. It mar ho lever tv oan uso to oraok 

HolK wood's celluloid curtain, open film vaults 

42 



Mi operations <>f Vitapix Corporation, 
i>nl\ station-owned film syndicator in 
television, evei fulfill their complete 
potential, big and little revolutions in 
the t\ film business tnaj be the result. 
I In' available evidence suggests that 
V itapix is potentially : 

► \ means of providing national ad- 
vertisers with "'film networks" of 50 
(ii umie stations <>n which lime has 
been cleared, thus stimulating purchase 
of tv film -how- on a national spot 
basis I — or so SPONSOR infers from the 
wax \ itapix is set up i . 

► The lever which the television in- 
dustry will use to crack Hollywood's 
celluloid curtain, opening the vaults of 
re 'lit top-x intage film-. 

SPONSOR 



► The distribution approach which 
major Hollywood producers would be 
inclined to favor when they enter full- 
scale tv production (because it is rem- 
iniscent of the kind of producer-ex- 
hibitor relationship which Hollywood 
enjoyed in its heyday). 

► A force which will improve the 
quality of film programing in televi- 
sion while at the same time putting a 
brake on high prices. 

► A force which will help standard- 
ize tv film pricing practices. 

That is the potential. Where does 
Vitapix stand today? 

As of the first of the year Vitapix 
has 32 station members or stockhold- 
ers — one to as many markets. It is 
negotiating for 19 other memberships, 
seeking 60 station members mainly 
in the major U. S. markets. 

The company's capital totals over 
$850,000. It was raised both from sale 
of membership stock to stations and 
from the initial investment of the com- 
pany's founders, a group including 
well known broadcasters and members 
of allied fields. Among them: 

John E. Fetzer, president WKZO-TV, 
Kalamazoo, Mich, and chairman of 
the NARTB Tv Code Review Board; 
Richard A. Borel, director WBNS-TV, 
Columbus; J. Leonard Reinsch, man- 
aging director, WSB-TV, Atlanta and 
WHIO-TV, Dayton; Horace L. Lohnes, 
partner, Dow, Lohnes & Albertson, 
Washington, D. C, attorneys special- 
izing in broadcast law. 

As to properties, Vitapix has three: 

1. A Hollywood Western series of 
27 feature-length films starring Johnny- 
Mack Brown which Vitapix bought 



giiiiiiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiuimi iiiniiiiiji 



These 32 Stations Are Vitapix Stockholders 



\m.mllM. ; m.\< l\ 

Atlanta, Ga \\-i;i\ 

Baltimore, Md. V. \l \i; I \ 

Birmingham, Ua. \\ \l\l 

Boston. Mass. \\ I!/ I \ 

Charlotte, N. C. w III \ 

Columbus, Ohio w BNS-1 \ 

Dallas, Tex. \\ I \ \ I \ 

Dayton, Ohio WHIO-TV 

Denver, Colo. k I / I \ 

Detroit, Mich. WWJ-T\ 

Fresno, Cal. KBID 

Greenville, S.C. \\ I l!< 

Houston, Tex. KPRC-TY 

Kalamazoo, Midi. WKZ()-T\ 

Kansas City, Mo. k< \Hi|\ 



Lexii 

Oklahe Okla. 

Omaha, Neb. 

idelphia, Pa 
Phoenix, Vriz, 
ii.l. Me. 

Proi idem e, R. I 
Rock Island, 111. 
Si Paul, Minn. 
Intonio, I i \ . 

v .in I ' al. 

ise, N. Y. 
\\ ichita Falls, Tex. 



Wl \l' 

Ml \ 

HI I \ 

Wntt |\ 

\\ PTZ 

KPHO T\ 

\\ ( , \ N 
KOIN T\ 

\\ i \i; i\ 

u HB1 l\ 

KSTP 

\\ii\n\ 

KRON l\ 
KING l\ 

WHIN 
kttl I l\ 



= As of 1 Januarj r 

itllllllllllllllllllilllllltllllllllllllllllltllllllllllll in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii iii.;,> 



outright for $600,000-plus in 1952 and 
syndicated mainly to defer overhead 
while the lengthy process of organiza- 
tion was in progress. (Vitapix was 
founded in early 1952 but did not start 
full-scale activity till 1953. It has 
sold the Western series in over 80 
markets. ) 

2. A wrestling film series called 
Vitapix Championship Wrestling which 
is again mainly an overhead-deferring 
venture and which Vitapix distribute- 
for a percentage of the gross receipts. 

3. A series of brand-new feature- 
length films made to be shown on tele- 
vision first and in movie theatres sec- 
ond; this is Vitapix Feature Theatre 
which Vitapix distributes on the basis 
of a guarantee of full production cosl 



Id the producer coming from syndi- 
cation receipt-. 

\ it;t|ii\ Feature Theatre is bj fax the 
most important of tin- three and the 
storj of how it was acquired tell- \ou a 
lot about the waj \ itapix will operate. 

Talks with the producer of the se- 
ries. Princess Pictures, Inc., began last 
summer, with two network film <li\i- 
sions bidding against \ itapix. When 
negotiations came to an impasse, awa\ 
from the conference table slipped \ ita- 
pix executives to bit the phones t<> their 
i Please im u to page 92 



film 



Features made for tV first, movie houses second are sold by Films qo on air January with 27 markets sold by year s end. 

Vitapix. Below: Burt Balaban who produces films, Vitapix Pres. Mullen Vitapix sold $500,000 worth of films in few days to membe's over phone 




11 JANUARY 1954 



43 



by litiy Lapica 

j he -• "',| of thought | »«- 1 - i ~t - 
among -Dine broad* .1-1 and prinl me- 
dia people thai measurement services 
were designed t<> Bhow that most peo- 
ple <lon i read, In ai m -,■,■ tnosl ;nl> 
whether in newspapers, magazines, on 
radio >•< <>i\ tele^ ision. 

sponsor hastens t<> assure them that 
ilii- i- not so that the primarj aim of 
air measurement sen ices is to measure 
program audiences and that the pri- 
marj aim of print services is to im- 
prove ad effectiveness. 

The air services are most!) quanti- 
tative; the print, qualitative. 

Air ratine services are not designed 



What's wrong with prii 

Pari 15 of SPONSOR'S 21 -part All-Media Evaliiatt I 



to acquire much data on \\h<> hears or 
remembers your commercial, as com- 
pared with the program itself. 

Print's measuring services use three 
differing techniques to uncover which 
ads are best read or best rem< inhered; 
onl) one of the three techniques simul- 
taneous!) obtains data on the reader- 
ship of editorial content. 

sponsor's year-long Media Evalua- 
tion Survej uncovered main mistaken 
beliefs, a few facts about the air and 
print measurement services. (See 
"What's wrong with the air rating 
services?" SPONSOR, 28 December 1953, 
for an analysis of the six main research 



organizations in the field, a table list- 
ing the facta about each, another tabu- 
lating th<- opinions of 77 advertisers 
and agencies regarding information 
sources and SPONSOR'S Ideal Rating 
System and how the services compare.) 
Here's what this arti< lc will cover: 

1. Why knowing the facts about 
readership services is important. 

2. What they've uncovered. 

3. The facts about the three com- 
mercial organizations in the field 
Starch. Gallup-Robinsou and Readex. 

4. What the researchers think of 
them. 



THE FACTS ABOUT THE READERSHIP SERVICES: their sampling methods, methd 



GALIAP & ItOM VSO\ (Princeton): Technique— aided 
recall called "impact." Reports on ads in Life, Satevepost, McCalFs 
"iil> to some "id advertiser-subscribers. Weeklies measured every 2 
weeks; VcCairs every monthly issue. Personal interview used. 
Interviewer finds qualified readers during first week magazine is 
out: 100 for each magazine (200 men, 200 women) in 18 metro- 
politan areas. Only one and two-page ads are measured. Three 
Steps u-cd: (1) with magazine closed respondent must qualify as 
reader of current issue; (2) he is shown list of ads on cards and 
asked to describe those he remembers; (3) his "playback" or recall 
of advertiser's message in these ads is taken down verbatim by inter- 
viewer. Some ads rate as low as 1%; others go to 40 and 51 
Subscribers get report in three week- showing "proved name regi-- 
traiion" -core of their own anil competitors' ads pin- verbatim play- 
back of what respondents said. Additionally G&R holds "Impact 
Advertising Clinic" in subscriber company's offices everj three 
months nn what's been learned. \ study group is maintained in 
Princeton to "distill out the meaning of our research data." Thi- is 
then presented in one form or another to member firms at clinic-. 
Fee f,, r reports varies by size of firm. G&R has 10 office employes 
in Princeton pin- interviewers and supervisors in field. Impact 
reporting service began fall of 1949. To date 12.000 ad- have been 
checked Some big subscribers: Vrmco, Mcoa, Ballantine,, Bendix, 
Hlii/. Bristol-Myers, Campbell Soup, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Colgate- 
Palmolive, Corn Products, Firestone Tire & Rubber, General I 
trie General Mill-. Goodrich, Kraft. Lipton, Westinghouse. Chief 
advantage: tells ad\erti-er whether he got me.-age across. Chief 
limitation: confusion in recalling specific ads. Firm's partners are 
George Gallup, founder of American Institute of Public Opinion 
(Gallup Poll) ami Vudienoe Research Institute, and Claude Robin- 
son, organizer of Opinion Research Corp. and Public Opinion Index 
for Industry. 



READEX (Mahtomedi. tfinti.): Technique — recogni 
issue is sent by mail to respondent 'no interview). Sample 
scribed as "reasonably inadequate" by President Bob Pender 
Regular reports provided on following magazine-: Christian lb 
Popular Mechanics i monthly); farm papers: The Farmer o 
Paul. Southern Planter (quarterly); trade papers: Constrl 
Methods & Equipment < monthly) : small-town new-paper- in M 
-oia. Kansas and Georgia Mini-monthly or monthly; company 
lications — no regular schedule. Method originated by Pende 
when he operated hi?- own ]- \ agency; Readex began 1 Jan 
1949; 400 report- issued through November 1953. Method 
copies of publication are mailed (or delivered b\ new -boys or * 
i rn In ion on request) to cro — ection of subscribers who are f 
to show what article- or ad- interested them and to return the 
in postpaid envelope. Pencils are supplied — blue for men. rei 
women. Respondent i- asked in letter to draw line through 
news -ton or article, picture, per-onal item and ad that inter 
them from front to last page. Those who haven't read i-*ui 
a-ked to so state on cover and return. Reports i ontain percen 
of men and women readers expressing interest in each item an 
Main returns vary from 20 to 30'; for paid consumer publicat 
10 to 1596 for paid trade papers. 60 to 701 for daily new-p. 
distributed by newsboys (with 100$ recorded in four instance 
le-s than V i and even a blank for free controlled and com 
publications. Chief advantage: economy, lack of interviewer 
simultaneous taling- on editorial content. Limitation-: Hal 

liol relurn-. or to determine jusl what rating- mean, ^ome 

ent or pa-i users: (advertisers) Allis-Charlmer-. Bell Telep 
Chevrolet, Du Pont. Eastman, Ford. General Mill-. Goodrich, 
-anto. Standard Oil of [nd.; ' Agencies) \\<r. BBDO. Leo Bl 
Kudncr. Needham. I oui- & Brorbv. 



44 



SPONSOR 



icasurement services? 



•Iv shows how to uncover their limitaitions 



5. What the Advertising Research 
Foundation is tr\ing to find out ahout 
readership techniques. 

The A. C. Nielsen Co. has kept a 
"box score" for many years on how 
often executives are right in their de- 
cisions on questions of marketing pol- 
icy and strategy ( which includes ad- 
vertising) . 

The answer: 58% of the time. 

This means, if the figure can be ac- 
cepted, that 42 /f of the time executives 
are wrong. And they are the experts 
who spend their lives in making such 
decisions. 

If doctors were wrong 42% of the 



time . . . or pilots . . . ... 

But marketing and admen are, in 
Nielsen's epinion. 

No wonder so man} of them leap at 
any research tool that will help them 
trim the vast margin <>l error. 

This ma\ explain wh\ there are six 
major air rating services and three 
print measurement organizations. 

The wonder is why there aren't 



JVEXT ISSUE: "How air rating services 
compare market by market," based on study 
by Ward Dorrell, research director of John 
Blair & Co. Also list of markets the rating 
services cover, frequency of coverage and 
the various supplementary services offered. 



ii ■ * 'i i onvei Bel) . wh) nil m 

Lint advertisers don't support >>r bu) 
more measurement n~<- 

those the) have more eff« tivel) . 

I In- question th< i II"" a< 

■ urate ire these measurement to li- 
niques? Hom < an the) be made n 
h i urate ? How d<> the) compare ' 

I \ ■ Advertising Resean Ii I ounda- 
lion's Printed Advertising Methods 
Stud) Committee headed b) Sherwood 
Dodge, \.|'.. Foote, Cone 8 Belding, 
has spent the past year on this mjI>- 
ject. Ih'- \l!l hopes t" finance a ma- 
joi field test this Bpi ing. Some - 1 J~>.- 
trticle continues next /»/.;:<•' 



uestioning, and what they cost 

CH (Mamaronech, IV. Y.): Technique — recognition: 

shown reader by interviewer. Advertisement Readership 
covers 33 consumer magazines (every issue), all 52 issues 
ness Week; 8 business papers each month: Aviation Age, 
Materials Handling, Steel, Factory, Power, Machinery, 
ring News-Record, Machine Design; newspapers: Boston 
-, Houston Post, Los Angeles Herald-Express, New York 
Philadelphia Inquirer. Price: usually from $35 up per re- 
ample: 200 men or women for magazines read by one sex; 
i, 150 women for magazines read by both. Method: Inter- 
finds qualified reader, takes him through magazine asking, 
u see or read anything on this page?" with follow-up ques- 
determine degree of reading, whether "noting." "seen-asso- 
(recognized advertiser's name) and "read most" (read more 
If). Report gives readership percentages for men and women 
"readers per dollar" figure for ad based on "primary read- 
lembers of family which bought or subscribed to publication, 
of readers, readers per 100 copies and other data. Starch is 
irm in business (started 1932). Has measured over 500.000 
uce. Also has semi-annual consumer magazine report on 
onomic characteristics (among other data) of readers based 
XI households, product acceptance and purchase reports and 
1 readership reports. Began to measure which ad made 
lit impression" on readers in Life starting October 1952 
idvantage: scope of data plus long record of success in field 
limitation: measures readership in ad rather than how wel 
nessage across. Staff: 110 office personnel. 190 field inter 
Clients: over 200, including virtually every agency billing 
1 it»ii or more. 



Basic questions admen 

raise about readership studies 

(Advertising Research Foundation will seek to answer most 
of these in field tests planned for this year) 

1. What is thr hind anil tize of sample required 
for opt i in urn results? 

2. Is there a difference between readership 63 
prospects and non-prospects? 

3. How <an intensity of response i" an ml be mea- 
sured more adequately ? 

4. Do "fat" magazines receive Inner recognition 
ratings than "thin" books because oj less attention to 
the ads or to boredom during the intervieu ? 

5. How long may the time lapse he between expo- 
sure to an ad and the intervieu before memo 

lies crucial? 

6. Hon great is the confusion factor [readers confus- 
ing same ad seen in different magazines or similar 
ads in separate issues of same boot 

7. How great is interviewer ami ad bias? " ill a 
man tell a pretty woman interviewer he rend a I 
ere or a panty ad? ' 

Broadcasters should also learn much from these 
tests, for copy principles are much the same, 
whether for print or for radio and television. 



11 JANUARY 1954 



45 









SPONSOR 9 * Werfia Study — Published to date: 



1. K In evaluate media? 
(20 April 1953). 

2. Media Basil •. / newspapers, 
direct mail, radio, magazines 

(4 l/,n 1953). 

.'J. Media Basics II Tv, business 

papei s, miiiliidr. transit 

i 18 May 1953). 

f. Hon to choose media, \iarl I 

I 1 June L953). 

.1. //<)!<• to choose media, part II 

I 15 June 1953). 

0. ////<// you should I. now about 

Life's l-mediu stmli (29 /one 

1953). Supplementary article on 

same topic. "Is Life's media 

stud\ lair to radio and tv?" (a 

debute i, 13 July 1953. 

7. Beware of these media research 
pitfalls, part I (27 July 1953). 

8. Beware of these media research 
pit fails, part II < 24 August 1953). 

9. How 72 leading agencies evaluate 
media (7 September 1953). 



10. l/nu ')\ agencies euiluate 
media • _j J September 1953). 

1 1. //«!< HI1IX) evaluates media 
(5 0< >"/,(■/• L953). 

12. How Emil Mogul tests media 
weekly lor Rayco i 19 October 1953). 
Jtl. W /i i tAese 31 /Jrnu i/i«i'/ //<.<■ 
air media (16 A member 19531. 

J 4. What's wrong with air rating 
seniles (16 November 1953). 

15. W hat's wrong with print measure 
merit services (11 January 1954). 

To be published: 

16. How air rating services compare 
b\ market. Also markets covered 
and supplementary services offered. 

1 7. How to set up an 
ideal media sales test. 

IS. Psychological aspects of media. 

19. Sales impact of radio and tv. 

20. New media evaluation and 
research developments. 

21. sponsor's conclusions. 



iiuiinniiimii iiiiiiiii ilium minimi niiimiimmiinmimiiiiiiimimiiiiiimim 



000 is needed, of which about $50,000 
has been pledged bv SPONSOR press- 
time. Alfred Politz Research, Inc.. 
which made the Life magazine Study 
of Four Media and the Christal Sta- 
tions' radio survey in 1953, has been 
recommended to do the field work for 
the print test. 

\Yh\ should vou know all you can 
about the print measurement services 
— whether you're an advertiser or an 
agency man? There are three basic 
reasons : 

• The major reason — to narrow your 
margin of error so far as making mar- 
keting land advertising) decisions is 
concerned. 

• So you can improve v our copy. 
Most of the improvements in copy- 
writing over the past 25 years — in- 
cluding much of the air copv as well 
— have been due to print copy re- 
search. These improvements include 
use of pictures, limited block text, 
"use" or "reason why" copy, bold. 
provocative heads and man) other fea- 
ture-. Radio has incorporated some 
of these into it- own copv sometimes 
unwittingly. Television can use more. 



• So that \ou ma\ understand the 
limitations on your audience. Some 
21 vears after Starch began his maga- 
zine measurement ratings and 14 vears 
after the Advertising Research Foun- 
dation ran its first newspaper reader- 
ship test, many advertisers still believe 
that most people see and read their 
ads — especially if they are full page 
and particularly if the\ 're in color. 
The chart on this page should disillu- 
sion them. 

And if you're a broadcaster who is 
constantly having air ratings thrown 
in your face by your print competitors 
to show that \our audiences are mi- 
nuscule, knowing the facts about the 
print measurement services should fur- 
nish vou with some explosive ammu- 
nition for your own counter-ban age. 

But beware of two things: I 1 i No 
print measurement rating is project- 
aide to the magazine's ABC circula- 
tion, much less to its entire "audience" 

all those who read it whether sub- 
scribers or not. (2) Jusl as a program 
rating is not necessaril) a pood indica- 
tion of the -how- sales power, so 
there is no ne< e--arv correlation be- 



SPONSOR's All-Media Advisory Board 



tween a high printed ad rating and its 
-.ile- effectiveness I unless vou can first 
separate the prospects from the non- 
prospects I . 

\\ hat then have the readership serv- 
ices uncovered that should interest ad- 
vertisers? 

Some of the most significant con- 
<lu-ion- that can be drawn from the 
mass of data accumulated bv these or- 
ganizations follow : 

From Starch mayuzinv surrvys 

1. Readership of ads varies im- 
mensely with product intere-t. Twice 
as many men read auto ads. for ex- 
ample, as read food ads. but twice as 
many women read food ads as read 
auto ads. 

2. 1 remendous differences in read- 
ership exist between ads. The same ad- 
vertiser, u-ing the same size of space 
and color, can double and triple the 
number of people who see and read 
his ads. 

3. On the average, a half-page 



STUDY IN BOOK FORM 

SPONSOR'S All-Media Evaluation 
Study will be published in book 
form in the spring after the re- 
maining articles in the 20-article 
series appear. Price has not yet 
been determined, but you may re- 
serve a copy now. 



black-and-white magazine ad is 
"noted"' bv 16^5 of the readers of a 
publication, a one-page black-and-white 
ad is seen bv 2')' < and a one-page four 
color ad is seen bv 39' ! . 

4. Readership measurements do 
ascertain the amount of reading of ads 
with "reasonable, practical accuracy." 
Ibis is corroborated bv independent, 
objective eve-camera records. 

5. Memorv error or confusion is 
approximate^ 3 to V ; under a thor- 
ough component-parts interviewing 
procedure. It can rise to 1(> to 19^i 
under a loose interviewing procedure 
without checking component parts. 

(>. Inflation of readership percent- 
i Please turn to page ( 'T > 



George J. Abrams ad director, Block Drug Co., Jersey City 

Vincent R. Bliss executive v. p., Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago 

Arlyn E. Cole pres., Mac Wilkins, Cole & Weber, Portland, Ore. 

Dr. Ernest Dichtcr pres., Inst, for Research in Mass Motivations 
Stephens Dictz v. p., Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, New York 
Ben R. Donaldson ad 4 sales promotion director, Ford, Dearborn 



46 



Marion Harper Jr. 
Ralph H. Harrington 
Morris L. Hite 
J. Ward Maurer 



Raymond R. Morgan 
Henry Schachte 



SPONSOR 



president, McCann-Erickson, Inc., New York 

ad mgr., Gen. Tire & Rubber Co., Akron 

president, Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas 

ad director, Wildroot Co., Buffalo 

pres., Raymond R. Morgan Co., Hollywood 

v.p., Sherman & Marquette, New Yo'k 






How radio-tv helped local 
detergent get distribution 



S. California-brand cracked crowded liquid detergent market using 
radio and tv only. . Dish-a-way was in half of L.A. stores in 30 days 




WW ith the detergent field getting 
more crowded, cracking it is no mean 
feat. You've got to get in via the 
super markets and they've got more 
brands than they know what to do with. 

The Deco Chemical Co. of Los An- 
geles did it. however. Using only ra- 
dio and tv, the firm achieved 50% dis- 
tribution in the Los Angeles area with- 
in 30 days. The product: a liquid de- 
tergent dubbed Dish-a-way. 

With Deco's ad agency. Jimmy Fritz 
and Associates, calling the signals, 
Deco shrewdly started off by buying 
into tv shows which many supers run 
in the Southern California area. 



While Deco broke the ice with tv, a 
saturation radio campaign quickly fol- 
lowed and, at present, 75% of the 
firm's monthly budget goes to am. 
I The company has been ploughing 
back into advertising 15% of gross 
sales. After the first 30 days, Deco 
was advertising at the rate of $3,000 
a month — and going up fast.) The 
agency expects that when the selling 
settles down to a more routine job, 
print advertising will be added and the 
budget will be divided as follows: 40% 
for radio, 30% for tv and 30% for 
print. Radio has been and will con- 
tinue to get the biggest slice of the 



let. The firm sponsors the show Mod- 
ern Romances on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days. ( Ex-Lax sponsors the show na- 
tionally on Mondays, Wednesdays and 
Fridays.) Deco recently bought the 
show in San Diego (KCBQ) and fu- 
ture plans include expanding the pro- 
gram to other ABC Radio Pacific Net- 
work stations. 

Dish-a-way's initial success was no 
flash in the pan. Business has been 
growing rapidly despite the competi- 
tion of other liquid detergents such 
as Joy (P&G), Lux (Lever Bros.) and 
Glim (B. T. Babbitt). John DeWitt, 
president of Deco, is eyeing national 




INITIAL BUY WAS IN TV SHOWS AIRED BY SUPER MARKETS. RADIO GETS MOST EMPHASIS (75%) TO REACH HOUSEWIFE 



Supers like these tv shows since, 
provided they are able to sell all the 
participations to their suppliers, they 
get their own tv advertising free. They 
are usually an hour long and most of 
the shows involve feature films. The 
suppliers, in turn, receive a merchan- 
dising package, which includes tv an- 
nouncements, assurance of good shelf 
position, special displays, other aids. 

Starting 15 September, when their 
product made its debut, Deco bought 
into shows on KECA-TV, KLAC-TV 
and KNXT. These participations are 
still running. 

11 JANUARY 1954 



budget because Deco is primarily in- 
terested in reaching the housewife and 
the firm believes that daytime radio is 
an efficient way to accomplish the job. 

For its radio saturation campaign 
the agency bought time on KBIG, 
KFWB, KHJ and the Mutual-Don Lee 
California Network, KLAC and KMPC. 
Selling was done via 30-second tran- 
scribed spots with local market tags at 
the end added by the announcers. The 
announcements run six times daily, 
five times a week on each station. 

Later, Deco bought a soap opera on 
KECA. ABC Radio's Los Angeles out- 



distribution and is now looking for a 
Midwestern plant to back it up. 

Dish-a-way is Deco's first stab at the 
consumer market and DeWitt is pretty 
happy with the results. The firm had 
been concentrating on industrial and 
medical detergents but had been ex- 
perimenting with a consumer product 
for some time. It was packaged under 
a private label and the firm decided to 
sell it themselves. * * * 



case history 



47 




Just as our mighty land is made up of varying 
scenes . . . rolling plains, winding rivers, snow-capped mountains 
... so Storer audiences are composed of varying elements . . . 

differing in income, needs, habits, interests. 
Storer stations plan their programming 

with these differences in mind. 



'>f 










STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

WSPD-TV WJBK-TV WAGA-TV KEYl-TV WBRC-TV 

Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. Son Antonio, Texas Birmingham, Ala. 

WSPD WJBK WAGA | KABC WBRC WWVA WGBS 

Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. San Antonio, Texos Birmingham, Alo. Wheeling, W. Va. Miam., Flo. 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: ^k ' 

TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Solos Mgr. 

118 East 57 Street, New York 22, ELdorodo 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, FRonklin 2-44M 



W ti/mi 





Pittsburgh's PIONEER 
UHF television station! 



IT'S GOOD 

BUSINESS 

TO SELL 

THE RICH 

PITTSBURGH 

MARKET 

THROUGH 




(%utHe£5SI 

PITTSBURGH M 



Notional Representatives: WEED TELEVISION 

New York Chicago Detroit Boston 

Son Froncijco Atlanta Hollywood 




agency profile 



Peter Hilton 

President 
Hilton and Riggio, New York 



"The air media are vital in opening up markets for distributing 
new products."" Peter Hilton, president of Hilton and Riggio. told 
SPONSOR. 

"As an agency specializing in launching new products, we've found 
that tv is particularly efficient in providing advertising prestige neces- 
sary to give a new item the support of distributors. Radio helps es- 
tablish the brand name with consumers through frequent low-cost 
impact." 

In 1953 about 40 r , of Hilton and Riggio's S3 million over-all 
billing- were in radio and tv. with most new products using all media. 

Lushus, a Canadian gelatin dessert made b\ Shirriffs Ltd.. was an 
exception. Last April when Lushus was introduced in Columbus, the 
product's first U. S. market, television bore the brunt of the cam- 
paign, though all major media were used. 

Lushus' move into Columbus was the culmination of two vears of 
U. S. market re r ear< h by the Canadian manufacturer. Sales and ad 
strategy of Jell-O. the firm's No. 1 competitor, had been studied and 
discussed and studied some more. Finally Columbus was chosen as 
the test market. 

Before the opening date of the campaign I 12 April i . agencv execu- 
tives had acquired distribution for Lushus in the four major Colum- 
bus food chains as well as in 85 ^f of the independent grocery stores. 
But General Foods had learned about the projected campaign. Jell-0 
invaded the market with an unprecedented advertising barrage to 
nip the competition in the bud. For four weeks after Lushus' entr) 
into the market all choice radio and tv time on all Columbus stations 
was sold out. sa\s Peter Hilton. 

Now that the Lushus campaign has been on the air in Columbus 
for over nine months. Hilton and Riggio have tested consumer knowl- 
edge of the product at the point-of-sale. \sked where thc\ had 
noted Lushus advertising, housewives answered this way: 73', on 
tv: 15', in newspapers: 12 r « in other media. 

Convinced of the efficac] of t\ in getting distribution and consumer 
acceptance For Lushus, Hilton and Riggio expect to expand the cam- 
paign into other markets in spring. 

On the agenda for 9 Februarj is an agency-sponsored new product 
introduction seminar. Says Hilton: "We feel that the better educated 
businessmen are about the problems of introducing new- products, 
the greater the potential growth of our services.' 1 



• • • 



50 



SPONSOR 



>it> 




1 




t 





I 




ZIV HITS A NEW 
HIGH IN RADIO 

HIlarity! ! 



&smm 



****** 



/ 



^ *">'* A * IOT , 



■•usthe 

MEA " WlDDLE 



KID 



Red , keen, 






( 



REDS A PANIC! 

as the original chocklehead 

CLEW KADIDDLEHOPPER 

, Red's homespun humor 
• ls s oper hilarious. 



/ 



*r~* 



' 



FR ANTic 



1 McPUGG 






A 



5 HALF-HOURS 
PER WEEK 

means repeated 

SALES 
PORTUNITIES 

for YOU! 



260 half-hours 
planned for 5-per-week . . . 

full of COMMERCIALS! 

full of LAUGHS! 

full of audience RESPONSE! 



^-hours' 



ACT FAST! WRITE, WIRE. 

PHONE BEFORE YOUR 

MARKET IS SOIOI 



MBKt 



mum 



- 



■* 



n, 



* 



^^ 



w ** 



V* 



^-~4 



NEW Yo*K 






VDAN-TV 'EKKf 

NOW ON THE AIR 

WITH A FULL SCHEDULE OF 

ABC NETWORK PROGRAMS 



CHANNEL 



INTERCONNECTED 




on dollar market depends on WDAN-TV exclusively 
Television Network Shows. Inside this rich area no 
be the local ABC Television outlet. The area in- 
billion dollar project of the National Distillers Prod- 
ucts Corporation, east of Tuscola, the throbbing U. S. Army Air- 
Force center at Rantoul, the vibrant thousands at the University of 
inois, the Du-Pont-DeNemours gigantic operation for the United 
States Government at Newport, the expanding developments at the 
Danville plants of General Motors and General Electric, the can- 
ning centers of Milford, Hoopeston and Rossville — an area that has 
long been famous on sales charts for its stability and ability to re- 
spond to sales stimuli. Concentrating its picture TV coverage in 
this small, rich area, WDAN-TV has many advantages to offer the 
advertiser, the most important two being cost and productivity. 



Phone or Wire for availabilities 
around this ABC Television Audience 



National Representative: EVERETT-McKINNEY ~ £ ^S^f^bSarT 

WDAN-TV 1500 N. WASHINGTON ST. • PHONE 1700 • DANVILLE, ILLINOIS 



! f 




illii 



f. Dleiv construction permits 



CITY A STATE 



DA, OKLA. 
HID, OKLA. 
■3PLIN, MO. 
IRKSVILLE, MO. 
A CROSSE, WIS. 
EWPORT, KY. 
AN DIEGO, CAL. 
HOMASVILLE, GA. 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO 



DATE OF 
GRANT 



ON. AIR 
TARGET 



POWER IKWI- 



VISUAL I AURAL 



STATIONS 
ON AIH 



SETS IN 

M»"VI I- 

10001 



II I'M i tl 1 a, MANAGER 



KEOK 10 

5 

KSWM-TV 12 

KBIZ-TV 3 

38 

WNOP-TVi 74 

21 

6 



16 Dec. 1 June 251 141 NFA 

16 Dec. 100 50 NFA 

23 Dec. 59 35 NFA 
16 Dec. 15 June 100 50 NFA 
16 Dec. 18 9 NFA 

24 Dec. 18 9 3 450 vhf 
23 Dec. 186 100 2 206 vhf 
23 Dec. 6 3 NFA 



F.U.rn Okta T» Co 

Streett Electronic! In 

Air Time Inc 

KBIZ Inc 

- Conroy. ten mgr 
LaCretae Tv Corp 

Tri City Belli. Co 

Elliott L Cushmjn 

E D R yrrt, 8r. 



RADIO 
REP1 



Tit rh ~i Is allocated to Cincinnati. Ohio. 



ff. V<«ir stations on air* 



CITY & STATE 




CALL 
LETTERS 


CHANNEL 
NO. 


ON-AIR 
DATE 


POWER 


(KW)" 


NET STNS 
AFFILIATION ' ON AIR 


SETS IN 

MARKFTt 

'0001 


PERMITEE & MANAGER 




1 VISUAL 


AURAL 


REP 


NDERSON, S. C. 




W AIM-TV 


40 


15 Dec. 


16 


8 


CBS 1 


NFA 


Wilton E Hill 


Burn Smlttl 


ANVILLE, ILL. 




WDAN-T\ 


f 24 


1 Jan. 


19 


10 


ABC 1 


NFA 


Nftfihwe.ttrn Pub. Co 
Robert 8uro«. gen mgr. 


E».- 

M ' K inn, y 


•>AHO FALLS, IDAHO 


KID-TV 


3 


20 Dec. 


6 


3 


CBS, NBC 1 


NFA 


ld»><o R«-li» Corp. 

C. N Liyne. gen mgr. 


Glll-Poraa 


ORTH ADAMS, MASS. 


WMGT 


74 


1-10 Jan. 


300 


150 


Du M, WPIX 1 


NFA 


Gr.ylook Onto Co. 
Jor-n Partons. gen. mgr. 


Walker 


■IREVEPORT, LA. 




KSLA 


12 


1 Jan. 


12 


6 


ABC, CBS, 1 
Du M, NBC 


NFA 


Intrrlm Ty Corp. 
Dcane Flett. gen mgr 


Raymer 


'ESLACO, TEX. 




KRGV-TV 


5 


1 Jan. 


28 


14 


Du M, NBC 1 


NFA 


KRGV TV Inc. 

L Tiylor. prev 

Byorn W Oglr. g-n mgr 


Raymer 


'ILMINGTON, N. 


C. 


WMFD-TV 


f 6 


31 Dec. 


54 


27 


NBC 1 


NFA 


WMFO TV Inc 

Richard Dun!ea. gen mgr. 


Weed T» 



Iff. Addenda to previous listings 



Since 
•levision 



5 October 1953, the following stations have returned their and 27 uhf- 
construction permits to FCC. To date, 35 stations — 8 vhf on channels 



BELOIT, Wis., WRBJ, ch. 57 
BUFFALO, N. Y., WBES-TV, ch. 59 
DAVENPORT, Iowa, KDIO, ch. 36 
DENVER, Colo., KDEN, ch. 26 
DENVER, Colo., KIRV, ch. 20 
EL PASO, Tex., KEPO-TV, ch. 13 
EUGENE, Ore., KTVF, ch. 20 
FALL RIVER, Mass., WSEE-TV, ch. 46 
FLINT, Mich., WCTV, ch. 28 
FREDERICK, Md., WFMD-TV, ch. 62 
GALVESTON, Tex., KTVR, ch. 41 



HENDERTONVILLE, N. C, WHKP-TV, 
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., WNES, ch. 67 
JACKSON, Mich., WIBM-TV, ch. 48 
LAKELAND, Fla., WOTV. ch. 16 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., WMIL-TV, ch. 31 
OWENSBORO, Ky., WVJS-TV, ch. 14 
RICHMOND, Ky., WBGT, ch. 60 
ST. CLOUD, Minn., WJON-TV, ch. 7 
SALINAS, Calif., WICU, ch. 28 
SANTA FE, N. M., KTVK, ch. 2 
YAKIMA, Wash., KIT-TV, ch. 23 



have relinquished their ft c.p.'s. (Vhf stal 
2 through 11: uhf stations, < hannels 1 \ through 

:h. 27 .1 '/ 

I dn 
nothing but »< 
at / 
upon the profit-making possibi 

th unbrid In 

turned to th* FCC altni the 

number of new {/rants n 

1 



Total U.S. stations on air. 
ind. Honolulu and Alaska (1 

Jan. '54) 

No. of markets covered 



352 

221 



BOX SCORE 



Vo. of post-freeze c.p.'s grant- 
ed (excluding 28 educational 
grants: 1 Jan. 
\o. oi grantees on air.. 



aew c.p.'s and stations going on the air listed here are those which «*>"™J £ 
Dec. and 1 Jan. or on whirl) information could be obtained In that period. Mat ion ; r 

insidered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. --Power of c.p. s is Ml nco raeu 
ftL applications and amenuuiems of imliri.iual grantees, rinforuiauun ™ ' h ' n ' ^'I.. ' \' h " 
markets where not designated as being from NBC Research, consists of estimates f om the 

■tloni or reps and must be deemed approximate. §Data from NBC Research and Planning 



211 



No. tv homes in I .S. il 

fan. *54) 27. .-.OO. OOO: 

Percent oi nil US. homes 

with 00",, 



Percentages rm 

grantees. SPON- 

been given the tv grant I. 






■oluran (when . 

t.c on leu In market- 






11 JANUARY 1954 



55 



Tv film shows recently made available for syndication 

Programs issued since August 1953. Complete list of available film in next issue's film section 

ill . . i, in:;: in u n . i;i ; mill : in niiiiniiiiiiiiiii I Mini I IDUUHMH :.,;!...::::...: ■ 1 1 1 1 ... I ■ ..::.: 1 1 ::. I H||aBaMaHBB|a| | 



Show name Syndicator Producer Length Price Range' No. in series Show name Syndicator Producer Length Price Range Nc 



ADVENTURE 



Adv»irtur» It My Lakeside Tv 

M 



Jungle Macabre Guild Film 



Hal H. Harrlion I2yj mln. open 

Radls & Tv IS min $50-400 

Packages Inc. 



CHILDREN'S 



Animal Tina Sterling Tv 

King C.lltt Kllng 

The Cinnamon Bear Fltz A Assoc. 

Terry and the Official Films 
Pirates 



Tim* far Beany Consolidated Tv Bob Clampett 
Sales 



Unci. Mistletoe Kllng 



Kllng 



ll'/j mln. $25-156 



COMEDY 



Oufly's Tavern 1 MPTv 

Father Knows Best" Screen Gems 

Lift with Elizabeth Guild 

My Hero Official Films 



Hal Roach Jr. 30 min. 

Cavalier 30 min. 

Guild 26': mln. on request 

Ed Beloln 30 min. 



DOCUMENTARY 



Wild Life la 

Action 



Wanders of the 
Wild 



Lakeside Tv 
Sterling Tv 



Lakeside Tv 12'/, min. $25-500 



Borden Prod. 15 min. 



13 
39 



Sterling Tv 


15 min. 


on request 


104 


Kllng 


12 mln. 


$22-142 


65 


Gllwln Prod. 


15 min. 


50% of Class B 


26 


Dougfalr Prod 


26 mln. 




30 



unlimited 



39 
25 
39 
39 



26 



MUSIC 



Oklahoma Chuck- Lakeside Tv 
wagon Boys 



Lewis & Clark I2'i mln. 



$25-500 



Opera & Ballet Lakeside Tv Transatlantic Tv lira mln. open 

Operettas & Ballets Hoffberg Prod. Hoffberg Prod. 13 mln. open 

Werner Janssen George Bagnall Janssen 15 mm. on request 

Series &. Assoc. 



NEWS 



Drew Pearson's 
Wa hlngton 
Mtrry-Go-Rounds 



Charles Curran 15 mln. 



Fulton Lewis Jr. a United Tv Pro- United Tv Pro- 12 mln. 
grams grains 



United Press- United Press 

Movietone Newt 



Muvletone News 30 min. 
15 mln. 



on request 



SPORTS 



Boxing from Kllng 

Rainbo 



Madison Square Du Mont 

Garden 



Kllng 



26'. ', mln. $40.50-675 



= The Referee 



Kllng 



Wlnlk Films 26' : mln. $55-500 

1 2' | min. 



Kllng 



TRAVEL 



DRAMA, MYSTERY 



Colonel March 


Official Films 


Panda Produc- 
tions 


26' 2 mln. 


on request 


Flash Gordon 


MPTv 


Inter- Continen- 
tal Tv 


30 mln. 




General Electric 


Stuart Reynolds 


Sovereign Prod. 


25 min. 


100% Class A 


Theatre 










Janet Dean. Regis- 


MPTv 


Cornwall Prod. 


30 min. 




tered Nurte 










On Stage with 


Dynamic Films. 


Dynamic Films. 


15 min. 


on request 


Monty Woolley 


Inc. 


Inc. 






Joe Palooka Story 


Guild 


Guild 


26' i min 


on request 


Pulae rf tha City 


Teleteena 


Telescene 


I2' 2 mln. 


$50-750 


Racket Squad 


ABC Film 
Syndication 


Hal Roach Jr. 


30 mln. 




Secret Chapter 


Guild Films 


Ron Ormond 


15 min. 


$50-400 


Sovereign Theatre 


Stuart Reynolds 


Sovereign Prod. 


26 min. 


100% Class A 


The Playhouses 


ABC Film 
Syndication 


Meridian Corp. 


30 mln. 




Your Star Showcase 


TPA 


Various 


30 mln. 


on request 



39 



'.'J 



26 
26 
98 

26 
26 
26 



Hawaiian Paradise George Bagnall Franklin 
& Assoc. 

Safari Sterling Tv Sterling Tv 

This Is Hawaii George Bagnall Franklin 

& Assoc. 



15 mln. 



on request 



15 mln. on request 

30 mln. on request 



= This World of Ours Sterling Tv 



Dudley Pictures ll'j mln. on request 



VARIETY 



Interviews of the Academy Fllmt Academy Fllmt 15 mln. $50-400 

Century 



Old American 
Barn Dance 



Kling Kllng 

Ray Forrest Show Sterling Tv Sterling Tv 



26' i mln $50-675 



30 min. 



WESTERN 



Annie Oakley- CBS Tv Film Annie Oakley 30 min. 

Prod. 



J 



Where price range is not given, it has not yet been fixed, or syndicator prcf:rs to give price only on request. -Canada Dry is sponsoring this film in 80 
markets semi-monthly. Separate series is available for local sponsors in these satic markets on alternate weeks. ''Available 8 January. 'Available early this year. 
Run originally under another title, now being re-rclcascd. 'Available early in April. SPONSOR invites all tv film indicators to send information on new films 



se 



SPONSOR 



Mary, Mary-quite UN-CONTRARY 



How to shoot it . . . show it . . . and be sure of it . . 
again — and again . . . 

Trained technicians — directors, cameramen, 
effects and laboratory men — have always been able 
to accomplish tremendous things with film. 
Today the tricks of their trades become more and more important. 
For the show on film is the show that "lives" to be shown 
without change, or quirks of temperament 
— day after day — on-and-off network. 

Difficult to film a show? No! It's easy 

economical, too — when you SAVE IT ... on 

Eastman Film. 



\ 



I 



4 



« 



VA 



I 







I 




IJ- 





For complete information write to: 

Motion Picture Film Department 
Eastman Kodak Company 
Rochester 4, N. Y. 



East Const Division Midwest Division Wost Coast Division 

342 Madison Ave. 137 North Wabash Avenue 6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 

New York 17, NY. Chicago 2, Illinois Hollywood 38, California 



Agents for Hie distribution and sale of Eastman Professional Motion Picture Film* 
W. J. German, Inc.: Fort Lee, N. J.; Chicago, III.; Hollywood, Cahf. 



100,000 watts . . . channel 3, Louisville 

• first in Kentucky 

• first in coverage 



Effective January 1, joins the select list of 
great television stations nationally represented by 




TVBGl SPOT SALES 



30 RockrMlrr Plata, .V. .<• York tO, N. V. 

Chicago Detroit Cleveland Washington San Francisco 

I. us Anijihs Charlotte' Atlanta' 'Bomor LurnmiK Aiiomln 






The One 

Best Radio Buy 

in Kentucky 




mm 



■ 



Louisville 



5,000 watts 



Effective January 1, joins the distinguished list 
of leading radio stations nationally represented by 




B l ■ SPOT SALES 

l*^ km 30 Rockefeller Plaza, Xew York - . N. >'. 

Chicago Detroit Cleveland Washington San Frane\sco 
Los Angeles Charlotte' Atlanta' 'Bomar Lcmmct AttoeiaitM 



checklist 
for a busy 
film-buyer 

Seven keys to bigger TV 
audiences with such sales- 
making favorites as . . . 

] ABBOTT & COSTELLO SHOW 

52 sure-fire comedies that click with 
kids and grownups alike in millions of 
homes, made especially for TV. 

] BIFF BAKER, U.S. A. 

Overseas intrigue in a fast-moving 
family adventure series of highest 
network quality. 

I — I ROD CAMERON in 
1 — ' CITY DETECTIVE 
Recently rated as the country's #1 
local film for television — and sold to 
Falstaff Beer in 118 markets for the 
largest regional sale in TV film history. 

] FAMOUS PLAYHOUSE 

A super-assortment of over 175 criginal 
half-hour dramas with Hollywood 
names and sure sales appeal. 

] FOLLOW THAT MAN 

The exciting "Man Against Crime" films 
(34.6 network Nielsen average) 
starring Ralph Bellamy, retitled for 
first-run in many TV cuies. 

] I'M THE LAW 

Starring George Raft in the unique 
adventures of a metropolitan police 
inspector, packed with sales punch. 

] PLAYHOUSE 15 

78 fifteen-minute dramas of highest 
quality made for TV by the producer 
of BIG STORY and T-MEN IN ACTION. 

They ALL bear the same 
MCA-TV stamp of quality! 
For information, on these 
or other MCA-TV Advertising 
Showcases on Film, just clip 
this advertisement to 
your letterhead. 



o n 



A 
JJ 




At, 



Ill MM 









NEW YORK: 598 Madison Ave., PL 9-7500 
60 






There'll be less quantity, more 
quality in '.II syntlieatetl films 

/>Y Fred J. Mahlttrill. dirrrlar <>/ nprratii'ni. 
t BS ; I r i/". iaUi 

Iii ici ins of the film syndication in- 
dustr) as a whole, the important things 
to look for in the coming vear are the 
following: a decrease in the quantity 
of program production "stars" hut a 
verj pronounced improvement in terms 
,,l production quality; a clarification 
of standards for color film and a grad- 
ual approach to the filming of svndi- 
cation television programs in color: a 
. ontinuing upward trend in the num- 
ber of film programs used locally on 
television stations; an increasing reali- 
zation 1>\ main more advertisers of the 
real value of so-called second runs and 
a mu.h greater use of these repeat 
shows: more solid organizational set- 
ups on the part of the major film dis- 
ributors and far greater emphasis on 
ervice, merchandising and sales pro- 
motion. 

All in all. 1954 should be the vear 
in which film syndication as an indus- 
Irv finally emerges from its growing 
pains and gains its rightful place as an 
important segment of the fast growing 
and dramatic television business. And 
he real benefit of this emergence will 
be not only to the film distributors and 
producers but even more importantlv. 
to the advertisers, agencies, television 
stations and the viewing audience. 

CBS TV Film Sales in L953 had its 
best year, saleswise. in its short and 
exciting historv. This resulted from 
I he combined effects of the Lifting ol 
the television station construction 
"freeze." a threefold sales staff in- 
i rease, and the addition of four major 
film properties: Amos V Andy. Art 
Linkletter and the kid*. Gloria Swan- 
son's Crown Theatre and Annie Oaldey 
to the previousl} existing catalog ol 
nine program scries. \ll present indi- 
i ations are thai this w ill be a short 
lived record and that 1954 will far ex- 

I eed the sales mark (balked up for 

1953. 

Plans are well along for expansion 



right down the line in terms oi in- 
creased -ale- -taff. new major film 
products and -tepped up sales promo- 
tion and merchandising. * * * 



SPONSOR survey slums tr films 
are u SI2ZM00M00 business 

For nearl) two month-. SPONSOB edi- 
tors have been gathering and sifting 
data of all types concerning the boom- 
ing I . v . t\ film industry. Special sur- 
veys have been conducted in which all 
of the leading Byndicators, prodi* 
and commercial film makers were con- 
tacted. Admen, clients and film buv- 
ers were interviewed. A tv film section. 
based on this research, will appear in 
the 25 Januarv issue. 

Here's a preview of the main trends 
unearthed by SPONSOR'S quizzing: 

• Size — Several of the smaller film 
companies have folded. Some, like 
I'nited TV Productions and Gross- 
Krasne. have merged. Generally speak- 
ing, the big firms — in both the com- 
mercial and program field — are get- 
ting bigger, sponsor's estimate for the 
1954 gross in the film industrv — all 
types— is $125,000,000 based on the 
combined forecasts of man) producers. 

• Color \nw that t\ broadcasters 
and set-builder- have the FCC's go- 
ahead in color tv. the film industry is 
ino\ ing from the realm of experimenta- 
tion in t\ color films into the realm of 
day-to-da) production. SPONSOR'S sur- 
veys show that as much as a third of 
the 1954 production of programs and 
commercials ma\ be shot in color, 
using principallv the still-new color 
stocks developed by Eastman Kodak. 

• Talent — Main a new star name is 
being developed via tv films, and main 
an established Hollywood st. r is seek- 
ing new lustre through the route of 
tv movies. More than ever before, 
-tars are becoming active participants 
in the financing and production of 
video movies. However, the SAG con- 
tracts — while causing a few well-estab- 
lished commercial personalities to net 
a lot of work — are tutting down dras- 
tically on the amount of experimenta- 
tion that film producers will do in 
1954 with new. untried talent. [*00 
expensive. 

• Renins Repeat film -bow- have 
definitelv established themselves as an 

important factor in 1954 tv program 

plan-. Typical: On a summer rerun 
of Dragnet films. Mel-en < al ulates 
that 45.it'; of people who watched the 
second showing had also seen the first. 

• • * 



SPONSOR 







102,200 FAMILIES IN OAK HILL, W. VA.?>? 



NO, NOT IN OAK HILL, 

BUT IN WOAY'S DAYTIME AUDIENCE! 



YOURS FOR ONLY $2 7.60/ 



'/i-bour, 26-thnt ran- 





STATION 


COVERAGE DETAIL BY 


NCS AREAS 






Total 

Radio Homes 

in Area 


STATE 

NCS Area 

County 


No. of 
Counties 


DAYTIME 


4-Week Cum. 


Weekly 


Averac 


e Day 


NCS Circ. 


%* 


NCS Circ. 


%* 


NCS Circ. 


%* 




WEST VIRGINIA 
















20,370 


FAYETTE 


1 


18,490 


90 


18,220 


89 


10,150 


49 


18,190 


GREENBRIER 
MONROE 
SUMMERS 


3 


15,490 


85 


15,130 


83 


6,720 


36 


66,940 


KANAWHA 


1 


10,310 


15 


7,180 


10 


4,410 


06 


14,570 


LEWIS 
BRAXTON 
DODDRIDGE 
GILMER 


4 


3,110 


21 


2,280 


15 


1,680 


11 


18,260 


LOGAN 


1 


2,780 


15 


1,960 


10 


1,020 


05 


19,440 


MERCER 


1 


8,000 


41 


6,480 


33 


3,990 


20 


14,290 


NICHOLAS 
CLAY 
WEBSTER 


3 


11,450 


80 


11,080 


77 


6,620 


46 


23,930 


RALEIGH 


1 


20,220 


84 


19,610 


81 


8,540 


35 


12,290 


ROANE 
CALHOUN 
JACKSON 
WIRT 


4 


2,720 


22 


1,990 


16 


1,460 


11 


16,750 


WYOMING 
BOONE 


2 


9,630 


57 


8,610 


51 


6,730 


40 


225.030 


10 TOTAL 


21 


102,200 




"2 540 




51 320 





* — % of Radio Homes in Area 



IF WOAY could offer you nothing more 
than "Metropolitan Oak Hill", we'd harclh 
bother you with details! But do you know 

of any other 5000-watt daytime station that 
delivers so many loyal listeners for so little 
money — 102,200 daytime families for a 
mere $21.60 per quarter hour! ? ! 

We don't even have a representative — but 

even so, our national business is growing 
b\ leaps and bounds. Let us give you 
the WOAY story, including availabilities. 

Address: Robert R. Thomas, Jr., Manager, at: 

WOAY 

OAK HILL, WEST VIRGINIA 

10,000 Watts AM 
20,000 Watts FM 





• j y q-jyig.j* g 



HI FI DO 

WE prepared ourselves foi a New Experience. The host 
revved up his test equipment, ducked roll-off, measured 
gram pressure ol stylus, interpreted the cathode-ray oscillo 
scope and various voltmeters, ohmeters, and a wave-distortion 
analyzer. The tweeters, the middles, the woofers had iheii 
impedance matched and re-matched in tin- crossover network; 
the aii in the speaker-array's baffle was vacuum cleaned, 
the needle brushed, the record brushed, the strobe disk read 
for turntable speed. All was ready. The house lights dimmed 
(and win not, with all that load?) . The guests, a little dim 
themselves alter an hour of preparation, settled back among 
the wires, coils, tubes and tools for a sound experience of in- 
effable pleasure. The needle found the groove, there was an 
expe< lain hush . . . 

The dog started howling. 

Oui host was playing his favorite record — at the equip 
ment's maximum 20 watts. It was a frequency test record. 
audible in part only to canines. 

# # » 

Today's hi-fi aficionados resemble radio fans of the early 
20's, tearing down, rebuilding, getting neurotic about real or 
imagined hook-up imperfections, often losing sight of the 
purpose ol all the fooling around — the enjoyment ol sound. 

What's this got to do with W.M I ? It lias to be dragged in 
In the tail, but this is what it has to do with WMT. We have 
a lot of fancy equipment, a lot of power (5,000 watts AM. 
100,000 watts TV) but our eye is on the target: building 
audiences that buy our sponsors' products. 

The Rat/ Agencj will supply hi-fi proof. 



WMT and WMT TV 



CBS loi Eastern Iowa 

Mail Address: < edai Rapids 



ionall) bj / fir Katz in ". v 



N i ghttime 11 January 1954 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY | THURSDAY 



N i ghttime 1 1 January 

FRI DAY 




W. VA. & OHIO WERE 
"S(NO)W— MAN'S 
LAND . . 




. . . BUT NOW THEY BELONG TO 

WTRF-TV! 

Yes, since October 24 "snow" is a thing of the post in the rich tri-stote area 
including W. Va. & Ohio. CHANNEL 7 now brings the finest of local programming 
and the top NBC and A8C shows to the "television-fringe" fri-state area CHAN- 
NEL 7 serves almost three million buyers in West Virginia. Ohio, and Pennsylvania 
... and reaches 20 cities of more thon 10.000 population within its rich primary 

48th U.S. MARKET . . . plus 

A RICH . . . BUZZING . . . BOOMING PRIMARY AREA 
With 445,192 VHF Sets 



Primary Affiliate NBC 

SECONDARY ABC 



WTRF-TV 



CHANNEL 



7 



FIRST STATION IN W. VA.'s FIRST MARKET 
WHEELING. WEST VIRGINIA 



Steubenville, Ohic 



Martins Ferry, Bella, re Ohic 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: GEORGE P HOLLINGBERY CO 
New York Chicago Atlonto Los Angeles San Fi 




FEATURING 

35mm THREE CHANNEL 

INTERLOCK PROJECTION 

and 35mm 

TAPE INTERLOCK 



MOVIELAB FILM LABORATORIES, INC 



619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N. V 





IN SAN FRANCISCO TELEVISION 



HIGH KRON-TV, since February 14, 1953 has operated at 
HIGHEST legal power on its favorable Channel 4. 

HIGH KRON-TV telecasts from the HIGHEST antenna in the 
San Francisco-Oakland area. 

HIGH KRON-TV led all Bay Area stations with HIGHEST aver- 
age quarter-hour ratings during KRON-TV's telecast- 
ing periods, according to October 1953 Telepulse. 

HIGH KRON-TV programs — NBC Network Local and Syndi- 
cated are HIGHEST in October Telepulse ratings. Ten 
of the "Top Fifteen" are KRON-TV features, double 
the other two stations combined. 

LOW KRON-TV, Channel 4, operates on the LOWEST fre- 
quency in the Bay Area — insuring a stronger signal over 
a greater area. 

LOW It all adds up to the fact that KRON-TV gives the adver- 
tiser the LOWEST overage cost per results. 




SAN FRANCISCO H-i 

FREE £ PETERS, INC. • Nolional Representatives 



11 IANUARY 1954 



69 



LAWN GUIDE 



APPLIANCES 



SPON^iK Seaboard Lawn Guide AGENCY: Gauge Vaeociate* 
( UPS1 II I W HISTORY: The sponsor offered, as a 
giveaway, the "Seaboard Lawn Guide." One announce' 

merit mer nine rtn/io stations in mill around Philadelphia 

was aired, with the best results according to the sponsor 

— coming from ttl.Al. The single It CAT announce- 
ment, a participation announcement during The Green 
Thumb Club program, pulled in 532 requests for the 
Utum guide, or 233' i more than the next station. Cost of 

the participation last fall was 145. 



\\( \l . Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: The Green Thumb Club 





SPONSOR: Sears, Roebuck & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: The Albuquerque Sears 
store had a large stock of trade-in appliances in its ware- 
house last fail. The appliances — electric refrigerators, 
ranges, vacuum cleaners and other devices — had been 
traded in for netv appliances. The store bought 10 spots 
in Spanish-only on KABQ; four between 8:00 and 9:00 
p.m. on 26 October, and six between 5:00 and 6:00 a.m. 
on 27 October. The total cost was $50 — which, within 48 
hours, sold $2,500 worth of reconditioned appliances. 

KABQ, Albuquerque PROGRAM: Announcements 



FLOOR WAX 



results 



SPONSOR: S. C. Johnson & Son AGENCY: Needham, Louis 

& Brorby, Inc. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The first year that S. C. 
Johnson & Son. advertised over CHUB, using 10 an- 
nouncements per week, business showed a 38 f '< increase. 
During the past five months, using the same continuous 
advertising schedule of 10 announcements per week, the 
increase has amounted to another 14.6 %. For a total 
advertising cost of about S950 during the five-month 
period, the sponsor s sales have totalled about $60,000. 



CHUB, Nanaimo 



PROGRAMS: Breakfast Book 
Music for Milady 



MAIL ORDER STORE 



HOUSES 



SPONSOR: Sears, Roebuck 8 Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASK HISTORY: The Greenville Sears store 
bought seven announcements on one day in order to get 
local housewives to request a free Christmas catalogue. 
More than 1.300 people called the Sears store, extra tele- 
phone operators had to be put into service and 13 lines 
into the local store were tied up throughout the day, the 
store reported. Cost of the seven pre-Christmas announce- 
ments u as 129.75. The Sears outlet said results were 
tu ice as good as those obtained from the use of three 
other media. 



SPONSOR: W. H. Tolson & 
Associates 



AGENCY: Arc Advertising 
Agency 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: With nine homes of a south- 
east Los Angeles housing development remaining to be 
sold, the sponsor bought two \5-minute segments of 
Chico's Saturday morning program, which is beamed to 
the English speaking Mexican-American market of Los 
Angeles. The following Monday, the agency notified 
KOWL that all the homes had been sold as a direct result 
of the radio advertising I no other advertising was used). 
Total cost of the two segments on the program was $60. 



\\ ESC, ' rreenville 



PRO( . H \ M : \nnouncements 



KOWL. Santa Monica 



PROGRAM: Chico 



AUTOMOBILES 




-I'nN-ni; i entral ' hevn 



VGEN< 'i : Direct 



I VPSUU < \Sl HISTORY: To headline the unveiling 
of the L953 Chevrolet cars la^t year, the sponsor bought 

a 11,000 saturation program on it (, \H. The program 
featured Bill Mayer, it G IR's morning man. originating 
a 2' 2-nour program from the auto slum rooms. it hen 

In persons out oj a crowd of 5,000 persons — all drawn 
to the auto showrooms through Miner's broadcast — 
bought neu cars, the dealer bought more time on If (, [R 

tor the next day. The next day, another lo units were 
sold. Total cost of the special programs which resulted 

in the sale of I '.I I neu cars lias less than $1,300. 



WGAR I l.wland 



PRO(.K\M: Special broad. 



SPONSOR: ' rump Vuto Home supply AGENCY: Direct 

I \PM I 1. < VSE HISTORY : A few weeks ago the spon- 
sor purchased the 1 :00 to 1 :30 p.m. Saturday portion of 
WDIA's schedule. The aim: to reach a \egro audience 
with sales massages on Raytheon tv sets, titer two weeks, 
the advertiser reported a gross sales increase of s2.ni 1 " 
on weekends alone. On one Saturday the sponsor sched- 
uled six one-minute announcements between 7:00 and 
1:00 p.m. At the end of the day. the sponsor tallied up a 
$500 increase in Kelvinator sales which he credits specifi- 
cally to the radio advertising. He says he got $2,500 
worth of weekend business for $77.10 invested. 

WDIA, Memphis PROGRAM: Cool Train 

Announcements 



RADIO KING 

carries more national spots 

than other two leading Seattle 

network stations combined* 



Radio KING leads Network Station A 
by 102% in Total National Spots 



Radio KING leads Network Station B 
by 157% in Total National Spots 



RADIO KING also 
wins with local spot advertisers 



Radio KING leads Network Station A 
by 59% in Total Local Spots 



Radio KING leads Network Station B 
by 68% in Total Local Spots 



*Based on independent monitoring of Seattle's top three network stations, week of October 25-31 




Radio KING ffZW. 50,000 Watts - ABC Seattle 



LEADING NATIONAL AGENCIES- 



N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc., New York 

Young & Rubicam, Inc., New York 

Young & Rubicam, Inc., Chicago 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc., New York 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc., Detroit 

Needham, Louis & Brorby, Inc., Chicago 

John F. Murray Advertising, New York 

Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago 

Foote, Cone & Belding, tos Angeles 

Harvey-Massengale Co., Inc., Atlanta 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., New York 

Gardner Advertising Agency, St. Louis 

Erwin, Wasey & Co., Inc., New York 

Erwin, Wosey & Co., Inc., Los Angeles 

Compton Advertising, Inc., New York 

Campbell-Ewald Company, Detroit 

Pollyea, Inc., Terre Haute, Indiana 

The Biow Company, San Francisco 

Street & Finney, Inc., New York 

Sidney Garfield and Associates, San Francisco 

Leo Burnett Co., Inc., Chicago 

Doherty, Clifford, Steare & Shenfield, Inc., New York 

H. B. Cohen Advertising Co., Inc., New York 

Badger and Browning & Parcher, Inc., Boston 



Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc., New York 

Sherman & Marquette, Inc., New York 

Ted Botes 8. Co., New York 

J. Walter Thompson Company, New York 

Donahue & Coe, Int., New York 

Byron H. Brown & Staff, Los Angeles 

The Nealey Associates, New York 

Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc., New York 

Cunningham & Walsh, Inc., New York 

Storm & Klein, Inc., New York 

Benton & Bowles, Inc., New York 

Raster, Farrell, Chesley & Clifford, New York 

W. B. Doner & Co., Chicago 

William Esty Co., Inc., New York 

Lynn Baker, Inc., New York 

Dan B. Miner Company, Los Angeles 

Rockett-Louritien Company, Los Angeles 

Campbell Mithun, Inc., Chicago 

McCann-Erickson, Inc., Chicago 

Raymond R. Morgan Compony, Hollywood 

Morse International, Inc., New York 

Knollin Advertising Agency, San Francisco 

Geyer Advertising, Inc., New York 



JOHN 






BLAIR 


| National Representatives 


t ttmnn. 














rLMti nu i nc3c i \J " m v v 




ALL Detergent 


Cangendorf Bakery Products 


Ana tin 


Life Magazine 


Armour's Star Franks and Sausage 


Lipton Soup 


B. C. Headache Remedy 


Liquid Lux 


Bayer Aspirin 


Monischewitr 


Bromo Quinine and 


Manning's Coffee 


4-Woy Cold Tablets 


MGM Pictures 


Carnation Evaporated Milk 


■ Rub 


Instant Chase & Sanborn Coffee 


Musterole 


Chevrolet Trucks 


Nosh Automobiles 


Clabber Girl Baking Powder 


M*-> i Old Sp.ce 


Co-ets 


Pall Mall Cigarettes 


Delrich Margarine 


Cosmetics, Perfumei and Tintex 


Denntson's Food Products 


Pepto-Biimol 


DeSoto Motor Cars 


Doctor Pierces Golden 


Doan's Pills 


Medicol Discovery 


Vano Dura Starch 


Prestone 


Durkee Margarine 


Purex Liquid Bleach 


Feen-a-mint and Chooi 


Puss-n Boots Cot Food 


"Key Word" Game 


Bu-toy Raindrops 


Glamorene Carpet Cleaner 


Skippy Pet Food 


Halo and Vel 


Snowy Bleach 


Hills Bros. Coffee 


SOS Magic Scouring Pads 


Jack & Jill Cat Food 


Thoro Fed and (Col Kan 


Swonsdown Cake Mixes 


Va-tra-«ol, Voporub, 


Jello 


Vick's Cough Syrup 


Kool C 


garettes 


Wadroof Cream-Oil 



11 JANUARY 1954 



71 



WTVP 

CHANNEL 17 
. DECATUR, ILLINOIS + 



SOLID COVERAGE 
IN THE HEART OF 




PROSPEROUS 
CENTRAL ILLINOIS 



WTVP 

CHANNEL 17 
DECATUR, ILLINOIS u 



DELIVERS ONE OF THE 

FASTEST GROWING 
MARKETS IN AMERICA 

SELL IN... 

THE MARKET THAT 
MARKETING FIGURES 
CAN'T KEEP UP WITH! 



WTVP 

CHANNEL 17 
DECATUR, ILLINOIS . 



National Representative George W. Clark, Inc. 




[Continued from page L4) 

these examples of fun-selling are not copyw j i t«-i composed bul 

are the works of the very same talent which prepares the rest 
of the show. 

However, one only has to turn his television set on and pa) 
attention to the roster of chainbreaks and station identifica- 
tions that roll hy during the course of a few hours to sample 
the humor that is agency prepared these days. 

Some of the subjects which are treated with the so-called 
light touch, are as out of place as I would be in the Vassar 
locker room between chuckers. One tooth paste laugh fe-t I 
witnessed set me to thinking about a trip I'd made to the 
dentist the other day. He greeted me with the fact- about the 
number of cavities I'd have to waste scads of time and money 
on and as he started drilling into one. I got to thinking about 
what 1 might have done to him if he had presented the news 
to me by singing a cute little jingle and winking. That— how 
this tooth paste told its story. 

The quality of the animation that passes for amu-ement 
these days is not improving either. In fact, since agencies have 
discovered how to save money by cheating in animation (as 
well as by cheating in the selection of the people to whom 
they assign their animation), this techni pie oi visual presen- 
tation has taken a step backward. This is a shame because the 
large screen folks have moved animation decidedly forward 
from a rather cornball "out-of-the-inkwell" school into what 
might even be deemed a modern art form ( I refer to such 
wonderful styles as were seen in Gerald McBoing-Boing and 
the art transitions in The Four Poster, etc.). 

I also recall, with not much relish, a series oi car service 
spots that clutter up the medium. If any form of human en- 
deavor needs to be given prestige and provide the public 
with a feeling of security, honesty and reliability. I'd say car 
repairs are it. Ma\l e having fun with the subject is the way 
to build this feeling in the minds of a dubious populace. Rut 
I strongly doubt it. In fact. I'd go so far as to say that this 
approach will serve to confirm the worst suspicions of car 
owner- everywhere. 

Mill before you gel the idea that Tin iu-t an old -our puss, 
let me hasten to assure you Tin one ot the original fun loving 
kid- whom \ou"ll find vokking it up even chance I get. It's 
ju-t that I like my humor where I expect to find it and well 
done at that. • • • 



11 



SPONSOR 




POWER HEARING gives your advertising dollars a whopper 
of a Hooper because your sales messages can reach out and attract all 
of the vast Mountain West. However, to cover this rich 
Mountain West market — and cover it best — you'll want to use the 
one station that commands one-third of the entire listening audience 
throughout the 58-county Salt Lake Wholesale Distribution area. 
KSL Radio, and only KSL Radio, dominates so large an audience 
in the Mountain West: 232,430 families during the week daytime 
(more than the next two stations combined), and 
327,050 families during the week at night (42,000 more than 
the next four stations combined). 

Use Power Hearing to steer ^Vrn i riOn 

customers to your product. Contact your 
nearest CBS Radio Spot Salesman today. ^Qi 116 

JVlourrtain 

West3est 

Power Hearing, sometimes called Radio, is 
optional equipment available at no extra cost in homes 
and cars. 98% of all homes, and 92.4% of a" 
postwar cars are so equipped. 

Source: Ntelsen Coveroge Service, 8AB, Hooperaring. 




SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
11 JANUARY 1954 



CBS Radio Network . . . 50,000 Watts . . Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sale? 



73 




a forum on questions of current inter**! 
to air advertisers and their fi<j<>iu-i<>* 



II hut clicf llic* IVetc York n c» ir .vp« per strike teueh 
i/oii about tlepurttnent stove use of rcicfio find (r 




Mr. Fleischl 



I he great lesson 

in come out of 
the newspaper 
strike is Bimply 
the re-affirmation 
nf an old sti>r\ : 
"Business is not 
dependent on any 
one medium. 
Ncicssit) still be- 
ing the mother of 
invention, many 
a "newspaper-only" department store 
executive turned to radio during the 
publishers' blackout, and learned this 
great lesson in the course of doing so. 
In the words of one major depart- 
ment store: "Generally we shun testi- 
monials, but we cannot permit tradi- 
tion to restrain us from telling you 
that results to many of our item offer- 
ings over the airwaves were most grati- 
fying." 

A second leading store is consider- 
ing a 52-week campaign to supplement 
newspapers, while still another is plan- 
ning to use radio for specific store 
sales. 

Equally interesting were the figures 
released by the Federal Reserve Bank 
of Y ^ .. showing that during the week 
immediately preceding the strike de- 
partment store sales were down ~'< 
against the corresponding week of 
1952. Week of the -trike (November 
30th— December 5th i they were down 
while week of December 6th — De- 
« ember 12th they were down 10 
The strike was ovei December 8th! 

Radio's success in proving itself a 
valuable medium For direct traceable 
sales durin" the strike was achieved in 
spite of the fact that : 

1. It \\a~ used in a last minute 
"desperation" operation, and 

2. It was an uncertain, unplanned 
da\ -io-da\ measure, bo thai 

3. A- a result main buys were made 



indiscriminate!) as inone\ became 
available, and 

4. Untested, unchecked cop\ was 
tossed at broadcasters often just min- 
utes before airtime. 

All this on an expenditure of ap- 
proximatel) 25'; of the normal depart- 
ment store budget for the period. 
Imagine what a little planning and a 
set budget could have done! 

It is interesting, too, to note that 
people didn't bu\ radio-advertised mer- 
chandise because the newspaper strike 
drove them to radio as a temporary 
substitute. A study of the Pulse of 
New York for the period December 1st 
thru December 7th, 1953 will show ex- 
actly the same percentage of sets-in- 
use as were tuned in for the corre- 
sponding week in 1952 when the news- 
papers were going full-blast. This was 
not a period of "emergency listening" 
or "emergency buying." This was just 
radio acting like its normal effective 
self. The enterprising, imaginative de- 
partment store executive has learned 
all this, and will use radio as a power- 
ful adjunct to his usual advertising. 
M. M. Fleischl 

Vice President-General Manager 
WMCA, New York 



It confirmed my 
opinion that de- 
partment stores 
are dead on their 
feet in the use of 
these two impor- 
tant media. It 
strengthened my 
observation that. 
outside Bernice 
Fitzgibbons and 
one or two oth- 
ers, advertising managers and pub- 
li< it\ director have little or nothing to 
sai about their ad budgets. 




Mr. Mirel 



A department store is so set up that 
the merchandise managers are the 
most powerful people within its frame- 
work. Following them are the divi- 
sional merchandise men and then the 
buyers. The feeling of these intrepid 
merchandise men is that they know 
more about even thing — including ad- 
vertising — than any heads-in-the-clouds 
advertising men. They change head- 
lines, rewrite copy, insist on layouts 
being made their way — and, of course 
— they know (according to them I — 
what media are best. 

And they get their way 90^c of the 
time. Why? Because they — the buy- 
ers and merchandise men — have the 
direct responsibility I they claim) for 
the volume of sales and for the profit 
of their departments. It is traditional 
in department stores that if the ad pulls 
its the merchandise. If sales are down 
it's the lousy ads. 

What do the poor advertising men 
do? 

Some of the braver and younger 
souls fight it — for a while — while their 
bicarb of soda and their nembutal pills 
hold out. But inevitably — and this is 
heartbreaking to see — they give in and 
concede that the assistant buyer in 
linens knows more about headlines, 
copy and media than they do. 

So the first reason is this: Merchan- 
dise men dominate in stores: they con- 
trol media selection: they know noth- 
ing about radio and tv; ergo no use of 
these media. 

Second reason: Tv stations and ra- 
dio people either do not understand 
the retailer's problems, or refuse to 
do business on the local level when 
thej can net national accounts. Ex- 
ample: During the recent strike. I 
called all the t\ stations for an account 
of mine. Onl\ one. \\ AJBD, made a 
determined effort to provide us with 
an availability and programing that 






74 



SPONSOR 



was intelligent. The others made the 
same tired pitch they ordinarily do. 
Of course, no sale. 

Third reason: Fear of the unknown. 
Everybody knows newspapers (so they 
claim). When a newspaper ad fails, 
as happens often, there are a million 
exuses including the traditional one 
quoted above. And after the excuses, 
bingo — right back to the very same 
newspapers. Millions of dollars a year 
are spent newspaperwise — and some 
say too much. But let the store run a 
few spots without direct returns and 
everybody and his brother roundly 
condemns the air waves. 

To sum up: Department stores 
learned nothing from the strike — nor 
will they until a few constructive things 
happen — as follows: 

1. Instruct the merchandise mana- 
gers first. This can be done since they 
have a better than average intelligence 
(some are even as smart as their ad- 
vertising men). By preparing and pre- 
senting factual data, without exaggera- 
tion or nonsense, these men can be 
won over. They need sales and volume 
too. 

2. The stations need to hire com- 
petent department store men to teach 
them the tangible and intangible prob- 
lems of the retailer. In this instance 
the man, the right man, is vitally im- 
portant. He serves as the connecting 
link between the two. He must be will- 
ing to set up a goal and fight for it, in 
spite of the many disappointments and 
early failures. He must work closely 
with the store people and translate 
their best-seller items into the proper 
presentation for radio and tv. He must 
not be easily discouraged. He cannot 
be a Madison Avenue boy nor an 
"idea" man alone: He must have a 
good appreciation of the store's prob- 
lems, be a good enough merchant to 
discuss inventory, markup and mer- 
chandise trends with the merchants, 
and a conscientious advertising crafts- 
man who is willing to try many dif- 
ferent techniques to snare the elusive 
customer's buck. 

3. We must all of us — merchandise 
people, radio and tv people and ad- 
vertising people — we must all admit 
that so far we have failed in pooling 
our talents and using them most ef- 
fectively. We should get together and 
begin from scratch to use the most ef- 
fective advertising tools available, to 
help sell in a competitive market. 

And last, but certainly not least, 
{Please turn to page 97) 

11 JANUARY 1954 




1,749,245 
PEOPLE 



IN THE SOUTHEAST 



Channel 4 



WFBC-TY 

Greenville, S. C. 



Maximum Power 

Began Operations Jan. 1, 

1954 



SERVING 60 COUNTIES 
IN S.C., N.C., TENN., & GA. 



LARGEST TV COVERAGE 
BY FAR IN S.CAROLINA 



135,480 TV SETS WITHIN 
WFBC-TV COVERAGE AREA 



RANKS WITH ATLANTA. 
MIAMI, JACKSONVILLE, 
NEW ORLEANS 




HERE'S THE WFBC-TV MARKET 
POPULATION 1,749,245 People 

INCOME $1,892,961,000. 

RETAIL SALES $1,187,300,000. 

AREA SERVED 20,106 Squore Miles 



Market Data from Solei Management 
Survey of Buying Power, May 10, 1953 



Most of these rich industrial counties had 
oniy "fringe area" TV reception or none 
at all until the advent of WFBC-TV. 

WFBC-TV has far more TV Homes, Popu 
lation, Income, and Retail Sales in its 
market than any other television station 
in South Carolina. 

Most of these sets have low-band anten- 
nas, tuned for VHF reception. Ideal for 
WFBC-TV (Channel 4) VHF station 

Outranking several of the former leaders, 
the WFBC-TV Market is truly a great 
new TV empire in the Southeast. 



Write now for Rote Cord and Market Data 
Brochure. Ask us or our Representatives for 
information and assistance. 

HIGHEST] VHF ANTENNA IN THE TWO CAROUNAS 



Channel 4 



1204 FEET ABOVE SURROUNDING TERRAIN 



National Representatives 

WEED TELEVISION CORP. 

501 Madison Ave. New York 22 



WFBC-TV 

Greenville, S. C. 



NBC NETWORK 



75 




Crete «>» IT needed to produce Pull .Hull color coiiiitiprcicif 



Now that < oloi t\ i- underway, in 
earnest, ii is interesting to uotifi the cast 
needed b) Pal] Mall a feu weeks ago 
to produce one one-minute color t\ 
i igarette commercial: 

Seven people to build the set (de- 
Bcribed as a "rich, elegant ballroom ' 
which took three days to construct I 
and to tailor the costumes; two hair- 
dressers; three makeup men ; one ward- 
robe woman: two wardrobe men: two 
comeramen; two assistant cameramen; 
seven carpenters; three scenic artists: 



three property men: the production 
< rew men. and eight actors (featuring 
Vlice Wallace and Bennett Grant with 
narration bj Ernest Chappell). 

Shooting started at 10:00 in the 
morning and was finished at 6:00 p.m., 
with 3,000 feet of black and white and 
~>.<iii() feet of color film being shot. 

Production was handled bv Peter 
Elgar Productions, Inc., for Film Coun- 
sellors on behalf of Pall Malls agency, 
Sullivan. Stauffer, Colwell & Bavles. 
New York. * * * 



Sharp increase noted in comedies, plays on netivorks 



A sharp upswing in network tv and 
radio situation comedies and dramatic 
plays is disclosed in the current Radio- 
Tv F actuary, published by Executives 
Radio-Tv Sen ice, Larchmont, N. Y. 

The F actuary Indicates there are 63 
sponsored dramatic programs on tv. 
Situation comedies jumped numerical- 
ly from six to 21. dramatic plays from 
16 to 22; mystery-detective dramas 
are about the same — 14 this year. 15 
last. There are six juvenile and West- 
ern dramas on tv's list. 

In radio situation comedies rose 

Color tv test devised 
for packaged goods 

\ '"-< reen test" for packages which 
might be making a debut on color tele- 
vision has been set up by Cascade Pic- 
tures of California. Culver Citv. 

The company will take test shots of 
an advertiser's package using various 
types of color film negatives suitable 
for color tv transmission. Packages 
are photographed under various light- 
ing combinations, against different 
complementary, color ba< kgrounds and 
from all angle-. Foi companies adver- 
tising more than one product, pack- 
age- are tested singly, and in a group. 

When changes in packaging design 
are indicated, the proposed new pack- 
age is again tested, both in color and 
black and white to assure maximum 
effectiveness over both systems. * * * 



from five last year to 11 this year, 
and dramatic plays rose from nine to 
13. Mystery-detective dramas, how- 
ever, dropped from 12 last year to 
nine this year. Juvenile and Western 
dramas this year total the same as 
last year: seven. 

The Factuary shows that food and 
food products firms are the most ac- 
tive in network sponsorship, with 32 
such firms on the tv networks. 24 on 
radio networks. 

Radio leads among sponsors of cer- 
tain classifications. There are 13 drug 
and drug product firms with network 
radio programs; only 12 drug firms 
use network tv. There are 11 religious 
groups on network radio, only one on 
network tv. Four insurance companies 
use network radio, only two use net- 
work tv, and five gasoline or lubricant 
producers use radio compared with 
two on network tv. * * * 

II If O promotion piece 
features moving wheel 

Value of covering the entire state 
of Iowa in advertising plans is pointed 
out in a promotion device recently 
mailed to advertisers and agencies 1>\ 
WHO. Des Moines. 

The user, bj turning a wheel, can 
see chart- and figures which show the 
percentage of -ales of various products 
which are made within metropolitan 
areas, and the percentage of sales made 



throughout '"the rest of Iowa." 

The \\ HO device shows that more 
than G5 r \ of food sales, for example, 
are made in ''the rest of Iowa." corn- 



Buy WHO and Get 

Iowa's Metropolitan Areas.. 

~ .,, the REMAINDER 




of IOWA! 



* 




Turning the wheel brings up facts, figures 

pared with Iowa's largest city which 

accounts for less than 11% of the total. 

WHO claims coverage of the whole 

state, as well as the largest audience 



of 



anv 



medi 



* * • 



Briefly . . . 

Phil Da\ is. whose Phil Davis Musi- 
cal Enterprises. Inc.. has written radio 
and tv jingles that are said to have 
reached as large an audience as many 
popular records, has entered the pop- 
ular music field with records featur- 
ing music and lyrics — but no commer- 
cials. Davis' new record company sub- 
sidiarv. Pavis Records, released its first 
offering last month: "That's What a 
Girl Appreciates" and "Whenever I'm 
Near You." As an independent record 
firm, the company plans to build up a 
stable of vocalists and composers as 
well as featuring some of its own origi- 
nals, according to the company. 

• • • 

WNEW, New York, interviewed "lit- 
erallv hundreds" of applicants before 
selecting the new m.c. of the station's 
Make Believe Ballroom — and then de- 
cided on the station's own Jerry Mar- 
shall who has conducted Music Hall 
for the past seven years. On 1 Jan- 
uarv. Mar-hall replaced Martin Block, 
who left WNEW to join ABC. 

• • • 

During 1953. about 130 tv station- 
in 7 ( > cities were added to the Bell 
Telephone System's nationwide net- 
work of tv facilities. A spokesman for 



76 



SPONSOR 



AT&T told sponsor that during the 
past year, the number of stations add- 
ed to the tv system was double that of 
all previous years. At the end of 1952, 
there were 114 stations in 71 cities con- 
nected with the Bell tv system. Total 
stations now connected with Bell's tv 
facilities is about 244, with the sta- 
tions in about 150 cities. 



"The Kansas Radio-Television Audi- 
ence of 1953," a study by F. L. Whan 
of Kansas State College, is being sent 
to agencies by WIBW, Topeka. At- 
tractively bound and printed, the 62- 
page report covers not only various 
types of listening breakdowns among 
the various Kansas stations, but also 
compares air media with other media. 
The report, in three major sections, 
consists of charts and graphs for quick 
comparisons, results of the survey in 
complete detail and an appendix dis- 
cussing the techniques used by Dr. 
Whan in the study and other informa- 
tion. 

* * * 

Among significant findings in the 
Whan study of Kansas radio and tv 
audiences (see above) are these: 
98.3^ of Kansas homes have radio 
sets; 14.6% have tv sets, of which 
11.5% are in farm homes, 15.3% in 
village homes and 16.4% in urban 
homes; 61.2% of Kansas cars are ra- 
dio-equipped, and the radio is turned 
on 71% of the time by women when 
driving and 74.4%) of the time by men 
when driving; time spent with radio by 
women during the day averages 189 
minutes daily, with tv, 33 minutes, 
reading a newspaper, 38 minutes and 
reading a magazine, 25 minutes; men 
listen to the radio 146 minutes on an 
average day, watch tv 25 minutes, 
spend 41 minutes reading a newspaper 
and 21 minutes reading a magazine. 

* * *• 

Revenue of WOV, New York, was 
up 31% this year over the same pe- 
riod a year ago, Joseph N. Curl, sales 
manager, disclosed recently. The rev- 
enue increase was figured before New 
York's newspaper strike, which brought 
the station still more business. WOV 
has a single-rate policy, the same for 
both local and national advertisers, 
both day and evening. The outlet di- 
vides its broadcast day between Eng- 
lish and Italian, with the English por- 
tions beamed primarily toward the 
Negro market. * * * 




11 JANUARY 1954 



77 



CIO ON RADIO 

< Continued from page 35) 

supporting worthy campaigns and 
pointing up (-10 contributions to same. 
Appeal- f<>r Communit) Chest, I nited 
Fund, veterans' causes are common. 

1. I iewpoint commercials, telling 
how the CIO look- at various issues. 

5. Amalgamated Clothing Workers' 
commercials. This union has a secon- 
der) sponsorship on the program, pre- 
sents five commercials in each two- 
week period. These pitches tell what 
the Vmalgamated label stands for. and 
how trade unions serve the communit) 
generall) . 

All commercials are delivered by an- 
nouncer Frank Harden. 

Planning for the program began 
earlv in L953 after President Reuther 
instructed the CIO Publicity Depart- 
ment to develop a national public re- 
lations program. Many conferences 
with CIO and advertising groups pro- 
duced sentiment in favor of a daily 
radio new- broadcast and a less fre- 
quent t\ program. To determine more 
specifically what type of program and 
commentator would be best as well as 
the general public relations approach, 



Reuther appointed a special committee 
of publicity experts from the various 
unions headed by the CIO Publicity 
Director, Henry C. Fleisher. The rec- 
ommendations of tbe committee, 
through Flei-her. were used as a guide 
b) the Publicity Department, the CIO's 
general counsel Arthur J. Goldberg, 
and Henry J. Kaufman & Asso< iates. 

\ andercook was picked for the job 
from some 22 other commentators con- 
sidered. He held liberal views, was 
widely traveled, and offered over 20 
years of experience as newsman, au- 
thor and commentator, including a 
stint as staff commentator for NBC 
fro,,, 1939 to 1945. 

At the very outset, Reuther stressed 
that Vandercook would not act as a 
"propaganda agent" for the CIO. He 
would present the news as he saw it 
and his views would be his own, pre- 
sented by the CIO as a public service. 
Public reaction to Vandercook is re- 
flected in such written comments from 
listeners as: 

"We listen with infinite satisfaction 
to your factual reporting and appre- 
ciate vour ability to put the news into 
perspective. ' 

"Yours is a voice of reason inform- 



SO CLOSE 

AND YET 

SO DIFFERENT! 




Dallas and Ft. Worth ... one big market 
with two different personalities! Reach the 
listeners with the combination that ' pro- 
grams for both tastes. KLIF, Dallas, has 
the ear of popular music fans . . . KXOL, 
Fort Worth, wins the hillbillies ... and both 
are strong on neics. 

ASK ANY FORJOE MAN about the 
KLIF - KXOL combination. 




73 



ing rather than inflaming your lis- 
teners." 

"It is good to realize that from you 
one will receive a frank and fearless 
expression of opinion on vital issues of 
the day." 

The one problem the CIO faced as 
regarded Vandercook was his beard. 
For many years and in many lands, a 
mustache and a Vandyke beard had 
graced the Vandercook visage. They 
were his trademarks. But union offi- 
cials, after long discussion, decided 
that the beard might not be psychologi- 
cally good in the eyes of the public. 
So they approached Vandercook with 
the idea of removing it. He proved to 
be "most cooperative" about it and it 
was a bare-faced Vandercook who ap- 
peared in advance publicity photos for 
the press. Newspapers joyfully trum- 
peted the event with such headlines as 
"Vandercook has close shave and 
"Vandercook gives up beard for CIO." 
Selection of ABC network stations 
in keeping with CIO coverage aims and 
the allotted S600.000 budget was not 
easy, says Publicity Director Fleisher, 
key figure in the broadcast planning. 
They wanted outlets not only in areas 
where the CIO has strong membership 
distribution and needs a practical pub- 
lic relations job I "the CIO is the guy 
next door" I . but also in markets, es- 
pecially rural and agricultural, where 
they could reach new groups and make 
new friends. For instance, they are us- 
ing KXFL. Waterloo, Iowa (50.000 
watts i, primarily to get to the farmers. 
I Thev have slanted a number of com- 
mercials at the farm audience, are par- 
ticularly anxious to get across their 
message to farmers. I Down South, the 
CIO voice is heard in textile-producing 
areas where the CIO is currently or- 
ganizing and can use a pro-union influ- 
ence. Other targets are teachers, busi- 
nessmen, professional people — in fact 
all non-labor groups. 

A coast-to-coast network of 152 ABC 
Radio stations was finally selected. The 
CIO was satisfied since it estimated in 
a "Progress Report" on the program 
dated 1 November, that the 152 sta- 
tions reached an area embracing ap- 
proximately 33,866,950 U.S. families, 
which comprise 75.7' < of all I .S. ra- 
dio families. (The program is now 
heard on 154 stations, i 

Intensive promotion backed up the 
Vandercook program from the start. 
The Kaufman agency hired CIO staff 
publicit) man Edward Lashman to 
handle field promotion of the program. 

SPONSOR 



NOW— Increased to 




MAXIMUM POWER! 
HIGHER TOWER! 



Imagine the increased effectiveness 
of WKY-TVs weekly 115 hours of 
popular programming . . . now 
telecasting with maximum power 
over Oklahoma's ideal flat terrain 
using new 6 Bay Antenna from 
a 975 foot tower. 



FIRST IN OKLAHOMA WITH 
MAXIMUM POWER IN LOW BAND VHF 



Formula for Advertisers and Their Agents: 

WKY-TVs Increased Radiated Power + 

WKY-TVs Established Audience Leadership 

_ INCREASED 
—"SEllING POWER! 





WKY-TV reaches 

more than 244,759 

TV homes (Dec. 1, 1953) 



Owned and operated by 
The Oklahoma Publishing Co. 
The Daily Oklahoman 
Oklahoma City Times 
The Farmer-Stockman 
WKY-Radio. Represented by 
THE KATZ AGENCY 



11 JANUARY 1954 



79 



He travel- about, stirring up interest 
among local CIO groups in promoting 
tti«' show. 

That the councils and local n n i « «n - 
are enthusiastic in their support of tin 
program is evidenced b) the amount of 
promotional materials the) ordered 
from the CIO Publicitj Department 
and the agenc) between I September 
and 1 November: 

18,000 posters in three sizes 
12") pictures of Vandercook 
(ii in ad mats plus small slugs 
2.(MI() miscellaneous items ranging 
from handbills to convention displays 



In the - u ii in kt of L953, the CIO. 
through it- local unions in 20 mar- 
kit-, sponsored a 13- week series of 
quarter-hour tv shows, Issues of the 
Day. This was a series of films pro- 
duced at CIO headquarters whose pur- 
pose was to document and clarif\ is- 
sues in the face of the coming national 
election. 

Aside from this the CIO has spon- 
sored onh occasional show-, as press- 
ing situations warranted. By and large, 
however, it has aired its views on sus- 
taining news and discussion programs 
made available to the CIO and other 



has grown even faster 

than one of America's 

fastest growing 

markets. 



continues to be the 
WAY OUT IN FRONT 

■ 

favorite of successful 
radio advertisers 



LONG ISLAND'S AMAZING NASSAU COUNTY 



POPULATION 


888,998 


121% increase since '40 


BUYING INCOME 






TOTAL 


$1 ,758,000,000 


Greater than 13 states 


PER FAMILY 


$ 8,071 


4th among U.S. counties 


RETAIL SALES 


$ 838,171,000 


Greater than 12 states 


FOOD STORE 


$ 264,005,000 


17th among U.S. counties 


AUTO STORE 


$ 137,187,000 


25th among U.S. counties 


HOUSEHOLD 


$ 50,474,000 


21st among U.S. counties 

Sales Management, May 1953 



WHLI 



"THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND" has a larger day- 
time audience in the big booming major Long Island Market 
than any network or combination of independents . . . (Conlan) 



WHLI 

HEMPSTEAD 
LONG ISLAND. N. Y 

Paul Godofsky, Pres. 

Represented by Rambeau 



AM 1100 
FM 98.3 






labor and business organizations by 
the networks. One such program is 
NBC Radio's Viewpoint U.S.A., an- 
other is CBS Radio's Washington, 
U.S.A. Newly elected president Reu- 
ther appeared on a number of national 
radio and tv programs during the first 
half of 1953. 

The CIO Publicity Department re- 
ports that during the year it placed 
the CIO's views on Taft-Hartley amend- 
ments (a transcribed, 15-minute broad- 
cast) on over 332 radio stations in 46 
states. 

So the CIO is no stranger to the air. 
But for the first time, it is really "or- 
ganizing" its efforts, buying time and 
going all out to do a thorough public- 
relations job via air media. * * * 



TV PANELS 

[Continued from page 38) 

ufacturing Co. Radio's Twenty Ques- 
tions went on Du Mont in July 1951 
bankrolled by Mennen Products and 
the same month, General Foods 
>napped up Goodson & Todman's sec- 
ond baby, It's News to Me, on CBS 
T\ : Pantomime Quiz landed Lever 
Brothers as a sponsor the summer of 

1951 on CBS TV lit hadn't been able 
tn get out of sustainer ranks the sum- 
mer before). In September, P. Loril- 
lard bought Down i ou Go on Du 
Mont and in December, C. A. Swan- 
son & Sons and Bendix Manufacturing 
launched alternate-week sponsorship of 
The Name's the Same, a third Goodson 
& Todman opus. 

Tie Got a Secret, G&T brainchild 
No. 4, first saw light of day in June 

1952 on CBS TV under sponsorship 
of Carter Products and Toni. And in 
September 1952, Cats Paw Rubber 
bought Qui: Kids for alternate weeks 
on the same network. 

This year brought four new panel 
entries. /"// Buy That, the first and 
only daytime tv panel, went on CBS TV 
for Seeman Brothers in June. Quirk- 
As A Flash started for Thor Corp. on 
ABC TV in March. Judge for Your- 
Self, latest G&T creation with Fred 
Allen, appeared on NBC T\ in August 
sponsored by P. I.oiillard. And in Oc- 
tober, Ha/el Bishop's hour-long Peter 
Potter Show i formerlv Juke Box Jur\ t 
made it- debut on ABC TV. 

► Type of atirfiwire? 

What kind of audience watches tv"s 
profusion of panel shows? 



80 



SPONSOR 



Josef C. Dine and Allan H. Ii.il inns 
announce the opening of the 
PUBLIC RELATIONS FIRM 

of 

DIM and KALMIS 

Public Relations ♦ Publicity 
Promotion ♦ Sales Development 



Eighteen years of public relations success 
in television, TV films, radio, newspapers, 
magazines, trade publications, and industry. 



4 West 58 Street, New York 
PLaza 3-1370 



Washington 



• Chicago • Hollywood • Boston • Miami 



11 JANUARY 1954 



81 



According t<> a recent SPONSOR arti- 
- le | "How America's Bocial classes re- 
act to tv," 5 Octobei L953 issue) quiz- 
panel shows like W hut's )l\ Line? 
tend to attract "sophisticated members 
of the I ppei and I ppei Middle classes 
who like tv shows which afford — i j 1 ■ 1 1 1 - 
humor, satire and intellectual stimula- 
Hon." This is oot to saj that the pan- 
els tppeal onlj tu this upper socio-eco- 
nomic group (which after all, com- 
prises < ml \ about I")', of the popilla- 

tion). Hut Beveral ad agenc) sources 
told sponsor man] sponsors use the 

panels in hopes of reaching this more 



Belecl audience along with the rank- 
and-file "Middle Majority" viewer. 

One panel sponsor in particular 
which has counted heavily on "class" 
audience appeal is Benson & Hedges. 
Im sell its Parliament cigarettes, it i< 
using Pantomime Quiz on l)u Mont in 
the Tuesday 8:30-9:00 p.m. slot, buck- 
ing Berle on NBC TV and Bed Skelton 
on CBS TV I though it does have the 
advantage of following Bishop Sheen 
on Dii Mont). This show is a video 
charade game with two teams of pan- 
»l i -t ^. who try to capture a Quiz Tro- 
phv Cup. With it, B&H hopes to at- 



SELL MORE IN THE 

SOUTH'S No. 1 State! 




tract viewers who are not intrigued bv 
gaga and slapstick — but who prefer a 
little more intellectually-stimulating 
fun. As Tom McDermott, radio-tv di- 
rector of Benson & Bowles, put it: "It's 
the kind of show that reflects what Par- 
liament is Irving to do: get itself across 
as a 'class' product to the upper social 
group that wants better entertainment 
and qualitv products." 

(This, incidentally, represents Ben- 
son & Hedges' first venture into net- 
work tv though the firm does make 
heavj use of radio and t\ announce- 
ments. I 

Audience appeal, of course, \aries 
somewhat with the nature of the in- 
dividual show and who the sponsor 
wants to reach. With Life Begins at 80, 
for instance,, Serutan wants to — and 
does — reach "mostlv people over 35" 
(according to ARB, the show's audi- 
ence is comprised of 81 '< adults). 
\\ ith This Is Show Business, witty pan- 
el-talent showcase moderated bv Infor- 
mation Please's old host. Clifton ladi- 
man, and featuring panelists Sam Lev - 
enson and George S. Kaufman, both 
Schick razors and Carter Products i al- 
ternate-weeks I are interested in getting 
to a wide average adult audience. Since 
the show follows AW Skelton on CBS 
TV, it is in a good position to inherit 
just such an audience. 

Hazel Bishop, on the other hand, 
wants to tap the large, squirming au- 
dience of "dig-that-crazy-clarinet" kids 
with its Peter Potter Show on Sunday 
nights to push cosmetic sales. Popular 
W est Coast d.j. Peter Potter plays pre- 
released records while a panel of four 
Hollywood "names"' decide if it will be 
a hit or a "miss.'* This is an entirely 
different audience from the one Hazel 
Bishop reaches on Wednesday nights 
with its This Is Your Life program on 
NBC TV (not a panel). 

Insofar as audience composition 
goes, women viewers seem to predomi- 
nate. About 10' '< more women than 
men watched nine panel shows listed 
in the ARB October National Report: 
average viewer percentages were 
'A~ ] -_-'( men. 47 1 -.', women, and 
159? children. Here is the breakdown 
on the individual shows: 



82 





% 


% 


% 


1 itie v netwoi K 


Mm 


Wom- 


Chil- 






en 


dren 


Name's the Same VIU 


37 


49 


14 


1 went] Questions Du M 


S5 


46 


19 


I id Begins H BO !>u M 


35 


4ti 


19 


Down You <■■> Du M 


34 


51 


13 


fudge ("t Vounell I NB< 


38 


50 


12 


What's \lv 1 ine ( BS 




49 


12 


I've Got .i So ret < BS 


38 


47 


15 


1 In- 1- Show Business ( lis 


43 


45 


12 


Who Viui 1 hat (NBC) 


38 


44 


18 






SPONSOR 



A 



sk your national representative 



You're on the verge of a decision, 
and a problem. 

What business papers to pick 
for your station promotion? 

It's no problem to kiss off, 
for your choice can have a telling 
effect on your national spot 
income. 

But where to get the facts? 

The ansiver is simple. Ask your 
national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around 
They learn which business papers 
are appreciated, read and discussed 
by buyers of broadcast time. 

His is an expert opinion. 

Don't overlook your national 
representative. 



s 



ponsor 

the magazine 
radio and TV 
advertisers 

use 




"No, the weight 

isn't EQUALLY distributed!" 

Measure Kent icky's economic dimensions and you'll find the 
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total retail sales . . . 51.3% of its food sales . . . 59-8 r ( of 
its drug sales! 

5000-watt WAVE delivers this tremendous market intact — 
covers it (plus a quarter-billion-dollar chunk of Southern Indiana) 
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84 



► .Sponsors using panels 

What types of sponsors use panel 
Bhows? A wide variety of products 
are pitched, ranging from big items 
like washing machines I Bendix Appli- 
ances, Thor Corp.) down to Chiclets 
I American Chicle Company I and Car- 
i. r's Little Liver Pills. 

Drug sponsors are especiall) well- 
represented: Ex-Lax. Bauer & Black 
i Curads plastic bandages), Serutan, 
Pharmaceuticals Inc. i for Geritoll, 
Carter Products. 

Uso prominent are cosmetics and 
toiletries advertiser-, cigarette firms 
and household product sponsors. 

In the "cosmetics and toiletries" cat- 
egory are: Jules Montenier whose 
What's My Line? has pushed chiefly 
Stopette deodorant, now also sells Poof 
Deodorant bod) powder and Fit: 
shampoo: Hazel Bishop's cosmetics; 
Helen Curtis' hair "Spraj Net"; Car- 
ter- \rriil. Nair depilatory and Rise 
shave lather. 

Household product- include S. C. 
Johnson waxes and polishes. Ekco 
Products utensils. Seeman Brothers' 
Air Wick and Nylast, home appliance 
sponsors Bendix and Thor. 

Cigarette sponsors are Benson & 
Hedges for Parliaments: P. Lorillard 
for Old Golds and Muriel cigars; and 
R. J. Reynolds for king-size Cavaliers. 
(For three years up till January 1953, 
American Tobacco bankrolled This Is 
Show Business on CBS TV.) 

It may be noteworthy that of the 19 
sponsors using panel shows currently, 
there is onlv one food sponsor. C. \ 
Swanson, which has been selling its 
frozen meat products via The Name's 
the Same I ABC TV) since December 
1951. 

►- Commercials 

Sponsors using panel -how- general- 
1\ have the advantage of continuing 
or frequent visibility of the product 
name — a commercial plus not to be 
minimized. While Dorothy Kilgallen 
is cleverly deducing that the man's 

cupation must be matin cuffing, the 

viewer ma) be glimpsing all or part of 
the boldly lettered declaration "Stop- 
ette presents " hat's \l\ Line'.-'" On a 
backdrop above the head- of the Twen- 
ty Questions panel appears "Curad 
Plastic Bandages" with a light under 
each of the 20 letter-: the bulb- light 
up one by one as the number of ques- 
tion- used up b) the panelists mounts. 
In Pantomime Quiz, •'Parlaimcnt Cig- 
arettes" is lettered above the score- 

SPONSOR 



board, while packages of Parliaments 
are scattered everywhere. 

Most commercials on panel shows 
are done live, though there is frequent- 
ly a combination of live and film se- 
quences. There is better contact with 
the audience in live commercials, P. 
Lorillard feels, so they let announcer 
Dennis James pitch for Old Golds in 
this manner on Judge for Yourself. 

Though panelists themselves rarely 
get involved with the- commercial 
I aside from possibly fingering an) 
sponsor's product which may happen 
to be in front of them on their table in 
the course of the show ) . the show's 
moderator or M.C. may also very like- 
ly be the one to deliver the commercial 
when it's done live. Host Jack Barry, 
for instance, does the honors for Geri- 
tol and Serutan on Life Begins at 80 
and Juvenile Jury. Garry Moore, a per- 
sonality identified with Cavaliers from 
past commercial association, is both 
m.c. and product salesman on I've Got 
a Secret (though film pitches actually 
predominate on this show) . Mike 
Slokey, host on Pantomime Quiz, also 
delivers the words of praise about Par- 
liaments. 

Carter Products prefers all-film com- 
mercials on Doun You Go and This Is 
Show Business. Bauer & Black gener- 
ally exhibits one live, one film com- 
mercial per show on Twenty Questions. 
Ex-Lax on Leave It to the Girls runs 
the gamut of animated-cartoon, film- 
and-live action, and all-live pitches 
with an announcer, informal-talk- 
across-the-desk style. 

Most of the commercials for Jules 
Montenier on What's My Line? have 
been film, with live ones inserted main- 
ly for special promotions or appeals. 
Agency Earle Ludgin reports that a 
"spectacular success" has been scored 
by one of the new commercials : a com- 
ic ballet interpretation of a girl's ex- 
periences with deodorants, done by TV 
star Dorothy Jarnac. 

► Results 

It is Montenier's experience with 
What's My Line? that supplies the big- 
gest result story of them all. Montenier 
started to sponsor the show for Stop- 
ette spray deodorant in April 1950. 
It began on an every-other-week basis, 
alternating in its time slot with a com- 
pletely different program. The other 
program failed to take hold and Stop- 
ette began every-week sponsorship of 
the show on 8 October 1950. 

Stopette sales began to climb and 



'>aw delighted .,,,■,,. \ and sponsoi evei 
since. What's \h Line? virtuall) made 
Stopette what ii is today. Ii is prob- 
abl) the biggesl single fa< toi in 
cess of this spraj deodorant as a type 
since it proved visuall) thai Bpraj de- 
vices were eas) to use. Tin- Bnow has 
also been the primar) advertising pow 
er behind the introduction of I 
Deodorant Bod) Powder ami Finesse, 

the Flowing Cream Shampoo, a <l- 

ing to Montgomer) Y McKinney, 
Earle Ludgin v.p. ami account execu 
tive for Montenier. 

Here's one concrete instance, cited 



to sponsor bj M< Kinne) . >>( mail r< 
-uli- obtained from " /"// i l/> / i i 
V sample offei made onl) several time- 
on tin- show pulled approximate!) I ■" 
000 requi 

a i essful was " hat's 1/ » Line? 
on is that ii neni on radio, to< I i i 
luring tl personnel, the show 

ran on NBt Radio foi 1 5 months. It 
was sponsored b) Philip Morris 
(Biow) from Maj through Novemba 
\'> >2. ami bj Monteniei from Decern- 
bet 19 <-' ti [ul 

I he h /' hat's l/i Line? b) thii 
was reaching some 18,225,000 people 




WDAY 

(FARGO, N. D.) 

IS ONE OF 

THE NATION'S 

MOST POPULAR 

STATIONS! 

An independent survev made by slu- 
dents at North Dakota Agricultural 
College among 3,969 farm families in 
a 22-county area around Fargo proved 
this: WDAY is a 17-to-l favorite over 
the next station — i- a .'i'/i-to-l favorite 
over all other stations COtnbinedl 



NBC • 5000 WATTS 
970 KILOCYCLES 



FREE & PETERS, INC. 
Exclusive National Representatives 



11 JANUARY 1954 



85 



a week, Btates McKinney. Montenier 
(ui down it- sponsorship in October 
id ever) othei week, alternating with 
Remington Rand (through Young & 

Rllbi< am I . 

\- loi results Borne ol ih<- other pan- 
el sponsors have a< li i< \ ed : 

Bauer <\ Black has been riding with 
Twenty Questions since January 1953. 
The firm's t\ advertising i- coordinat- 
ed with othei m.dia and with point- 
of-sale and merchandising material 
(such as the Miss Curit) Comic Hook 
Contest, a coloring contest f<>r \oung- 



Blers currentl) running on the Bhow). 
George \. Percy, Bauer \ Black ad 
manager, pionts <»ut that the market 
-liare of Curad Piasti* Bandages, the 
ln-t bandages of tin- plastic type, has 
increased 30095 in approximate!) two 
years. 

C. \. Swanson has been sponsoring 
The Vamtts the Same for two years 
on alternate weeks. So satisfactory has 
the -how proven in helping push sales 
of the firm's fro/en meat products that 
Swanson has just renewed its contract 
for a third year. 





CBS 

Radio 

Network 




National 



You ride with the winner 
when you ride with WGR... 
the most listened-to station all 
over Western New York, North- 
western Pennsylvania and near- 
by Ontario. 



For example: WGR's vivid 
broadcasts of baseball, 
basketball, football, plus 
all-around sports coverage 
win top audiences through- 
out the year. 



BROADCASTING 
CORPORATION 

RAND BUILDING, BUFFALO 3, N. Y. 



Free & Peters, Inc 



\\ hen Lucky Strike was sponsoring 
This Is Shou Business, Bert Wheeler 
as a guest one night recited a poem 
called -What is a Boy?" No offer of 
copies was made, hut over .">(). 000 un- 
expected, unsolicited requests for the 
l>ic< e poured in. * * * 



CANCER AND CIGARETTES 
(Continued from page 41 1 

ex-smokers go on. 

This opinion comes Erom some of 
the cigarette people themselves. Of 
course, the) are nc\er talking ahout 
their brand. It is always the other 
fellow's. And the opinion is alwa\s 
off-the-record. Tobaccomen are too jit- 
terj these da\s to talk for publication 
and some wish the whole prohlem 
would just get up and go away. 

The industry, of course, is not sit- 
ting this one out. There's well over 
$4 billion in retail sales at stake. After 
meeting secrcth in New York Cit) 
during the waning days of 1953, a 
group of 14 major producers, growers 
and distrihutors announced on 3 Jan- 
uary the formation of a Tobacco In- 
dustry Research Committee to dig into 
"all phases of tobacco use and health." 
Of the top cigarette firms, only Liggett 
& M\ers was not represented in the 
announcement. 

The setting up of the new research 
committee was heralded in newspaper 
ads all over the country. Headed " A 
Frank Statement to Cigarette Smok- 
ers." the ad took note of the cancer 
talk and said that "distinguished au- 
thorities point out" there is no agree- 
ment among medical researchers re- 
garding the cause of lung cancer and 
no proof that cigarette smoking is one 
of the causes. "We believe," the state- 
ment said, "the products we make are 
not injurious to health." The ad said 
that a scientist of "unimpeachable in- 
tegrity and national repute" will be 
in charge of the research activities of 
the new TIRC. There was, however, 
no indication that there would be am 
change in the current m\ -cigarette-is 
healthier-than-y ours advertising. 

Regarding health advertising, one of 
the top cigarette company executiye- 
told SPONSOR: "I ndoubtedl) some of 
the advertising of cigarettes is adding 
to peoples' fear- as to the possible 
harmful effects of smoking. Cigarette 
manufacturers using such advertising 
should wake up to the fact that any- 
temporary advantage they might gain 
might well represent a decided disad- 



86 



SPONSOR 



vantage for the long pull." 

One of the most widely-known and 
respected ad agency executives in the 
business said: "Cigarette advertising 
with its emphasis on health, nicotine, 
tars and what-not is definitely driving 
people from smoking. It drove me. 
After reading the ads for years, I ju-l 
decided one day it was safer to stop 
smoking than keep coughing. I used 
to put away 60 a day. 

"In my opinion, most of the blame 
for the current status of cigarette copy 
lies with the advertiser, not the agency. 
We carry out the orders of the adver- 
tiser. We can recommend certain 
courses of action but it still has to be 
okayed by the client." 

Statements along this line also have 
come from a host of periodicals cover- 
ing the cigarette-and-cancer story. The 
Wall St. Journal recently delved into 
the subject, came up with this quote 
from Fred S. Royster, president of the 
Bright Belt Warehouse Association: 
"The country is being frightened away 
from tobacco by outlandish medical 
claims." And a president of one of 
the major cigarette companies is 
quoted as saying: "You can't spend 
millions year after year implying that 
your brand is healthy while all the 
others will kill you without it having 
some effect on the public." 

The blunt fact remains, however, 
that most of the people in cigarette ad- 
vertising don't believe that health 
themes hurt sales. They admit that the 
consumer is worried at present because 
of the publicity given to medical re- 
search on cigarettes and cancer. But 
the publicity would have worried them 
just as much if there wasn't any health 
advertising by cigarettes, the admen 
say. 

"Sure," said a research executive at 
a leading agency, "some brands are 
hit hard by this cancer stuff, but some 
are helped by it. All advertising does 
is channel smokers from one brand to 
another. It doesn't really scare them 
away from smoking. You can't duck 
the fact that the smoker is health con- 
scious." 

This was echoed by an ex-account 
executive on a cigarette account. "You 
certainly can't get away from the fact 
that the smoker is health conscious. I 
think it would be more accurate to say- 
that the smoker is more health con- 
scious than ever. He's always been 
health conscious. There's been talk 
about health and tobacco since Sir 
Walter Raleigh first began smoking 




IN RADIO! 



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IN TV! 




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TELEVISION NETWORKS 



Wichita dfalls ^television, Sine. 



che weed. Cigarette • ompanies have 
been claiming 1 1 » « - i r brands are health- 
ier than theii < ompetitors Bince the 
20s. 

" I ake a liMik at the record. U- 
though there have been exceptions, 
during the past I" <u 15 years I"<l Ba) 
thai ever) time .t health gimmick was 
used in advertising, i igarette sales have 
gom up; when the health gimmick was 
removed from the copj Bales have gone 
down. Some brands have been buill 
on health copy. Philip Muni- i- a 
good example. 

"People ma) have different ideas 
about the propriety of using health 
advertising. But, brother, \ mi can t 
tell me it doesn't sell cigarettes!" 

I an\ cigarette people tin- argu- 
ment is clinched 1>> the sales trends ol 
the past Eevt years. In addition to 
worrying about publicity on cancer, 
the cigarette advertise] is facing a con- 
vulsive change in cigarette lialiits. 
Brand switching is going on incessant- 
ly. The legions of cigarette smokers 
(and there are still more than 60 mil- 
lion of them) are wheeling into new 
formations, rallying behind the kings 
and the filters which, sa) the ails, re- 
move irritant-, throat scratch, nicotine, 



tar- and what-have-you. 

Here is what happened to cigarette 
sales last year, according to estimates 
li\ Business It eeh \ 

I. While total cigarette sales went 
down about -' - . the regulai or 70 mm. 
size reall) got it in the neck. Sales 

we ff nearl) 12 billion units oi more 

than 1395 from the year before. Ever) 
one ol the important brands lost 
ground except Kool, which remained 
where it was. However, Kool, being 
mentholated, should reall) be consid- 
ered in a class 1>\ itself. 

These figures do not take into ac- 
1 ount that the three of the 70 mm. 
brands (Chesterfield, Philip Morris 
and Old Gold) have king size versions 

and one of them I Raleigh i went king 

size exclusive!) last year. However, 
even combining regular and kinj: size 
-ale- of these brands, their totals were 
lower last year than in 1052. 

Sales ranking of the six top brands 
remain- in the same order as 1952. 
Here they are in order, with regular 
and king size sales combined. Camel, 
99 billion, off 5.5 billion: Luck) Strike 
1 which hit 103 billion in 1940 1. 65 
billion, off 8.5 billion: Chesterfield. 02 
billion, off six billion: Pall Mall (this 




The Western Market is completely 
clothed in KOA-Radio's outsize signa 
Size: 302 counties in 12 states. 

The Western Market is a big earner — 
S5-billion last year. (Average farm in- 
come exceeds the national average by 
74.3%.) 

A big spender, too. Last year, S4-billion 
for consumer goods as well as for the 
equipment and materials that are the 
Western Market rancher-farmer's stock- 
in-trade. 

Big earner free spender, the Western 
Market is covered by the KOA hat. Se 
your product. . .buy KOA-Radio. 

50,000 WATTS • 850 KC 

CALL PETRY 



DENVER 



Covers The West Sett/ 



FOR FOOD ADVERTISERS: \ LEAGUE {AMERICA'S MOST FOOD-CONDITIONED AUDIENCE 



kinji size brand -old 9.5 billion in 
1946), 1-8 billion, up 5.5 billion: Philip 
Morris, 55.5 billion, off 1.5 billion, and 
Old Gold. 2.'-? billion, off .") billion. 

2. \\ bile the 70 mm. share of the 
market went down from 70.7 to 70.5' [ . 
the kinji - -hare of the market went up 
from 18.5 to 25.0', . Gains were regis- 
tered all along the line except for such 
minor brands as Regent, W ings and 
Marvel, each of which lost half a bil- 
lion in Bales. 

I he increased -hare of the market 
for the kin^-. however, was niainlv 

due to the fact that Philip Morris, 
Raleigh and Old Gold went king size 
last year. Sale- of these kings plus 
Chesterfield kin^- account for about 
50' , of all king size -ales. American 
Tobacco's brace of 85 mm. entries, 
Pall Mall and Herbert Tareyton, ac- 
count for 02',. So, actually, the 1055 
trend in kings i- not so much a marked 
preference for the 85 mm. size as a 
conversion of regular size cigarettes to 
the longer length, plus a preference for 
two established brand-. 

II. The filter-tip cigarettes are still 
a small part of the market but a grow- 
ing one. Their share ( four top brand- I 
i- 5.2',. compared to 1.4', in 1952. 
I here is some crossing of categories 
here since \ iceroy, which accounts for 
nearly half of all filter sales, went kins: 
size early last year. B) pushing the 
filter-king size combination in its copy, 
\ icero) went from 2.7 billion in 1052 
to 6 billion last year. Other filters did 
well. too. Parliament, now owned b) 
Philip Morris and currently being te-t- 
ed in a king size version, went from 
1.9 to 3 billion. Kent, introduced in 
about April. 1052. sold .7 billion that 
year, jumped up to 3 billion last \ear. 

The new Liggett \ Myers entry, I. \ M 
Filters, bowed last October and it is 
too earl\ to sa\ in what direction it i- 
going. But if trends mean anything, 
it can onl) go up. 

4. Over-all domestic sale- ol cigar- 
ettes in 1055 were 587 billion, down 
nearl) 8 billion or 2', from the pre- 
vious year. This estimate, like those 
above, was made before the vear was 

over and some cigarette sources Feel 

that when the final figures are in. the 
drop will be greater. 

5. To the cigarette companies, the 
important figure is their total share of 
the market, rather than the ups and 
downs of their various cigarette 
brands, for all the companies are hedg- 
ing against the future with kin::-, fil- 
ler- or both. 



88 



SPONSOR 



Because of this hedging, a companj 
can make up with one brand what it 
loses on another and so the competitive 
positions of the large cigarette firms 
are not as volatile as individual brands. 
For example, the leading company, 
American Tobacco, has watched Luck) 
Strike, its top seller, slide downward 
for vears with disconcerting regularity. 
However. Pall Mall and Herbert Tar- 
evton have compensated for this and 
more. As a result, American Tobacco 
corralled a slightly larger share of the 
market in 1953 than in 1952. R. J. 
Reynolds (Camel. Cavalier I and Lig- 
gett & Myers ( Chesterfield. Fatima. 
L & M Filters) lost a little; Philip Mor- 
ris (Philip Morris. Dunhill, Parlia- 
ment. Spud. Marlboro), P. Lorillard 
( Old Gold. Embassy. Kent I and Brown 
& Williamson ( Raleigh, Viceroy. Kool, 
Avalon. Wings) went up a little. 

These six firms control no less than 
99.5' i of the cigarette sales. 

With all this evidence painting a 
clear picture to the agencies of a cigar- 
ette-wary America, the tobacco com- 
panies find themselves impaled at pres- 
ent on the horns of dilemma. How 
far can they go in boosting their own 
brands as giving greater health protec- 
tion? It would seem they cant overdo 
such advertising lest health conscious- 
ness of consumers leads to the final 
step: giving up smoking altogether. 

( The sensitivity of the tobacco firms 
was illustrated recently by reports that 
Brown & Y\ illiamson cancelled spon- 
sorship of Orchid Award on ABC TV 
because Walter Winchell. who pre- 
cedes the show, broadcast newspaper 
and magazine commentary on the 
cigarette and cancer question, i 

Some of the cigarette sources con- 
tacted by SPONSOR felt that advertising 
should be toned down somewhat. 
There is some evidence that this is al- 
ready happening. Philip Morris has 
dropped, for the time being at least, 
the line that it "takes the fear out of 
smoking" by using Di-GL. I Di-GL is 
Philip Morris" name for di-ethylene 
glycol, used as a moistening agent. 
Most other cigarettes use glycerine. I 
Philip Morris is still hawking Di-GL 
but with a softer line. 

Viceroy opened up its campaign, 
when it jumped to king size last year, 
with a "double-barreled health protec- 
tion"' theme but this was later changed 
to a quieter "double filtering action 
for double pleasure." However, recent 
Viceroy tv commercials have been ask- 
ing, "Which cigarette is better for your 

11 JANUARY 1954 



health than an) othei leading brand?" 
I his is followed bj an impressive look- 
ing machine which is said to tesl the 
amount ol nicotine in i igarettes. 

\ ic-ero\ - testing machine ma) have 
been a rea< tion to the su< i ess P. Loril- 
lard has had in putting a< ross its new 
filter cigan tte, Kent. In a thre* 
pronged selling-men liundising-advei 
rising drive, Loi illard and its agew \ . 
V oung and Rubicam, have i on< rx ted ;i 
proof-of-difference campaign which 
snowballed into a good yeai in 1953, 
so good thai Kent caught up i" Parlia- 
ment, an established filter, in ■ Fell 



swoo 

Nol .ill i i_ arettet are yelling about 
how health) the) are. Some of the top 
To mm. brands are selling pleasure and 
taste. < 'Id < !old "cures jusl one thing 
the u "i Id's best loba< • os, and the 
firm boasts il offers a "treat, not I 
treatment. < amel and I >w k^ Sti ik-- 
the two leaders, are bearing down 
Imm\ iK <>ii testimonials < amel also 
brags about its sales leadership and 
its "< ool and mild" taste. Lui kief are 
"made bettei i" taste better" and it is 
pointed out thai "smoking is .i mattei 
of taste." I ven < amel's younger broth 




This Kansas farm home— and thousands like it all across 
the state — are islands of buying power in a sea of wheat, 
corn, cattle and hogs. 

What they buy . . . and the brand names they specify 
... are tremendously influenced by WIBW. The reason's 
simple. WIBW is the station Kansas farm families listen 
to most— twice as much as the closest competing sta- 
tion. Let WIBW sell your product in this big-buying 
market with over $1.5 BILLION CASH INCOME. 
Kansas Radio Audience. '53. 




$«rviif ond Sellinf 

'THE MAGIC CIRCLE' 

t„ Cw t .«.«*»«, I«. • UN mi. 6~ «*•• WIIW • ICIK 




89 



i 1 . king Bize < a\ alier, is being Bold in 
.! low kr\ . [he consume! is urged to 
"feel thai I lavaliei mildness; taste that 
( avaliei flavor." (Cavaliei sales 
jumped 1 1 < > 1 1 1 L.5 t" 2.5 billion lasl 
\ car. i 

\\ batevei tack cigarette companies 
take in their future advertising ap- 
proach thej all fare this problem: 
Mosl people jusl < l< >n i believe cigar- 
ette advertising. The cigarette < om- 
panic- know this. In some cases, their 
own agencies have established it in 
secrel sui vey s. 

This lack of believability plus an- 
noyance at health advertising has been 
pointed ii|i l>\ Btudies outside of the 
agency field, too. Audience tests of 
« igarette commercials by Schw< rin 
Research Corporation disclosed thai 
the range of belief ran in most cases 
from 4 to <>' ! • Commercials for one 
brand got 12' ', believabilirj and. in 
.mother case. 20' < of the audience be- 
Lieved that the cigarette's claims of 
superiority were true. 

Most commercials for other types of 
products register a much higher per- 
centage of believability. For example, 
a series of refrigerator commercials 
tested by Schwerin were believed by 
25 to 30' ^ of the audience. And the 



firm points out thai advertisers who 
work particularly hard for credibilit) 

the I "iii Co., for example do con- 
siderably better. 

Interestingly enough, the cigarettes 
that did best in the Schwerin tests did 

it without hard sell. 

< onsumer annoyance at health 

claims has Ik en -tressed recenth bv 
the National Better Business Bureau, 

which said in recommending stand- 
ards for cigarette advertising: 

"There i- growing evidence that the 
general public bitterly resents the use 
of deceptive 'health' claim- in cigar- 
ette advertising and it i- significant 
that advertising men themselves have 
been as vocal in their criticism of this 
type of claim as any other group. 

"This resentment has been festering 
for a long time. Cigarette advertising 
has been a source of serious complaint 
from both business and the public to 
the National Better Business Bureau 
and to local Better Business Bureaus 
throughout the nation for many vears." 

But the NBBB voiced its belief that 
there has been a substantial improve- 
ment in the believability of cigarette 
advertising during the past year or 
two. It also pointed out that cigarette 
firms "against whom Federal Trade 




W/BNS makes your sales pitch stick 

Your sales pitch sticks on WBNS because our listeners 
stick to WBNS . . through every rated period . . through 
local talent and network shows. Proof? WBNS carries 
the top 20 rated programs in Central Ohio . has more 
listeners than any other station'. 



CBS for CENTRAt OHIO 




radio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Commission orders have become final 
have faithfulh observed the provisions 

thereof." And the NBBB reports the 
voluntary cooperation of several lead- 
ing cigarette advertisers "in correct- 
ing claims which were unfair or mis- 
leading or otherwise unworthy of pub- 
lic confidence. 

The NBlil! has come up with an 
eight-point program for bettering cig- 
arette advertising. I he eight points 
weie submitted to the cigarette people 
and the NBBB reported that "no 
cigarette advertiser . . . expressed any 
criticism of . . . these standards."' 

I be eight point- i in condensed 
form l are as follow-: 

1. Advertisers should be prepared 
to Bubmit proof of all medical claim-. 

2. Cigarette advertising should not 
claim that cigarette smoking is bene- 
ficial to health. 

3. Cigarette advertising should not 
claim that cigarette smoking will not 
cause harmful effects "without quali- 
fication as to the individual smoker 
and the extent to which he smoke-." 

4. Advertising which claims that a 
particular brand has fewer harmful 
substances should be supported bv 
"impartial scientific test data which 
conclusively prove that the claimed 
difference does, in fact, exist to a sig- 
nificant degree." 

5. Advertising which claims that a 
particular brand is less harmful to 
bodilv organs should be based on im- 
partial clinical test data and the differ- 
ence should exist to a "physiologicallv 
significant degree." 

6. Testimonials should be genuine 
and represent the sincere opinion of 
the author. 

7. Comparative sales claims should 
be based upon "verified current sales 
figure-. 

8. Cigarettes should be sold on 
their merits, without disparagement of 
competitn e brands. 

So far there are no indications that 
cigarette advertising will radically 
change. Taking recent cigarette adver- 
tising as a whole, it looks like the to- 
bacco fraternity is convinced that they 
can't do anything about making the 
consumer less health conscious so they 
might as well float with the tide. Per- 
haps the cancer scare w ill die out i they 
hope I . 

\ more serious drop in cigarette 

-ales might jolt the tobacco advertisers 
into another approach. If they are 
thinking of one now. they are certainly 
keeping it well hidden. * * * 



90 



SPONSOR 



Only a combination of stations 
caqflpover Georgia \s 
najor markets. 



The Georgia Trio 



5000 w 

590 kc 

CBS Radio 




represented 
individually and 
as a group by 



The KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT ATLANTA 

11 JANUARY 1954 



The TRIO 
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Represented by 

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STAVSW 



■ 

HOUSTON 



EWS 



NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 

Nationally Represented by 

EDWARD RETRY A CO. 



VITAPIX 

{Continued from page 43) 

station members. \ few days later the) 
were back with approximate}) half a 
million dollars worth of contracts from 
22 member stations. I his allowed 
Vitapix to outbid the network*, it* 
executives Bay, on a Bafe and Bound 
basis. 

It- ability to sell $500,000 worth of 

film on the phone BhoWS how the fun- 
damental principle on which Vitapix 

i- hased work-. The principle: It's 
easier to sell a stockholder than a 
strangei . 

Station members of Vitapix need 
less personal selling hecause: 

The) know their voting privileges as 
stockholders give them control ovei 
the verj Vitapix executives who sub- 
mit films to them. 

They know that all films selected for 
syndication are passed on l>v a screen- 
ing committe consisting of representa- 
tives of six of their fellow member 
stations. 

Thev know, as stockholders, what 
films actually cost Vitapix since thev 
are sent confide ntial fact sheets on each 
film as it is considered. 

They know that the price of each 
film is pro-rated according to the size 
of their market and that the pricing 
formula is the same in all markets. 

Vitapix Feature Theatre is being 
sold to individual stations for resale 
to advertisers locally — basicallv the 
wav most tv film is sold today I unless 
it is sold to a local agencv or client I. 
But it seems probable to SPONSOK that 
\ itapix will not restrict itself to local 
selling. Vitapix probabl) could utilize 
its close relationship with stations for 
making sales of film packages to single 
national advertisers in 50 or more mar- 
kets at a time. (Vitapix, bv the wav. 
will not specialize in feature-length 
films. It plans to acquire packages of 
all lengths and t\ |i<--. I 

Vitapix might be able to sell the 
packages to national advertisers and 
then clear time on 50 or so member 
stations. It would then constitute a 
*'fihu network"' television's first. 

Main a brand-new film is pitched 
firs! to a national advertiser for airing 
in )(• markets, with remaining markets 
in he syndicated locally. Hut syndica- 
tors find it hard to sell films this wav. 

National spol airing of tv film v ia a 
""film network"' set up bv the client 
has, however, found some favor. Some 
advertisers who have been usini: this 



approach, as opposed to putting a film 
show on a network, are: Hamilton 
watch with ) our Jeweler's Showcase; 
20 Mule Team Borax with Death I al- 
ley Days; Canada Drv with Terry and 
the Pirates i for the past 12 months) 
and Annie Oakley I signed for the com- 
ing war i . 

\mong the advantages of the Bpol 
film approach are that it lets the ad- 
vertiser pick his markets: vary his air 
times to suit conditions in each mar- 
ket; and the advertiser gets more co- 
operation from each station when the 
film is spot rather than network. 
Reason: If its spot, the station gets 
the whole price of the time, less com- 
missions to its up. If it's network, the 
station gets onlv about one-third of the 
time rate, the network requiring most 
of the rest for it* gales, operating and 
line costs. 

This additional cooperation from 
stations is often in the form of pro- 
gram promotion locallv and merchan- 
dising to wholesalers and retail stores. 

The hitch in buving film on a na- 
tional spot basis is usuallv the liaison 
work required to line up good time in 
each of the 50 or more markets you 
want. Most advertisers would rather 
huv a network period and get clear- 
ances automatically (except in one- 
and two-station markets'. 

It is sponsor's conclusion that \ ita- 
pix might verj well move to help 
clients solve the spot clearance prob- 
lem. 

\s for the other previously men- 
tioned major potentialities of \ itapix 
in the film firmament, let's take them 
one at a time. 

► Cracking the celluloid curtain: 
\ itapix has taken its first big step to- 
ward making Hollywood loosen up it* 
tv policies bv undertaking distribution 
of \ itapix Feature Theatre. Vitapix 
is in effect telling Hollywood that if it 
does not speed up its entrv into pro- 
duction of full-length film for tv. the 
broadcasters may have to do the job 
themselves. Said the president of Vita- 
pix, Frank F. Mullen, when Vitapix 
signed with Princess Pictures this fall 
for distribution of its feature-length 
films: 

■'The reluctance of some leaders in 
the motion picture industrv to make 
their top-quality product available to 
television broadcasters, and the fail- 
ure of the motion picture industrv to 
grasp the importance of this new me- 
dium of entertainment, is compelling 
the broadcasters to enter the field of 
motion picture production for initial 



92 



SPONSOR 



television release. . 

A major deterrent to Holhwood en- 
tr\ into film production for television 
has been the attitude of motion pic- 
ture theatre owners. '"Don't bite the 
hand that bu\s your product," the- 
atres have warned in effect. Hollywood 
majors, aware that theatres can still 
outbid television stations for full- 
length films, have confined their pro- 
duction activities to shorter-length 
films made on their lots by outside 
independents or by subsidiaries they 
have set up for tv only. 

The example set by Princess Pic- 
tures in producing full-length films in- 
tended for first-run on television, and 
by Vitapix in distributing them, ma\ 
have an important influence on pro- 
ducers. It may provide them with the 
argument they need to persuade their 
exhibitors that production of features 
for television is inevitable, namely: "If 
we don't do it. somebody else will." 

Princess Pictures is able to produce 
feature-length motion pictures which 
employ star-name talent, on a budget 
low enough for profitable first-run sale 
to television. This is accomplished by 
shooting the majority of the films 
abroad and through the use of time- 
conserving multi - camera techniques 



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learned m i\ film production. 

I he personnel ol Prim ess Pi< turea 
comes out of both theatrii ..I and w 
film ranks. Burl Balaban, pi.-nl.-iii of 
the company, was head -I both pro 
graming ami production foi Para 
mount Television before organi 
Princess Pictures. I'm.., to thai I.. 
;m executive ..I Paramount Pi< tures 
whose president is his father, Barnej 
Balaban. 

Princess ha. I completed foui ..I a 
scheduled 26 film, b) presstime. 
Stars used thus far include: Jeffre) 
Lynn, Urira Tamiroff, Lee Bowman an. I 
Pegg) Aim Garner. Vitapix had sold 
the complete package ..I 26 films ii 
markets bj (he first ..I the year. Of 
the 27 sales. 22 were i,, it- member 
stations. I Member stations •_■,•! .M-daj 

first refusal rights on properties dis- 
tributed b) \ itapix; after that \ itapix 
is free to sell its product to non-mem- 
ber stations.) The series will be on 
the air late in January. 

Vitapix will distribute the 26 Prin- 
cess features in theatres as mil as on 
television, renting them t<. second-run 
theatres at first in mm-h area- an. I. 
much later, in t\ market- where the) 
will alreadj have been run mi the air. 
The fact that stations will have the 
films first and theatre- second i- 
pointed up bj \ itapix a- among the 
most merchandisable facets of the 
series. 

The films are available in either ~>1- 
minute or 70-minute lengths. The) 
are being shot, Vitapix points mil. 
with television aforethought and there- 
fore utilize lighting designed to -how 
up best on tv. Moreover the pruning 
down to the 54-minute version from 70 
minutes is accomplished without cut- 
ting any of the bone. Vnd stations need 
do no editing. Some of the film- will 
be in color. 

While it is undoubtedK the Imp.- .,| 
\ itapix and its tv station owners that 
Hollywood majors will gravitate more 
toward tv if the) can he shown a suc- 
cessful example, it should he pointed 
out that Vitapix i- not in business to 
set examples. Vitapix waul- t.. -ell. 
It is a profit corporation ami it- m< 
bers expect to ,^.'t Lark dividends on 
their stock along with other member- 
ship benefits. 

► The favored Hollywood distribut- 
ing approach: Vitapix believe- that 
when Holhwood is read) t" -ell t<> t\ 
on a grand scale — opening up both its 
vaults of film from the past five or 10 
years and all its productive facilities 



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IN 
CIRCULATION 



NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 

Nationally Represented by 

EDWARD PETRY * CO. 




a company like \ itapix will he the pre- 
ferred method of distribution. Vita- 
pix reasons that Hollywood executives 
were most successful in the days when 
they were able to sell to theatres on a 
block-booking basis. In that era prior 
to court rulings which declared block 
booking in restraint of trade. Holly- 
wood producers had control over their 
market through theatre ownership or 
block-booking arrangements. Risk in 
film production was minimized and the 
producer had a predetermined floor 
under his investment. \ itapix feels 
Moll) wood would like to play it safe 
somewhat the same way in entering 
tclc\ ision. 

Does that mean the wa\ \ itapix is 
set up resembles block booking and is 
therefore liable to be ruled illegal by 
the government? 

Vitapix founders spent several years 
trying to make sure they had the an- 
swer to that question. The important 
step they took to be sure their organi- 
zation was not in restraint of trade was 
to make purchase of film b\ member 
stations voluntary. Moreover stations 
need not buy a minimum amount of 
film during any given period. Thev 
have first refusal rights on each film 
series for 30 days in their own mar- 
kets. After that if they do not wish to 
buy, the film is up for sale to their 
competitors. Block booking as prac- 
ticed by Hollywood made it obligatory 
for theatres to buy product of produc- 
ers with whom they were allied. 

Vitapix sought the opinion of the 
well known Washington. D. C, law 
firm of Arnold. Fortas & Porter as to 
the legality of its structure. Said Paul 
A. Porter, former chairman of the 
F.C.C. and holder of several high ad- 
ministrative posts in the Roosevelt and 
Truman Administrations, in a letter 
ast spring summarizing the firm's 
opinion : 

". . . it is clear that the basic con- 
cepts of this project as outlined to us 
are not prohibited by either the gen- 
eral anti-monopoly statutes or the regu- 
lations and policies of the Federal 
Communications Commission. . ."" 

Vitapix will seek to get some of the 
advantages of block booking on a vol- 
untas basis. It hopes that its member 
stations will represent a stable market 
to Hollywood producers — or produc- 
ers Ironi anywhere— because it will be 
to the best interests of station mem- 
bers to buj from \ itapix. It can point 
to the fact thai its members will have 
more than usual trusl in \ itapix be- 



cause of the ownership relationship 
described previously. In addition there 
are these powerful factors: Member 
stations will ( 1 ) get special discounts 
on Vitapix film not available to non- 
members and (2l film costs will be 
lower to start with, according to Vita- 
pix plans. 

\ itapix executives agree, if you ask, 
that there will be room for more than 
one distributor set up along station 
membership lines. "But we will have 
the best stations in the best markets 
lined up." said Robert H. Wormhoudt, 
executhe v. p. (For stations \ itapix 
has thus far, see box on page 43.) 
You'll note man) of the stations are 
NBC or CBS primary affiliates and 
most are in major markets. While 
Vitapix executives say it is conceiv- 
able membership might extend some 
day to 200 markets, this is considered 
unlikely. 

When David 0. Selznicks library 
of all his past films was rumored to be 
up for sale some months ago. \ itapix 
was in among the bidders. "You can 
be sure when libraries like Selznick's 
open up. we'll be likely prospects to 
acquire them." said Vitapix president 
Frank Mullen. 

Vitapix has stated to its members 
that it has received assurances from 
major Hollywood producers that thev 
will make better-quality film for tv. if 
a film distributor owned by stations 
gets into action. 

► Improving the quality of program- 
ing for tv: If you ask Vitapix execu- 
tives what the primary immediate aim 
of the organization is. thev "11 tell you 
it's to bring out improved film. " Vs 
station operators," says Robert Worm- 
houdt, "our members know how to 
program for a broadcast audience bet- 
ter than anv other kind of group could. 
I heir know how will he reflected in the 
choice of \ itapix programs." 

Vitapix feels it can provide im- 
proved tv film programing while main- 
taining prices at a level below prevail- 
ing rates in film selling. How ? 

One answer is to be found in the re- 
duced amount — and cosl of selling 
Vitapix feel will be necessary. It 
starts the 1954 year with a sales staff 
of onlv four in as man) regional of- 
fices. Expansion to 2o salesmen at the 
vcrv outside is planned by Vitapix for 
the distant future. The cost of selling, 
Vitapix says, is as much as M)' ', of 
the total film rental paid bv stations. 

Another answer is in buying from 
economical producers like Princess. A 



94 



SPONSOR 



Vitapix executive pointed out that 
Princess had done what many said was 
impossible. The Princess - produced 
Vitapix features are sold at a price 
which is described as "higher than the 
price of old Hollywood films but lower 
than the cost of many of the half-hour 
shows now being sold." 

Implicit in Vitapix' objective of im- 
proved programing at reasonable cost 
is the throwing down of a challenge to 
other syndicators. If \ itapix accom- 
plishes what is hopes to do, others 
would have to follow suit to some de- 
gree to stay competitive. 

Vitapix executives believe that cur- 
rent tv film prices are frequently ex- 
orbitant. One reason for this, they say, 
is that tv films are often financed by 
borrowing and therefore must pay a 
high return to cover interest on loans. 
Vitapix expects that productions it 
syndicates will not be those burdened 
with heavy financing costs. 
► Standardizing film pricing prac- 
tices: It is the contention of Vitapix 
that it is the only film syndication or- 
ganization which has a pricing formula 
"based upon a pure mathematical pro- 
rate of the total television audience in 
the United States." 

This is Vitapix sales and advertising 
v.p. Edward L. Koenig's description to 
sponsor of the Vitapix pro-rate form- 
ula: 

"Obviously such a pro-rate must be 
based upon some one consistent and 
relatively stable factor — either number 
of sets in a market, population or sta- 
tion rate card. We elect to use the sta- 
tion rate card because w r e feel that it 
most accurately represents a true ap- 
praisal of the relative television value 
of each market. Here is how it works: 

"We take a total cost of a property, 
add the sales cost and pro-rate this 
against the entire countrv, expressing 
our price for each propertv in each 
market as a stipulated percent of the 
markets average published one-time. 



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one-hour Class " V rate foi .ill 
tions. This ma\ vary, depending upon 
the propert) and the number of runs 
contracted for, anywhere from Mi', m 
one case to 1 1!!' , in anothei i tsi 
the one-time, one-hour rate i ." 

Vitapix feels thai its formula puts 
the pricing of film on a i onsistenl ba- 
sis in keeping with the ni.uk. I 
pradin - of other industi ies. Strict 
adherence to il- pricing polic) will 
eliminate, charging what the traffic will 
bear and horse trading, \ itapix feels. 

While other film syndicators would 
disagree that \ itapix i- alone in tak- 
ing this tack, there's no quarrel ovei 
the fact that consistent pricing bj \ ita- 
pix — along with anyone else could 
help add stability to film selling. 

Vitapix' implications for the indus- 
try are so broad and have so mam 
facets that main \aried questions 
about its operation suggest themselves. 
Here, in brief, are question- and an- 
swers which should help round out tin- 
picture of its operations. 

Q- Does I itapix resemble Broad- 
cast Music Inc., the station-owned mu- 
sic licensing body? 

A. It does in that it is a broadcaster- 
owned and controlled group which was 
formed to help give stations some link 
with production of material the\ need 
for programing. But there similarity 
ends. BMI is a non-profit corporation. 
\ itapix is a conventional profit cor- 
poration wherein dividends will be 
paid regularly on both common and 
preferred stock. Secondly. BMI is or- 
ganized to incorporate wide member- 
ship whereas it's Vitapix intent to lim- 
it stockholders to one station per mar- 
ket. 

Q- W hat kind of new properties are 

in the offing for Vitapix in 1954? 

A. In February Vitapix will prob- 
ablv announce plans to distribute four 
programs which are currenth being 
seen live on KTLA. Los Angeles. The 
programs are: lna Ray Hutton Mi- 
Girl Shou: Spade Cooler: Lawn 
Welk: Frosty Frolics. 

The shows have been on the air two 
to four vears each and are described 
as "never having been rated below a 
10 with two of them currently up in 
the 25 and 29 brackets respectively." 

The program will be filmed by 
KTLA — which is owned by Paramount 
Pictures — in the Warner Bros, lot 
Paramount recently bought for a re- 
ported $850,000. In making the pur- 







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IN LIVE 
SHOWS 



NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 

Nationally Represented by 

EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



chase Paramount executives made clear 
the l"t would In- used to produce h 
films for \ itapix. 

\\ iili entr) oi KTLA Into full-scale 
filming "I shows i it has in the past 
syndicated kinescopes mainl) I, an im- 
portanl milestone is pa— < d in t\ hi-- 
tor\. Foi Paramount thus becomes 
tin- first of the Hollywood Big Three 
to ruler production of film for tv. albeit 
through it- station rather than directly. 

K 1 1. \ is a \ itapix member and it's 
important to point out that \ itapix re- 
gards it- member stations everywhere 
as important sources <>f properties. 

<f- II hat is the background oi ex- 
ecutives of I itapix.'' 

A. Frank E. Mullen. \ itapix pre-i- 

dent, was with RC \ and NBC lor 26 
years. His last eight years with NBC 
he served as executive vice president. 
Since then he has been president of 
the three G. \. Richards radio sta- 
tion-: president of Jerry Fairbank, 
Inc.. t\ film producer who pioneered 
main t\ film techniques, and a con- 
sultant to a number of t\ stations. 

Robert H. Wormhoudt. executive 
vice president, is a veteran in tv film 
selling. He was formerly general sales 
manager of I nit) Television. Inc. 

Edward L. Koenig. Jr.. \ ice presi- 
dent in charge of sales and advertising, 
was formerly an account executive 
for Young and Rubicam and an ac- 
count executive and director of radio 
and television for BBDO. Los \ngeles. 

<}• What is I itapix doing about 
color and It lapcY 

A- All contracts with producers will 
provide for at least 25' ", of films to be 
shot in color. In that way it's felt that 
by the time color is important to sta- 
tions Yitapix will have a full 13 weeks 
in color for each of its series. 

\ itapix regards this as a transition 
period during which stations will di- 
vide their hours between color and 
black-and-white shows. It does not 
feel the necessity, therefore, to shoot 
in color exclusively. Ultimately it be- 
lieves most film for tv will be shot in 
colo] . 

The possibilities of tape are a matter 
of serious concern to Yitapix. It rea- 
sons that anv company which under- 
take- to syndicate film properties 
made with conventional cameras must 
seriously study whether or not tape 
will be a threat to value of these prop- 
erties. "We might find, a \ itapix ex- 
ecutive explained, "that on the fourth 



run of a certain filmed property we 
syndicated, the second run of a com- 
peting taped series wa- priced lower 
because of economies in tape produc- 
tion." 

Because it regards tape as so impor- 
tant, \ itapix is exploring the possi- 
bilities of acquiring a financial inter- 
est in the tape field. 

*£*• M /// / itapix seek to supplant the 
station rep as a time broker for peri- 
ods sold on its stations in this way? 

A- \o. \ itapix will not seek to 
compete with Btation representatives. 
Bather it will seek to enlist them a- al- 
lies in national spot -ale- of tv film 

packages. Reps, a- a matter of fact, 
have long advocated this type of huv 
as one earning the maximum in co- 
operation from stations. (See SPONSOR 
K) March 1952.) 

it- II ill I itapix sell films in mar- 
Lets where it dors not have membt 

A. Yes. \ itapix is in business to 
make a profit and will sell film wher- 
ever feasihle. Selling in non-member 
market- i- regarded a- important. 

'**• Are any of the stockholders of 
I itapix non-broadcasters'.'' 

A-- There are non-broadcaster- who 
own stock but majority of voting stock 
i- in the hands of station-. 

<t- It ill I itapix itself enter film pro- 
duction? 

A. No. \ itapix has no intention of 
ever getting into production with cam- 
eramen on its own payroll. Its felt 
that if \ itapix ever gets into financing 
of tv productions it will be done 
through a separate subsidiary of the 
company and it will be voluntarv as 
to whether each station member need 
participate in the financing venture. 

Some means of financing film pro- 
duction is regarded by \ itapix man- 
agement as important to the future of 
the operation because \ itapix feels 
that manv profitable deals could re- 
sult if it financed film-. 

<}- Does \ itapix plan to broaden its 
membership lines? 

A. \ itapix reports that many small- 
market stations have requested the 
chance to work with \ itapix. Some 
form of limited-participation member- 
ship is being studied. Stations might 
he given 30-day option rights to \ ita- 
pix film without having voting -to< k. 
\ itapix would gain by having a wider 
circle of stations with whom it enjoys 
a close working relationship. -k -k -k 



96 



SPONSOR 




Mr. Ward 



SPONSOR ASKS 

[Continued from page 75 I 

smart department store people watch- 
ing the inroads of the supermarkets, 
auto chains, drug stores and discount 
houses, Ml 1ST find a way to sta\ 
ahead. 

Let's give them the key to open the 
door. 

Jules Mirkl 

Jules Mirel Advertising Agency 

New York 



Without being 
presumptuous, I 
think we can say 
that New York 
department stores 
learned a little 
about radios 
speed and flexi- 
bility during the 
recent newspaper 
strike. Here at 
WCBS. in one in- 
stance, we were able to get copy for a 
leading Fifth Avenue specialty store on 
the air 40 minutes after we started talk- 
ing about availabilities. And we pro- 
duced results — an impressive boost in 
sales — within 24 hours. In other cases, 
stores were able to phone in — or 
change — copy just a few moments be- 
fore air time. Accommodations like 
this, made without cost, are very im- 
portant with the merchandise changes 
that are constant in the department 
store business. 

As far as WCBS is concerned, we 
reaffirmed our confidence in the power 
of good radio to move specific mer- 
chandise off the shelves of specific re- 
tail stores, and to bring the customer 
into the store on a more general basis. 
We also feel that we made some last- 
ing friendships. But that depends . . . 
because we learned that, in spite of 
the wonderful work already done by 
BAB, radio still has a tremendous edu- 
cational job to do with department 
store management. We encountered a 
profound lack of basic knowledge as 
to what radio can do and how it 



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should bt used toi hi si effi< ien< ) 

More than that, we found .1 hard 1 
"I resistance to radio advertisin even 
though 11 proved its power. I he stores 
all had productive experieru ea u ith ra 
dio; we were able to move men handise 
for them. But, iiuu thai the strike is 
over, sales prool notwithstanding 
there still remains .1 deep 1 om iction 
on the part of their ad dir» tors thai 
newspapers are the onl) medium foi 
retail advertising. How do we 1 ombal 
(lii> discouraging condition? To saj 
the least, it will require a con entrated 
sales-educational campaign. \\ e'v< 
to work on the problem from all known 
angles, and then inv< nl a few more, to 
prove thai radio, used alone oi with 
newspaper^, can do a more effei tive 
selling job than has ever Keen done up 
to this point. 

Carl \\ w;i> 
General Manage) 
WCHS. \,„ Yorh 



In date, depart- 

1' jKmmL incut stores have 

-hied awa) from 
radio and i\ foi 
M the simple reason 

^f^ / that newspapers 

have been Used as 
their traditional 
show -w i n d o w. 
■^^■^■^■" Stores have been 
Mr. Shaw afraid to experi- 

ment because the) 
would have to dig into an advertising 
budget which has been appropriated 
for newspapers only. They have used 
radio and tv on various occasions foi 
special campaigns, i.e.. mail order or 
special services. Mail order items. too. 
have been sold under the aegis of a 
known department store name with 
good results. 

It is now said that the department 
stores have an opportunity to compare 
results obtained onl) from radio and 
t\ during the recent New ^oik news- 
paper strike. But the strike period was 
a hectic one. Competition was so keen 
for radio and tv time that special pro- 
grams were organized b) the radio and 
tv stations. Programs that had no 
proven listenership. lime availabilities 
that would have been by-passed under 
normal circumstances were avidl) 
seized b) main of the stores. 

Recent surveys have compared 1953 
sales figures with computations ol pre- 
vious years and report that radio and 
t\ held department stoic sales up to a 



CBS 



IN THE LAND 



MILKandljpNEY 

WBAY 



GREEN BAY 



5,000 WATTS 




BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



11 JANUARY 1954 



97 



COMPLETE BROADCASTING 
INSTITUTION IN 

f\icnmonu 



WMBG 
WCOD 
WTVR 



-AM 



-FM 



-TV 



First Stations of Virginia 

WTVR Blair TV Inc. 
WMBG The Boiling Co. 



ERCHANDISING 

AND 

PROMOTION 



NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 

Nationally Represented by 

EDWARD PETRY t CO. 




pai with pasl years. I Iii> i- probabl) 
an inaccurate conclusion because the 
I j i j r > J ■ < - was on it* usual Christinas 
Bhopping spree and people were in a 
buying mood. 

Our experience with our client, 
I Irani Department Stores. Inc. dur- 
ing the recent newspaper strike in New 
\ "\k has confirmed our lon« standing 
contention that department stores can 
derive excellent Bales results from prop- 
erty planned radio and t\ campaigns. 

During the strike emergency, we 
were forced to bu\ radio and t\ time 
on a da) to da) hasi>. competing with 
man) other newspaper-starved retail 
outlets. When possible, we allocated 
certain items to speeifir spots or pro- 
grams and found thai we had a ver) 

i <l public reaction and in man) 

eases actual mail order results that 
compared favorabl) with newspaper 
-ales, based upon costs. 

Today, we can sit down and operate 
in a sensible and creative fashion. \\ e 
can pick and choose our spots and we 
can purchase time in bulk and therein 
bring costs down to fit our budget. 

The stores enjoy a retail rate with 
newspapers because they bu) tremend- 
ous amounts of lineage which the) 
place on a 52-week schedule. If we 
are given the opportunity to purchase 
radio and tv time on a similar basis, 
the stores can utilize these media to 
better advantage. The costs of radio 
and tv vs. results would thereby com- 
pare favorabl) with newspapers when 
purchased on a da\ in. da\ out con- 
sistent schedule throughout the vear. 

Let us simply sa\ that no one me- 
dium can do a complete job. We be- 
ieve newspaper advertising cannot be 
replaced by radio and tv. but that de- 
partment store selling can be supple- 
mented with a good coordinated radio 
campaign and with visual selling via tv. 

\\ e look forward to greater use of 
radio and tv by department stores who 
have learned the value of radio and tv 
during the newspaper strike and the 
-ale- results than can be derived from 
these two "new advertising media. 

1.1 IN SlIVW 

Radio and Tv Director 
Hoffman- Manning. Inc. 
\ at ) oil 



Do you use SPONSOR'S index? 
Each six months SPONSOR publishes 

an index for the preceding period. 

It s a valuable guide and copies arc 

available to xou without cost. 



RATING SERVICES 

(Continued from page 40 i 

ages due to memor) confusion appears 
to be more than offset bj deflation due 

to forgetting. "For ever) person who 

mistakenl) states having seen an ad- 
vertisement, there are possibi) two, 
three or more who have seen the ad- 
vertisement and forgotten it."' Ap- 
proximate!) 24' '< of ads observed and 
read 10 or more seconds are not rec- 
ognized 14 da\s later. About 33^ <>f 
ads observed and read five or more 
seconds are not recognized 14 days 
later. 

7. In general, the more readers an 

ad attracts, and the- more completely 
it is read, the more sales are produced 
b) that ad except as noted in point \o. 
9. (This is disputed b\ such indepen- 
dent researchers as Richard Manville. 
who heads his own New ^ ork firm. I 

!!. Eiighl) effective types of ads 
produce three to five times as many 
sales as weak, ineffective copv treat- 
ment for the same product in the same 
medium during the same period of 
time. 

9. Some types of cop) treatment 
actually repel buyers. 1 he more read- 
ing there is of such ads. the less buy- 
ing there is. 

10. Sample size: Point of diminish- 
ing returns in readership measure- 
ments sets in between 100 and 150 
interviews per sex when they are well 
conducted and distributed. Using 1.000 
interx Lews would cost 10 times as much 
but the increase in accuracv would 
be onlv moderately greater, i Nielsen 
makes the same point in explaining 
why it is neither necessar) nor practi- 
cal — from the standpoint of expense — 
to increase the size of his radio sample 
— 1.500 metered homes, i 

11. Size of magazine (number of 
ads i cuts readership per ad moderate- 
1\. Fatigue I boredom I affects it also 
but onlv one-sixth as much, in a care- 
fully controlled procedure. 

12. \-kiiiL: about component parts 
of an ad or pointing at them increases 
the aocurac) (and raises the ratings) 
of the readership measurement of an 
ad. The "What-did-you-see-on-this- 
page?" technique, used alone, will miss 
much reading, for readers tend to skip. 

Starch cautions: "Readership rat- 
ings clo not pretend, and ne\er have 
pretended, to measure selling power. 
Hut no matter bow potent an ad mav 
be. it ~ sales influence is nil if no one 






98 



SPONSOR 



reads it. So measuring readership is 
the first step. 

From ARF's newspaper studies 

1. Men's readership of ads has in- 
creased in the postwar years; women's 
interest continues at a high level. 

2. Advertising ''registers" more 
heavily with skilled and unskilled oc- 
cupation groups as compared with 
buisness and professional. 

3. Size of city seems to have litttle 
significant effect on ad readership — 
except that it goes up for classified as 
size of the city decreases. 

4. Attention given to radio items 
increases with the size of the city. 

5. A very slight difference exists in 
favor of left-hand as against right- 
hand pages. 

6. Front pages are best-read, pic- 
ture pages rank second, sports pages 
third among men and society pages 
third among women. 

7. Medians for the 138 studies show 
that 54% of the men and 60% of the 
women read national advertising. 

8. Reader interest tends to increase 
as the size of pictures increases. 

9. Drew Pearson led the political 
columnists among men readers; Elea- 
nor Roosevelt among women. (138- 
Study Summary was published in 
1951.) 

10. Highest-scoring comics among 
men and women were Dick Tracy, 
Nancy, Blondie, Gasoline Alley and 
Henry. 

4 Tips from Readex 

1. Use more service information in 
copy. 

2. Use more space in individual in- 
sertions. 

3. Schedule service copy with suffi- 
cient frequency to develop habitual 
reading. 

4. Use specialized or localized copy 
in specialized or localized publications 
to improve readership. 

* J ,:- * 

What are the facts about each of the 
print measurement services? See box 
pages 44-5 for a quick summary. 

On the same pages is shown some of 
the things the Advertising Research 
Foundation hopes to find out in its 
study of print, which parallels the air 
ratings study mentioned in the last is- 
sue. 

Primarily the ARF wants to deter- 
mine whether an "adequate and prac- 
tical method" can be developed for 



measuring ad readership. 

Incidentally Aid- members, <>l which 
sponsor is one, voted the print stud) 
as the project they wanted to Bee undei 
taken first (an examination of tin- au 
ratings was second I . 

Basic criticism of all readership 
techniques was summed up for SPON- 
SOR by the research director of a ma- 
jor agency as follows: 

"What are their limitations'.'' No din- 
is sure." 

Most of the controversy is centered 
on Starch. Back in 1946 he published 
a booklet, Factors in Readership Mea- 
surements, in which he defended his 
technique against charges that reader- 
ship measurements don't actually mea- 
sure reading of ads, are too inaccurate 
to be useful because of inflation or 
deflation due to errors of memory, are 
based on samples that are too small 
and are guesses rather than accurate 
measurements. 

In 1951 Harold H. Webber, then 
Chicago v.p in charge of media and 
research, Foote, Cone & Belding, and 
now Chicago general manager, made a 
25-page speech before a closed meet- 
ing of the American Association of Ad- 
vertising Agencies in White Sulphur 
Springs, W. Va., denouncing the 
Starch Readrship Reports from pillar 
to post. He centered his fire almost en- 
tirely on Starch interviewers. His con- 
clusion: Starch did not measure ad 
readership. 

In the same speech Webber also 
spoke highly of the Gallup-Robinson 
"impact" technique. 

That fall (1951) Howard A. Stone, 
Starch's v.p., answered Webber before 
a 4A's regional meeting in Coronado, 
Cal., with a 20-page speech, equally 
buttressed with tables and statistics. 
His conclusion: The level of produc- 
tion of the reports was more uniform 
than the uses to which they were put 
by the uninformed. 

"Daniel Starch and Staff stands 
ready to adopt sound improvements 
whenever it is established that thej 
actually are sound and are economi- 
cally feasible," he said. 

Meantime Starch has launched his 
relatively new-type Consumer Maga- 
zine Report based on interviews with 
25,000 families over the year to ob- 
tain data on families, readers and use 
of close to 100 products and to show 
trends. The sampling is an area prob- 
ability one. 

And both Starch and Gallup-Robin- 
son have entered the television com- 




OMAHA 



* * 



NBC 

590 



inturonc* Bw>ld>ng 



JOHN BLAIR t CO., Representative* 



WANT TO SELL 
CANADA? 

One radio station 

o o 

covers 40% of 
Canada's retail 
- sales 



CFRB 

TORONTO 

50,000 WATTS, 1010 K.C. 

CFRB covers over 1 5 the homes in 
Canada, covers the market area that 
accounts for 40^ of the retail sales. 
That makes CFRB your No. 1 buy in 
Canada's No. 1 market. 



REPRESENTATIVES 
United Slates: Adam J. Young Jr., Incorporated 
Canada: All-Canada Radio Facilities, Limited 



11 JANUARY 1954 



99 




Same old story 
in Rochester . . . 

WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent audience rating 
leader since 1943. 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y. /// 
5,000 WATTS \ 

ReprestntaHvet . . . '*' 

EVERETT-McKINNEY, Inc., New Ywk, Chicago 
IEE f O'CONNELl CO . loi Angalat, San Francitca 



SWVSnW 



HOUSTON 



RATINGS 



menial measuring field Starch u-inji 
the telephone recall technique, G-R em- 
ploying the aided recall and the per- 

BOnal interview. (For detail- -ee "Will 

Starch's new t\ figures upset buying 
strategy?" 16 November 1953, and 
"Beware "I these misuses of Starch tv 
figures," 30 November 1953. i 

So far as readership ratings are 
concerned, tin- outcome depends to a 
large extent on the \.RF's recommen- 
dations as does the conflict among 
the air ratings. 

In summary, what then can he -aid 
i- wrong with the print services? 

Readex's Boh Pendergasl summarized 

it for SPONSOR as follow-: 

"I he two major troubles with pres- 
i ni rating services are that most adver- 
tising people do not want am mea- 
surement of anj kind on their creative 

efforts and most of those who do want 
the benefit of outside measurement- 
fail to understand those that exist." 

• • • 



NBC and TQN on the Gulf Coast 

JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 

Nationally Represented by 

EDWARD PETRY A CO. 



PAT WEAVER 

i Continued from page 32 i 

Weaver word. He has heen quoted as 
using it in several published inter- 
views during the past few years. Some 
of his other favorites are '"additive" 
and "blueprint. Additive is his wa\ 
of describing the difference between ra- 
dio and television. "The picture is 
merel) additive." he savs. meaning the 
picture doesn't change the basic nature 
of radio, just adds to it. 

Interviewers often find it hard to 
understand \\ eaver because he uses 
words which have special meaning- to 
him without stopping for definition. 
He's quoted bv This U eek writer John 
Brooks as saving: ". . . We feel we've 
got to have showmanship because 
vouve got to go easv on beamed pro- 
grams when there is the possibility fur 
saturation. ' 

Brooks expressed bewilderment as to 
the meaning of the sentence, but stu- 
dent- of Weavers stvle within the in- 
dustry have interpreted it as meaning: 
"Showmanship should be used to give 
most programs broad appeal, rather 
than narrow l\ beamed appeal, other- 
wi-e you won't have an audience." 

Weaver himself sometimes has trou- 
ble understanding what be meant when 
he - -how n a t\ ped transcript of his re- 
marks. But if he hears the same re- 
mark- plaved back on a tape recorder, 

then he"- all right. 



I he next big Weaver programing 
venture will be to launch Home, in the 
middle of Februarv. Home is an af- 
ternoon program which will be to tv 
what the "shelter books" are to maga- 
zines: it will extend the Today or 
magazine concept of programing into 
the women- field. 

The first memo proposing Home was 
written bv Weaver in August 1949. 
W hat took all the time to get it going? 
lor one thing Today was put on the 
air first because a show devoted to 
communications with the world was 
more a novelt) than Home. 

But after four and a half years of 
rjela) it- prett) certain Home will 
final!) go on in Februarv. Then later 
ma) come another magazine form of 
program — this one in late-night hours 
—Tonight. It would be similar to To- 
day, it- evening addition. 

Weavers ideas have a way of com- 
ing to fruition despite long delav . In- 
like some idea men whose thoughts 
rush out quickl) but are soon forgot- 
t< n in a continuing flood of new ideas. 
Weaver sticks with his original con- 
cepts. 

Some of the theme- which have re- 
curred in Weaver's professional and 
personal point of view since he joined 
NBC in August 1949 are these: 

1. In the face of the danger of aJorn- 
ie bombs reducing civilization to rub- 
ble, some intellectual preparation 
should be made. He at one time assem- 
bled books for his library which he 
would have wanted his son to have if 
atomic bombing destroyed other knowl- 
edge. At another time he told column- 
ist John Crosbv he felt it was tvs role 
to bolster human philosophy so that if 
it were necessarv for men to rise from 
the rubble of an atomic war they would 
be left with a strong philosophy. 

2. Modern radio and television will 
help future generations of nations ac- 
cept their differences. In the 16 July 
19.S2 issue of J arietv he put it this 
wav : "Barring war. 1 believe that a 
radio-television communications svs- 
tem of the scope and dimensions that 
we plan will create a iieneration of 
youngsters whose great point of dif- 
ference from us will be that they ac- 
cept diversity, individuality, differ- 
ences in belief ... a- wholly natural 
and desirable." 

Bv a vear later he had reshaped the 
idea into this form for a This If eek 
interviewer: "One of mv fav orite theses 
is that as television grows, kids will 
grow up \\ i I li exposure to a pluralistic 



100 



SPONSOR 



world. They will be face-to-face ac- 
quainted with Indians, Arabs, Chinese. 
Therefore it will be more difficult for 
the group that has control of the child 
to discipline it to the We-Group formu- 
la," i.e., to the "spirit of provincial 
conformity." 

These quotations show that Weaver 
not only sticks to a theme but also that 
he works variations on it as it rests in 
his mind. For example, he has over the 
past three or four years gone from tell- 
ing people that he is a "communica- 
tions optimist" to "information opti- 
mist" to the most recent "working op- 
timist." 

It was David Sarnoff who quoted 
Pat Weaver as calling himself a "work- 
ing optimist." The occasion was Gen. 
Sarnoff's statement on 4 December 
naming Weaver NBC president. 

The statement made clear Weaver 
had been picked for his showmanlike 
aptitudes. But it skirted one of the 
most important missions Weaver has 
undoubtedly been given by the gen- 
eral: to put over color tv. 

Weaver was hired as the showman- 
ship brains of NBC's black-and-white 
television in 1949. Through the ex- 
citement he created with big-name, 
big-budget programing like Your Show 
of Shows, Weaver helped to build the 
Iv set total from 2,000,000 to 10,000,- 
000 in two years. It's clear that he in- 
tends to try and stir up the same ex- 
citement about color tv. 

"The big need is to sell sets," he told 
SPONSOR, "so show planning for color 
will have to be hypoed over black-and- 
white to create excitement. We are 
going back to the days of 1950. I'd 
like to see us sell every color set we 
can make to a bar. Then the bartender 
can hang out a sign saying 'color tv' 
the way you used to see for black-and- 
white." || 

Weaver says he doesn't know yel 
what color will cost the advertiser or 
what programs will be on the air regu- 
larly in color by next fall. One thing 
he does know is that he'd like to see 
his Home show among the first to get 
color because color would be of so 
much value to its women's product ad- 
vertisers. He expects the program to 
attract plenty of clients, whether it's 
black-and-white at first or color. The 
women's market needs the power of 
broadcasting, he'll tell you. "It is in- 
conceivable to me, simply inconceiva- 
ble, that all that advertising money 
spent on women's products in the shel- 
ter magazines has been allowed to es- 

11 JANUARY 1954 



cape the ah media 

Weaver isn't concerned aboul i oloi 
effect on programing. "Color will do 
more to teleA ision as an industi \ than 
it will do to programing. \\ e a< tuallj 
do shows in color now. We are work- 
ing with color because our e\es Bee 
color. The onh problem i- lo make 

sure the color we use make- foi d 

compatible black-and-white pictures." 

In Weaver's coming struggle to es 
tablish public craving for coloi televi- 
sion at one end of the broadcast spec- 
trum and radio at the other, Robert 
W. Sarnoff will play a big pari: Sar- 
noff was named executive vice presi- 
dent at the same time Weaver beeame 
president. It was Sarnoff. sa\s \\ ea\er. 
who helped persuade him to come over 
to NBC from Young & Rubicam back 
in August of '49. 

Sarnoff is 35 years old (to Weaver's 
45), has been with NBC since Januarj 
1948. He's been serving as vice presi- 
dent in charge of the NBC Film Divi- 
sion and as Pat Weaver's executive offi- 
cer. The two have worked lordlier 
main times through the last four years 
( see picture page 33 I . 

Weaver describes the division of la- 
bor between the two as follows: "I'm 
working on setting up policy and oper- 
ating the divisions, cracking the whip 
and getting everybody working. Bob- 
bie works on administrative affairs 
and budgets though he's kept in close 
touch with planning." 

In his time Pat Weaver has passed 
through many waves of change in NBC 
administrators and administrative 
methods. I He is the fourth NBC pres- 
ident in as many years.) When Weav- 
er left Y&R (he was v. p., director of 
radio-tv. member of the plans board 
and executive committee), Niles Tram- 
mell was NBC president. 

By fall Joseph H. McConnell was 
president with Trammell moved up to 
chairman of the board. McConnell on 
8 November announced that television 
operations had been split from radio 
under Weaver. Weaver now headed a 
self-contained television network. 

After two years with the network 
during which he developed a roster ol 
top talent and programs and built both 
the magazine and rotating star con- 
cepts, Weaver was elected to the NB< 
board of directors on 2 November 
1951. 

Then on 18 June 1952 a new change 
in administrative pattern. Weaver was 
named vice president in charge of both 
the radio and television network-. \t 



'he -ame time I lank \\ bile, who bad 

|oined the • ompanj a week pre> ioui 
I the president j ol MBS, 
I" ■ ame \„ e presidi m nd 
man the two networks. "\\, 

oordinated m in i ;< merit, 
-•■'.I [oseph \b ( onnell, "to give new 

1 1 men) i 1 1 radio p r og i i m i n g b\ 

bi inging into radio mans of oui tele- 
» ision -in - and attra tions." 

Six months latei \l < onnell was out, 
" signing to be. ome president oi thi 
« olgate-Palmoliv< Pi el < o. I rank 
V\ bite moved up to the president \. 
John K. I lerbert, until then \ ice presi- 
dent in charge of network Bales, 
ceeded Weavei as vice president in 
charge ol the radio and telei ision net- 
works. \\ eavei was named to a newl) 
created position, \ i< e chairman oi the 
NBC board. It looked to man) as if 

be bad been kicked up-Iaii-. 

Some seven months latei in August 
of 1953, While resigned, for health 
reasons. Gen. Sarnofl stepped in as 
acting president. In Septembei \\ 
ei - descent from the rice< ban manship 
stratosphere to the N U< president \ be- 
gan: he was relumed to active charge 
of tv programing. 

Behind all the >hift- at M!( ! i- one 
main unsettling Ion.-: CBS. I * i j i ing 
the \eai \\ ea\ n joined NBC I BS had 
just completed it- talent raids which 
culminated in lassoing ol Ja< k Benny. 
From that point on I IBS kepi pulling 
ahead of NBC iii radio and catching 
up in television. CBS i\ billings, in 
fact, were ahead "l NBI - al man) 
point- in the j eai . I I he b"\ -• ore for 
11 month- ol 1953, as reported b) Pub- 
lishers Information Bureau: NBC Ra- 
dio, $41,517,433, » BS Had.... 156,82 • 
861; NBC TV, 186,615,046, I BS l\ 
187,106,365, or a h lead of almost 
$500,000.) 

Pat Weavei at 15 (his birthdaj was 
22 December) has the stamina he'll 
need to lock born- with < BS. He's six 
foot three, a -kier. a sailor and a ten- 
nis pla) er w ben be , an find the time. 

\\ eavei was born in I .os Ingeles, 
went to Dartmouth where he was grad- 
uated magna cmn laude in L930 with a 
Phi Beta kappa ke\ . For a while he 
worked in his family's roofing manu- 
facturing business in California. Then 
he came to New V.ik and tried writ- 
magazine fiction. No dice. I ' ►ther 
unpublished work-: two novels.) 

Later on Weaver did a little door-to- 
door selling, wrote cop) and sold print- 
1 - Angeles 1 efore he joined 
i Please turn i<> pagt I 

101 



KWJJ 



Chief of Independents 
Makum War on Slow Sales! 
The Indians sold New York for a 
string of beads. But KWJJ, big 
chief of the Northwest Inde- 
pendents, will sell you the whole 
Oregon country for just a little 
wampum. The chief can deliver, 
too. "KWJJ plenty powerful . . . 
cover much fine country 
. . . givum advertiser 
big bargain." 

National 

Representative 

BURN-SMITH CO., INC. 



KWJJ 

1011 S.W. 6th Ave. 

PORTLAND 5; 
OREGON 




WSYR-TV 

Syracuse, N.Y. 

Channel 3 
100 kw 



The Only Low-Band 
V.H.F. Station in 
Central New York 



Headley-Reed 
National Representatives 

NBC Affiliate 

WSYR-TV 









102 



John P. Blair is the first president 

to be re-elected by the seven-year-old Station 

Representatives Association. One oj his 

most notable accomplishments with SRA last year 

was the "Crusade for Spot Radio," a campaign 

carried on uith minimum funds. Proof of his 

enthusiasm for spot radio is shown in his John 

Blair & Co. balance sheet for 1953 which 

shows the biggest year since the company was 

founded 21 years ago. Industry-wide, national 

spot business for radio was up 8% last year. 



Frank White, former NBC president, 
lust fortnight was named board chairman of 
McCann-Erickson Corp. (International) . In his 
new post, White will supervise the agency's 
17 overseas offices. It's White's first position 
uith an agency, previous posts including that of AfiC 
president the first seven months of 1953; three 
years as Mutual president, and president of CBS- 
Columbia Records, Inc. He had also served 
earlier in his career as treasurer for two 
publishing companies. 



Phillips H. Lord recently sold his radio 

and tv program firm, Phillips H. Lord, Inc., 

to General Teleradio for a reported $1 million. 

Lord will be retained by General Teleradio 

on a consultation basis for five years. Program 

properties bought by General Teleradio 

{which owns WOR-AM-TV, \ew York, and controls 

Mutual) include Gangbusters, Counter-Spy, We the 

People, Sky Blazer*. Policewoman, The Black 

Robe, Treasury Agent and Mr. District Attorney. 

Lord created Gangbusters in 1935. 



D. L. (Tony) Provost late last month 
was appointed to the board of directors of the 
Hearst Corp. Provost, as tit t president and 
general manager of the radio and television 
division of the Heart Corp.. supervises the 
operation of WBAL-AM-TV, Baltimore, and JT/5.Y, 
Milwaukee. He was program manager of ITXBC, 
New York, before joining Hearst. WBAL-TY. 
on vhf channel 11, is an XBC affiliate as is WBAL. 



SPONSOR 



- 



PAT WEAVER 

(Continued from page 101) 

KHJ, the Don Lee outlet, as a writer 
in 1932. By 1934, he was program 
manager of Don Lee in San Francisco. 
A year later he went to New York and 
got a job with Young & Ruhicam 
where he produced the Fred Allen 
Show and even performed on it. He 
became supervisor of programs for the 
agency's radio division, later manager 
of the division. That put him on the 
plans board where he got a chance to 
work on the marketing problems of 
diverse Y&R accounts. 

Then in 1938, before he hit 30, 
Weaver was named advertising man- 
ager of American Tobacco Co., work- 
ing as a member of the top manage- 
ment group under the late and famous 
George Washington Hill. Weaver says 
now of those days 16 years ago: 

"Despite the legends Mr. Hill was a 
very flexible man. I persuaded him to 
change many of his basic advertising 
policies within a year after I joined 
American Tobacco. 

"While Mr. Hill wanted repetition in 
advertising he believed that people tire 
of everything so he asked for some- 
thing new every six months. Certain 
themes, though, like our tobacco story, 
were never changed." 

In 1941 Weaver got a leave of ab- 
sence from American Tobacco to head 
radio for the Coordinator of Inter- 
American Affairs. Later on he spent 
two years in the Navy as skipper of 
an escort vessel; then nine months pro- 
ducing Command Performance, war- 
time radio show for men overseas. 

Weaver came back to American To- 
bacco for a short time after the war 
but in 1947 rejoined Y&R as vice presi- 
dent in charge of radio and television; 
he went on to NBC from there. 

Weaver's interest in technology and 
close attention to what goes on in the 
RCA laboratories has led him to make 
the following predictions over the past 
few years: 

• "The television screen will ... be 
usable for showing material recorded 
in the machine from transmission dur- 
ing the night so that news, music, 
weather, time and features are avail- 
able by push button on arising." 

• Pocket-sized tv sets which throw 
an image on a wall will be available 
as soon as scientists have been able to 
develop a light amplifier (this latter 
is one of the several major electronic 
discoveries David Sarnoff has asked 

U JANUARY 1954 



his research men to deliver for him). 

Demonstration of a i\ tape recordei 
by RCA has already brought Weaver's 

prediction about 1 • ie. ording of t\ 

programs close to a possibility. Man) 
of Weaver's other predictions about 
electronic advances are less a ien< e fi< 
tional than you might think. David 
Sarnoll himself ha- mi urea-ion -poken 
in similar terms of tomorrow's elec- 
tronic living. 

Weaver's interest in technology pi.. I,. 
ably makes him all the more valuable 
to RCA because the companj i- in an 
era when encouragement of new de- 
vices is getting top priority. 

Weaver's Renaissance Man personal- 
ity, whipping diversities togethei a- it 
does, is best illustrated l>\ what he has 
to say. He had this socially conscious 
remark in the grand maimer to make 
to NBC TV affiliates at Boca Raton in 
the fall of 1951 : 

"Used for good, used intelligently, 
this medium |tv] can communicate an 
upthrust to the mental level, the matur- 
ity level, the knowledge level, the alert- 
ness level of this nation that will bring 
about almost a mutation in us." 

In the spring of the next year some 
remarks to a Newsweek reporter give 
you a fair sample of his sense of hu- 
mor: 

"I'm a frustrated writer. 1 often 
wonder, as my artists fawn on me and 
I sit counting my monev, how I stand 
it." 

Another example of the amateur 
Weaver humor (his brother Doodles 
Weaver is a professional comedian) 
dates to his early years in radio. Out 
on the Coast all the radio directors 
and producers papered their walls with 
pictures of famous stars, complete with 
the personal dedication. Weaver put 
a picture of a man with a beard on his 
wall which bore the following dedica- 
tion: "To Pat from J. C." 

Weaver has a reputation among his 
friends for being stubborn and cour- 
ageous. He gets loyalty amomj those 
who work for him. A lot of his pasl 
and present associates are waiting t" 
see whether Weaver will drop hi- aver- 
sion for wearing a hat now that lie - 
NBC president. 

"If he put on more of the stuffed- 
shirt manner. he*d of been where he i- 
before now," a man who worked with 
him in years past commented to spon- 
sor. 

Weaver in the flesh is friendly, in- 
formal. People who have watched his 



rise it NBC OVet the past four years 

saj In- ni. inn. i i- prett) neai tie- tame 

t" all jllliioi . \.-. utivi mi ].i • |,i .,-- 

•ind pi, \ ei i onde* ending. Hi- spa 
and the long memos he « i ite* to pro- 
pose neu program ideas have been 
compared to the efforts of a < ompi 
ulio hag more in In- In-. id than he ■ an 
put mi tin' - ore. Ili- sentero -•- fre- 
quentlj take "If f..i one place and ai 
mm- Bomewhere else I" • bum • •! all the 
ideas \\ eavej has gotten along the way. 

Bj waj "I contrast In* letters to peo- 
ple in the industr) are often hand 
written and one-sentence long. But he 
usuallj manages to squeeze some per- 
sonalit] into even the one sent< n< 

V\ ' avei has a reputation .,- , 
team man. He believes the organiza- 
tion should be able t" carr) out the 
philosophy he comes up with. \\ hen 
he gets mad at the team during work 
on a projei t. he's likelj to say, "\\ hat 
are we, a bun< b of morons?" rathei 
than cracking the whip directl) at 
subordinates. 

Mingled with \\ eaver's own phrases 
you re likelj to find show business and 
advertising slang. ""I don't dig that," 
he'll -a\ . i ii he'll put the suffiz "wise" 
on weld- as in tlii- fragment from a 
recent Weaver -ent.-n, .•: . . speaking 
i ommunications-wise. . . .'" 

Weavei was married in 1942 to Eliz- 
abeth Inglis, a beautiful, dark-haired 
British girl, foi merlj a Broadwaj a< - 
tress. The) have two children, [rajan 
Victor Charles Weaver, 8, and Susan 
Alexandra, I. The Weavers live in 
Manhattan, have a summer home in 
Nmd- Point. I.inii: l-land. 

W < -a\ ei told I e\ \|, ( rarj ovei the 
air the other da) bow he went about 
naming his bo) fra jan the program 
was Weekend, participation-format ra- 
dio -how based on \\ eaver's "wn think- 
ing). \ Iran-. iipt of Weaver's expla- 
nation goes this wa) : 

"M\ wife and I decided we should 
get a first name for him that would 

give him identit\ on the telephone book 
page and Trajan had always appealed 
to me as the one unknown real!) great 
figure of all times; the man who quite 
probablv set the basi stabilk) which 
carried the Roman Empire along for a 
number of years and inaugurated the 
centun that i- in all histoi 

Said McCrary: "If he doesn't like 
the name. \ on can call him TV. 

In any case, t\ at NBC has 
pretty much historian-showman-phraa 
maker Weaver's baby. * * * 

103 




Is your timebuyer an expert? 

\\ here does your timebuyer stand in 
the echelons of your advertising 
agencj ? 

Do you respect his advice and his 
judgment? [s it possible that you en- 
trust him with the selection <>f stations 
fni major campaigns, yet consider him 
as little more than a clerk at other 
limes? 

In it- Id November 1053 issue SPON- 
SOR ran a profile on the expectations, 
aspiration-, remuneration and condi- 
tions of work of 85 timebuyers in all 
parts of the U.S. Since that time many 
timebuyers have come to us with added 
information: some of which will be 
treated in forthcoming issues. From 
theii confidings one dominant thought 
emerged: "If we're asked to do the 
work of an expert, we want to be treat- 
ed like one." 

Young X Rubicam is one agem \ 
that doesn't downgrade the timebuyer. 
\\ ilh the thought that both the time- 
Inner and the spacebmer should know 
the client's objectives, converse with 
him when necessary, astute A. V. B. 
Ceoghegan. vice president and director 



of media, undertook two years ago to 
convert them into media buyers. 

The conversion has not been ea-\ : 
nor i- it complete. Hut it is interesting 

to note that at ^ \\\. with its s\stem of 
four media supervisors, I!! media bu\- 
ers and a -mall arm) of assistant me- 
dia buyers ami estimators, everj ac- 
i mint man seeks out the advice of the 
media buyer, regards him as the expert. 

\ii advertising has developed so 
swiftl) that secretaries have become 
timebuyers overnight. But whatever 
the timebuyer was yesterday, todaj 
Mm are asking him to do the work of 
an expert. 

If you want him to think like one. 
you must treat him like one. 



The hidden audience 

Network daytime radio, faced with 
the competition of strong davtime tv 
programing, is in for some hard knocks 
during 1954. 

The nets are not unprepared. They're 
cooking up new strategv. new pro- 
gram forms, improved selling methods. 

Too, there will be a considerable 
push to get advertisers to recognize 
and use the values of auto and other 
out-of-home listening. 

But will anyone during 1954 count 
the hidden radio audience, the indi- 
vidual set audience in den. kitchen, 
basement, bedroom, bathroom and 
porch? Will anyone count the hours 
Junior spends halfway under the bed 
listening to the Lone Ranger, or the 
episodes of Hilltop House. Guiding 
Light, and Second Mrs. Burton that 
mother takes in as she bakes a pie? 

The printed media count copies. Ra- 
dio and t\ count onl\ what the rating 
services record. And in our opinion 
no rating service is set up to take the 



full count of the hidden am audience. 

For its failure to count its full audi- 
t-in e. onl) the broadcasting industry is 
tn blame. If the advertiser is guided 
by a decline in listening as recorded by 
inadequate ratin» systems, only the 
broadcasting industry is to blame. The 
advertiser has no axe to grind, he has 
no vested interest in an\ single ad me- 
dium. 

He goes by the signs. And what the 
rating services report happens to be 
one that he uses most. 

• • • 

What every dept. store should know 

sponsor's complete and factual story 
on what happened to department store 
business during the New York news- 
paper strike in December (see 28 De- 
cember 1953 issue i can profit any de- 
partment store ad manager. 

It doesn't prove that newspapers are 
an unnecessary medium. To the con- 
trary, broadcast salesmen have alwa\s 
maintained that since a big segment of 
the population is eye-minded news- 
papers are the best way to reach these 
millions. Too, there are other un- 
duplicated values that newspapers offer 
for department store advertising. 

But should radio and television be 
forgotten? 

The results of the New ^ oik strike, 
coupled with hundreds of accumulat- 
ing case histories, reveal that as de- 
partment stores fight for increased 
business the air media must be more 
effectively and frequently used. 

Millions of shoppers are ear-minded. 
Radio is their big medium. This point 
has been frequently demonstrated bv 
ARBI Studies and other research proj- 
ects. During 1954 the alert depart- 
ment store executive can't afford to ig- 
nore the air opportunity. 



Applause 



They deserve it 

In a problem-besel industry, the ten- 
• bin \ in forget the achievements is 
great. Here are onlj a lew for 1953: 

1. Congratulations to VBC for Dan- 
ny Thomas, Raj Bolger, George Jes- 
sel, Paul I lai t n i.i ii ami a floi k of other 
bright t\ -hows. 

2. Congratulations to John Fetzer 
and his industry-minded (ode com- 
mittee for keeping t\ stations ami spon- 



sors minded of their public obligations 
in the matter of good taste. 

3. Congratulations to several agen- 
cies who resigned lucrative accounts 
rather than do second-rate jobs. 

1. Congratulations to General Sar- 
in ill. Dr. Baker, and hundreds of oth- 
ers who proved the ingenuit) of \mer- 
i< an enterprise in the development of 
t\ color standards. 

5. Congratulations to countless sta- 
tions who pitched in during 1953 with 



generous allotments of time for the 
public welfare. 

(>. Congratulations to Kenvon i\ 
Eckhardt and its several clients who 
stepped up their "adoption" of home- 
less children. 

7. Congratulations to national reps 
Blair, NBC Spot. Katz. Christal, on 
some L953 projects that helped all. 

!'.. Congratulations to BMI. BAB. 
and NARTB on their effective series 
of L953 meetings and clinics. 



104 



SPONSOR 




For Years, The KMBC-KFRM Team has 
been the undisputed leader among the radio 
stations in the great Kansas City primary 
trade area. As the sixth oldest CBS radio 
affiliate, KMBC has enjoyed the audience 
that goes with the nation's number one 
radio network. Arthur B. Church's 32 years 
of radio know-how are the key to the 
Team's leadership in local programming 
and the finest of facilities. 

In television, KMBC-TV is the "Big I" in 
Kansas City— both literally and figuratively. 
With the CBS Television Network (KMBC-TV 
shares time with WHB-TV on Channel 9), 
KMBC-TV immediately took the spotlight 
and its fair share of audience. (A special 
promotion tie-in with TV Preview Magazine 
conducted before Channel 9 had been 
on the air a month resulted in nearly 12,000 
pieces of mail). KMBC-TV originates eight 
live TV programs daily to add to the 
station's popularity. More are to be added 
in the near future 

KMBC-TV, the big "I" of television in 
Kansas City, and The KMBC-KFRM Team, 
undisputed radio leader in the Heart of 
America, belong on your sales force See 
your nearest Free & Peters colonel now 



KMBC TV 



BASIC AFFILIATE CBS TELEVISION NETWORK . . . SHARING TIME WITH WHB-TV 




channel 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 




,f KMBC-KFRM 

r CBS RADIO FOR THE HEART OF AMERICA 




1 



lagazine radio and W advertisers use 



25 JANUARY 1954 



I iflW If 



"America's Most 

Listened-To Independent 

Station!" 



M A 



f T , HE largest total audience of any Omaha station . w.jhfi la r or si 
share of audience, of any independent station irflAfeVrbi. v(]arU 
there be any question what station is the top buy in the Omaha- 
Council Bluffs area? Not according to media buvJ^ftjheO^tlQM 
over! Ask our national representatives. The Boiling Company, 
for proof . . . their files are bulging with it ! N gQ GENERAL LIBRARY 



le "Gruesome Twosome ...to Competition! 



In last place four months ago, WTIX now sports the top morning 
New Orleans Hooper ( December, 1953) ! Hang on to your hats, 
but not your budget bucks . . . this station is going places in a 
hurry! Rates? A few bucks lands you a whale of a chunk of 
New Orleans air! 

Check with our newly appointed national representative. Adam J. 
Young, Jr., for details. With these top ratings, your investment 
today will pay tremendous listener-dividends tomorrow! 



The Independent 
with Mew Orleans 3 
Top Morning Hooper! 



THE NEW 



Wtixi 

NEW ORLEANS 16, LA. 



14 



50< per copy • $ 8 per year 



HOW BAB HELPS 
THE ADVERTISER 






page 21 



Wheatena sells "tiot 
breakfast 1 ' habit 
with spot radio 

page 31 

How much can 
you rely on ratings? 



page 34 




Color tv: what 
part does it play 
in tv film picture? 

page 54 



How well do reruns 
of tv film shows do? 







page 56 



II 



Film programs cha 
producers, syndica 
tors, costs 

page 67 



• 




WDVR 



CHANNEL 6 RICHMOND, VA. 



tvo vu 



MAXIMUM POWER 



100,000 Watts 



MAXIMUM HEIGHT 






1049 Foot Antenna 



LOCATED IN THE GEOGRAPHICAL 

CENTER OF THE CITY 
Not a half station located on 
the Atlantic Coast, but a whole Station 
Located 100 miles from the Coast in th 
State's Capitol, RICHMOND, VA. 



Statewide Coverage 






actual photo of the new 1049 ft. 
Self - Supporting Tower 




CHANNEL 



WDVR 



Service from all four Networks 
Represented Nationally by Blair TV. Inc. 
Wilbur M. Havens - Station Manager 
Havens & Martin Inc. - Richmond, Va. 



Do young women 
tune soapers? 



L&M has no 
super filter 



Nash can't find 
tv show slot 



Merger may spur 
more air use 



Tatham-Laird 
billings jump 



Air gets coffee 
in stores 



£P?f2 



25 






A9 5A 



Big soap opera sponsor is studying audience composition figures or 
its daytime radio strips. Company execs are mulling whether firm 
has ^skipped a generation" by sticking to soap operas. Figures show 
percentage of older women listening to radio tearjerkers is high with 
many younger women preferring d.j. fare. 

-SR- 

Cunningham & Walsh upper echelon says story making rounds that Lig- 
gett & Myers has new "chemical filter" cigarette has no basis. Story 
about super filter was termed explanation for L&M's failure to join 
Tobacco Council cancer research effort. C&W key men were surprised 
when decision to drop Godfrey came suddenly from L&M after prolonged 
discussion. Firm is shopping now for daytime and evening tv shows. 

-SR- 

Merger of Hudson with Nash-Kelvinator is not expected to have immedi- 
ate impact on air advertising. N-K, which sells its refrigerators on 
CBS TV's "Omnibus," still wants network tv show for Nash cars. But 
it can't find satisfactory slot. Both Hudson and Nash are heavy users 
of spot. Likelihood is Hudson cars will gradually drop out of picture. 

-SR- 

If Hudson account is lost by Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance, effect 
on agency won't be serious. Geyer, Nash-Kelvinator agency, would 
suffer more by loss of account. Behind merger was drop in market 
share of both cars last year. Hudson, particularly, has slipped bad- 
ly. Firm ranked 15th in sales in '53, 9th in '46. Possibility other 
mergers are coming among auto independents has personnel in their 
agencies sitting on edge of chairs. Net result of multiple mergers 
may be increase in air budgets all around as Big Three move to com- 
bat stronger firms created by mergers. 

-SR- 

Tatham-Laird, Chicago, is moving up fast among agencies making heavy 
use of radio, tv. Firm started placing business for 3 new air-spending 
accounts first week in January: (1) Wander Co.'s Ovaltine, other 
products; (2) Simoniz Co.'s Hilite and Body Guard; (3) Abbott Labs. 
Sucaryl. Agency's billings have almost tripled in past 3 years, are 
near $14 million with perhaps 2/3 of total from radio and tv. 

-SR- 

First 3 days of Chock Full o' Nuts coffee campaign in N.Y.C. you 
couldn't buy brand. Restaurant chain started new coffee's heavy 
air campaign early so consumers would as k for brand, help force dis- 
tribution. Now spending at rate of 5250,000 on WNBC, WNBT, brand 
got "95% distribution" quickly. Sponsor's wife is star of company's 
tv show. Agency for Chock Full o' Nuts is Frederick Clinton Co. 



SPONSOR. Volume 8, No. 2. 25 January. 1954. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc.. at 3110 Elm Are.. Ballim re. Ml I 

mlatlon Offices 40 E. 49th St. New York 17. $8 a year In U. 8. *9 elaewhere. Entered *a second clan matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md poaiotSc* under Act t Marefe 1879 



REPORT TO SPONSORS lor 25 January 1954 



BAB, SRA go 
direct to client 



Admen hush 
over Godfrey 



Personal set 
revolution grows 



Local color tv 
on its way 



Who's New in 
Film Syndication 



Radio set sales 
jump in tv cities 



Job of selling radio is being taken on more and more directly by 
trade groups. Both BAB (see page 27) and SRA are stepping up direct 
bids to advertiser. BAB's long-planned campaign to make "big retail- 
er" big radio customer got underway last week in 6-city offensive. 
Kevin Sweeney, new BAB president, is in process of visiting San Fran- 
cisco, Seattle, Portland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Baltimore to pre- 
sent radio's new selling arguments to major retailers. 

-SR- 

Most executives at agencies with Godfrey clients scuttle for cover if 
you ask whether latest Godfrey hassle worries them. But Y&R offi- 
cial made this statement: "Godfrey ' s a grea t salesman. That's our 
prime concern. " Y&R has bought morning Godfrey show, recently dropped 
by Liggett & Myers, for Bristol-Myers. 

-SR- 

Radio's personal set listening trend, which has revolutionized nature 
of medium, is getting added impetus from engineers. Emerson will put 
out low-priced table model with personal listening attachment that's 
light, attractive unlike old ear phones. Second attachment for per- 
sonal listening slips under pillow. But biggest growth in personal 
listening will come when printed circuits, transistors cut size so 
that everyone can carry own set. 

-SR- 

Among first stations to get color cameras from RCA so they can origi - 
na te colorc as ts locally will be: WKY-TV, Oklahoma City; WBAP-TV, Ft. 
Worth; WBEN-TV, Buffalo; WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee; WCCO-TV, Minneapolis; 
KTLA, Los Angeles. These stations, says RCA, should have equipment in 
first quarter 1954. 

-SR- 

Predictions tv film syndication business would wind up in lap of 
Hollywood majors have not panned out. Most new firms today enter 
field from 3 directions: (1) privately financed independent produc- 
ers like Bernard Prockter's First National; (2) star talent investing 
in tv like Ella Raines' Cornwall productions; (3) broadcasters get- 
ting into film to insure good supply of product, like Vitapix operation 
in which stations own stock, and General Teleradio's planned syndica- 
tion operation. (For searching film report see section starting 51.) 

-SR- 

You can win bets on who pays for lunch with this question: Do people 
buy many radio sets in mature television markets? Answer is that in 
15 top U.S. markets populationwise 38.5" more radios were sold in 
'53 than in '52 (first 39 weeks). See chart on page 30. 



\«'ir national spot radio and tv business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



P Ballantine & Sons. 

Newark. Nj 
C.vtcr Prods. NY 

Economics Labs. Min- 
neapolis. Minn 

McCormick & Co. Bal- 
timore 

Nestle Co. White 
Plains NY 



Beer 

Am. I Rise. Carter's 

Little Liver Pills 
Soilax 

Tea and spices 

Cookie-Mix. Scmi- 
Swcet 



|. Walter Thompson. 

NY 
SSCB. NY 

Schcidclcr. Beck & 

Werner. NY 
Cecil & Prcsbrcy. NY 

Cecil & Prcsbrcy. NY 



Eastern Seaboard radio and tv 

mkts 
Selected mkts. to expand to 

20 major mkts 
20 tv mkts all over the country 

31 radio and tv mkts. Eastern 

Seaboard and Southwest 
25 Midwestern radio stns 



Radio and tv: 20-scc. 60-sec anncts: 

mid-Jan: 52 wks 
Tv: ';-hr film prog: 1 Apr: 52 wks 

Tv: 3 to 5 mm film anncts a wk: 1 

Feb: 13 wks 
Radio and Tv: 60-scc live dayti anncts: 

18 |an: 13 wks 
Radio: 60-scc dayti anncts: 8 Feb; 10 

wks 



SPONSOR 



fii 



They live on the Pacific Coast 



They listen to Don Lee 



V 



1^7 « 



■y- 



f 



^ V 



9 



/ ' 






■l 



*i 



«*V 



V| 



U 



Don Lee /S Pacific Coast Radio 

Of Ihe four major networks, only one has stations in the 45 important 
Pacific Coast markets - DON LEE, the nation! greatest regional network. 






RADIO 



Don Lee Broadcasting S 
Hollywood 28, California, 
represented nationally by 
H-R Representatives, Inc. 








advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



Bo i/« ii yet l/i<' in os I out of BIB services? 

Broadcast Advertising Bureau aids available to clients, agencies include presen- 
tations tailored for your needs, cumulative audience studies, product information 

It ml in set sales leatl ft* by 6*9% in big ft* markets 

CBS Radio Spot Sales study shows radio set sales were 69% above tv set sales 
for first 39 weeks of 1953. Study covers major U.S. markets 

ffoir It ft cafe* n« makes 'em eat breakfast 

Buying early-morning radio time in order to reach the whole family, especially 
adults, is hot cereal firm's strategy. Wheatena uses about I 10 stations nationally 

11 luii httppens irhen you write to the sponsor? 

SPONSOR editor sent postcards to 25 tv sponsors praising their programs, ask- 
ing for literature or tickets. You'll be interested to learn how many of the 
group responded to this informal survey, and in what fashion 

Batinys are here to stay, btif . . . 

Ward Dorrell, veteran researchman, now Research Director at John Blair, shows 
how ratings for the same program often vary widely 

SPO\SOR index for second half of 1953 

Articles and departments are indexed here under convenient headings. Extra 
copies of this index are also available to subscribers without charge 



27 



:$o 



31 



32 



34 



109 



Volume 8 Numbc 
25 January 1954 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 
AGENCY AD LIBS 
49TH & MADISON 
NEW AND RENEW 



MR. SPONSOR, Henry Gellerman 

P. S. 

TV RESULTS 



NEW TV STATIONS 

FILM TOP 20 

AGENCY PROFILE, L. T. Steele 

SPONSOR ASKS 

ROUND-UP 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



1M5-I TV FILM SECTION 

Over-all look at ft* film proyram field 

Major developments in the tv film field, including growth of the industry, sales 
patterns, programing developments, merchandising, key trends 52 

Color ft* ami film 

Round-up of latest data on what film programs are being shot in color, what 

the cost picture is, equipment and processing problems, advice to sponsors 5-f 

I! i' runs of ft* HI m shims 

Latest research on how well reruns do, what pricing formulas are, how reruns 

figure in film industry financing Cfl 

Costs of tv film shows 

Charts, pictures give breakdown of exactly where the money goes 58 

Tips on tv HI in proyram buyiny 

10 tips from experts to would-be sponsors of tv film shows fJ2 

Tr film proyrams listiny 

14 pages of charts showing what film programs are available to sponsors, who 
produces these programs, who syndicates them, how they range in cost 07 

lr film syndictttors listiny 

Directory of syndicates is arranged alphabetically, includes sales contacts and 

phone numbers for easy reference «J*> 



COMING 



/ In- ft* film industry: commercials 

SPONSOR covers all aspects of the film commercial field, including latest 
developments, production problems, producers, costs, effect of color, tips H Feb. 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glen 
Editorial Director: Ray Lapica 
Managing Editor: Miles Divid 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J.. 
Department Editor: Lila Lederman 
Assistant Editors: Evelyn Konrad, Joan 
Marks, Keith Trantow 
Contributing Editor: Bob Foreman 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cc 
(Western Manager), Wallace Engelr 
(Midwest Manager), Homer Griffith (S 
west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Produ 
Manager), Ed Higgins 

Vice-President-Business Mgr.: Bernard PI. 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Safz ( 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearma 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
combined with TV. EierullTe. Editorial. Clmjlatlo 
Advertising Offices : 49th A Madison (40 E. 49UJ 
New York IT, N. T. Telephone: MVrrar H1U I 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Grand Are. Phone: SI 
7-9863. Dallas Office: Ioterurban Building. 1500 1 
St Phone: Randolph TS81. West Coast Office: 6*1 
set Boulevard. Los Angeles. Telephone: Hollywood ' 
Printing Office: 3110 Elm Are . Baltimore 11. Md. * 
srrlptlons: United States 18 a year. Canada and ' * 
J9. Single copies 50c. Printed In V. S. A. Addr « 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St.. New Tort IT. 1 
MTrray Hill 8-1771 Copyright 1953. SPONSOR 
LICATI0NS INC 



Things have changed 
in ARKANSAS, too! 



A, 



LONG with so many other States in the South, 
Arkansas is a far better market than many old-timers 
hink. One example : Effective Buying Income per 
'amily is up 195.1% over ten years ago!'* 

ifou can reach almost all of Arkansas, now, with one 
adio station— 50,000-watt KTHS in Little Rock, 

}BS, and the only Class 1-B Clear Channel station 

n the State. KTHS delivers primary daytime coverage 
f 250,694 radio homes. Secondary, interference-free 

daytime coverage includes 73 of the State's 75 counties 
nd brings the number of radio homes up to a 

vhopping 823,881 ! 

*Vrite direct or ask your Branham man for all the big 
iCTHS facts, today. 



; Sales Management figures 




50,000 Watts ... CBS Radio 

Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management As KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 

B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



KTHS 

BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 





^2 %? 



PACIFIC COAST'S 

2nd 
LARGEST MARKET 

"OAKLAND 

SAN FRANCISCO 

BAY AREA" 

with KLX 

The Bay Area's Dominant and 

Only independent station 

broadcasting 



5000 WATTS 







No. 1 in News • Sports • Music 
THE TRIBUNE STATION 

TRIBUNE TOWER 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Represented Nationally by 
Burns-Smith Company 



ffcirioti E. ttt'utvr. ) mini; & Rubicam, Chicago, 
buys time tor American Bakeries < «.. makers of 
Grennan Cakes and Haystee Bread. "The main 
problem in buying for this account is the fact that 
distribution is in markets Mattered across the coun- 
ts." Marion says. "Also, si rue ue want to be on 
the housewife's mind year-round, I buy spot 
announcements ami programing tar this sponsor 
in four continuous 13-weeA cycles." This job keeps 
Minimi constantly busy reviewing schedules and 
availabilities on stations throughout the country. 



Avail*? Auffi'. Lennen & \<i<<7/. New York, 
leefs cOSt-per-1,000 should be used as a yardsluk 
in buying radio, but must not lie the only 
determining factor. "A low cost-per-1,000 in the 
middle of a boxing match is line." she says, "but 
not if you're selling baking flour." It's the com- 
bination of various yardsticks that assures a time- 
buyer of a good buy. a station's share of audiem e. 
relative strength of the competing station's pro- 
graming, type of audience reached, strategy of 
competing product all as vital as cost-per-M. 



Martin T. Kane Jr. .Hewitt. Ogilvy, Benson 
X- Mather. New York, thinks that the more a 
timebuyer I. nous about print media, the quicker 
will he grasp over-all strategy lor a particular 
client. "Also, he'll be able to strengthen his nun 
position." Martin adds, "and explain his choice o\ 
stations and adjacencies better, it he can show 
how they fit into the over-all plan." At his agency 
timebuyers are invited to attend print presenta- 
tions, and Martin does so whenever possible. His 
accounts: Helena Rubinstein. Dunhill Cigarettes. 



Saltan Taplinqer. dire, tor of rudio-tv, 
Hirshon-Garfield, New York, feels combining power 

stations and small independents is the ideal way of 
covering a market tor a regional spot client. "Or 
course." he adds, "some products just naturally 
seem to lend themselves to advertising over local 
stations predominantly. Take used COTS, tor example: 
Local d.j. shows are one ot the most effective 
Ways ot promoting used i ar sales." However, he 

ises both wide coverage and local impact 
lor a successful regional radio campaign. 



SPONSOR 



WHAM! 



WHAM 




The new engineering reports now show 
WHAM-land has grown. This rapidly 
growing market packs a more than two 
billion annual sales potential. Area loyalties 
notwithstanding, people hear and shop 
from WHAM Radio as far east as Utica, 
west to Erie and south into Pennsylvania. 
More than AV2 million people live, work 



and buy in this area. 

Put this 50,000 watt colossus to work 
selling your product or service for you. 



WHAM's market has everything — three of 
New York State's major metropolitan areas, 
highly profitable farms, twenty of the coun- 
try's twenty-one principal industries, vaca- 
tion playgrounds and homes. 

Thousands and thousands of buyers 
throughout this territory comment daily, 
"We heard it on WHAM." It's a ready mar- 
ket to buy anything you have to sell. 






LET 



WHAM 



SELL FOR YOU 



• Write, Wire or 
Phone WHAM or 
Hollingbery for 
Availabilities. 



The STROMBERG CARLSON Station, Rochester, N.Y. Basic NBC • 50,000 watts • clear channel • 1180 Ice 

GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY, National Representative 



25 JANUARY 1954 



Muster PLUS discloses 

lively doings after dark on the 

Mutual Radio Network 



ICGE 



m ere: 





TIME: January, 1952. 

EVENT: MBS presents Multi-Message Plan. 

SCOPE: Ten star shows added to evening lineup; 
national participation provided in top five 
(Monday-Friday, 8 pm) for unprecedented 
cumulative-reach effectiveness. 

RESULTS: First-year sponsors include General Mills. 
R. ]. Reynolds Tobacco . . . total: 7. 



•NirUpn Ratines. All tommmul BOmpt tU iOD 8-8:30 p.m.. 
Mnn.-Fri., Jan. -Oct. - S2 \, Jj.. Od [ul] •>■ \-l Main). 



TIME: January, 1953 

EVENT: MBS improves Multi-Message Plan. 

SCOPE: Nighttime radio given additional boo; 
by revamp of 8 pm lineup on MBS; 
preceded by news and followed by st 
drama and quiz programs at 8:30. 

RESULTS: Ratings soar 17? on MBS (off 13%, 255 
23* on other nets)*; 2nd-year sponsor 
Rromo-Seltzer, General Mills. Lever h 
P.L'G.. Reynolds Tobacco . . . total: 13 







For immediate details on 
remaining availabilities, 
reach for your phone now: 



1 



: 



TIME: January, 1954. 

SVENT: MBS improves Multi-Message further. 

SCOPE: Three strongest shows in '53 lineup now aug- 
mented by Squad Room and Madeleine Carroll; 
Multi-Message array now preceded by 
Perry Como and Eddie Fisher at 7:45 pm. 

RESULTS: Still greater reach, economy, sales-profit 
for still more clients; better entertainment 
for more listeners; clearer proof of 
vitality of nighttime radio for . . . you. 




LO 4-8000 New York 

WI1 4-5060 Chicago 

HO 2-2133 Los Angeles 



"TO 

PUSH 

A PRODUCT 
YOU GOTTA PUT 

STRENGTH 

BEHIND IT" 




And we've got the muscle . . . 
FOUR TOP DISC JOCKEYS, 
whose programs establish 
KSDO as San Diego's first 
station ... the one with most 
listeners.'' 

May we show you how KSDO 
can help yau muscle-in on this 
billion dollar market. 



HOOPER and 
NIELSEN 



KSDO 

1130 KC 5000 WATTS 



Representatives 
Fred Slubbins - los Angeles 
Daren McGovren - Son Fiancisco 
John E. Peorson, Co. - New York 




l>\ Hob /■ oreman 

If in the following few paragraphs I sound like an expert 
in retail advertising, you can chalk it up to the three months 
in 1936 1 put in wrapping stationery for a large New York 
department store. This experience gave me what is 50 often 
referred to as the "retail feel,"* a <pialit\ that evidently is 
lacking in so many advertising men and women these days 
according to the folk- who work in the retail end of our 
business. 

As an old department store man. therefore, I watched the 
recent retail rush to broadcast media which the New York 
Citj newspaper -ti ike perpetrated. Bulwarking m\ own rich 
experience with the interesting discussion of this situation in 
this \<t\ magazine a few issues hack [28 December, page 
30]. I have come up with some thoughtful conclusions. To 
w it: 

The copy used by most of the retailers during the strike 
was as unsuited to either radio or television as a one-minute 
radio spot would he running verbatim in newspapers. How- 
ever, the reverse of this (running print copy over the air) 
seems to be about what most stores did. 

I realize that they were pressed for time and that the copy- 
writers who labor within earshot of the sale- counters are 
perfectionists as well as perhaps neophyte- when it come- to 
radio and television. Hut there must have been some better 
way to make up for this lack of experience and time espe- 
cially at so crucial a period as just prior to the Christmas 
season. One store did. I understand, engage the >ervice- ol 
an agency which gave them access to writer- and production 
people who could approach broadcasting a- an old and fa- 
miliar friend rather than a fearsome new gimmick which 
might darn well work and. if SO, cau-e upheaval in the Store's 
ad department once management discovered the fact- about it. 

Since I al-o -pent one summer ( 1933) a- a runner in Wall 
Street, this. I believe, also gives me leave to analyze the finan- 
cial overtones of the Strike a- they pertain to the retail -ale- 
curve (how"- that for Wall Street phraseology?). However 
after reading everything from the U all Street Journal to horo- 
scopes 1 -till can't figure out if the absence of newspapers 
helped or hurl department store sales. And I doubt if the 
-tore- know thcm-cl\ es. 

If -ale- were actually down and this fact could be directly 
traced to the inability to put ad- in print, it >till doesn't mean 
i Please turn to page 1- 






10 



SPONSOR 



Now every other TV home in 
Milwaukee enjoys top rated 
CBS programming on WCAN- 
TV. ( onversions continue to 
soar! 235,000 UHF sets and 
onl) \h weeks i hi the .ur 

(Look lo 60% b) Vebruat) nth) 




Write now for rate cards and 
success stories 



Milwaukee 



*ARB Survey on 

5:30 — 6:30 P.M. Monday — Friday 
"Tales of the West" computed on bas 
20 quarter hours. 



Basic Optiona 



ReDresenred Nationally by 

Ale« Roienmon • 347 Madiion Avenue 

New York. New York 



25 JANUARY 1954 



11 



WHEN I SEENG 



SENOR 

THEY LEESTEN 





HERE'S WHY . . . 

KIFN, and only KIFN, reaches more than 
85,000 Spanish-speaking people in Phoenix 
and Central Arizona. This Spanish popula- 
tion spent nearly $20,000,000 in retail sales 
during 1952. They account for nearly 20% 
of Arizona's population. 

Remember, if you sell in Arizona . . . 
you should sell in Spanish. And to reach 
• his rich market, you must use KIFN, 
Arizona's only full time Spanish Language 
•tdtion. 

<££$}p\MO BEANS? SI. SENOR, 
>1| LOVE THEM! 

I helped sell 10 tons of 
them for Basha's Markets, 
Phoenix, during a recent 
week-end. Ask Mr. Ed Kearns 
at Basha's. 



AH, SENOR, WHAT AN 
ANGLE FOR A SIESTA! 

Using KIFN, Quality Furni- 
ture Company increased sales 
to Mexican people from 5% 
of volume to over 40% 
two years. Ask 
Mr. Al Garcia, Pres- 




&?*> 



ident. 



SENORA COW, SHE NEVER 
GIVE MILK LIKE THEES! 

In one year my listener 
sent 187,500 labels to Bor- 
den's Milk Company in return 
for china plates. Check with 
Mr. Sporleder at Borden's. 



'Statistics from Valley 
National Bank Survey. 



Ask These Yanquis About Me! 




IOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

HARLAN G. OAKES 

AND ASSOCIATES 

672 S. LaFayette 

Park Place 



NEW YORK, 
N. Y. 

NATIONAL 
TIME SALES 
17 E 42nd St. 



KlfN 

"LA VOZ MEXICANA" 
860 Kilocycles • 1000 Watts 

REACHING PHOENIX, AND 
ALL OF CENTRAL ARIZONA 




& 



ll.UIISIU 



bponsob invites letters to the alitor. 
Address 40 E. 19 St., New York 17. 

ALL-MEDIA STUDY 

Please reserve for us three copies <>f 
sponsor's Mi-Media Evaluation Study. 
sponsor's media studies an- the big 
bai gain in research! 

Joseph Katz 

President 

The Joseph Kutz Co. 
Haiti more 
o SPONSOR'! Ul-Medla Sm<l> «i:i !>.- published 

in I ....k f.irni liit.-r in the >i-:ir. II c -c-r > :il loDl an 
acceptable no* h> writlne. t» i» Eaal it St.. 
New fork 17- 



READERS' SERVICE 

My thanks to SPONSOR and Vugusla 

Shearman for sending me additional 
information in response to m\ letter 
requesting data on the subject of re- 
peating radio and tv commercials. 

You ought to feel good about being 
consulted so many times for the an- 
swers to these main problems. In our 
own case you are the only publication 
we ever write in this regard, and you 
always come up with the answers. 

Thank you again for your fine co- 
operation. 

Ed La Grave Jr. 
Account Executive 
Lessing Advertising 
Des Moines 



NEWSPAPER STRIKE 

Congratulations as usual on your 
top-notch coverage of radio and tv in 
the New York newspaper strike. In the 
entertaining picture strip that accom- 
panied the storj | "What happened on 
the air when N. Y. C. newspapers went 
on strike." 28 December 1953, page 
30 |. you quote WCBS as claiming a 
record bj getting an announcement on 
the air within 40 minutes after the 
order was placed. 

On November 21 the Harwood Mar- 
tin \e.ene\ called ii- at 9:58 a.m. to 
j 1; e an order for our mutual client. 
the Woodward & Lothrop Department 
Store. There had been a slip in placing 
a new -paper ad announcing that Santa 
( Ian- had arrived al the store that \ erj 
Saturday morning. The first \\ ood- 
v.inl \ Lothrop announcement of 
Santa's arrival wa- read over WOMS 



al 10:01 a.m. From copy taken over 
the telephone and handed to our an- 
nouncer just as he was completing the 
newscast for another client the elapsed 



time wa- -i\ and 



one-half minutes. 

\1. Robkkt Rogers 

I' resident 

WGMS 

Washington. I). C. 



I'm sure all the New ^ ork stations 

owe a great deal to both SPONSOR and 
Broadcasting for your factual coverage 
of the strike situation. You both did a 
job for the industry that no single New 
^ ork station could do. 

Robert G. Pati 

Advertising di: Sales 

Promotion Mgr. 
WCBS TV, W York 



SPOT RADIO 

I notice a small discrepanc) between 
\oiir published estimates of spot radio 
volume for 1953. 

The sponsor estimate in the Decem- 
ber 14 issue ['"12 big spot clients: bow 
they use the medium." Part one, 14 
December 1053. page 30]. is $130,- 
000,000 spot radio time sales for 1053. 
John Blair's estimate of sl35.non.nini 
spot radio time sales for 1053 appears 
in \our issue of December 28 ["12 big 
spot clients: how the\ use the medi- 
um," Part two. page 39]. 

Both vou and we will probably be 
charged with being undub conserva- 
tive. In any event, the consistent, sub- 
stantial, ever increasing growth of na- 
tional spot radio is a great tribute to 
the sales power of the medium, to its 
flexibiliu in meeting new conditions 
and to the success of all of the promo- 
tion and sales efforts of those far-seeing 
radiomen whose imagination sets no 
limit to the continuing growth of the 
medium. 

T. F. Flan lgan 

Managing Director 
Station Representatives 

Association 
Veto York 



12 



INDEPENDENT RADIO 

Congratulation- on what we ((insider 
one of the finest articles ever published 

about the independent radio stations 
["How to get the most out of an inde- 
pendent station." 2!! December 1053. 
page 12 . We feel the article printed 

i Please turn to page 15 I 

SPONSOR 



A Real "Hooper- dooper" 

FIRST TIME EVER ! 

Coincidental Hooperatings . . . 




1 - HOMES 

SEPTEMBER THRU DECEMBER 1953 

2 -AUTOMOBILES 

NOVEMBER 1953 

3 -GROCERY STORES 

OCTOBER-NOl EMBER 1953 



COMPLETE RADIO LISTENING ANALYSIS 
OF SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 

W^ [^ W^ W*™ copies are available to all 
1 il Ih Emm 1953 National Sponsors of 
Syracuse Radio and their advertising agencies. 

Reports contain all 3 authoritative studies grouped for easy comparison. 

This offer expires Feb. 10, 7954 




MAIL 

THIS 

COUPON 



* 



MEMBER OF ASSOCIATION OF 
DEPENDENT METROPOLITAN STATIONS 



STATION WOLF— SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Without charge or obligation please send our free copy of the 
3-Wcty Syracuse Hooperatin/g to: 



Name 

Sponsor or agent 
Street Cr number 
City and State 
Account placed 



Here, m 76 words, is the 

Abilene story 

KRBC-TV is the only television 

service in the 1 8-county Abilene 

trade territory 

In that territory are 236,586 
persons living in 78,073 house- 
holds (1950 census) They 
spent $312,772,000 over 
retail counters in 1952, 
$84,662,000 of that in Abilene 

In the first 1 20 days of 

KRBC-TV operation more than 

one-fourth of those families 

bought television sets. 

Our rates are reasonable— 

$150 basic hourly rate, $18.00 

for one-minute announcements.* 

May we serve you? 

'Film rate only 
Camera charge extra 




ABILENE 
TEXAS 

NBC, ABC, and DuMont 

Networks 

Effective Radiated Power 
Video 29.5 KW 
Audio 14.7 KW 

Hi prt si nil d Nationally by 

JOHN E. PEARSON TV, INC. 

Kces 

New York • San Francisco 

Chicago • Los Angeles • Minneapolis 

'/'< tas Aram, its Only 

AIRWAVES ASSOCIATES 

Dallas—-,/ North Field Si 
Room 76 • : El . ~ RI-5612 

Houston — $20 Loveit ltd., No. 
1-D; II 16 




14 



SPONSOR 



1 



in SPONSOR will give the independent 
radio stations a great deal of assistance. 
Please send us 300 reprints of this 
story. 

John A. Engelbrecht 

President 

W1KY and W1KY-FM 

Evansville 

• Reprinla <>f the article, "How to «et the most 
out of an independent radio station," cost 25c 
apiece. Quantity prices on request. 



In nt\ book you've performed a real 
service to independent operators 1>\ 
publishing your article on independent 
stations ["How to get the most out of 
an independent station," 28 December 
1953, page 42]. Congratulations to 
the sponsor staff for an excellent job! 
We'd appreciate receiving 50 re- 
prints of the article so that we can dis- 
tribute them in our area. 

Tim Elliott 

President & General Manager 

WCUE, Akron 



TV BASICS 

I greatly appreciate \our television 
statistics. 

"Tv Basics" is a very nice looking 
report. We found the figures contained 
therein to be not only useful but in- 
teresting for our purposes. 

If it has not come to your attention 
before, you might be interested to know 
that the Miami area now has three tv 
outlets and is expected to have three 
more within the next year. 
Michael W. R. Davis 
First Research Corp. of Florida 
Miami 



MESSAGE REPEATERS 

A few months ago your "Report to 
Sponsors" carried an article about my 
newest aid to merchandising — namely, 
message repeaters. At this time I am 
pleased to report to you a couple of 
case histories of the terrific impact 
message repeaters have at point-of-sale. 

In a 13-week spot campaign Sunny 
Jim Syrup used message repeaters in 
65 different locations for one week at 
a time in each location. In all of these 
stores sales of Sunny Jim Syrup went 
up at lea?t 100% over any previous 
week. 

We have just started a campaign for 
a new product — Ivar's Clam Chowder. 
The Tradewell group of super markets 
1 32 stores controlling 10^r of the 



Greater Seattle grocer) business) al- 
lowed us a test store w ith a I > < ase dis 
play. \\ e pul this displa) up with a 
message repeater on Fridaj noon, and 
by Saturda) nighl had Bold I" cases. 
I lie heads of Tradewell were bo pleased 
that tbe\ gave us free rein to >ct up 
mass displays in .ill 32 of their Btores. 
Bill Simpson 
KOL, Seattle I 



WHO LISTENS 

Thanks \er\ much Im the rep) ints of 
the Politz article which appeared in 
your December 14 issue ["Who li-tens 
. . . were . . . when . . . whj . . .", page 
36]. I think you did a \er\ fine job and 
I am glad to hear that you haw- made 
20,000 reprints of the storj for <li-tri- 
bution. 

\\ \ i. ri r Johnson 

Asst. Gen. Mgr. 
WT1C, Hartford 

• Reprints of the article, "Who listem," are 
available at 20u apiece Quantity prices on re. 
truest. 



WORKMANLIKE 

I enjoy the workmanlike treatment, 
the research and objectivity behind 
your magazine. 

Please send me your "Radio and Tv 
Director}." 

N. K. 1)dM)\ w 
L5 Fast 48 St. 
Sew ) ork 

• SPONSORS "Radio ;md l> Directory" is 
available free of charge. 



FARM ISSUE 

So much has been said about the 
October 19 issue of sponsor in the 
transcript of proceedings of the Na- 
tional Association of Radio Farm Di- 
rectors' New York meeting that I have 
been looking everywhere for m\ copy. 
I have failed to find it and I am afraid 
that this issue landed on an unappreci- 
ative desk here at \X ("MB. 

Do you have another cop) for me? 
I want to know where some of those 
advertising dollars dwell in this period 
of dropping agriculture prices and 
markets. I enjoy our other issues but 
of course the farm issue is vital to me. 

John \. ->mith 

Radio Farm Director 

WCMB 

Harrisburg-Lemovne. Pa. 
I Please turn to page 127) 




PERFECT1BALANCE 



^"P^ 



0. 



There's perfect balance with 
KMPC's powerful 50,000 

watts and Southern Califor- 
nia's vasl territory and great 

population. This means 
profitable radio selling. 
K\I PC is listened to and 
heard BUY° more people 
than could be reached I 
stations. 

"Yes, \vc mean BUY. Ask 
some of our contented 
clients who continuously sell 
and SELL on Southern Cali- 
fornia's "BIG TOP" indepen- 
dent radio station. 



Los Angeles, Calif. 

50.000 WATTS DAYS 
10.000 WATTS NIGHTS - ^ 



GENE AUTRY 
President 




R REYNOLDS. 
Vice Pres & 

Jen.Mgr. 



Represented Nationally by 
AM RADIO SALES COMPANY 

New York Los Angeles Chicago 



25 JANUARY 1954 



15 





You're seeing double 
in the daytime 



Today your chances for making Bales in 
daytime television have doubled... 

Because the l<> stations represented by 
CBS Television Spol Sales in two yean 

have : 

...doubled their daytime audiences, today 

attracting 14,500,000 different viewers 

...doubled their gains in multi-station 
markets, to win an average lead of 20' 

...doubled in economy, with COStS-per-M 
as low as 34 cents. 

These 10 stations are the best way to 
daytime television - and daytime television 
is the best way to 28 million housewiv< 
who spend over 204 million dollars 
each shopping day. 

In 1954 your sales picture will be brighter 

all clay long-on these 1<> big-volume 
television stations. 

CBS Television Spot Sales 

Representing wcbs-tv, New 'i .TV, Philadelphia; 

wtop-tv, Wash : ngt< n . wbtv. Charlotte; wmbk-tv. Jacksonville; 
wamt. Birmingham; wbbm-tv, Chicago 

in; K.--I.-TV. .- -v. kwt. Los Ancele* and 

CTi'N. < us Television Pacific Network. 



■ 







hp^ c ^...ort's r^jtifi* !^&& .'jotf 







\iWftfi- 







NBC -ABC - VUMONT 



276.ooo Waffs 
CHANNEL 36 



New and renew 




25 JANUARY 1954 



1. 



]%eu> on Television Networks 



2. 



3. 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



Associated Prods, NY 

Hazel Bishop, NY 
Capital Airlines, Wash, 

DC 
Emerol Mfg Co, NY 

Ceneral Motors, Detr 
Cold Seal I Class Wax). 

Bismarck, ND 
Mutual of Omaha, Omaha 

Mystic Adhesive Prods. 

Chi 
Quaker Oats, Chi 

Revlon Prods, NY 

SOS. Co, Chi 
SOS. Co, Chi 



S.O.S. Co, Chi 



Grey Adv, NY 

Raymond Spector, NY 
Lewis Edwin Ryan, Wash, 

DC 
Hilton & Riggio, NY 

Kudner, NY 
Campbell-Mithun, Mpls 

Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha 

George H .Hartman, Chi 

Sherman & Marquette, 

Chi 
William H. Weintraub. 

NY 
McCann-Erickson, Chi 
McCann-Erickson, Chi 

McCann-Erickson, Chi 



STATIONS 



NBC TV 50 

ABC TV 78 
NBC TV 51 

ABC TV 31 

CBS TV 84 
CBS TV 70 

ABC TV 33 

CBS TV 61 

CBS TV 51 

NBC TV 19 

NBC TV 80 
NBC TV 36 

NBC TV 51 



PROGRAM, time, itarf. duration 



Arthur Murray D.ince Party; M 7 30-45 pm: 18 

J.in, no. wks not set 
Dr. I. Q ; M 8:30-9 pm; 18 Jan. 52 wks 
Today; M-F 7-9 am; 39 partic 18 |an. 13 wks 

Tommy Hi nnch Sports Show; SjI 6-6 15 pm 

16 fan; 52 wks 

Motorama; W 10-10:45 pm; 20 |an only 

Jo Stafford Show; T 7 45-8 pm ; 2 Feb; 52 wki 

John Daly & the News; M. W 7 15-30 pm; 1 
Feb; 13 wks ico-sponsor with Whitehall ph.irm 

Carry Moore Show; F 1:45-2 pm seg; 15 Jjn. 
52 wks 

Contest Carnival; Sun 12:30-1 pm; 3 |.in. 52 wki 

Mr. & Mrs. North; alt T 10 30-11 pm: 26 Jan 

52 wks 
Hawkins Falls; alt M 11-11 15 ,im: 4 Jan. 52 wks 
Kate Smith Show; alt W 3.15-30 pm; half &» 

scg; 13 Jan; 52 wks 
Today; M-F 7-9 am; one partic per wk ; 7 Jan; 

52 wks 



Renewed on Television Networks 

SPONSOR AGENCY STATIONS 



Bauer & Black, Chi 
Bristol Myers, NY 

Faith for Today Inc. 
NY 

Ford Motor Co, Dear- 
born, Mich 

Hall Brothers, Kansas 
City, Mo 

Kraft Foods, Chi 

Lever Bros, NY 

Liggett & Myers Tob, 

NY 
Lincoln-Mercury Dealers, 

Detr 
R. J. Reynolds Tob, 

Winston-Salem, NC 



Leo Burnett, Chi 
DCSS, NY 

Rockhill Co, NY 

J. Walter Thompson, 

Chi 
FC&B, Chi 

J. Walter Thompson, 

Chi 
McCann-Erickson, NY 

Cunningham & Walsh, 

NY 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, 

NY 
William Esty, NY 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Du Mont 36 Twenty Questions: M 8-8:30 pm: 14 Dec: 55 wks 

CBS TV 66 Man Behind the Badge; Sun 9:30-10 pm ; 10 Jin 

52 wks 
ABC TV 21 Faith for Today; Sun 12:30-1 pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 

NBC TV 53 Ford Theatre; Th 9:30-10 pm; 31 Dec; 52 wks 

NBC TV 37 Hallmark Hall of Fame; Sun 5-6 pm; 3 Jan; 52 

NBC TV 49 Kraft Tv Theatre; W 9-10 pm; 6 Jan; 52 wks 

CBS TV 54 Arthur Codfrey Time; M, W 10:45-11 am; 4 

Jan; 52 wks 
NBC TV 89 Dragnet; Th 9-9:30 pm; 31 Dec; 52 wks 

CBS TV 123 Toast of the Town; Sun 8-9 pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 

NBC TV 70 Camel News Caravan; M-F 7:45-8 pm; I Jan; 

52 wks 



(See page 2 for New National Spot Radio and TV Business) 



Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 

NAME I FORMER AFFILIATION 



E. W. Berger 
Crawford Blagden 
William S. Blair 
C. S. Blakeslee 
Clifford E. Bolgard 
Brown Bolte 
Maria Carayas 
Herbert A. Carlson 
Cregory V. Drumm 

Leslie Dunier 
Charles F. Fleischmann 
M. Peter Franceschi 
W. A. Franchey 

Ceorge Ciese 
Dugald F. Gordon 
Ted J. Crunewald 
Joseph Cusky 
A. Could Harrison 



Kaiser-Frazer Sales Div,, Detr, vp 

Benton & Bowles, NY, acct exec 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY, res dir 

Wallace-Lindeman, Crand Rapids, acct exec 

Sherman & Marquette, Chi, media dir 

Benton & Bowles, NY, vp & acct supvr 

Roy S. Durstine, NY, timebuyer 

Own public rels and adv firm, Seattle 

Gibson Refrig Co, Greenville, Mich, mgr adv, sis 

prom 
Worth Stores, NY, adv dir 
Penick & Ford, Ltd, NY, adv, sis prom mgr 
FC&B Intl Div, pres 
Wilhelm-Loughlin-Wilson, Houston, vp chg new 

bus 
McCann-Erickson, NY, vp, dir intl div 
John Daniel Frey, Chi, acct exec 
William Esty, NY, radio-tv exec 
Lando Adv, Pittsb, dir consumer activities 
Westinghouse Elec, Pittsb, eastern distr sis prom, 

adv mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Geyer Adv, Detr. vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, bd of dir 

Hilton & Riggio, NY. timebuyer 

Crant Adv. Chi, vp 

Wallace-Lindeman, Crand Rapids, vp 

Emil Mogul. NY, radio, tv timebuyer 
Y&R. NY, contact exec 
Geyer Adv, NY, msr creative prodn 
Piedmont Adv, Salisbury, NC, mng dir 

Same, pres McCann-Erickson Intl Coip 
Zimmer, Keller & Calvert. Detr. acct exec 
Hicks & Crcist. NY, bus mgr tv-radio dept 
Same, partner 
Y&R. NY, contact exec 



(Continued next page) 

In next issue: New and Renetved on Radio Networks. Na- 
tional Broadcast Sales Executives. New Agency Appointment* 








Xumbers aitrr names 
refer to Neu and Re- 

I I . s ' :: '• ton 
John B. Simpson 1 3 i 

w. a: v- • •"•■■ 

Alan Sidnam 
Broun Bolte <3) 



25 JANUARY 1954 



19 



25 JANUARY 1954 



\pit- and renew 



3. 





5, 



6, 




*T>\ 




Advertising Agency fVr.s-oini<*f Chanyes (continued) 



M JMF 



Judson H. Irish 
Frank Kemp 
Howard Kuhn 
Robert Lansdon 
H B LcQuattc 
Muriel Mack 
Charles E. Patrick 
W H Poole 
Cardncr Rcamcs 
Roddy Rogers 
Dan Rubin 
Alan Sidnam 
John B. Simpson 
Edward Sonnenschein 
Richard Stanton 
Lawrence V. Stapleton 
David F. Titus 
Don E West 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Hewitt. Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY, copy chief 

Compton Adv, NY, asst media dir 

Compton Adv, NY, asst res dir 

N. W. Aycr, NY, acct exec 

Prcs, own agency 

Benton & Bowles. NY, timebuyer 

Donahue & Coe, NY, acct exec 

Y&R, Toronto, vp & mgr 

Comcr-Reames Adv, Kans City, partner 

WFIL-TV. Phila, exec prodr. dir 

Fedway Stores, NY. prom-mdsg stf 

Benton & Bowles. NY, vp & acct supvr 

FC&B, Chi, dir radio-tv dept 

Arthur Meyerhoff & Co, Chi, acct exec 

John Stanton & Son, NY, pres 

Crant Adv, NY, acct exec 

CBS. prog dir 

Standard Brands. NY, group brand mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Y&R, NY. contact exec 

Abbott Kimball, NY, vp. chmn pains bd 

Mcldrum & Fewsmith, Clevc, tv, radio timebiq 

Emil Mogul. NY, acct spvr Manischewitz Wine 

Y&R, Montreal, vp & mgr 

James R. Reese Adv, Kans City, exec 

Ward Wheelock, NY, mgr radio-tv prodn 

Huber Hoge & Sons, NY, acct supvr 

Same, bd of dir 

Same, vp 

Olian & Bronncr. Chi, acct exec & copy chief 

Ward Wheelock, Phila, creative exec 

Same, vp 

Mac Wilkins. Cole & Weber. Seattle, tv-radio I 

Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY, dir mi 



Sponsor E'er sonnet Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



M. F. Blakcslce 
Vincent P. Brunclli 
Ceorge Cohen 
Lawrence ). Cullen 

F. Harry Fletcher 
E. R. Glauber 

Richard B. Moller 
Norman Peterzcll 
Fred B. Walrath 



RCA. Camden, N|, dir distrib rels 
Personal Prods Corp, Milltown, NJ, dir paper div 
Emerson Radio & Phone Corp, NY, asst dir sis 
Automatic Controls Corp, Ann Arbor, Mich, natl 

sis mgr 
Bristol-Myers, NY, asst to exec vp chg sis 
Emerson Radio & Phono Corp, NY, dir Emerson 

distrib cos 
Pal Blade Co, NY, vp super mkt sis 
Biow Co, NY, acct exec P&C 
Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Conn, dis- 
trict mgr, elec hswares div 



Emerson Radio & Phono Corp, NY, dir distrib r 
Tek-Hughes, Watcrvliet, NY, dir adv, mdsg 
Same, eastern sis mgr 
Transparent Pkg Co, Chi, sis devel mgr 

Same, natl field sis mgr, prods div 

Same, also natl sis mgr for air-conditioning 

Hudson Pulp & Paper, NY, field sis mgr, tissue i 
Carter Prods, NY, prod mgr 
Same, regl mgr southeastern div 



Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



KCTY, Kans City, Mo, purch by Du Mont Labs from Empire 

Coil Co 
K|BS, SF, new natl rep Avery-Knodel 
WBEL, Beloit, Wis, new natl rep Hal Holman Co; power incr 

to 5000 watts 



WCHV. Charlottesville, Va. new natl rep Thomas F. Clark i 
WFAI, Fayctteville. NC, new natl rep Thomas F. Clark 
WTVU. Scranton. Pa, new natl rep Everett-McKinney 
WWEZ. New Orleans, new natl rep Ceorge W. Clark; 
rep Hollingbery 



New Agency Appointments 






SPONSOR 



Amboy Milk Prods, Amboy, III 

Amer Safety Razor Sorp, NY 
Block Drug, jersey City, N) 

Boyle-Midway, West Coast Div, 
Cadence Distrib Co, NY 
'Archie Bleyer, head) 
Clamorene, NY 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



LA 



Hearn Dept Stores, NY 

Kiwi Polish Co, Phila 

KMPC, LA 

KSAN-TV, SF 

MacArthur Prods, Indian Orchard, Mass 

McDonald & Arneson, Vallejo, Cal 

Mica-Seal Mfg, Berkeley, Cal 

Monarch Wine Co, Brooklyn, NY 

Peter Paul, Naugatuck, Conn 

Pevely Dairy Co, St Louis 

Smart & Final Iris Co, Cal 

John Wanamaker, Phila, NY 

Zotox Pharmacal Co, Stamford, Conn 



Melody Whip (filled milk prod) 

Cem razors & blades 

Minipoo Dry Shampoo, Alkaid Antacid Tablets, 

Poslam Ointment 
Polishes, waxes, germicides 
Phonograph records 

Clamorene rug cleaner, foam upholstery 

cleaner, paint brush cleaner 
Department store i for radio-tv adv onlyi 
Shoe polish 
Radio station 
New UHF tv station 
Portable Porter luggage wheels 
Telescopic Emergency Lights 
Waterproofing paints 
Manischewitz Wine 
Mounds, Almond joy Candy 
Milk, dairy, ice cream prods 
Food prods, canned & pkgd 

Dept store 

Zotox medication for poison ivy. oak and 
sumac 



Calkins & Holden. Carlock. 
McClinton & Smith, NY 
McCann-Erickson, NY 
Emil Mogul, NY 

| Walter Thompson. LA 
Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrnt 

NY 
Hicks & Creist, NY 

Hoffman-Manning, NY 

Ceyer Adv. NY 

Yambcrt Inc. Hywd 

Diamond & Sherwood, SF 

Fred Cardner Co, NY 

Ad Fried & Assoc. Oakland. Cal 

Ad Fried & Assoc, Oakland. CM 

Emil Mogul. NY 

D-F-S. NY 

Granville Rutlcdge Adv. St. Lou 

Stromberger. LaVene, McKenzie. 

LA 
Dowd. Rcdfield & Johnstone. NY 

John C. Dowd. Boston 
Dowd. Redfield & Johnstone, NY 

John C. Dowd. Boston 



V umbers after names 
refer to New and Re- 
new category 

II I tar/son (3) 

D. F. Gordon 1 3 I 

/ . /'. Brunelli I 1 1 
Crawford Blagden < 3 1 
/'. II. Fletcher I I) 

George Giese (3) 

Jtidson II. Irish (3) 

Gardner Rtames (3) ^ 

(3) ^ 



l( m. S. HI air 



(3) 



20 




SPONSOR 



WHO 

and Get Iowa's Metropolitan Areas.. 
PUu the Remainder of Iowa! 



S.DJ 



TAKE AUTOMOTIVE SALES, FOR INSTANCE! 



4.9% CEDAR RAPIDS 

10.7% TRI-CITIES - • 

12.5% DES MOINES • 

2.6% DUBUQUE- • 

4.4% SIOUX CITY • 

3.9% WATERLOO • 

65.1% REMAINDER OF STATE 

Figures add to more than 100% 
because Rock island County, Illinois 
is included in Tri-Cities. 



»\H/' 



i\v 



MINNESOTA 



El Eii 



I S.A.M. D 
L STATION 



DAYTIME 
AUDIENCE AREA 



NEBRASKA 



I53HHL 

m K luuDI IBddqq 

lHBB^BBBBg 
IcBBSQBQBR 
SBHBBBQSciVi 

I t' Ut^l M^T ISS3Fa— 1 

luDUIJUiJCllFt^i 

9 



Wisconsin 



THE "REMAINDER OF IOWA" ACCOUNTS FOR THESE SALES: 

(Which You MISS Unless You Cover the Entire State) 

65.4% Food Stores 

Eating and Drinking Places 
General Merchandise Stores 
Apparel Stores 
Home Furnishings Stores 
Automotive Dealers 
Filling Stations 
Building Material Groups 
Drugstores 



61.6% 
44.8% 
55.6% 
60.7% 
65.1% 
73.2% 
79.6% 
60.4% 



Source: 1952-53 Consumer Markets 



ILLINOIS 



KANSAS 






MISSOURI 




FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



BUY ALL of IOWA- 
I'lus "Iowa Plus"— with 

WIKI© 

Des Moines ... 50,000 Walls 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



25 JANUARY 1954 



21 



You oughta know this! 

MONTREAL 

is Canada's 
largest city . . 

Population 

. 1,500,000 



k 



And this, too! 

CrCF has been 
Montreal's big 
English favorite 
for 34 years 



i 



MONTREA 



IN U.S-WEED 

IN CANADA-AIL CANADA 





'hi taw 



Gellerman (r.) confers with commentator Gladstone about Bache commercial 

Henry (tellermun 

Advertising Manager 
Bache & Co., New York 

No one expects a pitchman to go on the air with the following 

high-pressure technique when Belling storks: 

". . . Write in toda\ while this offer holds. Vnd remember, folk-. 
you can pay for your stocks in eas\ weekly installments. 

Yet, Henry Gellerman. who masterminds advertising for Bache ^ 
Co., a conservative Wall Street investment hou>e. assured SPONSOR 
that radio audiences in New ^ ork, Philadelphia, Chicago. Detroit. 
Cleveland and Boston will be hearing a modified version of that mes- 
sage some five to seven times weekly starting 24 January. 

This new campaign begins the dav before the new monthly invest- 
ment plan authorized by the Securities Kxchange Commission goes 
into effect. This plan — a budget plan for buying securities on in- 
stallments — will broaden the base of potential stock owners. 

"Now we can take our message to the housewife." Cellerman 
explained. "And that's precisely what we're doing with this new 
campaign. We're no longer limiting our choice of programing and 
adjacencies to male appeal. Our only motto is hard sell." 

It's this hard-sell approach, combined with institutional and edu- 
cational techniques, that have brought Bache more leads-per-S via 
spot radio programing I see 27 July L953 SPONSOR, pane o(> i . 

On radio since 1948 at Gellermans instigation, Bache has gradu- 
allv increased its air budget from a dead start to 4V , of the over-all 
$500,000 budget in 1954. 

"We started off easy with public service programing on WNYC, 
New York,"' Gellerman told sponsor. "Then we tried minute an- 
nouncement- on WU\I!. New Y>rk. with convincing success." 

However, Gellerman was still not satisfied. "After all. everyone's 
a prospect," he says, summarizing his business theory. " \ml it's m\ 
job to help broaden the base <>f -lock Inning." 

\"w Bache commercials are heard daily on WOR's Today's Busi- 
ness, a program of transcribed business news and comments bj 
Henrj (dad-tone. This five-minute show, weekdays 7:15-7:20 p.m.. 
pulls lead- for Bache at the cost of $1.50 each, compared to a cost 
ol v - per lead from Bache newspaper advertisements. 

\nd to those skeptics who believe that ad managers of financial 
houses spend their vacations in front of a ticker tape, Gellerman will 
gladlv send postcards from hi< -ki trip to St. Moritz. * * * 



22 



SPONSOR 




FACT 
No. t 



FACT 
Mo. 2 



FACT 
No. 3 



POWER 

Farthest reaching TV signal in the Michigan 
area . . . gigantic 1,057 foot tower with 
maximum 100,000 watt E.R.P. . . . plus favored 
Channel 2 dial position add up to 

MAXIMUM CIRCULATION 



PROGRAMMING 

Daytime and nighttime, viewers customarily 
turn to Channel 2 for the best in entertainment, 
news and sports. And that means 

MAXIMUM VIEWING 

RATINGS 

Consistently leading with high-rated CBS, 
Dumont and local programs. For example, Pulse 
ratings for December, '53, show 9 out of the 
15 top shows on WJBK-TV. And that gives you 
MAXIMUM IMPACT 



WJBK-TV 

CHANNEL 2 



Eliminate guesswork when you're buying 
TV time in the rich Great Lakes area. 
Make your money go farther, literally 
and figuratively, on WJBK-TV, Detroit's 
only full power station. Look at the facts! 
Prove to yourself that Channel 2 is the 
place for you. Get maximum return for 
your TV dollars on WJBK-TV. 



m-i&t !/ 




Detroit 



Represented 
Naiionally by 

THE KATZ AGENCY 



BASIC CBS NETWORK & DUMONT 

STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY • National Sales Director, TOM HARKER, 1 18 E. 57fh, New York 22, ELDORADO 5-7690 
25 JANUARY 1954 23 



ON THE SPOT 
AT DEADLINE! 



iVeu? developments on SPONSOR stories 




• Salesmen want presentations 

• Talent wants publicity 

• Packagers want promotion 

• Agencies want information 

• AND NOW THERE ARE 
1,734,582 TV SETS 

reached by CHANNEL 4, Hollywood with 
50 hours per week of local telecasting by 
local personalities for locol sales results. 
Contact KNBH or NBC Spot sales. 




St'«': "Programing trends in spot radio" 

Issue: 14 J ulv 1952, p. 74 

Still iocl: Well-known radio and t\ personali- 
ties ran be purchased on spot hasis 



lii what ua> docribed b\ industrj observers as one of the biggest 
radio deals in recenl years the Frederick W. Zi\ Co. recently signed 
comedian Red Skelton for a three-year contract Among the unique 
angles of the arrangements are these: Sponsors will be allowed to 
buy the program series on a national, regional or local basis; the 
show is one of the first which features big-name talent and which 
will run 30 minutes daily, rather than the usual pre-tv radio program- 
ing formula of one 30-minute show week I \ ; Skelton will continue 
the features on the transcribed Ziv series that he made famous on 
his "live" radio and tv series I Willie Lump Lump, the Mean Widdle 
Kid, Klem Kadiddlehopper, San Fernando Red, Cauliflower \I< - 
Pugg I ; under a guarantee-againsl-percentage contract, Skelton is 
expected to make at least $1.5 million: Ziv is spending S3 million 
on the radio series, making it one of the costliest of recent radio 
programing ventures. 

A Ziv spokesman said the company had been negotiating with 
Skelton for two years. He claimed the weekly budget of the show 
will be the highest for any radio series on the air this \ear. 

Cost of the program series for sponsors is to be based upon the 
size of the market the advertiser wants to cover. At SPONSOR'S press- 
time the price range still was undetermined. Present Ziv shows range 
from $15 to as much as $750 weekly, depending upon the market. 
Altogether, Ziv packages about two dozen transcribed show-. 

John L. Sinn, executive vice president of Ziv. noted that the largest 
single group of users of Ziv shows are brewers. He said they spend 
over $10 million annually for Ziv programs. 

Sinn pointed out the Skelton program is an indication of Ziv s 
belief that radio is a thriving medium. 

Skelton will participate in the promotion of the radio programs. 
He remains free to engage in other activities. * * * 

Herh Gordon. Ziv v. p., looks on while Skelton signs three-year contract with Ziv 




24 



SPONSOR 




.*v** 



►•* 



»**' ., »•""' 





ABC 
NBC 
DuMONT 



WSJV-TV. ELKHART, INDIANA. JOHN F. DILLE, JR., PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER 
JOHN J. KEENAN, COMMERCIAL MANAGER 



*ln Retail Sales £ 
25 JANUARY 1954 



25 







WDAY-TV»,c..,. 

HOW ON FULL POWER 



(UP FROM 13,000 TO 65,000 WATTS) 



AND CARRYING PRACTICALLY 
ALL TOP-RATED PROGRAMS 

FROM ALL 4 NETWORKS 

(AND LEADING FILM PRODUCERS)! 






4jp- 



Affiliated with NIC • CBS • ABC • DUMONT 
FREE A PETERS, INC., Exclu*ive National Representatives 



25 JANUARY 1954 




BAD HELP:D SELL FISK ON RADIO: Fisk Tire will be big radio 
client for first time, after detailed BAB-aided study. Above, Elliot 



Detweiler, Fisk ad mgr., shakes hands with Ted Maxwell, of BAB. 
Duncan Ross, a.c, F. D. Richards, Walter Klee, asst. ad mgr., look on 



ire you getting Hie 
most out of Uh 
aids to advertisers ? 



Radio's promotion arm will tailor-make 
presentations, offer ideas and /or eopy help 
— if there's radio billing in the offing 



25 JANUARY 1954 



by Alfred J. Jtiffe 

M ou're an agency. You've got a 
print-happ) client. \ou feel your 
client needs radio and you've ^«>t a 
problem of prying open his mind. 

Maybe you have a few questions in 
\ our nun mind. Maybe you'd like to 
see what other advertisers making the 
same product have done with radio. 
\la\be you haven't got the resources 
or time to make a full-scale presenta- 
tion. Maybe you've got a radio mail 
order campaign in mind and aren't 
sure how to start the thing off. 

To get the answers a few years ago 
you'd have had to go to networks and 
stations, who might have spent more 
time boosting themselves than the) 
would on radios basic ?tor\. 

Toda\. you've got an over-all radio 
ally, the Broadcast Advertising Bu- 
reau. It's been of substantial help t" 
a lot of agencies las well as adver- 
tiser~ ' . 

Take the risk Tire Division of the 



27 



I .S. Rubber Co. For the first time 

in it- history, Fisk will make radio an 

appreciable i>aii ol it- advertising cam- 
paign. Elliot Detweiler, divisional 
advertising manager, announced two 
week- ago a radio campaign was de- 
cided upon alter a detailed Btud) <>f 
radio with I! \U. 

15 \1> attacked Fisk's problem from 
man) angles. It made presentations 
<>n tin- tire replacement market (spe- 
, ill. i a- will a- auto listening i gen- 
eral I. It came up \\ itli a useful suc- 
cess storj (specific) as well as the 
comparative cost »>f radio and news- 
papers I general • , not to mention a 
three-point cop) formula (specific). 

Naturally, the extent of BAB's help 
depends a lot on the radio billings 
potential. \ lot depends, too, on what 
BAB's got in its pool of information. 
However, in the three years since BAB 



'fj radio loo cheap?' 
.s«'/i<'((iit«>d for itt-xi Issue 

Following the election of Kevin 
Sweeney to the presidency of 
BAB, SPONSOR moved up an 
article on BAB which was being 
prepared for a later issue, be- 
cause of its topical interest. The 
analytical story which evaluates 
the cost of radio and other media, 
called "Is radio too cheap?" 
which originally was planned for 
this issue, will appear 8 February 



was set up this pool (which started as 
a puddle) has been ever widening. 
\nd advertisers and agencies ha\e 
heen dipping into it more and more. 
All indications point to BAB's heing 
even more useful in 1954. hoth to the 
Inner and seller of radio. Starting 
late in radio's life. BAB. though a full- 



scale am promotion arm now. i ? grow- 
ing with the zestful energ) of \outh. 
Here are some facts which delineate 
thi- growth: 

1. A 12', budget in< rease is in the 
works. BAB's budget for this fiscal 
year (ending 30 March 1954 I is $670,- 
000. \ $750,000 budget will in all 
likelihood be okayed bj the hoard of 
directors for the next fiscal year. BAB 
started out with a $168,000 budget, 
ended up spending $313,000 during 
it> fir-t \ eai . 

2. Subject to hoard approval of 
the exact number, plans are heing 
made to increase the sales force, the 
men who do BAB's footwork — as dis- 
tinct from the inside promotion men 
who gather data and think up the most 
convincing ways of presenting it. BAB 
now has three sales missionaries, two 
of whom were taken on in 1953. It is 



In addition to direct presentations to agencies, clients BAB has full 
roster of promotional activities including: tradepaper ads like one be- 



low; research reports, such as auto radio listening study. Promotional 
activities are separated to cover both national, retail advertisers 




28 



SPONSOR 



possible there may be as many as seven 
by next year. A year and a half ago 
BAB was making 100 presentations a 
month to agencies and advertisers. 
This figure has been quadrupled. 

3. On 1 April 1952, when BAB cele- 
brated its first anniversary and knew 
it was in business to stay, there were 
544 stations plus the four networks as 
members. At the end of 1953 the 
station figure had jumped to 835, the 
lour nets are still in, of course, and 11 
station reps are now members. 

BAB starts off the new year primed 
with a new president, Kevin Sweeney, 
formerly vice president and later ex- 
ecutive vice president. He replaces 
William B. Ryan, BAB's first president, 
who resigned effective 1 January. In 
another executive realignment, R. 
David Kimble, former director of na- 
tional promotion was made director of 
local promotion, taking over from 
Jack Hardesty, now Eastern sales man- 
ager of Westinghouse Radio Stations. 

The appointment of a new national 
promotion director (which was immi- 
nent at sponsor's press time) will 
mark the beginning of intensified pro- 
motional pressure on the national ad- 
vertising side of the business. Na- 
tional and local promotion will be com- 
pletely separated. BAB's mailing piece, 
Radio Salesman, will be split into two 
separate parts with one part angled to 
the local salesman and the other to the 
national salesman. BAB's sales tools 
will be aimed more precisely, too. In 
the past some national promotion aids 
were actually local promotion material 
also applicable to national advertising. 

Other appointments on the executive 
level are being considered. It is not 
certain whether a new vice president, 
as such, will be named. Sweeney and 
the BAB board are seeking to create 
jobs, rather than fill them. For one 
thing, with BAB's activity increasing 
the work load has to be spread. For 
another, BAB wants good men. Once 
they're gotten, the problem of a title 
can be quickly settled. For example: 
BAB is looking for a man who will 
head up the sales force but will he more 
than just a sales manager. He must 
be basically a promotion man, able to 
create ideas and whip them into pre- 
sentations with punch in them. Right 
now this is the only other job that is 
definitely looking for a man. 

All this expansion means more ser- 
\ ice to the advertiser and agency. Hare. 
(Please turn to page 118) 




Kevin Sweeney is new BAB president 

The new president of radio's promotion arm, 37-year-old Ke\in 
Sweeney, once worked for a — pardon the expression — newspaper. 
He even put in a couple of years with a tv station. But most of 
his career has been spent preaching the gospel of radio. 

It should be pointed out that the newspaper was the daily paper 
put out by the University of Southern California, Sweeney's alma 
mater. He was business manager during his senior year and sold 
$17,000 worth of ads. Which proves that Sweeney can sell what 
he puts his mind to. 

When Sweeney was graduated from U.S.C. in 1938, he an- 
nounced open-mindedly that he was available for either news- 
paper or radio work. It was radio's good fortune that K"\\ in 
Los Angeles bent an ear his way. Donald W. Thornburgh. now 
president of WCAU, Philadelphia, took on the young and en- 
thusiastic Sweeney as a promotion writer. 

In 1942 he went over to the Blue Network, and from there went 
into service for two years. 

After shedding his uniform, Sweeney went to work for Fletcher 
Wvlie Productions, a vast nexus of business operations, one of 
which was the Housewives' Protective League programs i later 
sold to CBS). Sweeney took the HPL operation, which was then 
in three markets and expanded it to eight, primarily by using the 
theory that a show, once successful, should be copied and sold 
in other markets. 

He was introduced to tv in 1948, when he became general sales 
manager of KFI and KFI-TV. Shortly after the tv station was sold 
to Don Lee in 1951. Sweene) joined BAB as director of promo- 
tion and sales. He was named vice president three weeks later. 

Suecnev at BAB has shown a tremendous capacity for work 
and an insatiable desire to get around the country to talk to both 
buvers and sellers of radio. Here's a recent itinerary: Monday. 
Chicago: Tuesday, Tulsa: Wednesday. Baltimore: Thursday, San 
Francisco; Friday, Seattle; Monday. Los Angeles, etc. 

The peripatetic Sweeney has another reason to travel. His wife 
and three children (they range from two to eight) live 3,000 miles 
from 270 Park Ave. — in Los Angeles. • • • 



25 JANUARY 1954 



29 



Radio set sales lead I v by li!l"n 
in big I v markets 



And *."»:{ radio set salos wort* 



up 38.5% compared with *52 



#n heavil) saturated U.S. television markets radios are 
being bought in numbers which will surprise many. A 
study released this week by the sales promotion depart- 
ment of CBS Radio Spot Sales shows that for the first 
39 weeks of 1953 in 15 major U.S. markets: 

• 69.4' i more radios were sold to dealers than tv sets. 

• 38.5$ more radios were sold to dealers than in the 
first 39 weeks of 1952. 

• Increases for some of the markets were high enough 
to be termed astounding; Chicago radio sets sales jumped 
90.4% in '53 over '52; New York was up 45.5%. 

The figures are this high despite the fact that they 
do not include car radios, would be much higher if auto 
radios were counted. Reason for the omission: It is 
difficult to isolate car radio sales by markets whereas 
county-by-county sale of other sets to dealers is recorded 
bj RETMA (Radio-Electronics-Television Manufactur- 



ers Assoc.). Set figures in chart below are for home 
counties of market area; they are through 39 weeks of 
year only because full year county figures were still being 
compiled by RETM \. 

Total year production figures for the whole U.S. 
showed 13 million radios produced compared with 7.250,- 
000 tv. Of the 13 million radios, five million were in cars. 

The 15 markets selected for the stud] include 22% of 
U.S. families and 25.5' , of Q.S. effective buying income 
(Sales Management. '53 I . CBS Radio Spot Sales chose 
these markets because it wanted to find out whether con- 
sumer interest in buying radio sets is keen in big-city 
areas most of which have long been exposed to tv. 

Said Spot Sales Promotion Manager Sherril Taylor: 
"Since consumers are spending good money to buy sets, 
and doing so in increasing numbers, it's plain that they 
actively want to listen." * * * 



"."».'* radio sides up in 14 of 15 major marhets, more ratlios were sold than tv 



15 major markets (home counties)* 



Neu York < il> 



Chicago 



Los Angeles 



Philadelphia 
Detroit . . . . 



Itoston 



San Francisco 



Pittsburgh 



St. Louis 



(lc\ eland 



Washington. II. C. 

IC.'ill iniui-c 



RADIO 



1952 



296,203 



147,468 



127,675 



111,169 



79,418 



51,630 



39,912 



44,485 



53,504 



>linncanolis-St. Paul 
Ituffalo 



60,787 



48,637 



1953 



431,106 



280,738 



180,535 



120,241 



126,646 



69,464 



54,946 



61,818 



59,403 



71,461 



47,428 



28. 150 



39,920 



Cincinnati 
Total* 



32,910 



54,331 



53.430 



35.604 



39391 



36.131 



±% 



+45.5 



+90.4 



+41.4 



+8.2 



+ 59.5 



+34.5 



+37.7 



+39.0 



+ 11.0 



+ 17.6 



+ 11.7 



12.7 



^25.1 



-1.3 



9.8 






TELEVISION 



1952 


1953 


±% 


230,847 


205,719 


-10.9 


116,190 


151,149 


+30.1 


166,455 


129,347 


-22.3 


64,609 


76,716 


+ 18.7 


51,764 


71,612 


+38.3 


34,307 


38,094 


+ 11.0 


35,976 


31,315 


-13.0 


45,072 


43.058 


-4.5 


44,791 


38,448 


-14.2 


46,817 


47,044 


+0.5 


34,405 


36.791 


«.9 


1 1.254 


34,124 


-17.3 


32,382 


34.217 


B.7 


28.575 


28.544 


-O.I 


27,474 


22,534 


-18.0 






/ 



•i more radio* 
than tv told 
(in 1953 only) 



+ 109.6% 



-85.7% 
39.6% 

+56.7% 



-76.9% 

82.:$% 
+75.5% 
+43.6% 

+54.5% 



+51.9% 



17.7% 



56.6% 



1.1% 

38.0% 

60.3% 



tat. i % 



•Marked lilted in order ■■< nombi .iitan area. 'Sale, Management." "' :l S « M Set RETMA I 



30 



SPONSOR 





uses spot 
radio to make mom 
took a hot breakfast 



Spending $200,000 via 110 stations, 
brand seeks to eoinbat eold eereal inroads 



Wheatena wants to reach family at breakfast, likes early morning newscast. At left, 
cast of "Hilda Hope, M.D.," one of Wheatena's network radio shows during the '30s 



PP heatena is caught in a sociologi- 
cal squeeze play. 

Like a lot of other cereal manufac- 
turers, the brand finds itself selling 
to a far different market from that of a 
generation ago. 

As a hot cereal, Wheatena is faced 
with the distressing fact that over the 
past several decades cold cereals have 
caught on in a big way. And people 
every year seem to be in more of a 
hurry at breakfast time. 

To combat the trend away from hot 
cereals, Wheatena has completely 
changed its radio advertising approach. 

In pre-war years Wheatena beamed 
at children. Now it's after adults. 

It used to buy late-afternoon or 
evening network time. Now it buys 
early-morning ( and sometimes after- 
noon ) time on a spot basis. Spot 
radio is the company's major medium 
for the 1953-'54 season for the second 
year in a row. sponsor estimates that 
the radio budget is about $200,000 for 
news programs in more than 100 mar- 
kets. This is believed to be an increase 
over last year; it's also a pretty good 
sign that Wheatena is pleased with spot 
radio. Its past advertising record 
shows many types of campaigns were 
dropped after 26 or 39 weeks. The 

25 JANUARY 1954 



fact it has gone back to spot radio this 
year — and more heavily than last — 
seems to indicate that Wheatena has 
experienced cash register results. 

In using spot radio. Wheatena can 
reach adults across the nation as the;, 
crawl sleepily from bed or while 
they're eating their inadequate break- 
fast. Wheatena wants to make the 
listener hungry for a hot breakfast— 
and hungry for Wheatena. It wants 
to reach him — and especially her — at 
the right moment to sell a breakfast 
food. 

The copy stresses health, is colorful, 
appetite stirring. More than that. 
it's also helpful. It explains ways to 
serve Wheatena and how to make 
breakfasts more attractive. 

As far as Wheatena is concerned, 
1947 breakfasts were a lot more at- 
tractive than 1952 breakfasts. In '47 
hot cereal sales totaled S70 million. 
By '52 they had dropped to $62 mil- 
lion, according to Food Topics. 

Cold cereal sales, on the other hand, 
went up from $161 million in "47 to 
8218 million in 1952. Food Topics 
figures show. 

Here's the way Wheatena's air copy 
seeks to counteract this trend. It s 
copy well worth study by any adver- 



tiser — whether he's in the hot cereal 
or the nuts and bolts field — who has 
the problem of restimulating interest 
in his type of product. 

" \ lot of people do something 
very odd every morning. Thc\ ve 
just gone 12 or 13 hours between 
meals and they think a nibble of 
toast and a gulp of coffee is going 
to hold them four or five hours to 
lunch. But, of course, a skimp\ 
breakfast won't hold you until 
lunch. It just leaves you feeling 
tired and cranky. Now there's 
no use lecturing \our family if 
they eat skimpy breakfasts and 
suffer these symptoms. ^ «u ve 
got to make "em want the good 
breakfast they need! Tempt them! 
Tempt them with \\ heatena. the 
golden brown cereal roasted and 
toasted from choice wheat kernels. 
If they haven't got an appetite in 
the morning, the different, deli- 
cious, nut-like flavor of Wheatena 
will give them an appetite. And 
l Please turn to page 123 i 

urn 



case history 



31 




'■: THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY 






4 POSTCARD 
LIKE THIS • 



• • 




O'VklON Of »Uit'C IfLAT.ON 



*re. F. David 

^99 Henry Hudson Pkwy. 

Rlverdale, New York. 

Dear Mre. David: 

We are very pleased to h»*ar from you concerning 
"Beulah" program and to learn that you 
enjoy this. Comments such as youre always 
mean a great deal to \is. 

It wae certainly kind of you to take the time to 
write ue, Mrs. i>avld. We hope you will oontlnue 
to tune In and enjoy "Beulah". 



i. . , GOT QUICK 
REPLY FROM P&G 



Sincerely, 
Winifred S. Carter 

• • • but these 10 major advertisers never answered in 
informal SPONSOR test ot the way clients handle audience mail 



SHOW AND SPONSOR 


MESSAGE ON POSTCARD 


DATE MAILED 


"Four Star Playhouse" Sing- 
wing Machine 


"Liked show. Do you have 
booklet on your machines?" 


16 Julv '53 


"Blind Date," Toni and Hazel 
Bishop i this summer) 


"We met on a blind dale; we 
never miss your show." 


8 Sept. '53 


"Super Cirius." Kellogg mm 
flakes 


"You hare a fine show. We'd 
appreciate four tickets." 


20 Oct. '53 


'Hallmark Hall of Fame," 
Hall lims. greeting cards 


"We enjoy the show. May we 
have several tickets?" 


20 Oct. '53 


"Date With .huh." American 

1 liii le ( O, i this summer i 


"Swell show. Who plays the 

part of the girl .huh '.-" 


9 Sept. "53- 


"My Little Margie," Philip 
Morris i this summer 1 


"/T« truh appreciate this 
slum's line entertainment." 


16 July '.") .'! 


"liriile and Groom," General 
Mills and Toni (diff. i/«ni 


"We'd like to pet married on 
your program soon." 


20 Oct. '53 


"Dennis Day" l\< t [they 

suggested viewers write in) 


\J c sent phone number for 
<iuiz show uas conducting.* 


22 Oct. '53 


"Big Town," Lever's Shadov 
Wave and Pepsodeni brands 


"lie appreciate seeing this 
line program every week." 


16 July '53 


"This Is Your I. He." Hazel 
lUshiip lipstick anil makeup 


") on are to he complimented 

lor a fine program." 


9 Sept. '53 



•No Mkncm IMicuui ' i Mr program. 



What happei 



Postcards to 23 spoiisorej 

by Miles David 

g here is nothing anyone in the radio 
and tele\ i-i«>n business is less likely to 
do than write a fan letter to a program. 
But for the past >ix months a sponsor 
reporter and his wife have been busily 
watching shows and sending off rave 
notes on two-pennj postcards. 

The purpose was to get a rough idea 
of how advertisers are handling their 
program mail these days. Notice the 
word rough. This project is not meant 
to "bust the town wide open," as thej 
say on television. It is not a carefully 
scientific cross-section based on calcu- 
lus, sociology and atomic physics. It's 
merely an informal way of finding out 
what happens when a viewer sits down 
and expresses his appreciation for tele- 
vision entertainment. 

The answer seems to be that nothing 
much happens. Only six out of 25 
sponsored network programs we wrote 
to replied. Significantly or insignifi- 
cantly (take your choice I the most 
effective and public relations-minded 
reply came from Procter & Gamble, 
biggest client in radio and television 
(see cut at left i . 

Postcards, which make up a good 
portion of network mail, were used for 
convenience. And to make sure the 
cards got normal treatment it goes 
without saying that the messages were 
kept free of any indication that the 
writer had any connection with radio 
or television. 

To avoid giving mail handlers the 
impression this was some kind of a 
claque for tv shows, only a few cards 
were sent out at a time. And our card 
writing extended over four months, 
starting in July and ending in Octo- 
ber. There was no significant variation 
in number of replies as between sum- 
mer and fall months. 

Mostly people just didn't answer. 

\\ c Vi rote to the Singer Sewing Ma- 
chine Co. program Four Star Play- 
house, for example, praising the show 
and saying that we'd like to receive 
some literature on their sewing ma- 
chines. Nothing. 

\\ e wrote to the American Chicle 

SPONSOR 



hen yon write to the sponsor 

ws drew replies from only six. But two out of two sustainers answered 



Co.'s summer show, Date With Judy, 
saying we enjoyed it and asking who 
played the part of Judy. No reply. 

We fibbed to Blind Date (sponsored 

Iternately during the summer by Toni 

jnd Hazel Bishop), stating that we had 

met on a blind date and never missed 

their show. No reply. 

We stretched the truth again and 
asked Bride and Groom (sponsored on 
different days by General Mills and 
Toni) how we could make arrange- 
ments to be married on their program. 
Nothing. 

We sent raves to My Little Margie 
and Racket Squad (both on this sum- 
mer for Philip Morris) and got no 
reply. 

We tried Lever Bros.' Big Town with 
another rave and got no reply. 

By way of contrast Procter & Gamble 
answered our two-sentence postcard 
about Beulah with a letter typed on 
company stationery and signed by 
someone from the public relations de- 
partment. Our postcard was dated 8 
September and mailed 9 September to 
the station which carried the show 
(WABC-TV). It could have arrived 
in Cincinnati no sooner than a week 
later, on say 16 September — or per- 
haps even a week later than that. (We 
haven't checked.) Yet the reply was 
dated 29 September, only 20 days after 
our card went in the mail. 

Actually Procter & Gamble was in 
process of dropping the show at the 
time the notes were exchanged. Yet it 
considered a courteous response to a 
consumer worth the expense. 

Another public relations-minded re- 
ply came from Captain Video. We 
wrote our praises to the Captain, simu- 
lating a child's handwriting and giving 
the name and address of a 10-year-old 
of our acquaintance. The card went 
out on 9 September and the youngster 
was agreeably surprised to receive an 
autographed picture three weeks later. 

We wrote to Howdy Doody asking 
for tickets and had a reply two weeks 
later asking us to wait patiently until 
tickets were available. 

25 JANUARY 1954 



We wrote to WCBS-TV for tickets 
to Colgate's Strike It Rich on 20 Oc- 
tober. Back from Walt Framer Pro- 
ductions came the tickets three days 
later. (We gave them to neighbors. 
You didn't waste your postage, Walt. I 

We wrote for tickets to Geritol's Ju- 
venile Jury on the same day and had 
tickets back from Barry, En right & 
Friendly in 10 days. 

Neither of the two packagers en- 
closed a covering note or form. 

The one form letter we received was 
from Omnibus. Our postcard praised 
the show and its commercials, went out 
21 October. The note was in our hands 
three days later. It was a cleanly mim- 
eographed form with name typed in. 

Two out of two cards we dispatched 
to unsponsored network television 
shows were answered quickly. We 
wrote to CBS' Man of the Week on 8 
September and had a typed and signed 
letter in reply from CBS Producer Wil- 
liam R. Workman back three days lat- 
er. We wrote to NBC inquiring about 



the name of a composition played on 

the Recital Hall on 8 September. We 
had the correct answer in the form of 
a letter a week later. 

So carried away were we l>\ all the 
card writing thai we ended up calling 
for one of those gadgets you see dem- 
onstrated on tv by pitchmen. In re- 
sponse to a WATV, Newark, pitch over 
a feature movie show we rushed to the 
phone and ordered an all-purpose tool 
said to ( 1 1 cut glass and I 2 I sharpen 
scissors, knives and cutlery of e\er\ 
kind. There was little waiting to make 
the phone call and the girl who took 
the order operated efficiently and in a 
minimum of time. We phoned on 1 Oc- 
tober, got our all-purpose tool 9 Oc- 
tober. 

The tool is advertised at $1.98 plus 
C.O.D. charges which brings the w - 
tual cost to $2.37. It arrived from 
Video Mart. Inc.. in good condition 
and we have been meaning to tr\ it 
out ever since. 

1 1' lease turn to page 125) 



BIG MAIL HAULS ARE \ ILUABLE INDEX to opinions of audience. Many 
clients make "box score" on mail reactions. Letters below went to Canadian town after Jack 
Berch plea on NBC in '50. Even without emotional appeal many shows pull mail steadily 



im/a& 


I 


c j""|S« ?■ 


1^ 

i 




* * 

n 

1 1 

S 


• r 

: . 


-if' lL w ? t» 

-Ml 7 * k vS B 


^^^^^_ 





33 



How the different rating servici 

In Part 10 of SPONSOR'S All-Media Study research chief of Blair rep firm sfai 

h\ W ard Dorrvll 




Author of this report is Ward Dorrell, former 
Hooper v. p. who is now research director of 
John Blair 4 Co., and Blair TV Inc., station reps 



00 tie of m\ first thoughts when asked 
to prepare this article for sponsor was 
to t<ll about the t\ salesman who reai- 
Iv knew how to use ratings to work 
both sides of the street. 

When he was asked b\ an a<zt'in v 
client to replace a low-rated t\ spot. 
he readily complied. Then, he went to 
see another agenc) who subscribed to 
a different rating service. He offered 
this agency the spot which he had just 
cancelled out. 

The second client quickly grabbed it. 
His television audience service showed 
it had a very high rating! 



If you think this Btorj is exagger- 
ated, just ask am t\ salesman. Hell 
tell \ou it's a common practice. 

We at Blair are especiall) aware of 
the wide variation between rating ser- 
vices, for the stations we represent sub- 
scribe to practical!) ever) service. W «• 
therefore have an opportunity to com- 
pare and observe services not afforded 
to most organizations which generally 
get onl) one or two services. 

W e draw up almost continuous com- 
parative charts on the various services. 
The purpose of these charts is to keep 
our management and sales forces well 



MHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII! IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

fv./l. It* ratings figures vary widely 



2. 



Columbus tv sefs-iti-ii \<*. too, ean 9 t c 




12;ib prvi, 



5:45F?m, 




lO.'lSA.N/i. 



6;iBr?rv 






•';.,:" ■ ■ MSI 
34 SPONSOR 



in in the same market 

$ researchers can be as far apart as 200% in local ratings 



informed on trends and to show the 
great variation in the findings of the 
different services. Some of these charts 
are reproduced below. 

We have always tried to minimize 
the use of television and radio ratings 
as the sole means of determining ei- 
ther the effectiveness of radio and tv 
as media or the effectiveness of a sin- 
gle station or program against another. 

We feel ratings should be used as 
they were originally intended: as a 
guide and estimate of the total audi- 
ence size and its distribution among 
"TtW "various stations. 



In our opinion, it will be a long time 
before this rating controversy will be 
resolved. In fast, it may never be re- 
solved — short of a Divine Revelation. 
How wonderful it would be if the heav- 
ens could open up and a sets-in-use 
figure appear therein for television and 
radio as the Lord's Truth, against 
which the various rating services could 
be compared! 

While I have great respect for the 
divine powers, I do not anticipate such 
an evangelical disclosure in the near 
future. In the meantime, we will have 
to fight along present lines. We will 



probably have to live with ratings of 
various kinds foi a long time to come, 
rherefore, we Bhould try to lr.un to 
use them as intelligently as possible. 

Our company has taken active pari 
in the controversy which has developed 
around ratings. Two wars ago, we 
produced our critical analysis of the 
telephone coincidental service in tin 
i Please turn to page 118) 



FLTI'IIE ISSUE: "How to set up an 
ideal Media sales test." Part 17 of SPON- 
SOR's All-Media Study. Issue date later. En- 
tire series will be reprinted in book form. 



Illll!llll!lilllllllllllllllllll!lllllll!lllllllllllllllllll!lill!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliy 

Columbus tv ratings often differ like this 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllilij iwii'i limn mini! inn ' :i:i:i . i; 




10:3O/\.rvi. 



12:30 RM, 



R.-lTI.\fiS; KTTV, Los Angeles chart shows how three diary services, one 
roster recall service reported the ratings last month of an independent tv out- 
let in a seven-station market. In some cases, such as at the 12:15 p.m. and 5:45 
p.m. periods, differences of over 200% exist. Since these slots on KTTV are filled 
by "Sheriff Joh*." a kid's show, Dorrell feels that differences may be due to 
fact that children fill out diaries with enthusias-n for their favorite shows 



2. 



$ETS'Il%-l ! SE: Columbus, Ohio sets-in-use figures vary widely between 
services. Here, chart shows the sets-in-use calculations of three research firms — 
ARB, TelePulse, Hooper — in a three-station city during April 1953. Figures are 
reasonably close only during the early morning (7:00 to 9:00 a.m.), early 
evening (6:30 to 7:30 p.m.) and late at night (after 10:30 p.m.). During the 
mid-morning, mid-afternoon and prime evening periods they are often way off 



3. 



R.4TI\fiS: Just as sets-in-use figures for the WBNS-TV, Columbus market 
vary between researchers so do ratings. ARB, for example, gave the sta- 
tion a Monday-through-Friday daytime average of 14.5 at 10:30 a.m., while 
Hooper rates it at around 3.0. At 12:30 p.m., two hours later, ARB gave 
WBNS-TV an average of around 4.5 while Hooper showed a figure of nearly 7.5. 
And so it goes. Chart demonstrates why ratings shouldn't be over-emphasized 



lllllil llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I III! Illllllllllllllllll I Illlli II Illlllllllllllllllllll! IIIIIIIHIIIIIIII iiiiiiiiiii I! 

25 JANUARY 1954 



35 



AUTOMOBILES 



SUPER MARKET 



SPONSOR: Worthington Motors \«-l NCY; \. J. Victor Co. 

CAPSUL1 I \-i HISTORY On 25 Sov ember 1953 

Worthington Motors sponsored its first II ednesday night 
10:00-11:00 pjn. movie ovei kill . Loi Ingeles. Iim 
days later, it sponsored a Frida) evening movie, T : M< »- 
8:30 p.m., "/( the same station. Ii\ the next day Worth- 
ington Motors had said 83 automobiles as a direct result 
t>t tv advertising, ('est of the tu<> programs was $2,200. 
Salts ovei 1200,000. "These kill shows have been out 
most successful advertising effort to date," savs Cal 
Worthington. on ner of the auto firm. 

kl l\. I .•- \nprle* PROGRAM: Evening movies 



SPONSOR: Save-Waj Market AGENCY: Direct 

< U>SULE CASE HISTORY : To test the pull oj tv adver- 
tising Save-Way Market in Phoenix scheduled two par- 
tidpations in Movie Matinee (KPHO-TV) offering sur- 
prise gift packages. All shoppers had to do to get the 
gifts uas to say, "I saw it on Channel 5." Response to 
the first announcement was so overwhelming that the 
store's owner had to revise the second announcement, 
leaving out the offer. He had given aivay almost 500 
packages within a few hours after the first offer was 
made. The two participations cost a total of SCO. 



kl'IIOTV, Phoenix 



PROGRAM: Movie Matinee 











1 LIGHTING • 




TV 

results 




SPONSOR: Sylvania Electric Products AGENCY: Cecil t 

Presbre) 

CAPSl IE CASE HISTORY: The superintendent of school 
in Manitou, Colo., uas one of thousands of viewers natch 
ing Beat the Clock over the CBS TV network recentl- 
(Saturdays. 7:30-8:00 p.m.). He uas tuned to KKTI 
Colorado Springs. During the commercial, he heard th- 
announcer say, "A light expert is as near as your tele 
phone." On the follouing Monday the superintenden 
contacted the local Sylvania representative by phone, gav 
him an order for S 10.000. 

KKTY, Colorado Springs PROGRAM: Beat the Clocj 


NAIL ENAMEL 




TOOLS 


SPONSOR: Vikki Nail Enamel AGENCY: Michael Lippert 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Vikki Nail Enamel's tele- 
vision program . hacked up by heavy merchandising, 
resulted in almost a 10 f v over-all sales increase for the 
company. It telecasts Vikki Varieties Saturdays from 
."):()() to 5:30 p.m. over WP1X. To tie in with the show, 
it set up a contest, announced that entry blanks would 
be available at \eu V ork-area drug stores. Five thousand 
druggists put up window displays for the event; Vikki 
sales jumped 'K~' , . Weekly cost of the show is $800 
for talent and production, S450 for time. 

WHY New York PROGR\M: Vikki Varieties 


SPONSOR: Grant Tool AGENCY: Ratn . 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This manufacturer of too 
sponsored a single 10-minute film 26 September ox 
II 1//.V-7T at a total cost of S278. The film featured ( 
assortment of tools suitable for use in home worksho] 
As a result of its television sponsorship Grant receii 
622 orders at $1.98 each, or a total oj $1,231. The cot 
pony reports this result "far exceeded" its expectatioi 

WMIM-TV, St. Paul-Minneapolis PROGRAM: 10-minute fi 


PLANT FOOD 


FURNITURE 




SPONSOR: RX LS IGENI 1 : Huber II. 

CAPSl II CAS1 HISTORY : Dollar for dollar televisi 
OUtpulled newspapers six to one for this manufacturer 
plant food. The firm placed advertising for the Hon I 
Department Store, distributor for the product, in ti 
) ork. I'a.. newspapers and over II SB II 1 . The tv a 
vertising consisted of one IS-minute film, Improve Vi 

Garden, at a total cost of $100. The newspaper adverti 

ments cost the sponsor $609.28. /-. B. Melhorn. inanau 

of lion Ton's housewares department, reports that te 
vision accounted for almost .")(!', of total sales. 

WSBA-TV, York, Pa. PROGRAM: tmprove Your Gar, 


on 

of 
on 

1 o 

d- 

ur 
te- 
ei 
te- 

en 




SPONSOR: Bekina Furniture Store VGENCY: Di 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Last December, Bekins F ■ 
niture Store showed the follouing 11 items over the I - 
Go Christmas Shopping show on KVTI : a sofa, chair t 
chair, tuo stej) tables, coffee table, rug. two lamps td 
two pictures. Immediately after the show, a Sioux Cy 
woman phoned the store to say. "Please send me onfj 
each. I'll take the whole bundle of furnishings » 
showed on kl TI a jew minutes ago." 

K\ T\ . Sioux City PRO< \ \ M : 1 et's Go Christ* 

Shopping 



WDEL-TY 

Wilmington 
Delaware 




o o 




Channel 12 



NBC 

TV Affiliate 



Viewers throughout the large, rich WDEL-TV 
market — Delaware, parts of Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey and Maryland— look to CHANNEL 12 
for up-to-the-minute local, regional and national 
news. In addition to NBC network news, this 
loyal, growing, buying audience sees local on- 
the-spot news stories filmed by WDEL-TV's 
camera crews and processed in the station's 



modern laboratories. Because they look, they 
buy. Every year this audience spends: 
$1,054,410,000 on retail items 
263,997,000 on food 
54,272,000 on general merchandise 
29,268,000 on drug items 

Reach them, sell them — profitably, economically 
—on WDEL-TV, CHANNEL 12. 



Represented by 



MEEKER 



New York Chicago Los Angeles San Francisco 



I 



WDEL 

AM TV FM 

Steinman 
Station 



25 JANUARY 1954 



37 



Are you getting the most 

out of this SPONSOR feature? 

(hi this i>ul:<\ tn every issue of sponsor, you will find 
a handy, up-to-date listing of neu ii station grants 
(see belou i. Included is the name of the company 
receix ing the c.p. the technical facilities granted 
and other appropriate facts. 

Beneath the compilation <>i those who hare received neu 
c.p.'s is another important listing- — all the stations 
which hare gone on the air iiith commercial programing 



during the tiro weeks preceding each issue of sponsor. 
Like the group of c.p.'s, the "new stations on air" 

department includes all the basic facts about the station 

a timebuyer wants to know. Its channel, power, 

network affiliation, number of stations in its market, 
set count I if one has been made by presstime). the 
name of its general manager and the station's 
national advertising representatU e. 
The box score, at the bottom of the page, is a succinct 
summary of television's status in the I nited States 
today. Information includes the total number of stations 
on the air and the number of I . S. ti homes. 




I. \eic construction permits 



CITY 4 STATE 



ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 
ERIE, PA. 



CALL 
IFTTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO 



KALB-TV 



22 
66 



DATE OF 
GRANT 



30 Dec. 

6 Jan. 

31 Dec. 



ON- AIR 
TARGET 



POWER (KW)' 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS I N 

MARKET! IPERMITEE &. MANAGER 
(000) 



29 

21 
7 



16 

11 
4 



NFA 

NFA 
208 vhf 



Alexandra Bcstg- Co. 
Walter H. Allen, pre*. 
Willard L. Cobb. gen. 

mgr. 
Coastal Bend Tv Co. 

Commodore Perry Bestg, 

Service. Inc. 
Dr. Perry D. Cook, prev 



RADIO 

REP' 



II. IX'ew stations on air* 



CITY 4 STATE 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

GREENVILLE. S. C. 
PENSACOLA, FLA. 



POWER (KW)* 



CALL CHANNEL ON-AIR 

LETTERS NO. DATE 



WAYS-TV 36 



AURAL I AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIR 



10 Jan. 



SETS IN 
MARKFTt PERMITEE 4 MANAGER 
'000» ' 



24 



12 



ABC 



2 274 vhf 



WFBC-TV 


4 


1 Jan. 


100 


50 


NBC 


2 


NFA 


WEAR-TV 


3 


14 Jan. 


10 


5 


CBS 


2 


NFA 



WAYS-TV. Inc. 
G. W. Dowdy, pres 
James P. Poston. gen 

mgr. 
Ca'olina Tv. Inc. 
Alcstcr G. Firman 

pres. 
Gulfpo't Bcstg. Co. 
Mel Wheeler, pres. 

gen. mgr. 



Jr 



Boiling 



Hollingber 



Since 29 June 1 <.>.">.'}. the following tele- 
rision -t.iiii.n^ lia\e been granted assign- 
ment of their construction permits or 
licenses, or have been granted transfer of 
control, to new parties. During the lasl 
half of 1953 seven stations were sold. 
Two others, Bold tlii* month, also are in- 
cluded in the listing. 



Iff. Addenda to previous listings 

CLEVELAND, Ohio, WXEL, from Empire Coil Co. 
to Storer Bcstg. Co. (Note: At SPONSOR 
presstime, transfer had not yet been approved 
by FCC.) 

DES MOINES. Iowa, WHO-TV, from Central Bcstg. 
Co. to WHO-TV. 

HANNIBAL, Mo., KHOA-TV, from Courier Post 
Publishing Co. to Lee Bcstg., Inc. 

KANSAS CITY, Mo., KCTY, from Empire Coil Co. 

to Allen B. Du Mont Labs., Inc. 
LINCOLN, Neb., KOLN-TV, from Cornhusker Radio 



& Television Corp. to Fetzer Bcstg. Co. 

LITTLE ROCK. Arlc., KRTV, from Little Rock Tel 
casters, Inc., to Rowley-Brown Bcstg. Co. 

LOS ANGELES, Cal.. KLAC-TV, from Dorot 
Schiff to Copley Press, Inc. 

PORTLAND, Ore.. KPTV, from Empire Coil Co. 
Storer Bcstg. Co. (Note: At SPONSOR pre 
time, transfer had not yet been approved 
FCC.) 

SPOKANE, Wash.. KXLY-TV, from KXLY-TV 
Northern Pacific Television Corp. 



Tmnl IS. stations on air, 
in' I. Honolulu and Alaska > 15 
Jan. '."> 1 1 
No. of markets covered 



BOX SCORE 



Wo. of post-freeze c.p.'s grant- 
ed {excluding 28 educational 
.'$.■»."» grants; 15 Jan. '54) 
221 ,\o. of grantees on air 



No. tv homes in l.S. (1 

Jan. St i 27..>00.0005 

I'errent ol all l.S. homes 

with tv sets (1 Jan. *54) 60 %§ 



193 

217 



"I: *h DOT ■ i> s and jtatlont going on the air lilted h) B which occurred I 

1 Jan. and i | million could i btalned In thai period Btetla 

red to be on the air when commercial operation start*. ••Tower of c.p.'s li that recorded 
i I ' (■ Informal Ion 01 the numbej 

In mark< NJBC B itM from the 

station- -\tmale SlUU fr.'ti, \ ':■ ll< n urrh an. I Planning 



Percentages on homes with sets and hnmes in tv coverage areas are considered approximate, 
ea, the representative of a radio statUm which Is granted a c.p. also represents tbe 
tv operation Since at presstime it is generally too early to confirm tr representations of i 
grantees. SPONSOR lists the reps of (he radio stations in this rolumn (when a radio station 
been given the tv grant) MA No figures available at presstime on acta Id mai 



38 



SPONSOR 




WWW - _ -^riftf 



ONE SUN BEATS A HALF MOON 





One average dollar invested in NBC daytime television delivers 621 advertising impres- 
sions. The same dollar invested in the average nighttime television show makes only 
303 advertising impressions— less than half as many. Clear as daylight itself is the 
fact that Daytime Dollars Buy More . . . when they're placed on NBC TELEVISION 

a service nf Radio Corporation of America 



■ j:< es A. C. Nielsen Co. Jan.-Aprir.53. PIB Gross Time Cost Jan.-April "53. Variety Talent Est Nov. '52. 






SNA 




ID) 



11 Willi 1. 



mm 



<i° 



* <i 



rails i in § 



Chart covers half-hour syndicated film pro 





Part* 

rink 














■ J 








Rank 
■ • 


Top 10 shows in 10 or more markets 
Period: 1-7 December 7953 

TITLE. 8YNDICAT0R. PRODUCER. SHOW TYPE 


Averaga 

rating 


7-STATI0N 
MARKET8 


48TATI0N MARKETS 


3STATI0N 


MARKETS 




N.Y. L.A. 


Boston Chi. 


Mplt. St L. Wash 


Atlanta Bait. Buflalo 


Cine. CI 


f 


I 


Favorite Story, Ziv (D) 


23.9 


7.8 J0.2 

kttv 


79.8 8.2 

irbbm-ti 
in SOdo 1 00pm 


23.3 48.0 15.4 

ti k"l t\ tvtop.ti 
9:00pm B :80pm 10:30pm 


72.8 

wana-tv 


79.5 7 

wkre-tv 1 
9:30pm 10 


2 


« 


I Led Throe Lives, Ziv |D) 


22.2 


T0.7 4.9 

irnbl kr;i iv 
( 00pm 


76.0 

: 00pm 


7.8 52.0 

wlw-a wben-tv 
9:30pm 


26.5 7 

wlw-t w| 
8:30pm 10 J 


3 


2 


Cisco Kid, Ziv (W) 


21.9 


70.4 9.5 

wnbt k" :i tv 
6 :00pm T :00pm 


74.5 76.6 

wnac-lv wlikb 
6:30pm 5:00pm 


79.5 27.5 72.8 

5:00pm 4:30pm 6:30pm 


76.3 76.0 38.8 

wapa-tv wbal-tv wben-tv 
7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pro 


27.8 7 

wrpo-tv » 
6:00pm 6 1 


4 


3 


C ill/ Deteetive s MCA, Revue Prod. (D) 


21.4 


3.3 7.7 

arpll knbh 
7:30pm 10 30pm 


5.8 

Ul'-[i u 


7.8 43.5 

wrnar tv wben-tv 
11:00pm 10:30pm 


V ■ 

10 a 


5 


4 


Foreign Intrigue, JWT, Shel. Reynolds (A) 


19.9 


78.0 75.4 

wnbt knbh 
10:30pm 10:30pra 


77.8 72.2 

m !»/ tv wnbq 
10:30pm 9:30pm 


79.0 79.5 758 

kftp-tf ksd-tv wnbw 
9:30pm 11:00pm 10:30pm 


3.0 

wbuf-tv 
8:00pm 


75.0 ;| 

wepo-tv 
8:30pm 10 I 


6 


3 


Boston Blackie, Ziv (M) 


19.4 


4.4 6.0 

wabc-tv knv 
10:00pm 8:30pm 


75.4 

u $ n 1 v 
9 :30pm 


73.6 

8:30pm 


9.8 73.8 

wlw-a wbal-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 


74.3 

wlw-t 
10:30pm 


7 


9 


Kit Carson, MCA, Revue Prod. (W) 


19.3 


9.7 7 7.2 

wnbt keca-tv 
6:00pm 7:30pm 


75.8 

i; 00pm 


27.3 

1 nopm 


75.8 7 7.3 

wlw-a wmar-tv 
6:00pm 6:00pm 


el 


8 


7 


Range Riders, CBS Film, Flying "A" (W) 


18.9 


9.7 

knxt 
7 OOpm 


25.8 

wbz-tv 
7 :00pm 


8.3 

weeo-tv 
5:00pm 


7 7.5 

wsb-tv 
6:00pm 


;l 


9 


10 


Superman, MPTV, R. Maxwell (K) 


I8.I 


72.0 72.8 

wnbt keca-tv 
G :00pm 8:30pm 


77.0 72.2 

unac-tv wbkb 
6:30pm 5:00pm 


8.3 29.0 7.8 

vrcoo-tr ksd-tv wmal-tv 
5:00pm 5:30pra 6:00pm 


77.3 76.0 39.0 

wsb-tv wbal-tv wben-tv 
7 :00pm 7 :00pm 7 :00pm 


72.3 1 

wkrr-tv ^B 
6:30pm <■ 


10 


II 


Wild Bill Rickok, W. Broidy (W) 


17.8 


4.2 7 7.2 

wor-tv ktla 
5:30pm 6:00pm 


8.3 73.0 

wnac-tv wbkb 
5:00pm 1:30pm 


26.0 26.0 73.8 

wcro-tv fcsd-tv wtop-tr 
5:30pm 12:00n 1:00pm 


72.3 74.0 24.3 

mb-tf wbal-tv wben-tv 
5:30pm 7:00pm 1:00pm 


73.8 ■ 


Rank 
■ow 


Past' 
rank 


Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 markets 














I 


3 


Orient Express, PSI-TV, Inc. (A) 


19.3 


2.4 3.9 

rabc-tv keca-tv 
8:00pm 8:30pm 






2 




Hopalong Cassidy, NBC Film (W) 


17.3 


77.2 9.4 

wnht kttv 
6:30pm 7:00pm 


8.3 

wbkb 
5:30pm 


29.5 73.4 

wrco-tv wnbw 
6:00pm 7:00pm 


74.3 

wsb-tv 




3 


I 


Jeffrey Jones, L. Parsons (D) 


16.7 


5.9 

kttv 
8:00pm 




2.5 

wbuf-tv 
9 :00pm 


4 





Gene Atltry, CBS Film, Flying "A" (W) 


16.S 


7 7.5 

ktla 
5:30pm 


8.8 

wbbm-tv 
5 :30pm 




5 


4 


Amos 'n' Andy. CBS Film (C) 


14.8 


8.2 75.2 

webs-tv knxt 
2:00pm 8:00pm 


7 7.5 7.6 

wbl tv wbbm-tv 
11 :15pm 1 :30pm 




6 


2 
3 


Victory at Sea, NBC Film (Doc.) 


13.6 


6.7 

wnbt 

7 :00pm 


72.3 9.8 

wbz-tv wnbq 
11:15pm 9:30pm 


8.2 

wnbw 
7 :00pm 


2.0 

wbes-tv 
8:00pm 


7 


Cowboy G-itfen, United Artists (W) 


13.5 


3.0 

n ibe (v 

1:30pm 


10.5 

Brbl rv 
2:00pm 


77.0 26.0 

wcro-tv k- 1 tv 
4:30pm 3:30pm 


72.8 

waga-tv 
7 :00pm 


75.3 

m po tv 

i sen 


8 


7 


Reart of the City, United TV Programs (D) 


12.0 


8.0 

kttv 
10:30pm 


7.3 

wbs- tv 

11:15pm 


7.3 

wlw-a 
8:00pm 


76.8 

wkre-tv 
9:00pn- 


8 




All .liner. Game of Week, Sportsvision (S) 


11.0 




8.6 

BPgD-tf 

9 :30pm 


3.3 

wtvl 
9 :30pm 




10 


8 


Abbott A Costello, TCA (C) 


10.9 


7 7.4 8.7 

wnbt kttv 
6:00pm 7:30pm 


76.8 9.8 

wnac-tv wnbq 
6:00pm 6:00pm 


70.2 
irtop- tv 


5.8 

wm ■ • 
6 :30pm 





Show type- symbols: (A) tdTtntari ■ . (D) Arami locamenUrr; (Ki klil show; 

\li mjlKty; tW] WmUm; (8) ■parti. Films listed are syndicated, half hour length, broadcast 

In four or more markets. The average rating Is an unweighted average of Individual market 



ratines listed above Ttlank space, in Urates film not broadcast In this market ll 

ber 1953. While network shows are fairly stable from one month to another IV 

tlicy arc run, this Is ttue 10 much ll with syndicated shows. B 



40 



SPONSOR 



li Ans 



i//y made tor TV 



3-STATION MARKETS 



[roit 


Milw'kee 


Phi la. 


S. Fran. 


Seattle 


,.3 






20.5 

krun tv 
S :00pm 


30.3 

king-tv 
8 :00pm 


.3 




7 7.8 

wcau-tv 

7:00|>m 


77.8 

kron-tv 
10:30pm 




:.3 


34.5 


77.0 


26.0 


36.3 




wtmj-tv 
5 :00pra 


wcau-tv 
7 :00pm 


kron-tv 
7:00pm 


king-tv 
7:00pm 


.0 


20.0 

wtmj-tv 
11:00pm 




20.3 

kron-tv 
10:00pm 




.8 


43.8 


7 7.4 


9.0 


28.8 




wtmj-tv 
9:30pm 


wcau - tv 
10:30pm 


kgo-tv 
10:30pm 


king-tv 
9:3(i|mi 


.5 


30.3 




72.3 


74.3 


* tv 


wtmj-tv 
11:00pm 




kgo-tv 
8:30pm 


ktnt-tv 
10:30pm 


3 


32.0 


74.4 


77.8 


27.3 




wtmj-tv 
4:30pm 


vvptz 
6:30pm 


kron-tv 
4:00pm 


king-tv 
5:U0pra 


.3 


8.3 


78.2 


23.8 


29.8 




wcan-tv 
7:00pm 


wptz 
6:00pm 


kpix 
7:00pm 


king-tv 
7:00pm 


.8 


28.0 


20.6 


7 7.0 


27.5 




wtmj-tv 
4:00pm 


wcau-tv 
7 :00pm 


kgo-tv 
6 :30pm 


king-tv 
5:00pm 



2-STATION 
MARKETS 



Birm. New 0. 



Charlotte 



50.5 

vvdsu-tv 

'J :: 



27.3 27.0 



win i tv 
5:00pm 



wdsu-tv 
5 00pm 



.5 79.8 78.6 77.5 20.8 



wtmj tv 
12:00n 



wptz 
6 :30pm 



kgo-tv 
6 :30pm 



king-tv 
5 :00pm 



23.5 35.5 



wabt 
0:30pm 



wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 



20.0 

wbrc-tv 
0:30pm 



78.3 46.3 



wbrc-tv 
10 :00pm 



wdsu tv 
10:00pm 



27.3 38.8 



wabt 

t; :00pm 



wdsu-tv 
4:00pm 



42.3 

wdsu-tv 
6:00pm 



22.8 25.3 



wabt 
6:00pm 



wdsu-tv 
5:00pm 



26.0 24.8 



wabt 
6:00pm 



wdsu-tv 
12:30pm 



l-STA. 
MKT. 



59.0 

WbtV 
0:00pm 

59.5 

wbtv 
8:30pm 



36.0 

Wbtv 

11:00am 



56.5 

wbtv 
8:00pm 



56.5 

wbtv 
9:00pm 



59.5 

wbtv 
8:00pm 



29.0 

wbtv 
3:30pm 



26.0 

wbtv 

3:00pm 



30.0 

wbtv 
3:30pm 



73.5 36.0 



kgo-tv 
8:30pm 



king-tv 
8:30pm 



72.5 

kgo-tv 
6:00pm 



5.3 

wcan-tv 
8:30pm 



5 

' -tv 
i pm 



22.3 

king-tv 
5:00pm 



37.5 

king-tv 
7 :30pm 



.3 

»-tv 
i pm 

s 

Ijl-tv 



78.3 

kron-tv 
7:00pm 



7.0 

kgo-tv 
7:00pm 



__■ pro 



75.0 2.3 

kron-tv kmo-tv 
10:30pm 9:00pm 



23.3 

wtmj-tv 

10:30pm 

73.4 

wcau-tv 
J 10:30pra 



6.3 3.0 

kgo-tv kmo-tv 
10:00pm 8:00pm 



45.5 

wdsu-tv 
9:30pm 



79.8 

wbrc-tv 
6:00pm 



53.0 

wdsu-tv 
7 :30pm 



27.5 

wabt 
6:00pm 



40.8 

wdsu-tv 
4:30pm 



8.8 37.5 

wbrc-tv wdsu-tv 
10:45pm 10:00pm 



37.5 

wbtv 
3:30pm 



25.0 

wbtv 
1:30pm 



mind when analyzing rating trends, from one month to another 
art 'Refers to last month's chart. If blank, show was not 
"I in last chart or was in other top 10. 



60QD FOR A PROFITABLE 

PASSAGE THROUGHOUT 

THE MID-SOUTH S 

FASTEST-GROWING MARKET 



GREENSBORO, 
N.C. 



wfmy-tv 



WHsmmtM, 



H.S. 

via 
MrttW|-XN 



DURHAM, 
N.C. 



via 



wfmy-tv 



fVSUEBORO, 
H.C. 



via 



DANVILLE, 
VA. 

via 

wfmy-tv 



m&H P0\HI, 
H.C. 

via 

MDSmLE, 
N.C. 

via 

- wfmy-tv 

via 

BURLINGTON, 
tiC. 

via 

wfmy-tv 

H.fc. ' 

■via 



- 



SALISBURY, 
H.C. 



via 



wfmy-tv 



Yr\. 



>Nlm^-\M 



this is 

just 

the 

IICK61 to sell the real 
North Carolina market. 

If you want to go places in a profitable 
way throughout the fastest-growing 
area of the fast-growing mid-South . . 
WFMY-TV is ready to cover a lot of 
ground for you in a hurry. 

Your itinerary, via Channel 2, includes 
a market that's $1,500,000,000 
strong in buying power, .home of 
some of the biggest, best-known names 
in American manufacturing . . rich with 
payrolls that stem from a busy combina- 
tion of industry and agriculture. 

When your message travels via WFMY-TV, 
you're sure of a warm and resultful 
welcome in television homes all over 
this progressive region. For more sales 
in the heart of the mid-South, WFMY-TV 
is just the ticket! 

wfmy-tv 

Basic CBS Affiliate -Channel 2 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Represented by 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 

New York— Chicago — San Francisco 



25 JANUARY 1954 



41 






ON 




SALINAS, CALIF. 

5000 WATTS 

Saturate California's 

Newest Metropolitan Area 

with the 

CLOVER LEAF 
STATION 

at half the cost of 
using separate stations. 

HERE'S THE STORY... LEAF BY LEAF 

SALINAS $58 Million Retail Sales 

MONTEREY $35 Million Retail Sales 
SANTA CRUZ $42 Million Retail Sales 
WATSONVILIE $27 Million Retail Sales 

Put them all together for. 

ONE STATION COVERAGE 

of these four cities and the rest of 

this Half-Billion Dollar Market 






K 



SALINAS 

CALIFORNIA 



REPRESENTED BY WEED & CO. 




I Continued from page 10 I 

that a sensible use of radio and television — which means well- 
written copy and video that does more than holding up a print 
advertisement — wouldn't have turned the tide in favor of the 
stores, in any case. 

In addition, I gather the stores got so di.-traught over the 
newspaperless state of the city that they withheld most of their 
advertising dollars. So, in effect, they were trying to make 
up for their loss of the press with less dollars each of which 



Hi 



,1 



Does 



was pulling only a small portion of its value. 
this constitute a fair test for radio and tv? 

As you can perhaps imagine by now, what I'm getting at 
is that this mystic world of retail advertising which so few in 
the national end of the picture seem to appreciate may not be 
so different after all. What's more important, it may be sus- 
ceptible to broadcast campaigns that are well conceived and 
adroitly spotted (speaking of well "spotted," I gather also 
that most adjacencies purchased by the stores were of the 
genus which cause agency timebuyers to hold their noses; 
another handicap!). 

In fact, I daresay that stores with a plethora of talent on 
their premises could quickly and easily adapt themselves and 
their people to as wise a usage of radio and television as any 
pill pusher on the national level. In fact, this seems to me to 
be an area which opens tremendous possibilities for radio 
and anything which does that, or gives a promise of so doing 
these days, is well worth looking into. 

Therefore I imagine the more aggressive station folk- arc 
working right now to prove what the strike proved and to help 
the store people make a more intelligent adjustment to broad- 
cast advertising. By so doing, they'll add new and needed 
revenue and once again prove that the human voice (radio) 
and the human voice plus pix in motion (television) are pretty 
effective sales instruments even if you can't tear the messages 
out and pin them to hubby's shaving mirror. 



• • • 



Letters to Bob Foreman are weleomed 

Do you always agree with the opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
presses in "Agency Ad Libs'? Hob and the editors of spon- 
sor would be happy to receive and print comments from 
renders. Address Hob Foreman, c'o SPONSOR, 40 F. 49 5/. 



42. 



SPONSOR 




ffijsfit^^ 





Sarra's commercials are extremely 
effective "visual selling" — they 
make friends and motivate 
buying action. 



ATTENTION 



Sarra's ingenious use of 
audio-visual techniques 
compels attention for the 
product's complete story. 



Sarra's commercials possess 
DETENTION an un f° r g eta ble quality — 
RBI K ™ ' tvn the impression lasts long 

after the broadcast. 



RECOGNITION 



Sarra's advertising experts never 
forget the primary importance of 
strong product identification. 



The advertiser gets results when 
Sarra's team of creative 
advertising men and expert 
technicians apply their talents. 



More than 2500 TV commercials al- 
ready produced, and over 20 years' 
experience as specialists in Visual 
Selling give Sarra "know-how". 
Find out how it can work for you. 



VIDE-O-RIGINAL is 
the name for a qual- 
ity-controlled motion 
picture print made in 
Sarra's own photo- 
graphic laboratory. And 
whether you order one 
— or one hundred — each 
is custom-made for max- 
imum fidelity. 




OTHER SUCCESSFUL TV 
ADVERTISERS SERVED BY SARRA 

The STUDEBAKER Corp.- 
Roche, Williams & Cleary, Inc. 

NORTHERN TISSUE. Northern 
Paper Mills- Young & Rubi- 
cam. Inc. (Chicago). 

JERGENS LOTION. Andrew 
Jergens, Inc.— Robert W. Orr 
& Associates, Inc. 

SYLVANIA TV sets. Sylvania 
Electric Products, Inc.— Roy S. 
Durstine,. Inc. 

The GREAT ATLANTIC & PA- 
CIFIC TEA COMPANY-Paris 
& Peart. 

RAINBO. FAIR-MAID. COLON- 
IAL breads, Campbell Taggart 
Associated Bakeries. 



CLIP BOARD OF 
RECENT SARRA RELEASES 




LUCKY STRIKE, American 

Tobacco Co.— Batten, Barton, 

Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 




STOPETTE Deodorant. Jules 

Montenier, Inc.— Earle Ludgin 

& Company 




PET Milk Co.-Gardner Adver- 
tising Co. Awarded Chicago Art 
Directors' Club Gold Medal. 




Pabst "BLUE RIBBON" Beer. 

Pabst Sales Co.-Warwick & 

Legler, Inc. 




SPECIALISTS IN VISUAl SEUING -^ 



NEW YORK: 200 East 56lh Street CHICAGO: 16 East Ontario Street 

TELEVISION COMMERCIALS . PHOTOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION • MOTION PICTURES . SOUND SLIDE FILMS 



25 JANUARY 1954 



43 




SATURATES 

CENTRAL CALIFORNIA'S 

RICH INLAND MARKET 

Effective buying income 

$942,044,000 

in KJEO coverage area 

81,850 sets Dec, 1953 

(90 mile contour area) 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

THE BRANHAM COMPANY 

Offices in Leading Cities 

EDEI 



CHANNEL 



ST 




agency profile 



L. T. Steele 

Administrative V.P. for Tv & Radio 
Benton & Bowles. New York 



O'NEILL BROADCASTING CO. 

FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

P. O. Bex 1708 Phone 7-8405 

J. E. O'Neill. President 



"'Although many tv programs today are either independently or 
network packaged, the agency's role in an advertiser's air campaign 
is no less important or complex." Ted Steele. Benton & Bowles" ex- 
ecutive head of tv and radio, told sponsor. "To the familiar func- 
tions of creating our own effective programs and commercials now 
are added — increasingly- — problems of negotiating and administer- 
ing most effectively for clients programs developed by packagers." 

He went on to explain that creating or selecting a tv show has 
become more than ever interlocked with media and time bu\ ing 
strategies. "In tv. the closest collaboration between agency media 
and program people is a must." 

He feels the big problems which a new tv advertiser faces are two- 
fold. "There's the problem of clearing a time franchise on a lineup 
of stations adequate to meet his coverage need. Also, he must ac- 
quire a program he can afford, which, when televised in such a 
valuable time slot, will attract an audience large enough and lo\al 
enough to make the whole investment in time and talent pay." 

A related trend in tv advertising that Steele points to is the emerg- 
ing of various forms of cost-sharing sponsorships: rotating, alter- 
nating, participating. These, he feels, open up major-leagut t\ 
opportunities to products with smaller budgets or seasonal selling 
problems. 

SPONSOR estimates that 60 r r of Benton & Bowles 1953 billings of 
160 million, or $36 million, were in air media: $26 million in tv. 
$10 million in radio. These figures give Benton & Bowles fourth 
ranking among the top 20 agencies by 1953 air billings, i See 
sponsor list of top 20 radio and tv agencies. 28 December 1953. i 

Among t\ shows supervised by Steele's department for Benton & 
Bowles clients are: Mama, the Red Buttons Show, Roy Rogers. Letter 
to Loretta, Pantomime Quiz and the daxtime strip. On ) our Account 
(agency-built). Network radio entries include such established pro- 
grams as the B&B-built Railroad Hour. II endx U arren and the News 
and about a dozen more daytime serials and participation shows. 

The Steeles live in Manhattan, \sked if he'd made anv New 
Year's resolutions, Ted Steele answered unhesitatingly: "Yes — to 
move to the country!" \n\bodv got a house for sale in Locust 
Valley, N. Y.? *** 



44 



SPONSOR 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA 



(AND WESTERN NEVADA) 




DELIVERS MORE FOR THE MONE/ 



These five inland radio stations, purchased as a unit, give you 
more listeners than any competitive combination of local 
stations . . . and in Inland California more listeners than the 
2 leading San Francisco stations and the 3 leading Los Angeles 
stations combined . . . and at the lowest cost per thousand! 
(SAMS and SR&D) 

Ringed by mountains, this self-contained inland market is 
90 miles from San Francisco and 113 miles from Los Angeles. 
The Beeline taps a net effective buying income of almost 4 
billion dollars. 
(Sales Management's 1953 Copyrighted Survey) 



WCLATCHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 




KOH /© reno 

KFBK ° SACRAMENTO 
KWG O STOCKTON 

r 1 \ 

KMJ © FRESNO 

) \ 

KERN ° BAKERSFIELD 




25 JANUARY 1954 



45 




n forum on questions of current interest 
to air ailvertisers and their agencies 



IJo i/on think thv audio portion of tv shows rhoutd 
nittL-r up (in itnportttnt svynient of network rcufio 




Gottlieb 



THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 

The answer to 
whether <>r not 
the audio portion 
of a t\ show 
should be used in 
network radio de- 
pends on the pro- 
gram in\ olved. I n 
some instances it 
can work, such as 
Meet the Press. 
That pro" r a m 
was originall) a radio show, then 
moved to t\. and now the t\ sound 
hack i- used on radio. In a case like 
this, it's almost a question of which 
came first, the chicken or the egg? 

On more or less stationarx shows. 
su h as CBS' Man of the Week, the t\ 
sound can be used on radio with sati>- 
factor) results. The results, audiowise, 
will not always be satisfactory, how- 
ever, because tv audio is inferior to 
radio audio. 

\\ ith regard to certain musical pro- 
grams, t\ audio could he used on radio 
without undue loss ol audio quality. 

The audio portion of tv corned] 
shows would not be so successful on 
radio be :ause much of i\ depends upon 
sight. \ humorous t\ corned) sequence 
in pantomime, foi instance, would ob- 
viousl) be meaningless on radio. 

Il is likel) thai ver) lew dramatic 
programs could be simulcast. The 
visual part ol a dramatic program 
simpl) plays too great a pari to be 
eliminated. 

The exact answer to the question, 
then, depends upon the nature ol the 
l>i ogram. 

When you arc looking at something, 
as in i\. you're not quite so aware ol 

the sound as you are when \ :annol 

see the source ol thai sound. 

In radio, the listenei must hear the 



sound and all of it — so that his 
imagination can operate properly. If 
\ou roh a person of the audio, his 
imagination is crippled. 

If you turn off the video portion of 
your t\ set and keep on the audio, you 
won't hear certain words. The opera- 
tor of the boom mike just cannot al- 
v\a\s keep the mike over the speaker 
or singer's head. If there's a great 
deal of movement in a tv program, 
it's even harder to manage the boom 
mike. Not that perfect sound reproduc- 
tion will result even if the boom mike 
is direct!) over the speaker. It never 
is as good as when the performer can 
speak directl) into the mike, as in 
radio. 

Motion pictures circumvent this 
problem l>\ dubbing in the sound track 
after the picture has been shot. Except 
for filmed programs, this cant he done 
on tv. 

For radio to use tv audio to a very 
great extent would he suicidal. There 
must be heller audio qualit) for an 
audio medium — not second best. 

Lester Gottlieb 
Vice President in charge of 
network programs 

CBS Radio 
Neu York 



I n conside r i ng 
t h e practicalit) 
of using taped 
versions of t \ 
^ ♦ shows on radio. 

it is necessar) to 
break down the 
problem into pro- 
gram i\ pes. 
fi^ M § Such programs 

Mr. Hamilton as audience par- 

ticipation, panel 
ami musicals do lend themselves to this 
type ol operation bo long as the pro- 




gram does not require sight for its 
continuity and pace. Participants in 
an) such programs would be com- 
pelled to abstain from an\ rcferen es 
having to do with si<:ht for obvious 
reasons. Variet) and dramatic shows 
would not he practical since often the 
basic conception of the program is 
based on the audience's abilit) to see 
what is occurring. 

\\ ith regard to using a radio tape 
for a t\ production. 1 would consider 
this completer) unpractical. The prob- 
lems of synchronizing movement with 
pre-recorded sound would present 
problems of staggering proportions. 
1 he onl) plausible application of the 
method that comes to mind would he 
the use of a musical tape while pro- 
jecting film locale shots compatible 
with the music being plaved. 

\\ i i.i.i \ m I). Hamilton 

Eastern Program Director 
ABC Radio Network 
Sew York 



\s the network 
which pioneered 
in this t\pe of 
operation we < an 
point to three 
successful use- ol 
this technique. 
When the \d 
miral Corp. re- 
ceded complaints 
from people that 
the) were being 
deprived of Bishop Fulton .1. Sheens 
Life Is II orth Living program, the 
compan) signed up for the entire Mu- 
tual Broadcasting System's radio net. 
W h\ Mutual'.'' Because of this web's 

deep audience penetration, in both t\ 
and non-t\ area-. 

\nd certainl) there are main fine 
telex ision programs whose main ap- 




Mr. Rice 



46 



SPONSOR 



peal is aural rather than visual. Among 
the "television" programs which the 
Mutual radio network is now carrying 
are The Eddie Fisher Show, Perry 
Corno's Top Tunes, and Author Meets 
the Critics. 

With television production costs as 
high as they are it seems a little ridicu- 
lous not to get as much mileage out of 
each program as possible. With sing- 
ers such as Como and Fisher, and dis- 
cussion shows such as Author Meets it 
is only common sense to amortize the 
cost of the program by disseminating 
it over as large an audience as possible. 
The network of more than 500 Mutual 
radio stations which these advertisers 
use assures them of reaching into every 
nook and cranny in America at very 
little additional cost, considering the 
original investment in the tv program. 
With advertisers becoming more 
dollar-conscious every day it seems 
likely that more and more of them will 
turn to this method of stretching their 
budgets. Despite the prophets of 
doom, radio still has a vast audience. 
And it always will have. Whether the 
people turn to radio because they 
don't have tv, or because it does a 
better job in fields such as news and 
music, or because they enjoy a "sort 
of audible wallpaper" (as Alistair 
Cooke calls radio), they will continue 
to devote many hours per week to 
radio listening. Just because people 
are in the kitchen, bedroom, family 
car, or on the beach is no reason for 
ignoring their listening habits. And 
there's no reason why a substantial 
portion of this listening shouldn't be 
to programs which are produced with 
a combined listener-viewer audience 
in mind. 

Herbert C. Rice 

Vice President in 
Charge of Programs 

MBS 

New York 



Any questions? 

sponsor welcomes questions for 
discussion from its readers. Ques- 
tions are evaluated for their in- 
terest to other readers and, if 
found suitable, will be submitted 
to the most appropriate authori- 
ties for answering. Topic for dis- 
cussion in the 8 February issue: 
"Do sponsors need a well-known 
star to attract large radio and tv 
audiences?" 



MAIL PULL 

Ar««y KCEN-TV 




covers ALL of the big 
Temple-Waco market! 

Engineers calculated a coverage radius of 
75 miles for KCEN-TV, but mail reporting 
good reception has been consistently re- 
ceived from distant points in excess of 1 00 
miles . . . proof of "plus" coverage in the 
big market midway between Texas' four 
largest cities where nearly a million peo- 
ple reside. 

THIS IS COVERAGE 






For the first time, advertisers can reach 
all of the Temple-Waco market with a 
single medium — 



100 KW 
VHF 



Cha 



nnel O 




P. O. Box 1 88, Temple, Texas 

George P. Hollingbery Company — Na»'/ Rep. 



833-Foot Tower 

830 Feet Above Average Terrain 

(Tallest tower in Texas, south of Amarillo) 



KCEN-TV 

NBC Interconnected 



Phone 3-6868 

Clyde Melville Company — Texa* Rep. 



25 JANUARY 1954 



47 




ItflV.I Interview* lick city's psyvholoyival depression 



In l);ui\ ill*-. \ a., people were wear- 
ing long l.i i - just before < In istmas. 
\ drought had liii tin- area's tobacco 
crops. I In- large te tile mill, Dan 
River, which supports mam oi the 
city's residents, was not operating at 
lull capacit) . \ml the weather w as too 
warm to kindle any enthusiasm about 
( In istmas shopping. 

Ye l. a -tudv of Danville's hu-iness 




Dick Campbe 

indicated things were not as 
almost everybody believed. 

\\ D\ \ originated a plan to lick the 
psychological depression. The gim- 
raick: concentrate on telling people that 
business is good in Danville, getting 
specific firms and plants to report on 
their current operating picture. 

Program Director Dick Campbell 
(see picture above i and News Direc- 

Color telecasts planned 
by ItS.lZ-TV for Unroll 

WSAZ-TV, Huntington, W. Va.. 
plans lo transmit it- first color telecast 
sometime in March, according to Law- 
rence II. Rogers, vice president ami 
genera] manager oJ WSAZ, [nc. 

The station has already received 
notice from l!( '. \ Laboratories that it- 
color equipment i- on the way. The 
equipment will convert the station to 
network color t< l<-\ ision. 

Rogers said it will be possible to 
transmit color before March if the 
Telephone Co. makes color circuits in 
Dayton or Columbus available to the 
station sooner than anticipated. * * * 



toi Charlie Craig spent an afternoon 

on the "beeper" telephone, tape record- 
ing statements 1>\ various merchants. 
I he next day. the tape-recorded tele- 
phone interviews were aired on the sta- 
tion's regular programs. 

Station breaks incorporated the same 
theme, with the message: "This is 
\\ D\ \. Dam [He, \ irginia, where busi- 
ness is good!" 

Throughout the day the station re- 
ceived calls from other merchants who 
wanted to participate. The campaign 

w;:s extended another da\ in order to 
get all •")() statements on the air. * * * 

! amities with ah I sets 
ivateh tv more — \RB 

Families which have tv sets equipped 
to receive both uhf and vhf stations 
spend 25% more time watching tv 
than families which have a vhf-onlv 
>et. This was one of the findings of a 
survey completed recently by Ameri- 
can Research Bureau for ABC. 

ARB found that families with uhf- 
\hf sets watch tv 34.96 hours weekly. 
Those with vhf-only sets watch tv 27.83 
hours weekly . * • * 



lianh uses cartoons 
to sell serious itleas 

The Republic- National Bank of Dal- 
las is using a humorous cartoon an- 
nouncement campaign on television to 
sell the serious idea of banking. 

I he bank turned to cartoon- because 
it believes this method of advertising 
adds to audience retenth it\ of the com- 
mercial message. It uses telops with 
cartoon- produced bv Glenn Advertis- 
ing Vgency in it- announcements. 

In a -ample telop series, the first 




Witch stirs cauldron 



bank commercial 



slide shows a witch stirring a smoking 
cauldron I see above), Audio for this 
illustration: "In early times witch- 
< rafters had developed secret recipes 
for accumulating wealth — like boiling 
leaves in a magic solution." 

On another slide the cartoon shows 
the results of a disastrous explosion. 
I he witch's pot is smashed to smither- 
eens, her clothes ripped to shreds. 
Audio: "Today we know it's nonsense 
— but a savings account can add up to 
be a real nest poo" 



Iht Mont unveils ttvo-proyrains-at-once tv receiver 



In radio, its personal set listening 
that solves family squabbles: in tele- 
vision, it may well be the personal 
earpiece. 

The Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories 
recently previewed its new Duoscopic 
tv receiver which shows two programs 
on one screen and permits two separ- 



ate audiences to view each program 
simultaneously (see picture below i . 

The Duoscopic receiver can tune in 
any two tv programs from any stations 
within range. Through the use of 
polaroid glasses, personalized earpieces 
and remote control audio units each 
person viewing the screen ma\ tune 







Called the Duoscopic tv receiver, Du Mont set receives two programs at the same time 



48 



SPONSOR 



in and out of either program indepen- 
dently of the other persons viewing ill 
the same time. 

The audio control unit has six 
switches and two knobs. The switches 
control the specific audio signals; the 
knobs control the volume. The audio 
control unit is so designed that the 
viewer can easily watch one program 
and listen to the audio content of 
another. 

If all persons desire to see the same 
program the Duoscopic Receiver can 
be viewed conventionally with only one 
picture presented, Du Mont officials 
said. The new receiver will be first 
shown to the public in New York and 
New Jersey. * * * 

KGO, San Francisco, is awakening 
childhood memories for many of its 
listeners these days. 

It has inaugurated a new station- 
break campaign, consisting of rhymed 
couplets a la Mother Goose. Here are 
some samples: 

"Tom, Tom, the piper's son 

He learned to play ivhen he was 

young 
And now he tunes his radio 
To Dance Time — heard on KGO, 

San Francisco.'' 
"Where are you going, my pretty 

maid? 
With your rosy cheeks and your 

golden hair? 
I'm tuning my radio, she said 
There's plenty of entertainment there 
— on KGO, San Francisco.'" * * * 

Briefly . . . 

When you get your meal checks in 
various Syracuse restaurants, on the 
back of the check — in place of the 
usual "Thank you . . . please pay 
cashier" or similar wording — is a pic- 
lure of two sign painters at work on a 
huge sign covering the height of a 
building. The wording being painted 
on the sign says, "Radio or tv— WSYR 
—dial 570-^ihannel 3." 
* * * 

Weiss & Geller, Inc., Chicago ad 
agency, has teamed up with social sci- 
entists to conduct a creative workshop 
for its employees. Purpose of the meet- 
ings is to apply the knowledge of so- 
cial scientists to advertising, accord- 
ing to Edward H. Weiss, agency presi- 
dent. Any member of the agency can 
attend the sessions, and those attend- 
ing are invited to submit copy ideas 
for use in any medium, based on fac- 
( Please turn to page 128) 



The Whole Family Will Love 

— > 




TV's Great New All-Star Show 
. . . Aimed At The Heart Of America 




BASED ON HAM FISHER'S DYNAMIC 
ALL-AMERICAN CHARACTER , . , FOLLOWED 
BY 70 MILLION DEVOTED READERS! 



Nothing else like it on TV today! The first TV 
series to be made available to local and regional 
sponsors with ALL-FAMILY AUDIENCE APPEAL 

Mom. Dad, Sister and Brother will all love 

JOE PALOOKA! It's got everything . . . comedy. 

action, romance, adventure'. 



JOE KIRKWOOD 

:i> Joe Palooka 

CATHY DOWNS 

as Joe's wife, Aim Howe 

SID TOMACK 

as Knobby, Joe's Manager 

MAXIE 
R0SENDL00M 

as Clyde, Joe's Trainer 

* * • • 

26 SHOWS 
NOW AVAILABLE 




Another Great Half-Hour Winner From The Producers of 
• THE LIBERACE SHOW • LIFE WITH ELIZABETH 



\/vr ///c 



420 MADISON AVENUE • NEW YORK 17, NEW YORK 



25 JANUARY 1954 



49 




\ 



-» 



For the first time on any screen— even be- 
fore your local theatres, TV will premiere 
this outstanding series of feature length 
motion pictures. 

HERE is a programming idea so sound, so big, so 
merchan disable, that 22 leading TV stations signed 
for the series of 26 pictures from the first story board. 

Today leading stations, advertisers and agencies in 
30 cities are building advertising and merchandising 
campaigns around this outstanding series produced for 
Vitapix by Princess Pictures, Inc. 

Films are ready for telecasting. 26 in the series cov- 
ering drama, mystery, comedy and adventure. 70 or 5 l- 
minnte running time. Black and white, or color. \ itapix 
uniform national pricing formula. For availabilities and 
prices phone collect today. 

^ Watch VITAPIX — a corporation owned 

by T\ stations, producing and distributing TV films. 

VITAPIX CORPORATION 

New York: 509 Moditon Avenue, Plan. 8-3013 • Chicago: 30 N. lo Salle St., AN 3-2950 
lot Angclci: 8949 Sonict Blvd., CR 1-7191 • New Orleans: 3190DeSaix Blvd., Valley 1837 



AW^ omir ° H 4 



Jackie Cooper 



Martha Scott 




Big Name Stars 




50 



Top Writers and Producers 

SPONSOR 







index 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



7 



Over-all look: Made-for-tv films are now a $60 million 
industry. Here are major developments, key film trends 

Color films: A sponsor survey of syndicated producers 
shows that over 60% are shooting vidpix on color stocks 

Film reruns: Nielsen reports that share of audience for 
repeat film programs is just as good as that of original 

Production costs: Where does money go in syndicatiil 
film production? Here's an accurate film budget analysis 

Buying tips: Planning to buy a syndicated tv film showt 
Here are 10 valuable and money-saving tips for sponsors 

Available films: Results of a two-month survey of the 
film industry. 1-i-page- directory includes latest shows 

Film distributors: An up-to-the-minute directory of the 
syndicated film sources in the U. 8., ivith sales contacts 



page 52 
page 51 
page 56 
page 58 
page 62 
page 67 
page .92 




Project editor 
Charles Sinclair 



This section covers program films. Next issue: film commercials 



25 JANUARY 1954 



51 



1. W FILM: $60 million business 



/j\t\ -mi i |cii\ Fairbanks shot the 
lir-i made-for-h him in 1946 -a low- 
budget episode of Public Prosecutor 
id \\\(. tin- t\ film program indus- 
ti\ has grown so fast lew admen can 
keep track of it. 

M.inv a client todaj i- hew itched, 
bothered and bewildered bj the ei^ht- 
year-old marriage "I t\ and the movie 
industry. Man) an agencj or station 
film buyer lit- tried t<> look into the 
future of the multi-million dollar film 
syndication business and bas found it 
as clouded as a London fog. 

What's happening with color films? 
What arc the trend- in multiple-market 
spotting oi syndicated films? What's 
the qualit] <>f the merchandising of- 
fered bj film distributors? Are the 
pricing formulas becoming stabilized? 
Is the industr) basicall) sound? How 
fast is it really growing? What about 
reruns? 

These were just a few of the ques- 



tion- which SPONSOR editors discovered 
were hot topics among clients and 

agencic-. \nd these questions formed 
the basis ol extensive questionnaires 
used to survey all the leading film pro- 
ducers and distributors. 

Briefly, this i- the -ize and shape of 
the syndicated tv film program busi- 
ness as of now : 

• Syndicated films are hip business. 
Film producers and distributors were 
asked in sponsor's questionnaires to 
reveal their gross business during the 
past year. On a confidential basis near- 
l\ all gave answers. This total was 
measured against the total of all tv 
film companies with weighting to get 
a projection, sponsor's guesstimate 
for the 1954 business in tv program 
films i not including feature-lengths or 
commercials): over $60 million. 

• The business is still grow ing. Some 
more industry estimates: back in 1948. 
between 7 and 10' r of the program 



Bchedule of the average network-affili- 
ated tv outlet was on film; today, the 
figure is calculated to be about 35' 1 . 
even though the total number of tele- 
casting hours of the average tv outlet 
has increased nearh four times. As 
far as film production is concerned, 
distributors estimate that the 1953 out- 
put was 300' '< over that of 1952 — and 
still climbing. 

These are highlights. In succeeding 
pages, you will find detailed reports. 
They include an up-to-the minute re- 
port on film industry progress in color 
television, a study of the rerun film 
market, a report on tv film production 
costs and an up-to-date list of film-. 

Here, topic by topic, are other major 
developments in the tv film syndica- 
tion business which emerged in spon- 
sor's stud\. 

► Color films: 

There's no hotter topic in the video 



Ziv TV is acknowledged leader in booming syndication field, currently 
has eight tv film series before cameras. Below, executives of Carter 
Products and SSCB agency meet with Ziv officials to discuss promotion 



plans for Carter-sponsored film show, "Mr. District Attorney." L. to r.: 
Russ Clancy, Ziv a.e.; Barrett Welch, SSCB a.e. for Carter's; M. J. 
"Bud" Rif kin, Ziv tv sales manager; Alan Miller, ad manager of Carter 




52 



SPONSOR 






54 



Producers, syndieators see banner 
film year. Here are latest trends 



film business today than color tele- 
vision and color tv films. 

As the executive producer of one tv 
film company explained the situation: 

"By its very nature, the tv film in- 
dustry must plan far ahead and stay 
on top of every major color film de- 
velopment and technique. In the field 
of program production we are way 
ahead of the live networks. We have 
to lie." 

How far ahead can be judged from 
the following figures: of those pro- 
ducers and syndicators replying to 
sponsor's questionnaires — and they 
represent a majority of the best-known 
firms — more than 60% are actively en- 
gaged now in shooting one or more 
(and as many as four or five) program 
series on color film, using either East- 
man, Ansco or Technicolor stocks. The 
capital investment easily runs into 
millions. 

(For complete report on color tv as 



il applies to syndicated film programs, 
see story on page 54.) 

► Sales patterns: 

So fast has the tv film industry 
grown that producers and distributors 
find it difficult to define trends in sell- 
ing. However, these facts are becom- 
ing apparent: 

1. Sales costs are a sizable item in 
the tv film business. The smaller di>- 
tributors or producer-syndicators usu- 
ally have at least five salesmen spotted 
across the country. The medium-sized 
firms may have 10 or more and the 
big firms over 20. Each salesman costs 
the company $200 a week or more, 
syndicators estimate. This, in turn, 
means that a sales cost is tacked onto 
tv film shows. On a film deal where 
the client is spotting the show "nation- 
ally' 7 (in at least 40 or 50 markets) 
the sales cost may be 109? • On a long- 
haul basis, where the selling is done 



ft- I'thn Industry has grown 

to huqe size, but is .still Im'sW 

i*i; financing ami telling hassles 






Sales: Then ' 

thi numbi 
muli 

film hov !'■■■ I b ' ■ 
si ill i iii local sal* to t\ 

I inam-'ttta: \i,, i producers 

still ini e a loss i ■ oup 

lati r, i r film 



market-by-market, the sales cosl ma) 
be as much as 10 <>r 50' < . 

2. Sales of new shows, rerun shows 
and show.- on a multi-market basis all 
increased sizabl) (luring L953. I \ICA- 
I \ . for instance, calculates thai it 
made almost equal gains during L953 
ii. each of these categories, i However, 
most syndicators admit that the real 
meat-and-potatoes end of the business 
is not the multi-market deal. Instead, 
it is the sale by a syndicator to tv sta- 
tions who in turn sell the show locallj 
{Please turn to paiir 96) 



Reruns of shows which played originally on networks or in syndication 
are now major part of the films-for-tv business. "Amos V Andy" show 
of CBS Film Syndication gets good ratings in second showings 



Newest trend: Stars, like Ella Raines shown with MPTV Vice President 
Ed Madden, often produce or help finance new video film packages. 
Her series, "Janet Dean," is being shot in color for future reruns 




25 JANUARY 1954 



53 




Guild Films began shooting its highly successful "Liberace" Since 1950, "Cowboy G-Men," popular syndicated Western, has 

show in color on 9 January with an eye to future tv reruns been filmed in color. Residual rights are currently for sale 



2. 





J lie average tv station in the U. S. 
wont have the equipment to telecast 
color video films locally, either 16 or 
35 mm., before the early part of L955. 

That > the consensus gathered by 
SPONSOR from equipment manufactur- 
ers like RCA, Telechrome. Du Mont. 

Yet the advertiser or agencv who 



Producers see ro.vu future 
ahouil for color film r e r un *, 

are Inverting heavily now 



Production: 1/ than 60< 

the if film producers replying in 

si'on vey said they had <"" 

or iif ■ 'I imil on color 

film linn fur first run 111 !■ 

f </ui|>>iK'iif : Film telecasting gear 

ami distr or tv s< I 

behind \ in film 

industry. Local sta , nut lun » 

culnr film I ill '55. 



asks tn(la\ "What is the syndicated 
film industry doing about color?" may 
well be in for a surprise. 

As part of its extensive survev of the 
made-for-tv film bu-iness, SPONSOR re- 
ceived data on the color plans of some 
60 film companies. Included in this 
group: organizations like Ziv T\ . NBC 
Film Division. Kling Studios, CBS 
Film Syndication, Jerry Courneya Pro- 
din tions, Vitapix, Motion Pictures for 
television, Franklin Productions. Cor- 
nell Productions and others. The re- 
turn- represent a reasonable cross- 
se lion o| the industry. 

Here- how the situation stands in 

earl} L954: 

1. Despite the fact that color film 

production calls for heavy invest nts 

on the part of producers (or their 
backers), the t\ film industry is heavil) 
involved in all sort- of color plans. 
More than 60$ of the firms replying 

to sponsor's questionnaire indicated 



and problen 



that they had one or more tv program 
film series now in production in color. 

2. Some producers -how a ver\ cau- 
tious attitude about color film (see be- 
low 1. But others, confident that it's 
onl) a matter of time before tv color 
film projection equipment will be in- 
stalled which will handle any standard 
color film, are in color production to 
the limit. Franklin Productions, for 
example, has shot three different se- 
ries and five pilot films in color — 
100$ of production. Others are rang- 
ing anywhere from 30 to 75 r < of pro- 
duction in color. 

3. Just as networks and stations are 
absorbing nearl\ all of the color t\ con- 
version cost- during 1954. se t\ film 
maker- view color as an investment to 
be recaptured at a later date, \atu- 
rally, this adds to the hazards of fi- 
nancing and producing a s\ndicated tv 
film series. The producers who (li- 
eu— ed their color plans with SPONSOB 

SPONSOR 




What will color add to a mystery show? Producer Hi Brown and 
NBC have recently experimented with color on "Inner Sanctum" 



Space adventures of United TV Programs' "Rocky Jones" may be 
shot in color in near future. Producers plan a switch soon 




Special SPONSOR survey got details on who is shooting 
in color now . Some have used color for six years 



indicated, on the average, that they 
would be lucky to get 50% of their 
costs back for a shot-in-color film se- 
ries on the first run (in black-and- 
white) today. One or two put the fig- 
ure as low as 30%. 

4. As never before, the color future 
of the tv film industry is closely con- 
nected with developments in the tech- 
nical field. Producers, syndicators and 
admen are all watching eagerly for new 
color film developments to come from 
the laboratories of film manufacturers, 
like Eastman, and tv equipment firms. 
So intense has this pressure become 
that several film producers griped bit- 
terly to SPONSOR editors that they felt 
too much emphasis was being placed 
on developing equipment and tech- 
niques for live color video. (This isn't 
necessarily so, tv technical firms say, 
explaining that there are more compli- 
cations to the proper telecasting of 
color film than any other phase of 



tinted video. To harassed producers, 
however, this is sometimes small com- 
fort.) 

That's the situation on a once-over- 
lightly basis. But what exactly is avail- 
able now, or in the near future, in the 
way of syndicated color tv films? What 
do producers say about the relative 
merits of various brands of color film 
stock? What plans for color tv film 
showings can advertisers make? 

Here in question-and-answer form 
are some of the major color develop- 
ments, as well as some of the comments 
of leading film men: 

Question. What do producers them- 
selves say about the color film situa- 
tion? 

Answer. For the most part, pro- 
ducers are "bullish" on the subject. 
Here are some of their opinions: 

John Sinn, president of Ziv TV: 

"Ziv was the first major tv producer 
to shoot in color. As far back as 19 1!!. 



we were shooting Cisco Kid on 16 mm. 
Kodachrome. Last year, about 05' < of 
our production footage was in color. 
This year, the figure will be about 
90%. We're confident that the present 
color tv system is such that any good 
L6 mm. color print will aive good color 
pictures on a home color receh er. 
Meanwhile, of course, we are deliver- 
ing black-and-white prints made from 
our color negatives at black-and-white 
prices." 

John Jay Franklin, producer, Frank- 
lin Productions: 

"I believe that color will be the im- 
portant factor as soon as the general 
public will be able to buy enough color 
receivers to make it worthwhile for the 
sponsor to contract for color produc- 
tions. We have used color for the last 
five years in all of our productions, 
looking forward to the day when we 
can distribute all of our pictures in 
{Please turn to page 112) 



25 JANUARY 1954 



55 




Edward Arnold is "host" on TPA's "Star Showcase," a rerun drama series fitted out with new 
introductions and title. Here, he chats with Milton Gordon, president of TPA syndication firm 




Original sponsor, Camel, is part-owner of "Follow That Man," originally aired on CBS TV as 
"Man Against Crime.' Syndicated by MCA-TV, show is earning rerun profits in major markets 



Tv webs have developed sizable syndication sidelines in past year. ABC, for example, is cur- 
rently syndicating two rerun shows, "Racket Squad" (below) and "Playhouse," plans to add more 




I RERUN 



New research shows r 



g i or the average t\ film syndicator 

or producer todaj the "rerun" show 
lias come to mean the difference be- 
tween eating in Sardi's or Ciro's — or 
not eating at all. 

As Bud Austin, director of national 
sales for Official Films, one of the 
largest syndicators of rerun packages 
{My Hero, Terry & The Pirates, Oh. 
Baby! and others i . explained the situ- 
ation to sponsor: 

"Even if you sell a syndicated film 
diow to a major client on a national 
basis for the first run. you'll be luck\ 
to break even — or even recover TV, 
— of your sales and production costs. 
If you're Belling the first run on a mar- 
ket-In -market basis. \ou rarely recover 
more than 50'/ the first time. ^ <>ur 
recovery is e\en less in either case if 
you've shot in color as a long-term 
investment. 

Result: Although there are more 
than 50 new tv film series in produc- 
tion now. there are also over 35 rerun 
series available to sponsors today i see 
14-page list of available tv films, start- 
ing page 67 I . 

Although the business in reruns is 
booming because of economic pres- 
sures on film producers and distribu- 
tors, reruns are finding an important 
place in the plans of many top clients. 

That's because rerun shows, in the 
past few years, have generally ex- 
ploded the old radio notion that "once 
a show's been on the air. brother, it's 
dead!" K\ idence of this can be found 
in endless rating case histories and in 
such studies as the A.('. Nielsen report 
i Bee box at right I . 

\\ here once film syndicators sheep- 
ishly sold rerun series at the back 
doors of agencies and advertisers, the 
film industry today gives a good rerun 
series the kind of ballyhoo once re- 
served only for the first-run properties, 

" \\ ithoul am doubt we have taken 
the lead in the issue of reruns." Robert 
\Y. Sarnofi (then v.p. in charge of 
NBC's Film Division, now NBC execu- 
tive v.p.) stated recently. "New Mill 
statistics re\eal that syndicated runs 
of network film programs — like our 
/ irtory At Sea and Badge 714 I Drap- 



SPONSOR 



i\v mean 20-50% of film nut 

i ior of reruns is often as good as first run, is sometimes higher 



net) — in local markets generally equal 
their first-run network ratings when 
their competition and time placement 
is the same or similar. Because of the 
constant increase in tv homes, second 
runs often reach more homes than did 
the original showings — even if the re- 
runs show the same or slightly lower 
ratings." 

NBC Film Division, like other syn- 
dicators, can indeed make a strong 
point for the rerun show on the basis 
of ratings. In New York, for example, 
Victory got a first-run ARB rating of 
5.2 back in November, 1952. In its 
New York rerun, Victory got an 11.3 
rating in October of last year — an in- 
crease of 153% in the number of 
homes reached. Some other increases 
for Victory between first and second 
showings: Chicago — 57 % ; Washing- 
ton— 180%; Cleveland— 95%; San 
Francisco — 160%. 

Not all reruns, of course, increase 
their audiences at such an eye-opening 
rate. But — as the Nielsen study makes 
clear — many shows reach about the 
same rating level in reruns that they 
hit the first time around, usually with 
one-third or more of the audience 
composed of people watching for the 
second time. This has put a definite 
market value on the residuals of any 
well-rated film program. 

As George Shupert, head of ABC's 
Film Syndication Division said: 

"We would never have entered the 
highly competitive film syndication 
business with not one, but two top net- 
work programs — Racket Squad and 
The Playhouse (Schlitz Playhouse) if 
we had not been absolutely confident 
that reruns could make money for us 
and for our clients. Our confidence 
has been justified." 

Since reruns approach (and some- 
times pass) first runs in audience size, 
what do they cost? 

1. Depending on its original rating 
behavior in most of the leading mar- 
kets, the discount on the first-run price 
can be anywhere from 20 to 40% off. 
The higher the original rating, the 
less the rerun price is reduced. 

2. Dramatic anthologies seem to wear 

25 JANUARY 1954 



Do audU'ttees watch rerun 

film shows? Yes, reports new 

Nielsen study of repeats 

With ABC, CBS and NBC paying 
the bill, researcher A. C. Nielsen re- 
cently made a study of the rating be- 
havior of repeat film shows during the 
summer of 1953 versus winter months. 

A total of 103 telecasts on 13 pro- 
gram series were checked to study re- 
run behavior. A control group of 90 
telecasts — similar shows, but not in- 
cluding any repeats — was examined to 
compare with reruns (see chart). 

Nielsen's conclusion: "Analysis in- 
dicates that the use of repeat 'films does 
not significantly affect audience levels." 

1. The average non-repeat show 
lost 7.6 rating points during the sum- 
mer. Repeat film shows lost only 5.9. 

2. In the non-repeat group, the 
average share of audience for the win- 
ter was 48.4% ; for the summer, 




50.2.' ! Repeating shows got a 52.1' - 
share on first showings in winter: a 
52.2' * share on summer reruns. 

3. Audiences don't tune out of re- 
run shows. Nielsen "Audience-heltl 
Index" showed that non-repeat shows 
had an AHI of 90 in winter: in sum- 
mer, 88. For the film rerun shows: 
90 on first showing; 89 on second. 

4. Of those homes tuned to a repeat 
film show, an average of 41% had 
seen show before, but watched again. 



FfiilllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIN 



best in the rerun market. MCA-TVs 
rerun Famous Playhouse, for instance, 
is composed of episodes from Ar- 
mour's Stars Over Hollywood and the 
spot-placed Gruen Theatre. Some 
shows, like CBS Film Syndication's 
Crown Theatre (in which Gloria Swan- 
son acts as the program "hostess"), 
are replays of that most durable of all 
general film dramas, Fireside Theater, 
which has gone around as many as five 
and six times. 

3. Nobody has fully explored the 
question of sponsor identification on 
reruns, particularly on shows for 
which the original sponsor built a 
tremendous merchandising campaign. 
Best bet: If you buy such a show, don't 
expect it to do all the work for you. 
Use as much merchandising as you 
can to back it up. * * * 




Official Films' "Terry & The Pirates" had its 
first run last year on national basis for Can- 
ada Dry, is one of many reruns now available 



57 



- ■ ■■. iiiiiiiiiiiiimiinii 



Half-hour drama tv film programs (average cost) 





C«l components 


High-priced show 


Average show 


Low show 


SCEN MHO 




$3,000 (10%) 


$2,500 (10%) 


$2,000 ( 9%) 


SI l»l IIMSION 




$2,500 ( 8%) 


$2,250 ( 8%) 


$1,950 ( 9%) 



i>iki:< "roil 



$1,000 ( 3'; ) 



$ 850 ( 3%) 



DIRECTOR'S STAFF 



$ 960 ( 3%) 



$ 900 ( 3%) 



TOTALS 



$32,000 



$27,000 



i ili.'sc fiEurts in it ^ report to SPONSOR on a series of half-hour dramatic ihows on filn. which ii produced 



$ 800 ( 4%) 



$ 850 ( 4%) 



CAMERAMEN i'2) 


$1,000 


( 3%) 


$ 900 


( 3%) 


$ 660 


( 3%) 


CAST 


$8,340 


(25%) 


$6,800 


(25%) 


$5,415 


'25 1 


SKI'S {CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION, DESIGN, 
PROPS, DRAPERIES, UT10\ PROPS, TRANSPORT 
1 ITION, SPEt I \L EFFECTS) 


$5,750 


(18%) 


$4,000 


(15%) 


$2,500 


(11%) 


1 M.IIIINC. 


$1,000 


( 3%) 


$1,000 


( 4%) 


$ 925 


( 4%) 


WARDROBE (MAKEUP, HAIRDRESSING) 


$1,000 


( 3%) 


$ 800 


( 3%) 


$ 500 


( 2%) 


FILM (PLUS PROCESSING IN LABORATORIES) 


$2,000 


( 6%) 


$1,900 


( 7%) 


$1,900 


( 97c) 


SOUND RECORDING (AND DUBBING) 


$1,250 


( 4%) 


$1,200 


( 4%) 


$1,100 


( 5%) 


FILM EDITING 


$1,200 


( 4%) 


$ 900 


( 3%) 


$ 900 


( 4%) 


GENERAL STCDIO EXPENSES, 

Insurance. >lis<*. 


$3,000 


(10%) 


$3,000 


(12%) 


$2,500 


(11%) 



$22,000 






,., ; . : : :„, . : UllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllM 



UHsRHHs 



4. COSTS: $27,000 is average 

You pay most for talent, script and sets though percent allotted to each 



ff hat producers of syndicated films fare today in the 
way of production costs and what advertisers get for 
their t\ film dollars — is outlined above. 

I hese cosl figures arc based on the experiences of Screen 
(,cin-. video subsidiary of movieland's Columbia Pic- 
tures, in shooting such film series as Ford Theatre and 
the recently announced Father Knows Best. 

[Ford Theatre is currently aired via the NBC TV web 
in more than L35 markets; it's syndicated as first-run ) our 
All-Star Theatre in others. Repeats of the original cycle 
are beginning to appear a- Ill-Star in several of the pres- 
ent lord market-. | 

The figures show graphically that the production of 
half-hour films in the mosl common budget categories is 
an expensive and complex process. 

"Syndicated t\ films require a bigger capital investment 
than any other phase of the broadcast entertainment busi- 
ness," Ralph Colin, veteran film man and vice president of 



58 



Screen Gems, told SPONSOR in a recent interview. 

"You need production know how. top talent, and an av- 
erage of $27,000 per program to produce a good half-hour 
film drama." Cohn added. "Probably, you'll have to show 
proof of financing for the first 13-week series. And. \ ou'll 
have to have a sound studio at \our disposal full time in 
order to produce at the rate of one half-hour film per 
week for a large-scale syndicated film deal. 

1 [ere's why : 

Sets: It takes about a day to put the sets up and a day 
to take them down on the average half-hour film show. 
Thus sets are an expensive item. 

Rehearsals: At least two days of cast rehearsals are 
mi, led. I sually, part of this is going on while the sets 
are being built. 

Shooting: It takes about three days on the set to shoot 
the average half-hour film show. If location shots are 
needed, thi> may take a bit longer. 

SPONSOR 




1ST 



Major component in cost of half-hour tv film drama is talent. Above, 
Ted Post rehearses Patricia Medina, Ben Astar for "Ford Theatre" 



SETS 



Some I8 r c of show cost for high-priced drama (see chart at left) 
is sets. Above, Tom Craycraft, one of Hollywood's top set designers 



ill'-lioiir drama 



I show's budget level (see chart) 



Total elapsed time: At least a five-day week, plus over- 
time. (Overtime, incidentally, is time-and-a-half.) 
I Admen will note in the cost data above that some per- 
centages — whether in the low, middle or high price cate- 
gory of typical half-hour production — stay relatively con- 
stant, while some fluctuate. 

Here are some of the reasons: 

The price for talent items (cast, writers) is often scaled 
to the production budget. High-priced shows will pay 
more for actors, for example, to get top names. 

Some production percentages — like camerawork — are al- 
so relatively constant. More cameras are used on fancier 
shows, and the cameramen paid over-scale in many cases, 
as are the top sound men and film editors. 

Directors and production supervisors, more often than 
not, are paid a salary by the producing company which is 
a fixed item, rather than a percentage. Sometimes, a 
higher-priced director is used on a low-price show. * * * 

25 JANUARY 1954 



Cost components of tv film drama shows 



SCENARIO 
rights to story purchasee 
scenario writers 
stenographic and n'nneograph 

SUPERVISION 
supervisors and assistants 

DIRECTOR 

and associate 
assistant directors 
company grips 
company property men 
script clerks 

CAMERAMEN 

CASTS 
stars or leads 
supporting cast 
day players 
extra talent 
commissions 



set dressings purchased 

rentals 

draperies 

operating costs & materials 

drapers 

set operators and animal 

handlers 
action props constructed 
purchases 
ti ansportation 
rigging and striking 
operating labor 
electric current 
wardrobe costs 
company wardrobe men 
costume rentals 
wardrobe costs 
company wardrobe women 
makeup artists 
hairdressers 

negative raw stock (film) 
positive raw Btock 





film laboratory charges 


OTHER COSTS 


still laboratory charges 


set operating 


recording i 


set handling 


sound equipment charges 


set maintenance 


dubbing crews 


shrubbery 


sound effect cutters 


materials and supplies 


film editor, asst. cutters 


construction labor 


projection' 


striking 


laps and wipes 


scaffolds 


titles 


backings 


stock shots 


construction materials 


director (of stock shots, 


unit art directors 


special effects) 


draftsmen 


operating labor 


miscellaneous 


laboratory charge 


set dressings construction 


social security taxes 


set dressers 


compensation insurance 


swing gangs 


sound royalties Fit A 


set loss 


reserve for vacation 


set damage 


reserve for retroactive salaries 


•Screen Gems 



59 



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Automatic carriers provide for 4" 
x 5" glossy or matte finish prints. 
Dual unit permits one carrier to 
be loaded while other is used in 
pickup. 



Automatic slide changer carrie*| 
standard 2" x 2" glass slides 
Dual pickup feature permits blend 
ing, or simultaneous pickup of tw< 
signals at once when operating 
from film, slides or opaques. 



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i complete Multi-Scanner 
orporating film, opaque and slide 
kup equipment. 




The advanced method of film, opaque or slide pickup —ready now! ready for you 
to use in your television broadcasting operations today! 

The Du Mont Multi-Scanner offers a far more simple, more reliable and better method of electronic 
reproduction than ever available before. Film reproduction assumes studio pickup quality with all 
the original gray tones and elimination of edge flare inherent in other film pickup systems. The 
same true pickup is attained when the Multi-Scanner is used on slides or opaques. 

Performance is only one of the many outstanding advantages of the Multi-Scanner. Simplicity 
of operation is such that the system is practically automatic. Thread the film in place, try it 
out if you wish, reverse the mechanism and you're ready to put the system in 
operation from a remote control panel. 

Truly, the Du Mont Multi-Scanner has no equal 
— it is the modern pickup system —ready for you today. 



OPERATION: No shading adjustments 
necessary. Picture free from edge flare 
and shading. Completely automatic 
operation from a remote panel. 

DEPENDABILITY: Simple mechanism 
carries film at continuous, smooth rate 
of travel. No tearing, wearing stop and 
go action. 

PERFORMANCE: Gamma-corrected 
signals from Multi-Scanner brings out 
all gray tones of film, opaque or slides. 

VERSATILITY: Reversing feature per- 
mits "dry runs" by operator immedi- 
ately before going on air, without 
necessity of complete rewinding of film. 

SHRINKAGE COMPENSATOR: Film 

shrinkage compensator permits com- 
plete control of allowances for shrink- 
age. Pictures frame right with the 
Multi-Scanner, whether new or old film. 

COLOR: The Multi-Scanner is the only 
film system presently available that 
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OUMONT 



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ALLEN Y DU MONT LABORATORIES, INC • TELEVISION TRANSMITTER DEPARTMENT • CLIFTON, N. J. 



10 lips on buying film 



1 



one, 
able 

r\ en 



f'imim-iuf guarantees: When buying a brand-new 

syndicated Sim series, particularly in :i multi-market 

deal, always check the producer's (or the syndicator 

producer's financial responsibility. Producing tv film 

Beries todaj sometimes involves ;i Long wail <>n the part 

of the producer for a return on his initial investment. 

It 's nut .it all impossible for n producer, even a good 

to be caughl shorl on money, in which case he may not be 

t<i deliver the remainder of the series. Some clients today 

the producer to posl big bonds before signing. 



£^ Time buying: Clients who are considering multi- 

S™ market film deah on the scale of Canada Dry's sponsor- 

M\ ship of Annie Oakley on a national basis, or regional 

deals like Johnston Bakeries' sponsorship of QTP's 

\j "Rocky .Inn's, should be careful in scheduling the starting 

dates of their film campaigns. Season: The usual num- 

ber of prints supplied for even a "national" tv film 

deal (perhaps SO markets) without extra charge to the client 

Lb around a do/en. These are shuttled between stations on a 

"bicycling" basis. Day and date starts mean costly extra prints. 



/~V i}ualltg control: Pilol films aren't always a good 
|l _;c of of what a series will lie like. If a series is 

W r i . . t completed when it is offered to you, you will have 

/ I to reh on the reputation of the producer or the syndi- 

■■ cator. Look at representative samples of his other series. 

DonM take chances, either; they can prove to he very 

COStly. Independent producers, and most syndicators who 
also produce shows, are financed by hanks who charge full rates 
of interest, and who have the producer in a corner. Therefore, 
the average producer isn't likely to offer cancellation clauses. 



■■ Legal protections: .lust as the financial responsi- 
I bility of a producer and/or syndicator should be investi 
J gated before signing up for an important film program 

M deal, so should the question of legal protection be ex- 

W plored, veteran film buyen warn. There is, for example, 

the (piestion of who, exactly, is responsible for the film 
during its various stages of travel (agency, client, pro- 
ducer, syndicator, shipper, station). Also, clients should check 
on the protection they are offered against crank lawsuits, morals 
questions with talent, retroactive union increases, and so forth. 



OiMi (Million; Video clients should always check a 

syndicator 's distribution facilities. Are the tv film prints 

carefully inspected .' Are they cleaned and repaired? 

hoes the syndicator have a reputation for delivering 

prints to stations in time for play dates? Does he carry 

insurance on the films while they are in his possession? 

And so on. Reason: The handling of tv films can become 

a huge problem. Big syndicators, like Ziv TV, NBC, CBS, Official, 

TPA and others have to handle as many as 1,200 prints per 

week. Clients who want commercials cut in should check cost. 



8Keseareh: The same warnings that apply to the pur- 
chase of live shows on the basis of broadcast research 
apply to the buying of tv films, particularly reruns. 
Ratings may be cited as being "typical." These should 
be checked, if they are being used as a strong factor in 
show purchase. The ratings may be old and made back 
in the days when the show- had only minimum competi- 
tion. Or they may have been made in one station markets, in 
which case they do not reflect the ability of the show to attract 
audience in multiple-station markets. Ratings are only a guide. 



J Iter tuts of tv films: Today, reruns are so well ac- 

■ Ci pii d bj clients and audiences alike that there is little 

/H of the original stigma ("They'll never get an audi- 
' B ence") surrounding them. However, there are price 
_M_ differentials between firs) and subsequent runs on nearly 
all film packages in syndication, with the price dropping 
anywhere from 111 to P>',, depending on time slot, origi- 
nal rating, number of sets and stations in the market, and such 

like. It's wise for a client to Check carefully on whether a show- 
ally a first run package, if it is offered for sale as such. 



9 



run 

show 

seen 



Exclusivity: New tv stations have appeared with 

great regularity across the face of the U. S. in the past 

few months. Many of these new tv markets overlap with 

old ones. Therefore, a sponsor who is buying a syndicated 

film series should be careful that the same program will 

not he seen in a serious overlap with his campaign. It's 

possible today for a sponsor to buy a show as "first- 

' in a new tv market only to find that the "second run" 

in<; -perhaps by a leading business competitor —is being 

by a sizable percentage of exactly the same audience. 



5 



licity 
merch 

Flush 



Merchumllslng: Nearlj all of the syndicators con 
tacted by sponsor in its survej of the made for tv film 
industry oiler vai aerchandising assis 

tance. The fanciest variety is offered by the top syndi 

cators like Zi\ TV, and by the syndication "ii- 1 ts >>* 

the major tv networks. Bowever, other syndicators and 
producers have developed Borne audience attracting pub- 
gimmicks, which can range all the way from the fram 
andise deals made with shows like Cowboy 6 \!<n and 
• •/i to personal appearances of Btai act 



Station contracts: Although the number of 
multiple-affiliate stations is dropping in the big tv 
markets, it's still wise to check on preemptions and 

"misses" in time contracts. Reason: Certain spe- 
cial tv programs, like Presidential speeches, major 
news and sports events, and suchlike can "bum))" 
a locally slotted film advertiser out of his usual time. 
Unless the time contract with the station spells out clearly that 
the advertiser will get a "make good" in his regular time slot 
sponsor may j;et one which does not reach the right audience. 




62 



SPONSOR 



- \t& 







& 



§ 



-HAPPY 



SHOW 



I, 



p^» 



£$$&£.' 






- 



v 



Fun's a-poppin' every m.nute . . . 
T THE PAGE AND SEE WHAT'S IN IT...FO* k 0{// 




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. . . you get the profits . . . 
act fast! Write, wire, phone 
before your market is sold! 



4S%/ 



&£*'«£. 






ViVlARITK// 



^Vk 



€L 



./ 



' i 



/? 



t- 



>s 



\ 



EVERYBODY SHOUTS 







CAULIFLOWER 

McPUGG, 

punchy Champ who 
leads with his head 



\\ 



i vooD rr, 

ZIV'S ROLUCKIN', ROARIN' 
RADIO LAUGH-FEST 



NOW . . . FOR THE FIRST TIME . . . AVAILABLE 
LOCALLY TO STATIONS AND SPONSORS 



// 



<\ 




SHOW 



II 




Complete Promotion 
Back Up Plan includes 
colorful, humorous 
posters, ad mats, radio 
announcements, pub- 
licity stories and 
photographs. 




as the or 
chuckle-head j 



. . . Red's homesi 
humor is super hi 






<r 



"MEAN WID 



A II 



. . . Red keeps • 
in an uproar 1 
Sponsors say 
DOOD IT". 



PROGRAMS: Syndicated shows arranged by length and subject matter 






ONE HOUR FILMS 



TYPE &. NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
(MIN.) 



PRODUCER 



SALES AfiENT 



COST RANC.I 



OMEDY 



H 



)LISH STAGE STARS 



60 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



On I. 



OCUMENTARY 



\M & ECCES 



53 



J. S. Blackton 



). A. Eiscnbach 



ARCH OF THE MOVIES 



53 



J. S. Blackton 



)LAND IN AMERICA 



53 



Victor Tv 



I A. Eiscnbach 
Victor Tv 



On n nui ■.( | ' 

On requ. -.1 | ■ 

$400-550 1' 



RAMA, GENERAL 



ON MIKE 



54 



Kagran 



Kagran 



NC'S CROSS ROADS 



60 



Sterling 



Sterling 



IC FILM FEATURES 



54 



Var. studios for NBC Film Div. NBC Film Features 



RANGE ADVENTURES 



54 



C. F. Foley 



On request 



On request 



104 
26 



C. F. Foley 



45% class 'A'- Plm 26i 

time rate 



EATER U.S.A. 



53 



Normandie Prod., Inc. 



C. Bagnall & Asso. 



On request 



TAPIX FEATURE THEATER 



54 



Princess Pictures, Inc. 



Vitapix Corp. 



On request 



USICAL 



LISH PARADE 



53 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



LISH PROGRAM, THE 



53 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



S300-475 
$500-700 



fl/G/OL/S 



YHOOD OF MOSES 



54 



J. A. Eisenbach 



). A. Eiscnbach 



RDS FOOTSTEPS, THE 



60 



Library 



Lakeside Tv 



On request 
On request 



ORTS 



L-AMERICAN WRESTLINC 



54 



Crosley 



Kling 



On request 



4CSIDE WITH RASSLERS 



60 



Fairbanks 



Consolidated 



On request 



/ENTURE INTO SPACE 



30 



Nasser-Bien 



Nasser-Bien 



vICHAIR ADVENTURE 
t ICNMENT UNKNOWN 
B CAME HUNT 



26:30 



Sterling 



Sterling 



On request 



On request 



27 



C. Lester 



C. Lester 



Open 



26:20 



Explorer's Pictures 



Specialty Tv 



$125-1000 



EIDER PATROL 



26:30 



Clampett 



C NA SMITH 



26:20 



Tableau 



PSI-TV i 



On request 



CY DETECTIVE 



26 



Revue 



MCA Tv, Ltd. 



On request 



CDE BEATTY SHOW** 



26:20 



Commodore 



Commodore 



On request 



CftCKDOWN 



UCEROUS ASSIGNMENT 



26 



David Hire 



Stuart Reynolds 



On request 



26:30 



Donlevy 



NBC Film Div. 



$75-2000 or. 



K TRACY SERIES 



25:40 



Snader 



Combined Tv-Pictures, Inc. 



$25-250 



FU MANCHU 



26:30 



Times Square Prod. 



Times Square 



$200-4000 



f DOCTOR 



30 



Gene Roth 



Ceo. Bagnall & Assoc. 



On request 



OSE 



26:20 



Commodore 



Commodore 



On request 



I FIGHTING MAN 



26 



United World 



United World 



On request 



F|L0W THAT MAN 



26 



Wm. Esty Co. 



MCA-Tv 



On request 



F EICN INTRICUE 



26:25 



S. Reynolds 



J. W. Thompson 



On request 



4TER, THE 



30 



Pathescope Producers 



William Esty Co. 



On request 



'ID THREE LIVES 



26:30 



Ziv 



Ziv 



On request 



F TNOTES: -Pilot 



•Color. tNew company National Telefilm Associates now syndicates all PSI-Tv properties mentioned In this ct 



5 'Plan 26i 



65 



52 



DCK CAR CHAMPIONS 


52 


Dagger Prod. 




Stock Car Film 


Co. 


On request 


13 


(AS RASSLIN' 


54 


Sportatorium 




Maurice Beck 




$50-300 


82 


APIX WRESTLING IN HALL STADIUM 


54 


G. S. Johnstone 




Vitapix Corp. 




On request 


39 


ESTLINC— HOLLYWOOD 


60 


Paramount 




Paramount 




$100-400 


Continuous 


[ESTLINC FOR TV 




Film Association 




Crosley 






52 


ESTLINC FROM INT'L AMPHITHEATER 


54-6 


I.W.F., Inc. 




Davis & Lukas 




On request 


Continuous 


ESTLINC WITH THE CIRLS 


54 


Crosley 




Khng 




On request 


13 


ESTERN 


PALONC CASSIDY 


54 


Wm. Boyd Prod., 


Inc. 


NBC Film Div. 




On request 


54 


CAS KID, THE 




Franklin Tv 




Ceo. Bagnall & 


Assoc. 




!• 


APIX WESTERN THEATER 


54 


Monogram 




Vitapix Corp. 




On request 


27 


HALF HOUR FILMS 


VENTURE 



In prod 
52 



26 



In prod 



26 



39 



!• 'Plan 52> 



39 



39 



i ■ 



Plan 26' 



13 



26 



39 cont. 



15 



39 



HALF HOUR FILMS— continued 



TYPE & NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
(MIN.) 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



COST RANGE 



PHANTOM PIRATE 



PULSE OF THE CITY 



26:30 



William Broidy 



William Broidy 



On request 



26:30 



M. Simon 



Condor 



On request 



NO. COM- 
PLETED 



ADVENTURE— Continued 












I'M THE LAW 


26 


Cosman 


MCA-Tv, Ltd. 


On request 


26 


INTERNATIONAL ADVENTURE 


26:30 


Cine-Tele 


Official 


On request 


26 


JACK LONDON ADVENTURE THEATER 


26:20 


Mutual Tv 


Stuart Reynolds 


On request 


3 (Plan 521 


|OE PALOOKA 


26 


Guild Films 


Cuild Films 


$100-2000 


39 


LAST MILE, THE 


26 30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


52 


OPERATION UNDERGROUND 


26:30 


Globe Tv 






(Plan 131 


ORIENT EXPRESS 


26:20 


John Nash 


PSI-Tv 


On request 


3 (Plan 491 



2 i Plan 521 



RAMAR OF THE JUNCLE 


26:30 


Arrow 


Television Prog, of America 


On request 


52 


RENFREW OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED 


26 20 


M&A Alexander 


M&A Alexander 


On request 


13 


ROBIN HOOD 


26 30 


Hal Roach Jr. 


Official Films 


On request 


1» iPlan 26i 


ROCKY JONES. SPACE RANCER 


26 10 


Roland Reed Prod. 


United Tv Programs, Inc. 


$51-1850 


13 (Plan 26' 


SECRIT FILE USA. 


26:30 


Dreifuss 


Official 


On request 


26 


SEVEN SEAS TO DANCER 


26 30 


Vcrschel Prod. 


Film Network, Inc. 


On request 


!• (Plan 39 


TERRY & THE PIRATES 


26:30 


Dougfair 


Official 


On request 


26 


TREASURE OF THE BAHAMAS 


27 30 


Tolstoy-Kayfetz 


Sterling 


Open 


1 


WATERFRONT 


26:10 


Roland Reed 


United Tv 


On request 


13 'Plan 39 t 



CHILDREN'S 



BED & BOARD 



LIFE OF RILEY, THE 



ARABELLA'S TALL TALES 




30 


J. J Franklin 


Ceo. Bagnall & Assoc. 


On request 


1 Plan 39 J 


CAPTAIN BREEZE 




26 


Tressel 






1* 


C'LL OF THE EVERCLADES 






Ball Productions 


Ball Productions 




!• 


COME TO THE CIRCUS 




28 


Library 


Lakeside Tv Co. 


On request 


1* 


THE GREAT FOODINI 




24:30 


Fletcher Smith Studios, Inc. 


Fletcher Smith Studios, Inc. 


$100-750 


20 


HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSON TALES 


26:30 


Interstate Tv Corp. 


Interstate Tv 


On request 


26 


IUNIOR CROSS ROADS 




30 


Sterling 


Sterling 


$50-200 


52 


LITTLE MATCH CIRL, THE 




27 


European Tv Corp. 


RCA Recorded & Tv Film Service 


On request 


!• 


MYSTERY PRINCE 




26 


Kagran 


Kagran 


On request 


Plan 13) 


FR!VATE LIFE OF A CAT 




20 


Alexander Hammid 


Outlook Prod., Inc. 


$25 


1* 


SLEEPY JOE 




26:30 


|. McCaughtry 


United Tv 


S35-375 


13 


TEXAS BLUEBONNET SERENADE 


>• 


27 


M. Riddick 




On request 


!• 


THUNDERBOLT'' THE WONDER 


COLT 


26:30 


Clampett 


Open 


Open 


Weekly 


COMEDY 















ABBOTT & COSTELLO 


26 


TCA 


MCA-Tv, Ltd. 


On request 


" 


AMOS 'N' ANDY 


26:30 


CBS 


CBS TV Film Sales 


$100-2000 


65 


ARCHIE— JOHNNY— CHARLIE 


26:30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


26 



26:30 



Gale, Inc. 



$17,000 network 1* 'Plan 



, 



BOSS LADY 


26:30 


Wrather 


M&A Alexander 


On request 


13 


DECOY 


25 


L Helhena 


L. Helhena 


$6500 


!• 


FEARLESS FOSDICK 


26:30 


Times Tv 


Sterling 


On request 


13 


HANK McCUNE SHOW 


26:30 




Atlas Dist. Corp. 


On request 


13 


JACKSON AND JILL 


30 


Fairbanks 


Consolidated 


On request 


13 


JOE E. BROWN 


26 30 


Hal Roach Jr. 


Official Films 


On request 





KATE & THE KIDS 


27:30 


Regency 


Sack Tv 


On request 


l« 


LAZY BAYOU 


26:30 


Brinckcrhoff Prod. 


Brinckcrhoff Prod. 


On request 


1» ' Plan 



26:30 



Hal Roach Jr. 



NBC Film Div. 



On request 



26 



LIFE WITH ELIZABETH 



MEET CORLISS ARCHER 



26 



Cuild Films 



Cuild Films 



$75-1800 



26 



J. L. Saphicr 



J. L. Saphicr 



On request 



39 ' 

-Plan 35 



MY FAVORITE COUPLE 



26 



Tom Kclley 



On request 



1- -Plan ' 



MY HERO 



OLD TIME MOVIES 



26:30 



Don Sharpc 



Official 



On request 



39 



26:30 



J. S. Blackton 



J. A. Eiscnbach 



On request 



26 

Planned 



PRIVATE SECRETARY 



Chcrtok 



Chcrtok 



On request 



RUCCLES. THE 



26 



Television Prod. 



Station Dist. 



50° o "A" time 52 



SADIE FERCUSON. Postmistress 



SKIN DEEP 

WARDEN DUFFY OF SAN QUENTIN 



30 



Cinccraft 



On request 



!• (?> 



24:30 
27 



F. Smith 
Swartz-Donigcr 



Open 



!• (?) 



On request 



13 



FOOTNOTES: 



•Hot nim. 






HALF HOUR FILMS— continued 



TYPE &. NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
(MIN.) 



PRODUCER 



8ALE8 AGENT 



COST . 



OCUMENTARY & EDUCATIONAL 



: 



/VENTURES IN LIVINC 



f IMALS OF THE WORLD 



EfOND THE CALL 



CREERS THAT CHANCE YOUR WORLD 



CVALCADE OF THE CRAFTS 



CILD AND HIS THUMB, THE 



CRISTMAS DECORATIONS'" 



[JSADE IN EUROPE 



ZJSADE IN THE PACIFIC 



MS FROM BRITAIN 



HMD & SEAL 



>DLINE HISTORY 



H TOWER 



.LAND. A MODERN COUNTRY 



^V DOES YOUR GARDEN CROW 



IV TO CET THE MOST OUT OF LIFE 



DE TIBET 



1CAN HAPPEN HERE 



■HHATTAN MONTAGE 



ICH OF TIME 



rftCH OF TIME THROUGH THE YEARS 



lEL 



) GERMANY 



',TERN FOR SURVIVAL 



'ITOCRAPHY IS FUN 



"(ULAR SCIENCE 



f WAR POLAND 



tl)RT TO THE NATION 



.t INC OF THE 7 SEAS 



I RA JOURNEY 



£TH AMERICAN TERRITORY 



TtY OF MANKIND' 



V3ET U.S.A. 



I IS CANADA 



'HLL OF YOUR LIFE, THE" 



FvSURE OF COCOS ISLAND 



H)RCIVEN CRIMES 



'/.EY OF THE STANDING ROCKS 



26:30 



Sterling 



Sterling 



26:30 



I- A. Eiscnbach 



26:30 



Globe Tv 



30 



Screen Gems 



|. A. Eisenbach 
Christophers 



On request 
On request 



26 

13 






Times Square Prod., Inc. 



Times Square Prod., Inc. 



20 



39 



J. Sillman 



Outlook Prod., Inc. 



30 



$50-300 



Cine-Video 



Cine-Video 



20 



I' 



20th Century Fox 



26:30 



March of Time 



20th Century Fox 



March of Time 



On request 



26 



20 & 27 



British Government 



British Information Services 



26:20 



Leslie Roush 



15-30 



Telenews 



Sterling 



24:50 



Dynamic 



Dynamic 



18-19:30 



Netherlands Information Service 



$460 
$15-100 

On request 
On request 

On r. 



Netherlands Information Service 



26:30 



John Ott 



International Film Bureau 



30 



Chertok 



Chertok 



30 



Kayfctz 



Association Films 



30 



C.E.C. 



Film Network, Inc. 



30 



Tv Snapshots 



Tv Snapshots 



30 



March of Time 



March of Time 



30 



March of Time 



March of Time 



26 



Tom Kelley 



26:30 



Maurice Blein 



J. A. Eisenbach 



20 



Cornell 



Sterling 



26:30 



Irvin B. Levin 



Degner & Assoc. 



30 



T. Anguish 



T. Anguish 



27 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



26:30 



B.C. Trading 



Zach Baym 



26:30 



J. A. Eisenbach 



J. A. Eisenbach 



18:45 



Libra Films 



Libra Films 



26:30 



R. Emtone 



J. A. Eisenbach 



26:50 



Times Square 



Times Square 



19 



Cornell 



Sterling 



26:30 



J. La Blanc 



J. A. Eisenbach 



26 



Thrills Unlimited 



L. Weiss 



26:30 



P. Parry 



P. Parry 



26:30 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



On request 



26 

400 includ 
m)t I00"> 

> Plan 26i 

13 

1* 

4 

26 'Plan 52 1 



Plmn, .) 



$50-300 



On request 



SI 500 



$50-2000 



$50-1000 



1' 

uji 26i 
13 cont 
Continuous 
26 



On request 



1* 'Plan 131 



On request 



48 



r 



On request 



% Class "A" 



Continuous 
39 



$250 



On request 



13 



On request 



13 



$65-500 



1« 



On request 



13 



$250-4500 



Scripts 



I 



On request 



13 



$55-1100 



13 Plan 52 1 



°o of time rate 1* 



On request 



26 



'1 ORY AT SEA 



24 



T. J. Barbre 



T. J. Barbre 



26:25 



Henry Saloman for NBC Film Div. NBC Film Div. 



On request 



On request 



1 
26 



'1, MEXICO 



25 



Dynamic 



American Air Lines 



On request 



V RE DOES IT CET YOU? 



16 



Century Producers 



Outlook Prod., Inc. 



$25 



V'LD CLOSEUP 



26:30 



Zach Baym 



Zach Baym 



S30-90 



26 



; \MA — General 



« LINCOLN'S STORY 



26:30 



W. Schwimmer 



W. Schwimmer 



On request 



VENTURES OF MR. WHIPPLE 



^RICAN WIT & HUMOR 



26 



G. F. Foley 



C. F. Foley 



30 



March of Time 



March of Time 



$12,500 network 2 i Plan ?> 
$100-800 



$50-1950 13 



i'iYMORE, ETHEL, TV THEATER 



26:30 



Interstate Tv Corp. 



Interstate Tv 



On request 



13 



I BAKER 



26 



Revue Prod. 



MCA-Tv. Ltd. 



On request 



26 



SI TOWN 



26:20 



Cross-Krasne 



United Tv 



On request 



78 

3 (Mm 



* HISTORY 



26:30 



William Broidy 



William Broidy 



ItVLCADE OF AMERICA 



26 



Sovereign 



Stuart Reynolds 



On request 



10 



C«ITERPOINT 



26:10 



Bing Crosby 



United Tv 



$51-1500 



26 



XiLAS FAIRBANKS PRESENTS 



FO'NOTES: -Pilot film. "Color. 



26:30 



Dougfair Corp. 



NBC Film Div. 



On request 



39 



•-TRIC THEATER 


26 


Screen Televideo 


Screen Televideo 


On request 


26 


A3US PLAYHOUSE 


26 


Revue 


MCA-Tv, Ltd. 


On request 


194 


A 'RITE STORY*' 


26:30 


Ziv Tv 


Ziv Tv 


On request 


39 



TYPE & NAME OF SHOW 

DRAMA — General 
FEMALE OF THE SPECIES 
FOUR STAR PLAYHOUSE 



CENERAL ELECTRIC THEATER 
CLORIA SWANSON SHOW 



GREAT LOVES 



HFART OF THE CITY 



HOLLYWOOD AT WORK 



HOLLYWOOD HALF HOUR 



HOLLYWOOD STUDIO PLAYHOUSE 
HOUSE ON THE HILL. THE 
hOW TO GET A HUSBAND 



IMPULSE 



INTO THE UNKNOWN 



)EWELERS SHOWCASE 
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 
KINGS CROSS ROADS 



LAKESIDE HALF-HOUR FEATURES 



MARK TWAIN THEATER 



MEN OF JUSTICE 
MR NICHTINGALE 
ONE MAN THEATER 
PLAYHOUSE, THE 

PLAY OF THE WEEK 
ROYAL PLAYHOUSE 



SICNET CIRCLE THEATER 



SOVEREICN THEATER 



STORY THEATER 



STRAW HAT THEATER 



TALES OF TOMORROW 



TELEVIDEO THEATER 



TRAIL BLAZERS 



UNEXPECTED, THE 



HALF HOUR FILMS — continued 



RUNNING TIME 
(MM.) 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



26 30 
26:30 



Hal Roach Jr. 
Don Sharpc 



Official Fi 
Official 



26 



Sovereign 



Stuart Reynolds 



26:30 



Bing Crosby 



CBS TV Film Sales 



26 20 



V. Pahlcn 



PSI-Tv 



26:10 



Cross-Krasnc 



United Tv 



30 



Official 



26:30 



Fairbanks 



Consolidated 



27 



Simmcl-Meservcy 



Lakeside Tv 



26 



Cincscopc 



Sterling 



30 



All-Scope Pictures, Inc. 



All-Scope Pictures, Inc. 



26:30 



Don Sharpc 



Official 



26 



C. F. Foley 



C. F. Foley 



26 



24:30 



Sovereign 

L. Hammond Producers 



Stuart Reynolds 



30 



Sterling 



Sterling 



28 



Lakeside Tv 



Lakeside Tv 



30 



Filmcraft Prod. 



Bob Marx 



26:10 



Roland Reed 



United Tv 



26 



Chertok 



Chertok 



26 



Tv Films of America 



J. Parker 



26:30 



Meridian Pictures 



ABC Film Synd. 



26:10 



Edward Lewis 



PSI-Tv 



26:10 



Bing Crosby 



United Tv 



26:10 



Andre Luotto 



United Tv 



26 



Sovereign 



Stuart Reynolds 



26:30 



Grant-Realm 



Ziv Tv 



26 



Wash. Photo 



Audio Video 



26:30 



C. F. Foley, Inc. 



C. F. Foley, Inc. 



26 



Screen Tclevideo 



Screen Televideo 



26:30 



Wm. Broidy 



Wm. Broidy 



26:30 



Ziv Tv 



Ziv Tv 



COST RANGE 



On request 



S60-2500 



On request 



$51-1500 



On request 



Open 



On request 



Open 



SI 5 000 network 
S100-750 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



SI 5.000-25.000 



On request 



$70-1500 



On request 



S51-850 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



On request 



NO. COM. 
PLETED 



Plan 26i 



26 



26 



i Plan 



104 



26 



13 



!• 



26 



3 (Plan 



19 



!• (PI; 



104 



10 



13 <F 



Planned 



'Plan 



26 



26 



52 



13 lPUa2 



26 



26 



60^6 Class "A" Weekly 



SI 2. 500 network 26 
$100-750 



39 



2 I Plan 2 



39 



VILLAGE TALE. THE 



26 



Cinescope 



Sterling 



On request 



WORLD THEATER 



YOUR ALL STAR THEATER 



YOUR TV THEATER 



VISITOR. THE 


26 


Marion Parsonnet 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


44 


WITCHCRAFT 


26:30 


C. H. Norton 


C. H. Norton 


On request 


1* (Mm 


WOMEN'S PRICON 


26:30 


Gale, Inc. 




On request 


(Plan 13 



26:30 



Cine-tele 



Official 



26:30 



Screen Cems 



Screen Gems 



26:30 



Frank Wisbar 



Ziv Tv 



On request 



On request 



26 



65 



54 



MUSICAL 



FOOTNOTES: 



ENCHANTED MUSIC 






United Tv Programs 


United Tv Programs 




13 


HAPPY HILLS 




27 30 


Regency 


Sack Tv 




l« 


HOLIDAY IN PARIS 




26 30 


|ohn Nasht 


CBS TV 


$30-1200 


13 


HOLLYWOOD SPOTLIGHT 


REVIEW 


26:30 


Studio Films 


United Tv 


On request 


26 


LIBERACE 




26 


Louis D. Snader 


Cuild Films 


$100-2850 


117 


MAKING MUSIC 




26 30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


13 


MUSIC FOR EVERYBODY 




27 


Spaeth & Berman 


Sterling Tv 


Approx. $500 


5 


MUSIC MAN 




26:30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


13 


MUSIC TO REMEMBER 




varied 


Screen Gems 


Screen Cems 


S50-150 


13 


MUSIC U.S.A. 




26 30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


52 


OLD AMERICAN BARN DANCE 


30 


Kling 


Kling 


$40-450 


26 


PAN AMERICAN SHOWTIME 






Standard Television 




13 



PARADISE ISLAND 


26:30 


Fairbanks 


Consolidated 


Open 


26 


SAPPY 


26:30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


13 


THIS IS HAWAII 


30 


). |. Franklin 


Ceo. Bagnall & Assoc. 


On request 


26 (PU 


VARSITY U S A. 


26:30 


Barney Ward 


CBS Film Sales 


Open 


!• 




"top grade" 

A top-grade cast headed by Jackie 
Cooper, and the outstanding direction^ 
of Ted Post, form the blend ofjngj; 
ents which make for 




a network-proven series 



you can now buy for local sponsorship 
...first run in over 134 markets! 




Joan Caulfield 



Jackie Cooper 



Prcuy Ann Garner 



John Ireland 



You can't buy reviews like these, but you can buy the show 
that won them ... 26 films from the current Schlitz Playhouse 
of Stars series, sparkling with big box-office names, with 
stories by such "greats" as Somerset Maugham, F. Scott 
Fitzgerald. A prestige program with proven audience appeal 
. . . here's a unique investment for smart TV advertisers! 



LOOK AT THESE LOCAL RATINGS: 

Boston 32.8 St. Louis 41.5 

Dayton 30.5 Chicago 25.2 

Minneapolis 29.5 Seattle 46.0 

Rating source: Telepulse. Dec. 1952 



ABC FILM SYNDICATIO 

IN NEW YORK: DON L. KEARNEY. 7 WEST 66TH STREET. SU 7-5000 
IN CHICAGO: JOHN BURNS, 20 NORTH WACKER DRIVE. ANDOVER 30800 
IN LOS ANGELES: BILL CLARK, ABC TELEVISION CENTER. NORMANDY 3-3311 



25 JANUARY 1954 



71 



TYPE & NAME OF SHOW 

FKY & SUSPENSE 



HALF HOUR FILMS— continued 



RUNNING TIME 
(MIN.) 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



COST RANGE 



NO. COM- 
PLETED 



ANTHONY ABBOTT 
BADCE 714 
BOSTON BLACKIE"' 
CAPTURED 



26 30 



Affiliated Artists 



Affiliated Artists 



26 



Phillips H. Lord 



NBC F.lm Div. 



On request 



I s (Plan 521 



26 


Dragnet Prod. Co. 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


48 


26:30 


Ziv Tv 


Ziv Tv 


On request 


78 



On request 



26 



CASE BOOK OF FEAR 
CASES OF EDDIE DRAKE 



TELENEWS WEEKLY 

UNITED PRESS MOVIETONE NEWS 



26:30 



Howard C. Barnes 



26:30 



H. Strook 



General Entertainment 
CBS TV Film Sales 



17 
30 



Telenews 



INS 



Movietone 



United Press 



< Plan 26) 



$50-1250 



13 



COLONEL MARCH 


26:30 


Panda Prod., Ltd. 


Official Films 


On request 


26 


CRAIC KENNEDY. Criminologist 


25:40 


A Weiss 


L. Weiss 


$80-1600 


26 


CRIME CRUSADER 


26 30 


Times Square 


Times Square 


$125-2250 


Scripts 


CRIME RATE 


26:30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


13 


FILES OF JEFFREY JONES 


26 30 


L. Parsons 


CBS TV Film Saks 


$40-1500 


39 


FRONT PACE DETECTIVE 


30 


Fairbanks 


Consolidated 


On request 


39 


HOLLYWOOD OFF-BEAT 


26 20 


Parsonnet 


United Tv 


$51-600 


13 


INNER SANCTUM 


26 


Galahad Productions 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


39 


INTO THE NIGHT 


26 30 


Sterling 


Sterling 


S35--150 


26 



INVITATION TO CRIME 


27 


Telecast 


Telecast 


$100-1000 


1' 


MAYFAIR MYSTERY HOUSE 




Edw. J. & H. L. Danziger 


Paramount Tv 




7 (Plan ?) 


LONE WOLF THE 


26 


Cross-Krasne 


United Tv 


On request 


' Plan 26) 



NEXT 3 MINUTES 


27 


C. Lester 


C. Lester 


Open 


1* (Plan ?) 


NICHT BEAT 


26:30 


Don Sharpe 


Official Films 


On request 


!• 


RACKET SQUAD 


26:30 


Hal Roach Jr. 


ABC Film Synd. 


$75-1500 


98 


SCOTLAND YARD 


26 30 


P.M. Sales Co. 


Du Mont 


$30--t90 


13 


SECOND CHANCE 


26:30 


Times Square 


Times Square 


$12,500 network 
$125-2250 


Scripts 


SLEEP NO MORE 


26:30 


Times Square 


Times Square 


$12,500 network 
$125-2250 


Scripts 


WHO DUN IT? 


26:30 


V.ctor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


13 


WRATH OF THE CODS 


27 


Telecast 


Telecast 


$100-1000 


!• 


NEWS 













On request 



Weekly 



On request 



Weekly 



NEWS FEATURE 



CANDID CAMERA 



27 



Funt 



Funt 



$125 



100 



FACTS FORUM 



26:30 



Byron, Inc. 



Facts Forum 



On request 



Continuous 



MACIC LAMP 



30 



H.T.P. 



Dallas, Tex. H.T.P. 



$1500 



26 



SPECIAL DELIVERY SOP. 



30 



Hollywood Tv Prod. 



Hollywood Tv Prod. 



35° of t.c. 



QUIZ 



CALL THE PLAY 

CALL YOU 



15 & 30 



Leonard Key Prod. 



Tv Exploitation 



26:30 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



On request 



156 



On request 



26 



DO YOU KNOW WHO 



26:30 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



On request 



26 



NAME THE STAR 



26:30 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



On request 



50 



VISEO 



26:30 



Films for Tv, Inc. 



Films for Tv, Inc. 



% of station 
rate 



13 (Plan? I 



WATCH CLOSELY 


26:30 


Coffman Film Co. 


Coffman Film Co. 


On request 


1* (Plan 2 


WHAT S YOUR EYE Q' 


15 & 30 


Lewis & Clark 


Lakeside Tv Co. 


$12.50-240 


Continuous 


WHO SAID IT? 


26:30 


Victor Tv 


Victor Tv 


On request 


50 


RELIGIOUS 


CHILDREN'S CHURCH 


26 


A. Lang 


A. Lang 




Weekly 


DOORWAYS TO DECISION 


20 


Scripture Films 


Film Studios 


$37.50 





FRONTIER PARSON SERIES'* 


26 


Scripture Films 


Scripture Films 


On request 


13 


COD S ACRE OF DIAMONDS 


20 


Scripture Films 


Film Studios 


$37.50 




CUIDINC STAR 


26:30 


Admiral Pictures 


Zach Baym 


On request 


l« 


HOLY NICHT 


26 30 


Major Tv Producer 


Major Tv Producer 


On request 


1* 


LIVING BOOK, THE 


26:30 


Forest Lawn 


Ziv Tv 


On request 


13 



LIVING PACES FROM THE BOOK OF LIFE 
STARS IN YOUR CROWN 



27 



G. L. Price 



C. L. Price 



20 



Scripture Films 



Film Studios 



$100-1000 



(Plan 52 H 



S37.50 



SONS OF COD 


22 


Square Deal 


Square Deal 




On request 


I* 


THRILLINC BIBLE DRAMAS 


26:30 


Cathedral Releasing 


Major Television Prod.. 


Inc. 


On request 


26 


YOU DO BELIEVE 


25:30 


Foundation Films 


Foundation Films 




On request 


Scries 


FOOTNOTES: 'Pilot film "Cota 
















Why UHF stations 
prefer the RCA "1-KW" 



• UHF stations can get an RCA "IK W 

when they want it (shipments are being 
made within 30 days after order). 

• RCA UHF engineering experience 
pays off for YOU. WBRE-TV writes: 
"Not only are we getting the coverage 
where we wanted it— WE ARE GETTING 
COVERAGE FAR BEYOND OUR ORIG- 
INAL EXPECTATIONS!" 

• RCA UHF spells Reliability and Sim- 
plified operation. WTPA-TV says: "Our 



TTU-lB operates as reliably as any AM 
transmitter. It's easy to n '<X3 — 

just a routine weekly maintenance and 
cleaning is all that's needed." 

• RCA can supply every UHF acces- 
sory you need. WSBT-TV reports: "Wc 
like to get everything from one place, work 
with ONE responsible supplier— RCA." 

Your RCA Broadcast Sales Represent- 
ative is at your service for technical help. 
Let him get going on your UHF plans. 



HALF HOUR FILMS— continued 



TYPE & NAME OF SHOW 


RUNNING TIME 

(MINI 


PRODUCER 


SALES AGENT 


COST RANGE 


NO. COM. 
PLETEO 


SPORTS 












ALL AMERICAN CAME OF THE WEEK FOR 53 


26 30 


Sportsvision 


W J Parry jr. 


On request 


13 


BIC 10 FOOTBALL HILITES 


30 


Sport (vision 


W. J. Parry Jr. 


On request 


3 1 


BOXING MATCHES FROM RAINBO ARENA 


30 


Kling 


Kim;- 


S35-450 


30 


CALIENTE RACES 


28 


Cine-Tele 






Weekly 


FAMOUS FICHTS FROM MADISON SQ. CARDEN 


26:30 


Winik 


Du Mont 


On request 


13 


FIFTH WINTER OLYMPICS 


29 


Cinc-Tcic 


Cine-Tele 


$30-75 Class 
"A" 


'* 


CUNNINC THE FLYWAYS 


30 


MPO Prod., Inc. 


MPO Prod., Inc. 




!• 


MADISON SQUARE CARDEN 


26:30 


Winik 


Du Mont 


On request 


65 


MAX BAERS SEARCH FOR CHAMPIONS 


26 


C. Bruce Knox 




SI 00- 1000 


13 


NATIONAL PRO HICHLICHTS 


26 


Tel Ra 


Tel Ra 


$75-1000 


13 each fa 


PCC FOOTBALL HILITES 


30 


Sportsvision 


W j. Pjrry Jr 


On request 


13 


PLAY VOLLEYBALL 


20 


Association Films 


Association Films 


S35-120 


!• 


RACINC CHAMPIONS 


25 


Dynamic 


Dynamic 




!• 


ROLLER DERBY 


15 & 30 


Seltzer 


Tv Exploitation 


$50-700 


52 


SPEED CLASSICS" 


15 & 30 


Dynamic 


Dynamic 


$25-150 


19 


SPORTS THIRTY 


30 


Sportsvision 


W. J. Parry Jr. 


On request 


52 


SPORTS ON PARADE 


30 


Sterling 


Sterling 


On request 


52 


SPORTS SHOW 


30 


March of Time 


March ot Time 


S50-1750 


26 


STOCK CAR CHAMPIONS 


26 


Dagger Prod. 


Stock Car Film Co. 


On request 


26 


TELESPORTS DIGEST 


26 


Tel Ra 


United Artists • 


$70-850 


Weekly 


TOUCHDOWN 


26 


Tel Ra 


Tel Ra 


$75-1000 


13 each fall 


TV SPORTS CLASSIC 


26 


D. Ettelson 


D. Ettelson 


On request 




WRESTLING— HOLLYWOOD 


30 


Paramount 


Paramount 


$100-400 


Continuous 


WRESTLING— INTERNATIONAL AMPHITHEATER 


26 


I.W.F., Inc. 


Davis & Lukas 


On request 


Continuous 


WESTERNS 


ANNIE OAKLEY 


26:30 


Flying "A" Pictures 


CBS TV Film Sales 


$40-1500 


26 


BUFFALO BILL 


26:30 


Interstate Tv Corp. 






I* 


CISCO KID, THE" 


26:30 


Ziv Tv 


Ziv Tv 


On request 


104 


COWBOY-G-MEN" 


26:30 


Telemount 


United Artists 


On request 


39 


DALTON OUTLAWS 


26 


Dalton Film Co. 




$70-700 


2 (Plan 156 


DEATH VALLEY DAYS 


30 


Flying "A" 


McCann-Erickson 




13 


FRONTIER DETECTIVES 


26 


Murphy-Thomas 


J. L. Saphier 


On request 


(Plan 39) 


CENE AUTRY SHOW 


26:30 


Flying "A" Pictures 


CBS TV Film Sales 


$60-2000 


78 


HOPALONG CASSIDY 


26 


Wm. Boyd Prod., Inc. 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


52 


KIT CARSON 


26:30 


Revue 


MCA Tv, Ltd. 




52 


LONE RANGER, THE 




Chertok 


Chertok 




Planned 


RANGE RIDER, THE 


26:30 


Flying "A" Pictures 


CBS TV Film Sales 


$40-1500 


78 


RAWHIDE RILEY 


26 


S. White 


Reynolds 


On request 


1* (Plan i 


SKY KING 




Chertok 


Chertok 




Planned 


STEVE DONOVAN 




Chertok 


Chertok 




Planned 


WILD BILL HICKOK 


26:30 


William Broidy 


William Broidy 




48 


WOMEN'S INTEREST 


CAPITOL COOKINC 


23 


L. Hammond Producers 




$3500 


1* (Plan 5 1 


FEMININE TOUCH 


30 


Sterling 


Sterling 




26 


SEWING IS FUN 


26:30 


Dcmby Prod., Inc. 


Demby Prod., Inc. 


On request 


2 (Plan 5: 
26 


TV KITCHEN 


30 


Kling 


Kling 


$50-180 






QUARTER HOUR FILMS 






ADVENTURE 


ADVENTURE IS MY JOB 


12:30 


Harrison 


Lakeside Tv 


$50-500 


1 


ADVENTURES OF NOAH BEERY JR." 


12 


Courncya 


Courncya -Hamclburg 


$20-500 


* 


ADVENTURE IN THE WEST 


14 


T. J. Barbrc 


T. J. Barbre 


On request 


(Plan 26 


ARMCHAIR ADVENTURE 


15 


Sterling 


Sterling 


$20-150 


104 


BOY & SIMBA 


15 


Jack Goodwin 


Coodwin-lntl. 


On request 


2 Fun 5 


DR JEKYLL MR HYDE" 


15 


Franklin Tv 


Ceo. Bagnall & Assoc. 




1* i Plan 


FINALE FOR THREE STRANGERS 


15 


Cine-Video 


Cine-Video 




!• 


(UNCLE MACABRE 


12 


Radio & Tv Packagers 


Cuild Films 


$40-400 


39 


rOOTNOTES: TIM Bin ••('■■It 













T 




"My eyes are my trademark!" 



When you see Eddie Cantor's fa- 
mous banjo eyes, you look for com- 
edy, humor, a touch of pathos— a 
real virtuoso performance. 

And when you see a familiar brand 
name as you shop, you expect an 
equally outstanding performance 
— or you don't buy the product 
again. 

That's one big advantage about 
living in a land where you enjoy free 

25 JANUARY 1954 



choice among many fine products, 
each identified by its own brand 
name. 

Leading manufacturers, seeking to 
win your favor for their brands, take 
infinite pains and a great deal of 
pride in bringing you wonderful 
products, continuously improved, 
representing unusual value for your 
money. 

As you leaf through the pages of 



this magazine, note how many of the 
products advertised here already 
have satisfied you. And always re- 
member that when you name your 
brand, you better your brand of 
living! 

BRAND NAMES FOUNDATION 

INCORPCo a 

A Non-Profit Educational Foundation 
37 West 57 Street, New York 19.N.Y. 

75 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS— continued 



TYPE 4 NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
(MIN ) 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



ADVENTURE 



NOAH AND FLYING ARK 
OUR POLITICAL HERITAGE 
PERSONS UNWANTED 



12 30 



12 



13:30 



ADVENTURERS. THE 
ADVENTURES OF BLINKEY THE" 
ADVENTURES OF BROWNIE PICTAILS" 
ADVENTURES OF WILLIE THE KID 



fnn.'ht & Friendly 



Barry Enright & Friendly 



12 



Tom Kilky 



COST RANGE 



NO COM- 
PLETED 



Courneya 


Courneyj 


$50-500 


52 


Encyclopedia Britannic* 


Assoc Prog. 


$35-925 


13 


M Riddick 




On request 


!• (Plan 261 



SECRET CHAPTER 


12 30 


Ron Ormond 


Guild Films 


$40-400 


39 




WORLDS OF ADVENTl 


12 30 


Courneya 


Courneya United Tv Prog. 


$20-500 


13 




CHILDREN'S 



S8000 



12 30 


Blinkey Prod , 


Inc. 


Blinkey Prod . 


Inc 


$40-500 


26 


13 30 


M. Riddick 








On request 


1* (Plan 26) 



On request 



■ Plan 131 



BANKINC ON BOB 


13 


Coronet 




Coronet 




$15-120 


1* 


BEAR HUNT 


13 


Coronet 




Coronet 




$15-120 


1« 


BETSY AND THE MAGIC KEY" 


12 


Jamieson Film 


Co 


Sterling 




On request 


13 


CARTOON CAPERS 


12 30 


Z.ich Biym 




Zach Baym 




On request 


13 


CHILDREN S SERIES 


13 


Coronet 




Coronet 




$15-120 


13 


CHIMPS" 


13 


Jerry Courneya 




Courneya-United 


Tv 


$20-500 


13 


DANNY AND THE SNARK 


12:30 


Simmel-Mcscrvcy 


Covernor Tv 




On request 


3 'Plan 26) 


DON Q DICK AND ALADDIN 


12 30 


Stibra 




Lakeside Tv Co. 




On request 


10 


ELEMENTARY SERIES 


15 


Coronet 




Coronet 




$15-120 


13 


FIX MASTERS 


12 30 


Courneya 




Courneya 




$50-500 


•Plan 52) 


FUNNY BUNNIES" 


15 & 30 


Dynamic 




Motion Pics, for 


Tv 


On request 


26 


FUN WITH FELIX" 


12:30 


F Smith 




United Artists Tv 




On request 


13 



HOW TO BE A COWBOY 



15 



Dcmby Prod.. Inc. 



Sterling Tv 



JERRY BARTELLS PLAYTIME 



11 30 



Bartcll 



Apollo 



JUMP JUMP OF HOLIDAY HOUSE 



12 



Mary & Harry Hickox 



Harry S. Coodman 



JUNIOR CROSS ROADS 
JUNIOR SCIENCE 



15 



Sterling 



Sterling 



12:30 



Oho 



Olio 



KID MAGIC 



12:30 



Aladdin Tv Prod. 



Aladdin Tv Prod. 



KIDDIE SURPRISE 
KINCAROO 



13 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



12:30 



F. Smith 



$35-150 



Currently in 
synd. 



to $350 



13 



50% of air time 



$25-65 (N.Y.) 



104 



On request 



On request 



13 



13 



On request 



26 



1 i Plan ?) 



KING CALICO ' 



15 



CNC Productions 



Kling 



LITTLE CIRL WHO DIDN T BELIEVE IN SANTA 
CLAUS" 



13:30 & 27 



M. Riddick 



LITTLEST ANCEL. THE 



13 



Coronet 



Coronet 



MAN OF TOMORROW 



13 



Hour Glass 



MOVIETONE CHILDREN S NEWSREEL 
PAPA BAER NEWSREEL 
PLATO THE PARROT 
PUNCH & TRUDY 



12 



Movietone 



20th Century Fox 



13 



F. Bacr 



Covernor Tv 



12:30 



Sid Stone 



12 



Riviera Prod. 



Riviera Prod. 



SPACE RIDER 



15 



Philip Nasser 



Philip Nasser & Co. 



STORYLAND 

STREAMLINED FAIRY TALES 



10-12 



15 



Encyclopedia Britannica 
H S Coodman 



Assoc. Prog. 



H S. Coodman 



$20-150 



65 



On request 



$75-500 



1' 



On request 



26 i Plan 52) 



On request 



52 'Yearly! 



On request 



26 



On request 



4 (Plan 1561 



$30-250 



(Plan 200* 



On request 



(Plan 200) 



On request 



On request 



13 



SUPERMAN CARTOONS 


11 


National Comics 


Motion Pictures for Television. Inc 


On request 


16 


TALES FOR TOTS 


12 30 


Lewis & Clark 


Lewis & Clark 


$25-400 


2 (Plan 52) 


TELECOMICS 


12 30 


Princess 


Sterling 


On request 


160 


•THUNDERBOLT- THE WONDER COLT 


12 30 


Clampctt 


Open 


Open 


Weekly 


TIME FOR BEANY 


12 30 


Bob Clampctt 


Paramount 


$125-500 


Wc t kl> 



TRICKS N' TREATS 

UNCLE MISTLETOE. ADVENTURES OF 



12 



15 



Fairfield Films 
Kling 



Station Dist. 



$50-200 



13 



Kling 



$20-150 



26 



UNK & ANDY 



WILLIE WONDERFUL 



15 

12 30 



Jack Kcnaston 
Br.ickin 



United Artists 

Olf.cul 



On request 



26 



65 



COMEDY 



BERT & ELMER - 
CHRISTIE COMEDIES 



12 



HENRY MORCAN SHOW 
JACK AND THE BOSS 
PAUL KILLIAM SHOW 
POOR CHARLIE 



12 10 



15 



12 30 
14 



Calbri .ith 
D Ettclson 
Elbert Kapit 
Cm. Video 
Sterling 
W Streech 



Klinj 

D Ettclson 



S22-225 



13 



°o of time rate 64 



United Tv 



On request 



26 



Cine-Video 



1* 



Sterling 
Sterling 



On request 



26 



2 i Plan 11) 



FOOTNOTES 



•I' 




A.T.&T. has no wire for hire 
but we ask you, 
do you dig TD-2? 

All live network programs now come to television \\ 00 1)1. AM) 
via a brand-spankin' new A.T.&T. "TD-2" microwave relay 
link from the main line at South Bend to Grand Rapids. 

In case you're not hep on your relay systems, type "TD-2" 
is the Cadillac of them all — much better than co-axial 
cable and the more inexpensive "TD" links. That's especially 
important now, with color at our front door — brother, 
really important! 

WOOD-TV was first to order and get this improved service 
in these parts, just as it was first to go to full 1000 foot 
tower height last month and will be first to go to full power 
next month (right now our interim 100,000 watts picture is 
greatest in all of television WOODLAND). 

WOOD-TV is first with INS facsimile news service in Michigan, 
and first to take delivery on color adapting equipment for 
its transmitter. When you spend a buck on WOOD-TV, you get 
lots more than that in advertising value and service. 

Schedule your advertising on WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids' only 
television station. The Western Michigan station with top 
technical equipment, top local and network programming — 
and the top market to go with them.* 

*Primary service, too, to Western Michigan's most populated 
area including Muskegon, Lansing, Battle Creek and 
Kalamazoo. 




WOOD -TV 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 

Grandwood Broadcasting Company. 

Reaches more people who have more and buy more 






25 JANUARY 1954 



77 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS— continued 



TYPE i. NAME OF SHOW 


RUNNING TIME 

IMIN.I 


PRODUCER 


SALES AGENT 


COST RANGE 


NO COM- 
PLETED 


COMEDY 


SOCIAL BLUE BOOK 


13 30 


M T. rr 


B L. Pctroff 


On request 


4 (Plan 13) 


VAUDEVILLE CEMS 


4 30 & 12 30 


Ciruma Service Corp 


Cinema Service Corp. 




13 


DOCUMENTARY & EDUCATIONAL 


AIRHEAD 


12 30 


Marathon Tv 


Marathon Tv 


On request 


1 • 


ALIVE FROM THE DEEP 


12 30 


Kayfetz Prod 


Sterling Tv 


On request 


!• 


AROUND THE WORLD IN NEW YORK 


13 


Kayfetz p r0< J. 


Sterling 


On request 


I* 


BRINGING UP PARENTS 


15 


Henry J Kaufman 


United Tv Programs 






BUSINESS EDUCATION SERIES 


15 


Coronet 


Coronet 


$15-120 


13 


CANINE COMMENTS 


12 


D Wade 


L Weiss 


$40-800 


13 'Plan 52) 


CLEAR IRON 


14 


Marathon Tv 


Marathon Tv 


On request 


I* 


DATE FESTIVAL 


12 30 


Libra Films 


Libra Films 


S35-350 


!• 


DR FIXUM'S— HOUSEHOLD HOSPITAL 


15 


Vogue Wright 


Vogue Wright 


$36-300 


26 


FEATURE ASSIGNMENT 


11 >0 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


25% of t.e. 


13 


FITZPATRCK TRAVELOGUES 


15 


J. Fitzpatrick 


Sterling 


On request 


26 


COINC PLACES 


12 30 


United World 


United World 


$15-125 


39 


CREAT AMERICANS 


12 


Encyclopedia Britannica 


Assoc. Prog. 


$30-800 


26 


HEALTHY LIVINC SERIES 


15 


Coronet 


Coronet 


$15-120 


13 


HOW TO DO IT SERIES 


15 


Coronet 


Coronet 


$15 120 


13 


HOW S-TO IN ARTS & CRAFTS 


10:15 


Encyclopedia Britannica 


Assoc. Prog. 


On request 


13 


INSIDE TIBET 


12 30 


Kayfetz Prod. 


Sterling Tv 


On request 


!• 


ISLES OF MYSTERY & ROMANCE 


12 30 


Simmcl-Mcscrvcy 


Simmel-Meservey 




5 


ITALIAN RHAPSODY 


11 


Cordon-Stratford 


Radius Films, Inc. 


On request 


l« (Plan ?) 


IOHN KIERANS KALEIDOSCOPE 


12:30 


International Tele-Film 


United Artists 


$45-400 


104 


JOURNEY TO AFRICA 


12:30 


Paul Hocflcr 


Zach Baym 


On request 


26 


KOREAN BACKGROUNDS 


15 


International Film Bureau 


International Film Bureau 


On request 


!• 


KNOWHOW 195-1 


12 30 


Unifilms. Inc. 


Unifilms. Inc. 


S25-250 


1* 


KNOW YOUR LAND 


12 


Philip E. Cantonwine 


Sanford Ycager 


$30-225 


13 


MACIC VAULT 


12 30 


Lakeside Tv 


Lakeside Tv 


$25-400 


8 


MUMMIES REVEAL THEIR SECRETS 


11 


Cordon-Stratford 


Radius Films, Inc. 


On request 


1» (Plan ?) 


NATURE TIME 


10 13 


Encyclopedia Britannica 


Assoc. Prog. 


On request 


33 


OUR LIVINC LANCUACE 


15 


March of Time 


March of Time 


$75-975 


Not yet 

planned 


OUT OF THE SEA 


13 


Tolstoy-Kayfetz Prod. 


Sterling Tv 


On request 


\* 


PARADE OF NATIONS 


12:30 


Libra Films 


Libra Films 


On request 


(Plan 13) 


SAFETY CAMPAIGN 


10 12 


Encyclopedia Britannica 


Assoc. Prog. 


On request 


5 


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT 


13 


Kayfetz Prod. 


Sterling 


On request 


r 


SCIENCE FOR YOU 


12 


Motion Picture Service 


Motion Picture Service 


On request 


(Plan 52) 


SHUTTERBUC. THE 


11:30 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


25% of t.c. 


13 


SOUTHWARD TO THE SUN 


12 30 


Cordon-Stratford 


Radius Films, Inc. 


On request 


2 (Plan ?) 


THIS LAND OF OURS 


11 55 


Dudley 


Sterling 


On request 


26 


THIS WORLD OF OURS 


11:55 


Dudley Tv 


Sterling 


$20-150 


26 


TRAVEL FILMS 


12 


D. Ettclson 


D Ettclson 


% of air time 


13 


VACATIONLAND AMERICA 


11 55 


Robt. Lawrence Prod., Inc. 


Robt. Lawrence Prod.. Inc. 


On request 


13 


VOICE OF EXPERIENCE 


13 


Tv Films of America 


J. Parker 




(Plan 104) 


WATCH THE WORLD 


12 25 


C Wallach for NBC Film D.v. 


NBC Film D.v. 


On request 


26 


WHAT CAUSES THE SEASONS 


11 


V Kayfetz 


Sterling 


On request 


!• 


WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT YOU' 


10 12 


Encyclopedia Britannica 


Assoc. Prog. 


On request 
25% of t.c. 


9 


WHATS IT LIKE? 


11 30 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


13 


WILD LIFE IN ACTION 


12:30 


Lakeside Tv 


Lakeside Tv 


$50-500 


26 


WONDERS OF THE WORLD 


12:30 


Cordon-Stratford 


Radius Films. Inc. 


On request 


13 


WORLD OF THE ARTIST 


10 15 


Filmmakers 


Dcscina Intl. 




3 


YESTERDAY S NEWSREEL 


11 55 


Ziv Tv 


Ziv Tv 


On request 


139 


YESTERDAY S WORLD 


12:30 


Simmcl-Mcscrvcy 


Simmcl-Mescrvey 


$35-150 


13 


YOUR FIREMAN 


12 


Riviera 


Riviera 


1- 


YOUR MACIC WORLD 


!; ' 


Int, national Tele Film 


International Tclc-Film 


$60-750 


104 


DRAMA — General 


AFRICAN VISIT 


15 


lick Goodwin 


Coodwin- International 


On request 


4 Cont. 


CARRIE WILLIAMS— JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 


12 30 


Pictwti 


Film Network. Inc. 


On request 


2 (Serial) 



1 



FOOTNOTES: Tile* Dim 



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NEW YORK: 598 Madison Avenue - PLaza 9-7500 
CHICAGO: 430 North Michigan Ave. - DEIaware 7-1 1 00 
BEVERLY HILLS: 9370 Santa Monica Blvd. - CRestview 6-2001 
SAN FRANCISCO: 105 Montgomery Street - EXbrook 2-8922 
CLEVELAND: Union Commerce Bldg. - CHerry 1-6010 
DALLAS: 2 1 02 North Akard Street - PROspect 7536 
DETROIT: 1612 Book Tower - WOodward 2-2604 
BOSTON: 45 Newbury Street - COpley 7-5830 
MINNEAPOLIS: Northwestern Bank Bldg. - LINcoln 7863 
ATLANTA: 61 1 Henry Grady Bldg. - LAmar 6750 






fii 



If^r 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS — continued 



TYPE I NAME OF SHOW 


RUNNING TIME 
IMIN ) 


PRODUCER 


SALES AGENT 


COST RANGE 


NO. COM- 
PLETED 


DRAMA — Genera/ 












CONTINENTAL, THE 


13 


Dynamic 


Dynamic 


S25-325 


13 


DILEMMA 


15 


Calbruth 


Kling 


$40-240 


13 


DRAMATIC MONOLOGUES 


12 30 


Libra Films 


Libra Films 


On request 


'Plan 13) 


CET A HORSE 


12 30 


R. Monroe 


R. Rogers 




1« 




HUMAN STORY THE 


12 30 


Jack Coodwin 


Goodwin -International 


On request 


1* (Plan 52) | 


IN FOCUS 


12 


Cale. Inc. 




On request 


!• (Plan 13) J 


INVITATION PLAYHOUSE 


12 30 


R Williams 


Guild 


S50-450 


26 


JONATHAN STORY 


12 30 


Wilkins Cooden 


Sterling 


$25-65 (N.Y.) 


52 


LITTLE THEATER 


12 30 


Teevee 


Teevee 




52 


NIGHT EDITOR 


15 


Mansfield 


Mansfield 


On request 


26 


OF LIGHT AND DARKNESS 


13 


Charter Oak 


Association Films 


S25-150 


1» 


ON STACE WITH MONTY WOOLLEY 


15 


Dynamic 


Dynamic 


On request 


9 


PLAYHOUSE 15 


12 


Bernard Procter 


MCA-Tv, Ltd. 


On request 


78 


PULSE OF THE CITY 


12:30 


Telcsccnc 


Tclescenc 


S50-750 


26 


STAR PERFORMANCE 


14 


Transtilm 


Transfilm 


$4500 each 


14 


STRANCE ADVENTURE 


12 25 


C LeVoy 


CBS TV Film SjIcs 


S30-650 


52 


THIS IS THE STORY 


15 


Morton 


Morton 


$36-314 


52 


THRILL SEEKER 


12 


R Monroe 


R. Rogers 


On request 


26 


YOU DECIDE 


12 30 


Films for Tv, Inc. 


Film for Tv, Inc. 


% of time rate 


2 (Plan 39) 


MUSICAL 












BALLETS DE FRANCE 


15 


March of Time 


March of Time 


S35-850 


26 


BROADWAY RHYTHM ON ICE 


13 


Thundcrbird 


Sterling 


On request 


" 


FOY WILLING 6 RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SACE 


15 


F Willing 


RCA 


On request 


260 


GREENWICH VILLACE 


14:30 


Medallion 


Sterling 


S20-75 


1 


GUEST BOOK 


12 


Studio Films 


United Tv 


On request 


" 1 


HAWAIIAN PARADISE" 


15 


| |. Franklin 


C. Bagnall & Assoc. 


On request 


26 Plan 52) | 


HAWAIIAN PARADISE ON ICE 


13 


Thundcrbird 


Sterling 


On request 


!• 


LETS ALL SINC 


13 


B. Creene 


B. Greene 




(Plan 52) 


MOREY AMSTERDAM MUSICAL VARIETIES 


12 


Mort Sackett 


Mort Sackett 




13 


MUSIC FOR THE EYE SERIES 


12 30 


Cordon-Stratford 


Radius Films. Inc. 


On request 


13 


MUSICAL OPERETTA BALLETS 


12 30 


Video Interfilm 


Hoffberg 


On request 


26 


OOH! LA! LA' 


12:30 


Sterling 


Sterling 


On request 


13 


OKLAHOMA CHUCK WACON BOYS 


12 30 


Lewis & Clark 


Lakeside Tv 


$30-500 


13 


PIANO MACIC 


12:30 


Times Square Prod. 


Times Square Prod. 


$60-500 


2 


PUPPET PLAYHOUSE 


12 30 


Globe Tv 


Lakeside Tv 




(Plan 39) 


STEPHEN FOSTER 


12 30 


Admiral Pictures 


Zach Baym 


S25-80 


12 


VIENNA PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 


13 


Eugin Sharin 


Sterling 


On request 


" 1 


WERNER (ANSSEN MUSIC BOX 


12 30 


Werner jansscn 


Geo. Bagnall & Assoc. 


On request 


13 (Plan 26 


YOUR COSPEL SINCER 


15 


Crosse-Krasne. Inc. 


United Tv Programs, Inc. 




26 


NEWS 












ADVENTURES IN THE NEWS 


15 


Telenews 


Sterling 


On request 


26 


CBS NEWSFILM 


12 


CBS 


CBS Film Sales 


$80-1000 


5 per week 


CLETE ROBERTS WORLD REPORT 


15 


U. S. Tv 


United Artists 


On request 


201 


CLOSE UPS 


13 


American Ncwsrccl 


Cuild 


$25-250 


13 




DREW PEARSON WASH MERRY-CO-ROUND 


12 50 


Times Square 


Times Square 


On request 


1 a week 


NBC DAILY NEWS REPORT 


12 


NBC TV 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


Daily 


NBC NEWS REVIEW OF THE WEEK 


12 30 


NBC TV 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


Weekly 


NEWS FEATURETTES 


12:30 


Keystone 


Official 




25 


PATHE HY LICHTS 


12 30 


Cmetcl Corp. & Pathc 


Du Mont 


$19-250 


26 


SEE FOR YOURSELF 


12 30 


Films for Tv. Inc. 


Films for Tv, Inc. 


% of time rate 


(Plan 26) 


TELENEWS DAILY 


15 


Tck news Prod.. Inc 


International News Service 


$150-10.000 


Daily 


TELENEWS WEEKLY 


12 


Tclcncws Prod . Inc. 


International News Service 


$50-350 


Weekly 


UNITED PRESS MOVIETONE NEWS 


15 


Movietone 


United Press 


On request 


Daily 


WEEKLY NEWS REVIEW 


15 


NBC News Dcpf 


NBC Film Div 







FOOTNOTES: Til.* film 






in Kansas City... 
i YOUR SPOTS ARE 

IN THE SPOTLI&M 




John 



Don Davis, President 
T. Schilling, General Manager 



When the spotlight swings on the 
favorite stars of Kansas City's vast TV 
audience — those stars are on Channel 
9. A full schedule of top-rated CBS 
Network TV programs and a wide 
variety of talent-packed local shows 
provide top entertainment. The Stars 
Shine On Channel 9 in the nation's 
rich 17th market, and that's why your 
message makes a greater impression — 
and makes more sales per advertising 



dollar— when you let WHB-TV sell 
this billion dollar retail trade area 
with 352,946* TV homes. 

1,079 feet above average terrain — the 
height of WHB-TV's new tower 
(jointly owned by KMBC-TV). Max- 
imum allowable power — 316 kw 
visual, 158 kw audio. 

Write, wire or call your nearest Blair- 
TV representative for availabilities! 

*Nov. 30 report of Kansas City Electric Assn. 



- 



FREE! Good Reading For 
Agency Executives And 
Advertisers! swing, vest-pocket 

size magazine published monthly by WHB 
and WHB-TV for time buyers, advertisers, 
agencies, sales executives. Features articles 
on advertising, research, marketing . 
contains excerpts from John Crosby's 
Radio and TV Column . . . pictures, 
quizzes, jokes and cartoons. Request your 
free copy on your company letterhead 

\ 




WHB-TV 

CHANNEL Q BASIC CBS-TV 

SHARING TIME TW Kansos City 
WITH KM8CTY 



WHB 



710 KC 



Represented Notionolly by 




Kansas city s 
OLDEST 

CALL LETTERS 



10,000 WATTS 
MUTUAL NETWORK 



ttepreitnttd 
nationally by 

JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS — continued 



TYPE L NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
(MIN I 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



NEWS FEATURES 



THE 



ARTHUR SMITH SHOW 

AS OTHERS SEE US 

BROADWAY IN REVIEW 

CAPITOL CONFIDENTIAL 

CAPITOL REPORT 

CAPITOL TIDBITS 

BOB ELSON S INTERVIEWS OF THE CENTURY 

FULTON LEWIS |R SHOW 

CAYLORD HAUSER SHOW 

HOLLYWOOD CLOSE UPS 



12 30 
12 



13 



Blue Ridge 

Wash Photo 

Tv Films of America 



Lakeside Tv 



Audio-Video 



|. Parker 



12 30 



12:30 
12 30 



Capitol Films 
Wash. Photo 
W.ish Photo 



Audio Video 



Audio Video 



12 



Academy 'Chicago) 



Academy (Chicago) 



12 



15 



Wm B Dolph 
PSI Tv 



United Tv Prog. 
PSI Tv 



Ccnc Lester 



C. Lester 



HOLLYWOOD ON THE LINE 
HOLLYWOOD REEL 
IDEAS ON PARADE 



12 



Ccne Lester 



12 30 
12 30 



E. Johnson & C Watson 



CBS TV Film Sales 
Paramount 



Tel Ra 



Tel Ra 



KIERNANS KALEIDOSCOPE 
KNOW YOUR CONGRESS 



15 



International Tele-Films Prods. 



United Artists Tv 



12:30 



Capitol Films 



THIS WEEK AROUND THE WORLD 
WASHINCTON SPOTLIGHT 



13 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



12 



M. Hammer 



Washington Spotlight, Inc. 



WASHINCTON PROMENADE 



15 



Wash. Photo. 



Audio Video 



WHATS NEW THIS WEEK 



12 



Wash. Photo 



Audio Video 



COST RANGE 



NO COM- 
PLETED 



On request 



13 



Class "A" time 



'Plan 13) 



I s 



On request 



Weekly 



$75-200 



$50-400 



17 



$34-575 



52 



On request 



26 



°o of time rate 13 (Plan ?) 



S22-440 



26 



$25-200 



52 



$40-200 



26 



On request 



104 



: 



LILLI PALMER SHOW 


13:30 


Charles Kebbc 


NBC Film Div. 


On request 


26 


LINKLETTER 6 THE KIDS 


12 30 


John Cuedel 


CBS TV Film Sales 


$50-650 


52 


MEET MISS HUBBARD 


12 


Motion Picture Scrv. 


Motion Picture Serv. 


On request 


(Plan 52) 


NTC'S STORIES OF THE STARS 


13 30 


Commodore 


Commodore 


On request 


'Plan 39) 


ROVINC REPORTER 


12 


Colson 


Colson 


40% of time 
rate 


• Plan 26) 


TELEVISITS 


13 


Ceo. Logan Price 


Ceo. Logan Price 


$25-250 


26 



On request 



$25-275 



52 
76 



40° Class "A" 
time rate 



Weekly 



50% Class "A" 
time rate 



WHAT S PLAYINC 



YOUR WASHINCTON AMBASSADOR 



15 
12 30 



Dcmby Prods. Inc. 



Demby Prods. Inc. 



Wash. Photo 



Audio Video 



$50-300 



Unlimited 



$125-400 



QUIZ 



BEAT THE EXPERTS 



HEADLINES ON PARADE 



5 & 15 

12 30 



Sterling 



United World 



United World 



On request 



52 



$25-225 



26 



MOVIE QUICK QUIZ 



PHOTOQUIZ 



15 



W Schwimmer 



W. Schwimmer 



12:30 



Telcnews 



Sterling 



$50-800 IN.Y.) 260 



On request 



Daily 



PROFESSOR YES N' NO 



12 



Lalley & Love 



Screen Cems 



$75-500 



26 



SEEIN- IS BELIEVIN- 



12:30 



Films for Tv. Inc. 



Films for Tv, Inc. 



°o of time rate Unlimited 



THREE CUESSES 



12 



Movietone 



20th Century Fox 



On request 



26 



VIEW THE CLUE 



15 



N. Coldstonc 



United Artists 



WHATS WRONC WITH THIS PICTURE' 
WHAT S YOUR EYE-Q? 



12 



Morton 



Morton 



12:30 & 26 



Lewis & Clark, Inc. 



Lakeside Tv 



AND IT CAME TO PASS XMAS STORY* 



14 



Edmund B Ccrard 



Masters Prod., Inc. 



CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY 



12 30 



D C Hartzcll 



COSPEL SINCER THE 



12 10 



Dundee Prod. 



Zach Baym 



United Tv 



HYMNS OF ALL CHURCHES 
LORDS FOOTSTEPS, THE 



M 



Victor Tv 



Victor Tv 



10 



Library 



Lakeside Tv 



MIRACLE OF CHRISTMAS" 
PASTOR CALLS THE 
PSALMODY" 



13 



Square Deal 



Square Deal 



14 



Coffman Film Co. 



Natl Council of Churches 



Square Deal 



Square Deal 



READINC THE BIBLE SERIES 



13 



Foundation 



Foundation- Sack -Tv 



RELIGION IN THE FAMILY 
RELICIOUS FILMS 



Square Deal 



Square Deal 



12 



D Ettclson 



SEARCH FOR CHRIST 



12 30 



Illustrate 



STORY OF THE BIBLE 



14 



V.ctor Tv 



TELEVESPERS 

WAY TO ETERNITY 



12 30 



Youth Films 



Official 



12 30 



Youth Fi 



Official 



FOOTNOTES: Til.* dim. 



■i' ■: i 



On request 



13 



$25-185 



260 



On request 



65 



WHO S BEHIND THE MASK' 


15 


Chas. Bruce Knox 




$235 


13 


YOU BE THE |UDCE 


12 30 


Wash. Photo 


Audio Video 


$30-200 


13 


RELIGIOUS 



50° o of Class 
"A" 



On request 



S34-500 



26 



On request 



Open 



On request 



13 



On request 
On request 



13 



On request 



D Ettclson 


% of time rate 


13 


Sterling 


srs-iso 


13 (Plan 2(1 


Victor Tv 


On request 


52 



26 



26 



1, 



3 TOP-QUALITY, STAR-STUDDED SHOWS 
FOR THE BUDGET-CONSCIOUS ADVERTISER 



BORIS 



MYSTERY 




As Scotland Yard's COLONEL MARCH 

A fascinating, BRAND NEW half-hour film series of scientific crime 
detection based on material provided by America's best-selling 
mystery writer JOHN DICKSON CARR. 

Let "COLONEL MARCH" sell for you on a regional or syndicated 
basis at amazingly low costs! 26 weeks of programming available. 

************************ 




COMEDY 



ROBERT 



CDNMINGS 

Starring in "MY HERO" 

JOHN CROSBY, NOTED TV CRITIC, says "The'dialogue, the stag- 
ing and the production are of a very high order indeed and I see 
no reason why "MY HERO" can't eventually give "I LOVE LUCY 7 ' 
QUITE A RUN FOR ITS MONEY." 

EXCITING RATINGS: Playing opposite a top budget hour variety 
show extravaganza, "MY HERO" did a spectacular |ob for DUN- 
HILL CIGARETTES. 

39 WEEKS OF HALF-HOUR PROGRAMMING AVAILABLE. 
Second run in most major markets; first run throughout 
rest of country. 









********** 



ADVENTURE 




********* ********** 







**•••••••• 



OFFICIAL FILMS' fabulously successful, faithful reproduction of the 
beloved comic strip that appears regularly in over 220 newspapers 
with a combined circulation of more than 25,000,000 readers! 

This half-hour show pulled ratings like these for Canada Dry in 
56 different markets: ATLANTA- 23.5; BUFFALO -33.3; CLEVE- 
LAND-20.8; ROCHESTER- 37.3; ST. LOUIS-35.0 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR LOCAL OR REGIONAL SPONSORSHIP. 
26 Weeks of programming available. 

FFICIAL FILMS, INC. 



• 
• 
• 
* 
• 
* 
• 
* 
• 
* 
* 
* 
* 
• 
* 
• 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
• 
* 





25W.45thSt. / N.Y.36 • PL 7-01 00 

AMEI ICA'S LEADING BUTO OF QUALITY TV FILMS •*•••••*•* 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS — continued 



NO. COM- 



TYPE 1 NAME OF SHOW ' " ' " » 



RUNNING TIME ...„„,„ SALES AGENT COST RANGE PLETED 



SPORTS 

ADVENTURES IN SPORT 

ADVENTURE OUT OF DOORS 
ALL AMERICAN SPORTS 



— Telen.ws Sterling 0n requeSt 26 

12 30 lack Van Cocvering Cornell Film Co. 40% "A" time 13 

Courneya $10-200 26_ 

PSI t v On request 13 



12 30 Courneya 



12 20 H. Sheets 



AMERICAN SPORTS '±f^ _ — — " 7 ~ 

.. I iL«;ii> T« On reauest 



ii - Hypenm Lakeside Tv 0n "«"«»» 



BIG CAME FISHINC 

BIC PLAYBACK. THE " Screen Gems-Te.enews, .nc. fcree^Cern, 26_ 

CRU.SINC THE KEYS ~ ^ZZL "»" KayMzProd^ SteHing ~^~ ~^ 

DOUBLE PLAY «« — ^^T^ _J30-4O0_ _39_ 



DICK DUNKELS FOOTBALL RATINGS -2 30 TURa Unite,. Features $50-400 13_<eack_ 

CofdonS, ' a ^_ R,d,us F,lms ,nc -°.V^- 

FAMOUS FIGHTS FROM MADISON SQ. CARDEN" 12:30 Winik 



Du Mont $55-600 39 



v *"•«"' 2=!5 °^^- 



FISHINC IN THE MEDITERRANEAN 

COINC PLACES WITH CADABOUT CADDIS 12 30 

GRANTLAND RICE SPORTS LIGHTS. THE 12 30 Atlas 



12 30 Karlen Karlen 



Beacon Tv Features Sterling $25-150 26^ 

Atlas On request 13 



., v Kavfetz Sterling On request !• 
HOLIDAY AFLOAT V^Rayretz ^ » _ _ 

Cornell F.lm Co. Cornell Film Co. <ln prod.) 



Franklin Tv Ceo. Bagnall & Ass.c. On request !• 



|IMMY DEMARET COLF PROCRAM __ 1230 

LITTLE CHAMP -3 YR OLD SWIM WONDER 1 2 30 

,- „„ u ,.. U10&26 Win.k Winik-Du Mont S30-150 13 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN # !•• 12 30 & 26 win.K 

-■ ., .. ' ,,.,«,, , 6 u/.mk Winik-Du Mont S30-150 26 

MADISON SQUARE CARDEN # 2*» 

MADISON SQUARE CARDEN # 3" 



OUTDOORS 
PADDOCK PARADE 
POLICE |U -J1TSU 
REFEREE. THE 



15 Kling Kling On request 



ROLLER DERBY 
SEA FEVER 



SKIING IN THE ALPS 
SPORTS ALBUM 
SPORTSCHOLAR 
SPORTS HISTORY 



13 or 13 Sclccta-Film On request 



SPORTSMAN'S CLUB 
SPORTS' MIRROR 



SPORTS ON PARADE 
SFORTS PACE 



ANSWER MAN. THE 12:30 B Chapman B. Chapman On request 



1230 & 26 Winik Winik-Du Mont __$30-150 26 

MADISON SQUARE CARDEN ., " 12:30*26 W,n,k W,nik-Du Mont ^55-600 26_ 

NORMAN SPERS FOOTBALL THIS WEEK 15 Norman »-• Sper ™™ DiSt ' - 

12:30 Byron. Inc. Byron, Inc. No t decided 13 



)2 30 Tc | Ra Tel Ra S50-350 Continuous 



15 Frankcl Association Films S20-100 I* 



15 & 30 Station Dist. Station Dist. $50-700 52 



13 v. Kayfetz Sterling On request !• 



15 Ziv Tv Ziv Tv On request 26 



12 30 United World United World S20-225 52 



13 Vnrtor Tv Victor Tv On request 26 



12 Mode Art Pictures Syndicate Films $60-400 52 



12 30 Wickham Films Ceo. Bagnall & Assoc. On request 13 



15 Sterling Sterling S25-85 <N.Y.) 104 



12:30 Official Official 13 



SHORTS SPOTLIGHT U*0 Tel Ra Tel Ra $35-650 Weekly 

STOCK CAR CHAMPIONS 12 30 Dagger Prod. Stock Car Film Co. On request 52 

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS '2 30 Tclenews Intl. News Serv. $50-350 Weekly 



TV S BASEBALL HALL OF FAME 12:30 lames B. Harris Motion Pictures for Television, Inc. On request 77 

UNITED PRESS MOVIETONE 15- Movietone United Press On request Weekly 

WATER WORLD ,3 v K3 Y TC,r Sterling On request 4 (Plan | 

WHAT MAKES A CHAMPION 10 & 12 Encyclopedia Britannica Assoc. Prog. On request 13 

WHITE MAGIC 12:30 Cordon-Stratford Radius Films, Inc. On request 1 (Planj 

WONDERS OF THE WILD 1230 Borden Prod. Sterling 26 



WORLDS GREATEST FICHTERS, THE 11:55 Creatcst Fights. Inc. Greatest Fights, Inc. 52 

WRESTLING INTERNATIONAL AMPHITHEATER 12 I.W.F. Davis & Lukas On request Continu 

VARIOUS TYPES 

ALL AMERICAN GIRL. THE" 12:30 )■ ). Franklin Ceo. Bagnall & Assoc. On request I* 



CAMERA S EYE THE 12:30 Teevee Teevee Open 39 

CAMERAS & MODELS IN ACTION 12 30 P. Parry P Parry % of time rate 3 Pla 



DUNNINCER 


13 


Affiliated Artists 


Affiliated Artists 


On request 


(Plan 


ITS IN THE CARDS 


IS 


Cine-Video 


Cine-Video 


On request 


Series i 


MR. FIXIT" 


11 30 


HTP 


H. T. P. 


25° time cost 


9 



ODDITIES BEYOND BELIEF 12 30 Telecast Telecast S50-500 13 



POPULAR SCIENCE 15 T. Anguish T. Anguish % Class "A" 78 

rate 



rOOTNOTES: »P 




WJAR-TV 

CHANNEL 10 

Providence • Rhode Island 

FIRST IN SIGHT 
In Southern New England 



I'm the live bird in the hand that's 
worth two in the bush — televising 
17 local live shows a day. Ask the 
alert advertisers why they buy 
more time on more of my top 
rated local live shows than on any 
other station in New England! 

In our over-all viewing area 88 
out of 100 families own television 
sets. 



National Sales Representatives: 
WEED TELEVISION 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS— continued 



TYPE I NAME OF SHOW 


RUNNING TIME 

(MIN | 


PRODUCER 


SALES AGENT 


COST RANGE 


NO. COM- 
PLETED 


VARIOUS TYPES 


STRANCER THAN FICTION 


12 30 


United World 




United World 


515-150 


65 


TV CAMERA ANCLES 


12 30 


C Lester 




C Lester 


% of time rate 


13 (Plan '1 


VICTOR LINDLAHR SHOW 


15 


Vidicam Pictures 




Scrutan 




3 


WFSTFRNS 














CHOST TOWNS OF THE WEST 


12 55 


Simmel-Meservey 




Simmel-Meservcy 


S35-105 


13 


LASH OF THE WEST 


12 30 


Western Adventure 


Prod. 


Cuild Films 


$40-400 


39 


TALES OF THE OLD WEST 


12 


Bengal 




Bengal 




13 


WOMEN'S INTEREST 


BE YOURSELF 


12 30 


Hartley 




Hartley 


% of time rate 


'Plan 13» 


CAPITAL CONVERSATION 


12 30 


Byron 










CROSSWINCS 'DAYTIME SERIAL' 


12:30 


R Monroe 




R. Rogers 




3 


DO IT YOURSELF 


12 30 


Hartley 




Hartley 


% of time rate 


'Plan 13) 


FASHIONS IN HOME SEWINC" 


12 30 


Times Square 




Times Square 


S60-500 


1* 


FEMININE ANCLE. THE 


15 


E. Vclaico 




United Artists 


On request 


13 


FEMININE TOUCH 


15 


Sterling 




Sterling 


On request 


52 


FOR WOMEN ONLY 


12 30 


Telenews 




Telenews 


On request 


1 (Plan 52i 


GARDEN SHOW. THE - 


12 


Milton Hammer 




Milton Hammer 


$20-200 


26 


HERE S LOOKINC AT YOU 


15 


Vidicam Pictures 




Crey Adv. 




3 


HOME IS HAPPINESS 


12 30 


Packaged Programs 




Packaged Programs 


On request 


195 


HOME MAKINC SERIES 


10 6 12 


Encyclopedia Britannica 


Assoc. Prog. 


On request 


13 


INSIDE DECORATION 


12:30 


Hartley 




Hartley 


On request 


3 


LEISURE HOUSE 


13 


C. Logan Price 




C. Logan Price 


S25-250 


26 


PARISAN MOODS 


12 30 


Video Drama 




Video Drama 


On request 


1* 


SEWINC IS FUN 


12 


Dcmby Productions, 


Inc. 


Demby Productions. Inc. 


$75-200 


!• (Plan 26> 


WIFESAVER. THE 


13 


Affiliated Artists 




Affiliated Artists 


On request 


!• (Plan 521 


WOMAN AROUND THE HOUSE 


13 30 


John H Battison Prods. 




$25-100 


13 


YOUR BEAUTY CLINIC 


15 


Dynamic 




S. Weintraub 


On request 


26 





SHORTS & 7-70 MINUTE SEGMENTS 






ADVENTURE 


COINC PLACES WITH UNCLE CEORCE 


10 


Fairbanks 


Consolidated 


On request 


26 


PARADOX 


5 


Kling 


Kling 


$9.50-15 


26 


CHILDREN'S 












CHILDREN'S LIBRARY 


10 


Sterling 


Sterling 


On request 


104 


CRUSADER RABBIT 


5 


Fairbanks 


Consolidated 


On request 


195 


CLOOM DOOMERS. THE 


5 


Philip Nasser 


Philip Nasser 


On request 


!• (Plan 20 


JIM & JUDY IN TELE-LAND 


3 25 


Tv Screen 


L. Weiss 


$10-250 


39 


MACIC LADY 


5 & 10 


Tclcmount 


Official Films 


Open 


13 


MR RUMBLE BUMBLE 


3 


Packaged Programs 


Packaged Programs 


On request 


30 


OUT OF THE HEART 


10 


United Spec. 


Outlook Prod., Inc. 


$25-150 


!• 


TELA FUNNIES 


13 30 


M Riddick Prod. 




On request 


Scrics-indet 


COMEDY 


MANNY OPPER TUNITIES 


2 50 


MAC Studios 


MAC Studios 


On request 


65 


NOTHINC BUT THE TRUTH 


3 30 


Lewis & Clark 


Lakeside Tv 


$20-185 


52 


PAT & MIKE 


10 


Cinccraft 






1 Plan ' 


DOCUMENTARY & EDUCATIONAL 












ANIMAL LIBRARY 


3 & 12 


l.ikcsidc Tv 


Lakeside Tv 


On request 


Unlimited 


ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION 


6 


Seminar 


Association 


On request 


1* 


BEHIND THE SCENES IN INDUSTRY 


6 


Hollywood Tv 


Hollywood Tv 


$35 each 


70 


BROKENSHIRE. THE HANDYMAN 


3 29 


Princeton 


United Artists 


On request 


52 


BURTON HOLMES TRAVELOCUES 


3 30 & 5 


Maior Tv Prods- 


Maior Tv Prods 


On request 


25 


DO YOU KNOW 


3 


Bengal Pictures 


Bengal Pictures 


On request 


1* (Plan | 


ETIQUETTE 


5 33 & 24 


Simmcl-Mcservey 


Simmcl-Mcservey 




S 


FAMOUS RESORTS" 


5 & 10 


Hollywood Tv 


Hollywood Tv 


25% of t.c. 


20 


FINLAND 


10 


Cmc Video 


Cine-Video 




l« 


HERE'S HOWE 


30 


Calbrcath 


H S Goodman 


On request 


65 



FOOTNOTtS 




HEIGHT 

COUNTS MOST! 



WAVE-TV Delivers: 

66.7% GREATER COVERAGE AREA 

than any other television station 
in Kentucky and Southern Indiana! 

19.8% GREATER CIRCULATION 



than the area's leading 



According to FCC curves, WAVE-TV 
now effectively reaches 85.5% more 
square miles than previously . . . 
54.6% more people . . . 51.5% 
I more Effective Buying Income — • 
gives you far greater coverage than 
any other TV station in this area! 




NEWSPAPER! 
627.3% GREATER CIRCULATION 

than the areo's leading 

NATIONAL MAGAZINE! 

You of course know that in determining a 
VHF station's effective coverage - — particularly 
in fringe areas — Tower Height is most impor- 
tant, Low Channel is next and Power is third. 

WAVE-TV's tower is on top the highest hill 
in this area — is actually 419 feet higher than 
Louisville's other VHF station! 

WAVE-TV's Channel is 3 — the lowest in 

the area! 

WAVE-TV's 100,000 watts of radiated power 
is the maximum permitted by the FCC for 
Channel 3 — is equivalent to 600,000 watts from 
our old downtown tower, on Channel 5/ 

Ask your local dealers and distributors about 
the big new WAVE-TV market and the cov- 
erage you get with WAVE-TV. 

LOUISVILLE'S 

WAVE-TV 

FIRST IN KENTUCKY 

Affiliated with NBC, ABC, DUMONT 

NBC Spot Sales, National Representatives 



25 JANUARY 1954 



87 



SHORTS & 1-10 MINUTE SEGMENTS-^Continued 



TYPE 4 NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
(MINI 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



DOCUMENTARY & EDUCATIONAL 



COST RANGE 



NO COM. 
PLETED 



MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR 




10 


Association Films 


Association Films 




6 




OBERAMMERCAU 




10 


Cordon -Stratford 


Radius Films, Inc. 


On request 


!• 


(Plan N 


ONE WORLD OR NONE 




9 


P Ragan 


Outlook Prod., Inc. 


$25-150 


!• 




OPERATION OOORSTEP 




10 


Byron, Inc. 


Byron, Inc. 


On request 


1* 




SCIENCE WONDERLAND 




10 


Sterling 


Sterling 


On request 


26 




SCREEN STORY THE 




7:30 


Marathon Tv 


Marathon Tv 


On request 


1» 




SYDENHAM PLAN. THE 




8 


World Today. Inc. 


Outlook Prod., Inc. 


S25-150 


1* 




THIS LAND OF OURS 




10 


Dudley 


Sterling Tv 


$20-100 


26 cont. 


TOWN SILVER OF LUENEBERC. 


THE 


9 30 


Cordon-Stratford 


Radius Films, Inc. 


On request 


!• 


Plan ?) 


UNDERWATER ADVENTURE 




9 


Kayfetz Prod 


Sterling Tv 


On request 


!• 




VISITINC NURSE 




5 


Vogue Wright 


Tv Productions 


$25-75 


3 


Plan 261 


VARIETY SHORTS 




8 & 10 


Educational Films 


Lion Tv 


On request 


26 




WOLF & COATS 'PUPPET SHOWS' 


10 & 12 


J. Pashow 


J. A. Eisenbach 


On request 


2 


Plan 26) 


WORTH REMEMBERINC 




4 


Lewis & Martin Films, Inc. 




$20-125 


2 


Plan 52) 


DRAMA — General 

















HIGHLIGHTS OF FAMOUS DIAMONDS 


30 sec. 


Michclson 


Michclson 


$10-15 


26 




POSTMAN R.NCS THE 


4 


ARA Productions 


Sterling 


On request 


13 




STRANCE EXPERIENCES 


3:30 


R. Hubbcll. D. Williams 


Mansfield 


On request 


28 'Plan 23. 




WHY WE DO IT 


3:15 


Morton 


Morton 


On request 


!• 




MUSICAL 




ADRIAN ROLLINI TRIO 


3:30 


Video Pictures 


Sterling 


$20-200 


9 




CHRISTMAS CAROLS'* 


1 15 & 3 47 


Dynamic 


Dynamic 


On request 


12 




DELTA RHYTHM BOYS & OTHERS 


3:30 




Covernor Tv 


On request 


13 




DUKE OF IRON (Calypso) 


3 30 


Video Pictures 


Sterling 


$20-200 


8 




H LLBILLY |AMBOREE 


3 


Sack Tv 


Sack Tv 




13 




KINCDOM CHOIR 


3 30 & 5 


Cinema Service Corp. 


Cinema Service Corp. 


$15-25 


13 




MUSIC HALL VARIETIES 


3 


Official Films 


Official Films 


On request 


1,000 




MUSICALS 


3 & 6 


Cinecraft 






1* (Plan ? 


POPULAIRES 


3 30 


Video Pictures 


Sterling 


$20-200 


9 




SNADER TELESCRIPTIONS 


3 


Snader Telcscriptions Corp. 


Snader Releases, Inc. 


On request 


400 




STUDIO TELESCRIPTIONS 


1:30 & 3:30 


Studio Films, Inc. 


United Tv 


On request 


1120 




TELETUNES 


3 


Riviera Productions 


Riviera Productions 


$15-50 


10 




TV DISK |OCKEY FILMS 


3 


Screen Corns 


Screen Cems 


S15-50 


60 




VIGNETTES IN RHYTHM 


2 30 & 3:30 


Clyde Brown Studios 


Clyde Brown Studios 


On request 


5 



















MYSTERY & SUSPENSE 



CAPSULE MYSTERIES 



Michclson 



Michclson 



$17-50-98.25 



39 



NEWS 



IINCLE DINGLE WEATHER FORECAST LIBRARY 15 sec. 

REWICK REPORTINC 8:30 



Jason Comic Art. Inc. 



Du Mont 



Recla Films 



WTV) 



STORY OF THE WEEK. THE 



Movietone 



20th Century Fox 



UNITED PRESS MOVIETONE NEWS 
WEATHER FORECAST JINCLES 
WEATHER REPORTS 



I & 10 



Movietone 



United Press 



30 sec. 



H S Coodman 



H S. Coodman 



20 sec. 



Mansfield 



Mai.sficld 



$7.50-25 perwk 31 



$25 per day 



Daily 



On request 



On request 



Daily 



On request 



On request 



20 



QUIZ 



BEAT THE EXPERTS 

EYE WITNESS 
MINI MACIC 



3 15 
30 sec. 



Tclcnews 
Hurwiti 



Sterling 



H S Coodman 



30 sec. 



Apollo 



MINI TRIX 
VIZ QUIZ 



30 se 

4 30 



Vidcopix 



Apollo 

Vidcopix 



RELIGIOUS 



LORD S PRAYER. THE 
OUR LADY S JUCCLER 



3 30 
10 



| A Eisenbach 



I A Eisenbach 



PASTORALE 



10 



RAYMOND MASSEY READS THE BIBLE 



3 20 



Illustrate. Inc. 
Square Deal 

IWF. Inc 



Sterling Tv 



Square Deal 



IWF. Inc 



FOOTNOTES: Tllut Ul 



$15-75 



65 



On request 



130 



$35 weekly 



26 



$35 weekly 
$10-100 



26 

500 



On request 



$15-100 



On request 



On request 



65 




YOU MIGHT CATCH A 247 -IB. TARPON * 



KIT 



WKZO-TV AREA PULSE 

(27 COUNTIES) 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE — MON.-FRI. — APRIL, 1953 





8 a.m.-12 noon 


12 noon-6 p.m. 


6 p.m.- 
12 midnight 


WKZO-TV 


62% (a) 


52% 


52% (a) 


STATION "B" 


26% 


25% 


25% (a) 


OTHERS 


2 


23% 


2 3' 



(a) Does not telecast for complete period and the share of 
audience is unadjusted for this situation. 




Me S>e6fei fetation* 



WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



YOU NEED WKZO-TV 

FOR BEST TELEVISION RESULTS 

IN WESTERN MICHIGAN! 

Latest Pulse figures show that WKZO-TV gets more than twice 
as many Western Michigan and Northern Indiana viewers as 
the next station, morning, afternoon and night! 

Latest Hooper figures show that WKZO-TV dominates the area 
around Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids, too — actually delivers 55% 
more evening viewers than the next station, twice as many 
morning viewers, four times as many afternoon viewers! 

WKZO-TV is looked-at, listened-to most in over 315,000 tele- 
vision homes. 

(80,000 WATTS VIDEO — 40,000 AUDIO) 

WKZO-TV 



25 JANUARY 1954 



OFFICIAL BASIC CBS FOR WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery- Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 

*ln March, 1938, H. W. Sedgwick caught a tarpon this size in Mexico's Panuco River. 

89 



QUARTER HOUR FILMS — continued 



TYPE 4 NAME OF SHOW 



RUNNING TIME 
IMIN | 



PRODUCER 



SALES AGENT 



COST RANGE 



SPORTS 












FOOTBALL EXTRAS 


S 


United World 


United World 


$5-75 


10 


FOOTBALL HI LITES 


10 


Atlas Tv Corp. 


Atlas Tv Corp. 


On request 


5 


GREAT CUYS & COATS OF BASEBALL 


3 


Zach Baym 


Zach Baym 


On request 


18 



PIRATES OF THE WOODS 



10 30 



Karlen 



Karlen 



1 



SPORTS ALBUM 



SPORTSCIRL 
SPORTS LIBRARY 



ONSHIP BASKETBALL 


10 




Association Films 


Association Films 


S20-100 


6 


< 


5 




Ziv T» 


Ziv Tv 


On request 


104 




10 




Libra Films 


Libra Films 


$35-350 


!• 


tY 


30 


sec. 


American Newsrcel 


Cuild 


On request 


510 



SPORTS SHOW 


6 


Hollywood Tv Prod 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


S35 each 


70 


UNITED PRESS MOVIETONE 


3 4 


Movietone 


United Press 


On request 


Daily 


WEST POINT CHAMPIONSHIP FOOTBALL 


10 


Association Films 


Association Films 




6 


WHAT S THE RECORD 


5 


Ludlum 6 Hayncs 


Sterling 


$10-35 (N.Y.I 


52 


WINTER S MAGIC SPELL IN AUSTRIA 


10 


Gordon-Stratford 


Radius Films. Inc. 


On request 


1 (Plan 'i 


VARIOUS TYPES 


CHRISTMAS SHOPPING IINCLES 


15 


H S Goodman 


H. S Coodman 


On request 


45 


FIVE FOOT FILM SHELF 


varies 


Ccncral Film Prod. 


United Tv 


$200-350 


• Stock shots, 
2000 feet) 


CUILD STOCK SHOT LIBRARY 


30 sec 


Lippcrt & Todd 


Cuild 


On request 


400 


HOW IT ALL BECAN 


3:30 


Tclevista Prod. 


Texas Film Ent. 


$17 up 


65 


NOTHINC NEW UNDER THE SUN 


3:30 


M Certi 


M. Certz 


SI 0-1 00 


13 < Plan 130) 


OH BABY! 


5 


Barry. Enright & Friendly 


Barry. Enright & Friendly 


On request 




REALITEASE 


10 


Libra Films Prod. 


Libra Films Dist. 


$35-350 


1* 


TALKINC PICTURES LETTER THE 


6 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


Hollywood Tv Prod. 


$8000 


26 


TV-CLOSEUPS 


5 


Fairbanks 


Consolidated 


On request 


26 


TV-ETTES 


1-6 


Atlas Tv 


Atlas Tv 


On request 


100 (Plan 
3001 


VARIETY REVUE 


3 24 


Wash. Photo 


Audio-Video 


75% Class A 


Weekly 


WHAT'S YOUR PROBLEM 


4 


Milton Hammer 




$15-75 


100 



WOMEN'S INTEREST 



BE HAPPY & HEALTHY 



Capitol Films 



On request 



10 



FILE FACTS 



3 30 



Kling 



Kling 



$7.50-12.50 



10 



HOMEMAKER SERIES 
IN THE FASHION SPOTLIGHT 
LEATHER IS FASHION 
WOMAN SPEAKS 



4-4 50 



3:30 



Simmcl-Mcscrvcy 
Couscns 



Simmel-Mcservcy 



Couscns 



S12 



40 



3:30-4 



Dynamic 



Dynamic 



On request 



10 



Film Studios 



Film Studios 



$10-100 



13 



WOMEN IN THE NEWS 
WOMEN OF TODAY 



10-12 



Film Studios 



10-12 



Film Studios 



Film Studios 
Film Studios 



$10-100 



26 



$10-100 



26 



FOOTNOTES: 'Pilot film 






For list of /Win |»roi;roin oi;n<f i color. s 

ii if/i IMIIIK'.O Of sales COIlKlCfV mill 
telephttne ii ii in I mt.v inrii fo pu ge H'2 



\ tlirectoru of |irm/iiicrv of film <-o»iiiii<»r<-idl.o 
irill «i|i|M'«ir in (fee ni'.vl iMtM of 
.srOVNOIC. oiu H I fortiori; 



Every month SPONSOR carries ratings of 
i/t«» Top 20 si; tiff i«n red film shows. See 
list this issue on pages 10. II 



Reprints of this fiftn section uill he 
available on ortler. (faantitg prices 
u-ill he sent to t;on on request 



90 



SPONSOR 

















IRONWOOD, MICH. - Mining TRAVERSE CITY, MtCh 





25 JANUARY 1954 



91 



SYNDICATORS: Alphabetical list of distributors, contacts, phone number: 



ABC FILM SYNDICATION 

7 West 66th St 

New York 23. N Y 

N YC : Don I Kearney. Sutaurhuino 7-5000 

Chicago: John B Burnt. Andovrr s C800 

Hollywood: Earl Hudson. Normandy 3-331 1 



ACADEMY FILM PROD. INC 

123 W. Chestnut St 

Chicago 10. III. 

Chicago: Bernard Howard. Michigan 2 0128 



ALADDIN TELEVISION PROD . INC 

165 North La Brca Ave. 

Los Angeles 36. Cal 

Lo* Angeles: Jullui F Tuchlrr. Wcbjler 3-9437 



TOBY ANGUISH MOTION PICTURE PROD 

8470 Melrose Ave. 

Los Angeles 46. Cal 

Lo* Angeles: Toby Angul>h. Wrbstrr 3-8301 



APOLLO PICTURES 

Empire Building 

Milwaukee 3. Wis. 

Milwaukee: R. E. Evans. Empire 1-8428 



ASSOCIATED PROGRAM SERVICE 

237 West 54th St 

New York 19. N. Y. 

N Y C : Ed Hochhauser Jr. Plaza 7-7700 



ASSOCIATION FILMS, INC. 
3*47 Mjdison Ave. 
New York 17. N. Y. 

NYC: Robert Finrhout. Murray Hill 5-8573 
San Francisco: W Slier. Prospect 5-2800 
Chicago: M. G. Wetland. Harrison 7-4399 
Dallas: Carl Stahl. Kandolph 3144 
Ridgehcld IN I.): Ralph Del Coro. Morsemcre 
8-8200 



ATLAS TELEVISION CORP. 

15 West 44th St. 

New York. N. Y. 

NYC: Henry Brown. Murray HIM 7-5535 



CEO. BACNALL & ASSOC. INC 

109 North La Cicnega Blvd. 

Beverly Hills. Cal. 

Beverly Hills: J. J. OLoughlln. Crestview 1-5133 

NYC.: Anthony Azzato. Regent 4-8389 

Chicago: Ben Barry. Victory 2-5454 



THOMAS J BARBRE PROD 

1215 E. Virginia Ave. 

Ccnver, Colo. 

Denver: Thomas J. Barbre. Race 4605 



2ACH BAYM FILMS 

13 E. 37th St. 

New York 16, N. Y. 

NYC Zach Baym. Murray Hill 9-4175 



BENGAL PICTURES 

3102 Qumcy St., N E. 

Albuquerque, N. M 

Albuquerque: Phil E. Cantonwlnc 

NYC: Sanford Ycager. 550 Fifth Ave. 

Los Angeles: Oellra Corp., 1140 Crenshaw Blvd. 



BLINKEY PROD. INC. 

106 West End Ave. 

New York. N Y 

NYC: Murray King. Sutguehaano 7-4429 

CLYDE BROWN STUDIOS 
6211 Arroya Clcn 
Los Angeles 42, Cal. 
Los Angeles: Clyde Brown 

BYRON. INC. 

1226 Wisconsin Ave N. W 

Washington. D C. 

N Y S : John H Wan. Circle 5-8188 

Washington: Byron Roudabush. Dupont 7-1600 



S W. CALDWELL. LTD. 

Simcoc House 

150 Simcoe St. 

Toronto. Ontario 

Toronto: S W. Caldwell. Empire 6-8727 



CBS TELEVISION FILM SALES 

485 Madison Ave 

New York 22, N Y 

NYC: Fred J Mahlttrdt. Plaza 1-2345 

Holl>»ood: Tom Moore. Hollywood 9-1212 

San Francisco: Glenn Ticer Yukon 2 7000 

Atlanta: Jim Orchard. El. 0727 

Chicago Wm PaTklMM, WMtrliall 4-6000 

Dallas: Carter Rlnglep. St 4996 

Tuioi.lu i Out I S W Caldwell. Kmgsdale 2103 



JACK CHERTOK PROD . INC 

1040 N. Las Palmas Ave 

Los Angeles 38. Cal 

Lo* Angeles: Paul MacNamara. Hempstead 5106 



CINEMA SERVICE CORP. 
106 West End Ave. 

New York 17, N Y. 

NY C : Joseph Selden. Trafalgar 3-141 1 



CINE TELE PROD 

6327 Santa Monica Blvd. 

Hollywood. Cal 

Hollywood: Harry J. Lehman. Gladstone 3376 



CINE VIDEO PROD 
Milford. Conn. 
Mlllord: Capt Garo W 



INC 



Ray. 2-6590 



COMBINED TELEVISION-PICTURES 

241 S. Beverly Dr 

Beverly Hills. Cal 

U- v r l> Hills: John A. Bycrs. Cristvlew 5-1114 

COMMODORE PROD & ARTISTS, INC. 

971 No. La Ciencga Blvd. 

Hollywood. Cal. 

Hollywood: Bill Heath. Br. 2-4701 

Lo* Angeles: Walter Whit* Jr., Crestview 1-7106 

Torv.,to (Ont.K S W. Caldwell. Kmgsdale 2103 

CONDOR PICTURES. INC 

1536 Viewsite Ter. 

Hollywood 38 Cal 

Hollywood: Milton Simon. Crestview 6-0033 



CONSOLIDATED TELEVISION SALES 

Sunset at Van Ness 

Hollywood 28. Cal. 

Hollywood: William Whiting. Hollywood 9-6369 

Chicago: Stuart V. Dawson. Michigan 2-5231 

Houston: Wade Barnes 



CORNELL FILM CO. 

1501 Broadway 

New York 36. N. Y. 

N YC.: David B. Dash. Wisconsin 7-6650 

CORONET INSTRUCTIONAL FILMS 

65 East Southwatcr 

Chicago 1. III. 

Chicago: Ellsworth C. Dent. Dearborn 2-7676 

COURNEYA PROD. 

633 North Almont Dr. 

West Hollywood 46. Cal. 

Hollywood: Jerry Courneya. Crestview 4-5621 

CLAYTON W COUSENS PROD 

333 West 78th St 

New York 24. N. Y. 

NYC: C W. Cousens. Trafalgar 3-5870 

DENCER & ASSOC 

2925 West Eighth St 

Los Angeles 5. Cal. 

La* Angeles: Irvln Levin. Dunkirk 7-2273 

DEMBY PROD , INC. 

34 East 51s St 

New York 22. N. Y. 

N Y C : Emanuel Demby. Plata 9-2495 

DU MONT FILM SYNDICATION DEPT. 

515 Madison Ave 

N.w York 22. N Y 

NYC: Mtrrlmin H Holtz Jr Lehigh 5-1000 

Hollywood: John Prltrhard .Hollywood 2-2721 

Chicago: Bernard Miller Whitehall 4-2370 

Baltimore: Harm Wright 

Detroit ehat J wheppard 

Cincinnati: Grorg* Brrngel 

Portland lOre l; Mernman H Holtz Sr Mur- 

dock 4255 
Dallas: Bill Butz. Sterling 2306 
Toronto iCan I: Telepli Movlos. Ltd 



DYNAMIC FILMS. INC. 

112 W. 89th St 

New York 24, N. Y. 

NYC: Margaret Pfeifler. Trafalgar 3-6221 



JACK A. EISENBACH PROD. 

658 S Mansfield Ave. 

Hollywood 36. Cal. 

Hollywood: J. A. Elsenbarh. Webster 1-8345 



FILMCRAFT PROD. 

8451 Melrose Ave. 

Los Angeles 46. Cal. 

Los Angeles: Bob Marx. Webster 3-9281 

FILM NETWORK, INC 

853 Seventh Ave. 

New York 19, N. Y. 

NYC. : Wesl Hooker. Judson 2-3026 



FILMS FOR TELEVISION, INC. 
Harbor Ave. 

Marblchcad Neck. Mass. 

Marblthtad Neck: Charles W. Phelan, Marble- 
head 2020 

FLYING A PICTURES, INC 

6920 Sunset Blvd. 

Hollywood 28. Cal. 

Hollywood: Armand Schaefer. Hollywood 9-1425 

GEORGE F. FOLEY. INC. 

625 Madison Ave. 

New York 22, N. Y. 

NYC: Geo. F. Foley. Plaza 1-1860 

Hollywood: Klngsley F. Horton 

FOUNDATION FILMS CORP. 

Citizens Bank Building 

Pasadena, Calif. 

Pasadena: Rid ard Pearsall. Sy 2-6476 

ALLEN A. FUNT PROD 

100 Central Park S. 

New York. N. Y. 

NYC: Allen A. Funt, Judson 6-5227 

MITCHELL CERTZ ACENCY, INC. 

240 South Beverly Dr. 

Beverly Hills. Cal. 

Beverly Hills: Mitchell Gert?. Crestview 4-4591 

HARRY S GOODMAN PROD. 

19 East 53rd St. 

New York. N. Y. 

NYC: Daniel Goodman, Plaza 5-6131 

Two. to (Ont.l: S. W. Caldwell. Kingsdale 2103 

GOODWIN INTL. 
P. 0. Box 4801 
Johannesburg. Africa 
Johannesburg: E. J. Lowe. 23-2548 



COVERNER T. V ATTRACTIONS. INC. 

151 West 46th St. 

New York. N. Y. 

N Y C : Arthur Kerman. Judson 6-4221 

Hollywood: Tom Corradlne. Hudson 2-4448 

Cleveland: John Barden 



GREATEST FIGHTS, INC. 

9 East 40th St 

New York 16. N. Y. 

NYC: BUI Bryan. Lexington 2-1717 

GUILD FILMS CO.. INC. 

420 Madison Ave. 

New York 36. N. Y. 

NYC: Reub Kaufman. Murray Hill 8-5365 

Hollywood: Will Lane. Hollywood 9-5456 

Chicago: Bob DeVinny. Wa. 2-4148 

Kansas City (Mo.l: Vic Peck. Armour 4310 

Cleveland: George Fisher. Garfield 1-2520 

Portland (Or*.): MeiTlman Holtz. Murdock 4255 

Toronto lOnt : S W Caldwell. Kingsdale 2103 

LESLIE HOLHENA 

932 N La Brea Ave. 

Hollywood 38. Cal. 

Hollywood: Leslie Holhrna. Granite 3174 

HOFFBERC PROD.. INC. 

362 West 44th St 

New York 36. N Y 

NYC: Jack H Hoffberg. Circle 6-9031 



HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION PROD. 
515 Fifth Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 
NYC: Jack McGowan. Murray Hill 2-0328 
Jersey City (N. J ): Hal Kleree. Journal Sua 
3-2034 



IMPERIAL WORLD FILMS 

49 East Oak St. 

Chicago, III. 

Chicago: Russ Davit, Michigan 2-6200 

INTERNATIONAL FILM BUREAU 

57 East Jackson Blvd. 

Chicago 4. III. 

Chicago: Wesley H. Green, Wabash 21648 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS SERVICE 
235 East 45th St. 
New York. N. Y. 
NYC: Robert H. Reld. Murray Hill 7-M 
Chicago: Gene Roguski. Andover 3-1234 
Los Angeles: Lee Ferrero. Richmond 7-4213 
St. Louis: Jack Estell, Garfield 0859 
Dallas: Ray Baumgardner. Riverside 342 
Des Moines: Martin Miller, Dcs Moines 3 

INTERNATIONAL TELE-FILM PROD 

331 Madison Ave. 

New York 28, N. Y. 

NYC: Paul F. Moss. Murray Hill 791 1 



INTERSTATE TELEVISION CORP. 

1560 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 

NYC : Lloyd Llnd. Plaza 7-3070 

Hollywood: G. Ralph Branton. No 2-9181 

Dallas: Thomas L. Milana. Prospect 1658 



IWF, INC. 
49 East Oak St. 
Chicago 11, III. 
Chicago: Michigan 2-6200 

KACRAN FILMS, INC. 

4 West 58th St. 

New York 19, N. Y. 

N YC: Joe Clair, Murray Hill 8-0585 

BERNARD E. KARLEN PROD. 

270 Park Ave. 

New York 17, N. Y. 

N.Y.C.: B. E. Karlen. Plaza 9-3107 



KLINC STUDIOS. INC. 

601 N. Fairbanks Court 

Chicago 11. III. 

Chicago: Chris Petersen Jr.. Delaware 7 

Hollywood: Lee Blevins. Gladstone 8878 

San Francisco: Richard Downey. Yukon 

St. Louis: Bert Somson. Rosedale 3500 

N.Y.C.: Seymour Thompson 

Seattle: D. D. Fairbanks. Main 3860 

Detroit: Stanley Jack 



LAKESIDE TELEVISION CO., INC. 

1465 Broadway 

New York 36. N. Y. 

NYC: Bernard Schulman. Longacre 5-1 

Los Angeles: Sam Weis., 951 N La Cuel 



ALBERT LANC PROD., INC. 

5746 Sunset Blvd. 

Los Angeles 26, Cal. 

Los Angeles: Albert Lang. Hu 2-71 1 1 



ROBERT LAWRENCE PROD . INC. 

418 West 54th St. 

New York 19. N. Y. 

NYC: Robert L. Lawrence. Judson 2-5:1 



GENE LESTER PROD. 

1487 North Vine St. 

Hollywood 28. Cal. 

Hollywood: G. Lester. Hillside 7287 



LIBRA FILMS PRODUCERS-DISTRIB 

6525 Sunset Blvd. 

Hollywood 28. Cal. 

Hollywood: Charles M. McCoy. Gladstoc?** 

M & A ALEXANDER PROD., INC. 

6040 Sunset Blvd. 

Hollywood 28, Cal. 

Hollywood: Max Alexander. Hollywood ■*» 

I Lit! eon tin*n i pa 




Hundred-and-forty-three 

percenter 



■ Individual as a gold inlay, E. 
Gilbert Forbes is news editor of 
WFBM and the number one news- 
caster in Indiana. He spends 80% 
of his time preparing broadcasts 
and telecasts, 5% of his time on 
radio (20 quarter-hours a week), 
3% of his time on rv (16 fifteen- 
minute or five-minute newscasts), 
25% of his time in outside activities, 
and 30% with home and family. If 
the total is 143%, it's about right. 
This is a busy fellow. 



Now in his sixteenth year as news 
editor hereabouts, E.G.F. was col- 
lege trained in journalism, entered 
radio in St. Louis, moved to WFBM 
in 1937, and spent 1944 as a war 



correspondent in Europe interpret- 
ing the ETO for our listeners. 

His technique is simple: He 
studies world affairs and delivers 
the news. Much in demand for per- 
sonal appearances, and practically 
unable to say no, Gilbert Forbes 
once discovered that he was ex- 
pected to address three different 
groups at practically the same time. 
His resolution of this difficulty was 
a masterpiece of tact and timing. 

Forbes is seen six days a week on 
television; heard seven days a week 
on radio; viewed with fellow-mem- 
bers of the Indianapolis Literary 
Club, the Press Club, the Artists' 
Society and the Meridian Heights 
Presbyterian Church, a few of the 
organizations in which he is active. 

When a Hoosier host wants to hit 
an arguing guest over the head with 
a piece of inflexible logic, all he has 
to say is "Gil Forbes said so." If 
Forbes said it, it's true, correlated, 
analyzed, evaluated, put in proper 
perspective and well expressed. 

Year after year, Hoosiers listen 
to Gilbert Forbes and the news. 
There may be a better framework 
for commercials selling items with 
general appeal, but not in these 
parts. Check the Katz man for 
availabilities. 



WFBM WFBM-TV 

INDIANAPOLIS • CBS 
Represented by the Kati Agency 

Affiliated with WEOA, Evansville; WFDF, Flint; WOOD AM & TV, Crand Rapids 



SYNDICATORS: Alphabetical list of distributors, contacts, 



MAC STUDIOS 

Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel 

Hollywood. CjI 

Hollywood: Howard Grafman 



MA|OR TELEVISION PROD INC 

1270 Avenue of Amincji 

New York 20. N Y 

NYC. Irving Letter. Plua 7 6990 



MANSFIELD ENTERPRISES INC 

49 East 53rd St 

New York 22. N Y. 

NYC: Harry Trennrr Plua 1-0927 



MARATHON TV NEWSREEL 

125 East 50th St 

Nfl York 22. N Y 

NYC: Konttantln Kaiser Murray Hill 8 0985 



MARCH OF TIME 

369 Lexington Ave 

New York 17. N. Y. 

NYC: Frank J. Shea. Judson 6. 



THE MASTERS PROD INC 

515 Madison Ave. 

New York 22. N Y 

NYC : Irving Sachs. Eldorado 5-6620 



MCA TV. LTD 

598 Madison Ave. 

New York. N Y. 

NYC: David Sutton. Pla/a 9-7500 

Bivcrly Hills: Bob Greenbrrg. Crestvlew. 6-2001 

San Francisco: Kirk Torney. Exbrook 2-8922 

Chicago: M B Llpsry. Drlaware 7-1100 

Boston: Dave Abbott. Copley 7 5830 

Detroit: Vrrle Boejue Woodward 2-2604 

Minneapolis: Charles Riehter. Lincoln 7863 

Cleveland: De Arv Barton. Cherry 6010 

Dallas: Edwin Greene. Prospect 7536 

Atlanta: 611 Henry Grady Bldg . Lamar 6750 



CHARLES MICHELSON. INC 

15 West 47th St 

New York 36. N. Y. 

NYC: Charles Mlchelson. Pla/a 70695 

Los Angeles: Bob Relchenbach. Hollywood 9-4580 



MORTON TELEVISION PROD . INC 

64 East Lake St 

Chicago I. III. 

Chicago: Morton Jacobson. Central 6-4144 



MOTION PICTURES FOR TELEVISION 

655 Madison Ave 

New York 21. N Y 

N Y C : Sy Wcintraub. Templeton 8-2000 

Hollywood Liw Kcrner Crrstvlrw I -6101 

Chicago: Richard F. Felner. Whitehall 3-0786 

Boston: Fred Yardley. Hancock 6-0897 

Detroit: Arthur Ka'man 

Dallas: Kenneth Roswell. Logan 2628 



MPO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

15 East 53rd St 

New York. N. Y. 

NYC : Judd L Pollock. Murray Hill 8-7830 



NBC TV FILM DIVISION 

30 Rockefeller Plaza 

New York 20. N Y 

NYC Leonard Warager. Circle 7-8300 

Hollywood: Clifford Ogden. Hollywood 2-2721 

Chicago: H. Weller K—l ul , Superior 7-8300 



NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES 

101 West 55th St 

New York. N Y 

NYC David Wolper. Columbus 5-8646 

LH Ang.li-, Birnard Tabakln. Crrstvltw 4-5135 

Di troll: Moe Dudilson. Woodward 3-5925 

Dallas Krn Ro well Elmhurst G380 

St Louis: Grorge Phillips Jrflrrton 6397 



NETHERLANDS INFORMATION SERVICE 

Holland. Mich 

Holland (Mirhi: Wlllard C Wlchrri. 3174 



OFFICIAL FILMS. INC 

25 West 45th St 

New York 36 N Y 

NYC' Herman Rush Plua 7 0100 



OLIO VIDEO TELEVISION PROD 
20 East 42nd St 
New York 17. N Y 

Milton Subotsky Murray Hill 2-3218 



OUTLOOK PROD . INC 

25 Broad St 

N«W Yoik 4 N Y 

NYC: Sally L Llndover. Hanover 2-5688 



PACKAGED PROGRAMS. INC. 

634 Pcnn Avi 

Pittsburgh 22 Pa 

Pittsburgh M f F lerst. Grant 1-4756 



PARAMOUNT TELEVISION PROD. INC. 

1501 Broadway 

N,w York 36 N Y 

NYC: John F Howell. Bryant 9-8700 

Lot Angiles: Gordon Wright. Hollywood 9-6363 



CEORCE LOCAN PRICE 

20828 Pacific Coast Highway 

Malibu. Cal 

Mallbu: George L. Price. Globe 6-2135 

RADIUS FILMS. INC 

310 West 53rd St 

New York 19. N. Y. 

NYC Alt lander S Gordon. Judson 6-6438 



RCA RECORDED b TV FILM SALES 
630 Fifth Ave. 
New York 20. N. Y. 
N Y C : A B Sambrook. Judson 2-5011 
Hollywood: Wm Gartland. Hillside 5171 
Atlanta: Wallach Cochran. Walnut 5948 
Chicago: W Reily. Whitehall 4-3530 
Dallas: Robert Finder. Riverside 1317 



REYNOLDS PROD 

7324 Santa Monica Blvd. 

Hollywood. Cal. 

Hollywood Stuart Riynolds. Crestvlew 1-6155 

NYC: Bill Gernannt. PI 7-1638 



RIVIERA PROD 

1713 Via El Prado 

Rcdondo Beach. Cal. 

Rcdcndo Beach: F W Zens. Frontier 5-4592 



RICHARD H. ROCCRS CO. 

14 East 62nd St 

New York 21. N. Y. 

NYC: Richard H Rogers. Templeton 8-5112 



SACK TELEVISION ENTERPRISES 

358 West 44th St 

New York. N. Y. 

NYC: Julius Sack. Judson 6-2258 

Dallas: Alfred N Sack. Sterling 3069 



WALTER SCHWIMMER PROD. INC 

75 E Wackcr Dr. 

Chicago. III. 

Chicago: Walter Sehwlmmrr. Franklin 2 4392 

NYC: Jack Ardrn. Lexington 2-1791 



SCREEN CEMS. INC. 

233 West 49th St 

New York. N Y. 

NYC John H Mitchell. Circle 5-5044 

San Francisco: Richard Dinsmorr. Lobard 6-5238 

Atlanta: Henry Gill, spir Main 6413 

Chicago: Jo'.n McCormlck. Franklin 2-3696 

Dallas: John Wilson. Randolph 5076 

nd: William Croley. Cherry 1-2264 
Holywood: Irving Brlskin. Hudson 2-31 1 I 

SCREEN TELEVIDEO FROD. 

333 S Beverly Dr. 

Beverly Hills. Cal 

■WITt) Hills Ruby E Abel Crestvlew I -6131 

SIMMEL-MESERVEY INC 

8826 Olympic Blvd 

Beverly Hills. Cal 

li.w.ly Hills: Louis C Simrarl 

SNADER RELEASES INC 

177 S Beverly Dr 

Beverly Hills Cal 

Binrl) Hills: Louis O. Snadir. Crrttview 5-4451 

SPORTAT0R1UM <EDW McLEMORE 

Cadiz & Industrial Blvds 

Dallas T.i 

Dallas. Maurice Berk Sterling 217) 



SQUARE DEAL PICTURES CORP. 

Pines Bridge Road 

Ossining. N Y 

Ossining: Donn Marvin. Ossining 2-2617 



STANDARD TELEVISION 

1203 West Seventh St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Los Angeles: Pearl Adelman. Madison 2192 



STATION DISTRIBUTORS. INC. 

40 East 51st St 

New York. N Y 

NYC: J. Williams. Plua 9-4953 



STERLING TELEVISION CO . INC 

205 East 43rd St 

New York 17. N Y. 

NYC: Richard Carlton. Oxford 7-2520 

Hollywood: Lee Orgcl. Hollywood 4-61 1 1 



STOCK CAR FILM CO. 

540 N Michigan Ave. 

Chicago. III. 

Chicago: Gerald Presson. Superior 7-9160 



SYNDICATED FILMS 

1022 Forbes St 

Pittsburgh 19. Pa. 

Pittsburgh: H. John Kemerer. Express 1-1355 



THE TEEVEE CO. 

211 South Beverly Dr. 

Beverly Hills. Cal. 

Beverly Hills: Marc Frederic. Crestvlew 5-I07C 

NYC: Saul Reiss. Pla/a 9-8000 



TELECAST FILMS. INC. 

112 West 48th St. 

New York 36. N. Y. 

NYC: Gordon W. Hedwlg. Judson 6-5480 



TELESCENE FILM PROD. CO. 

237 First Ave. 

New York 3. N. Y. 

NYC: Robert D. Tobias. Algonquin 4-8470 



TELEVISION PROCRAMS OF AMERICA, INC. 

729 Seventh Ave. 

New York 19, N. Y. 

NYC: Michael M. Silverman. Plua 7-2765 



TELEVISION SCREEN PROD. 

17 East 45th St. 

New York 19. N. Y. 

NYC: Charles J Basch Jr.. Murray Hill 2-8877 

Los Angeles: Adrian Weiss. Webster 8-5287 



TELEVISION SNAPSHOTS. INC. 

50 Park Ave. 

New York 16. N. Y. 

N Y C : Babette J. Doniger. Murray Hill 9-6874 



TEL RA PROD 

1518 Walnut St. 

Philadelphia 2. Pa. 

Philadelphia: Wally Orr Kingsley 6-4140 



| WALTER THOMPSON CO. 

420 Lexington Ave. 

New York 19. N Y. 

NYC: Howard Rellly. Murray Hill 3-2000 



TIMES SQUARE PROD.. INC. 

145 West 45th St 

New York 36. N Y 

NYC: Charles W. Curran. Circle 6-4443 



TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX TELEVISION 

PRODS . INC. 
444 West 56th St 
New York 19. N. Y. 
NYC: Clatton Bond. Columbus 5-3320 



UNIFILMS. INC 

146 East 47th St 

New York N Y 

N V f Charles E Gallagher. Murray HIM 8-9325 

Philadelphia. Jack Stewart. Kingsley 5-8013 



phone numbers 
T 

UNITED ARTISTS TELEVISION CORP. 

729 Seventh Ave. 

New York 19. N. Y. 

NYC: Bob Gaertner. Circle 5-6000 

Charlotte (N. C): Bomar Lowrance, 2-5IN 

Atlanta: Freeman R Jones. Walnut 6-386 

Chicago: Pat Brian. Harrison 7-6310 

Los Angeles: John Ettlmger. Republic t-IIH 



UNITED PRESS MOVIETONE 
220 East 42nd St. 
New York. N. Y. 

NYC: William C. Payette. Murray HIM 2 -to 
Albany: Robert T. Sheeran. Albany 5-7311 
Atlanta: Stanley Whltaker. Walnut 5577 
Boston: Bert Masterson. Capitol 7-4000 
Chicago: Edmund Steeves. Randolph 6-0041 
Dallas: Fred McCabe. Riverside 4085 
Denver: Samuel H. Pew. Alpine 1428 
Hollywood: Joseph Qulnn 
Kansas City (Mo.): Samuel D. Hales. Grant) It 
Los Angeles: Joseph Quinn. Richmond 6565 
Louisville: R. L. Dugan. Wabash 1217 
Mii.m apoiis: H. C. Thornton. Lincoln 7547 
Omaha: W. C Wilson. Webster 6868 
PittsLurgh: Gerald J. Rock. Court 1-4033 
Portland (Ore): Henry E. Mmard. Bratta 71 
Salt Lake City: Murray H. Moler. Salt U 

City 5-3502 
San Francisco: Fred J. Green. Yukon 6-61 
Seattle: David F. Belnap. Main 2505 
London (Eng ): George H. Pipal, Central Z 
Mexico City (Mex.J: Robert Present!. 3542 

133301 
Montreal (Can.): Philip R. Curran. Plateau*/ 
Paris ( France) : Jean de Gandt. Taltbout 615 



UNITED TV PROCRAMS. INC. 

650 North Bronson Ave. 

Hollywood. Cal. 

Hollywood: Wynn Nathan. Hollywood 9-8321 

Chicago: Carl Waters. Ce. 6-0041 

Dallas: Ray Wild 

Memphis: Tel.. 5-9986 

NYC: Aaron Beckwith. Plua 3-4620 

Pittsburgh: Eugene Adams. Electric 12325 

St. Louis: Herb Miller. Chestnut 4568 



UNITED WORLD FILMS 
445 Park Ave. 
New York. N. Y. 

NYC: Norman Gluek. Plua 9-8000 
Atlanta: Leonard Berth, Cypress 6201 
Chicago: Carl Water!. State 2-3840 
Dallas: Alan Roberts. Sterling 4277 
Portland (Ore): L. J. McGlnley. Garfield I 
Universal City (Cal): Geo. Bole. Stanley 7 

VICTOR RADIO & TV ENTERPRISES 

Post Office Box 485 

Passaic, N. J. 

Passaic: John Nowak, Preseott 7-7013 

Detroit: E. Bromlnski 

VIDEOPIX, INC. 

717 Liberty Ave. 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Pittsburgh: William Phillips. Court I- 



VITAPIX CORP. 

509 Madison Ave. 

New York. N. Y. 

NYC: Robert H. Wormhoudt. Plua 8-30 

Chicago: Carl A. Russell. Andover 3-2950 

New Orleans: BUI McDonald. Canal 67IS 

Hollywood: Crestview 1-7191 



VOCUE WRIGHT STUDIOS 

469 East Ohio St. 

Chicago 11. III. 

Chicago: (Jorge- T. Becker. Mohawk 4-SS 

NYC: Robert Shea. Algonquin 4-3400 

WASHINGTON SPOTLIGHT 

9^1 Washington Bldg. 

Washington. D. C. 

Washington: Milton Hammer. Sterling 3- 

LOUIS WEISS & CO. 
655 N Fairfax Ave. 
Los Angeles. Cal. 
Los Angeles: Adrian Weiss. Webster 8-5 
Pittsburgh: Bernard Tendel. Grant l-29» 
Chicago: Ben Barry. Victory 2-5454 
Baltimore. Harry Wright. Valley 5-0469 
S.in Francisco: Videofllm Assoc.. Exbrook 

WINIK FILM CORP. 

625 Madison Ave 

New York 22. N. Y. 

NYC: Leslie Wlnlk. Plua 3-0684 

ZIV TV PROCRAMS. INC. 

488 Madison Ave. 

New York 22. N. Y. 

NYC: M J Rifkln. Murray Hill 8-47 

Cincinnati: Edward Broman. Plua 1323 

Los Angeles: Walter I. Kingsley. H 










A 



sk your national representative 



You're on the verge of a decision, 
and a problem. 

What business papers to pick 
for your station promotion? 

It's no problem to kiss off, 
for your choice can have a telling 
effect on your national spot 
income. 

But where to get the facts? 

The answer is simple. Ask your 
national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around. 
They learn which business papers 
are appreciated, read and discussed 
by buyers of broadcast time. 

His is an expert opinion. 

Don't overlook your national 
representative. 



s 



ponsor 

the magazine 
radio and TV 
advertisers 



use 



3 GOOD REASONS 

why you should act promptly 
to buy 

"BOSS 
LADY" 



starring 




LYNN BARI 

13 half-hour films made 
especially for television 

1. Top Rating 

Started with a 17, ,7 Neilsen 
and rosi rapidly to 

2. Top Quality 

Film) <I with tasti . know-how 
and showmanship in all depart- 
in i nls : 

CASTINC • WRITINC • PRODUCTION 

3. Priced Right Too! 

Seeing is belies ing, for com- 
j>h 1 1 information 
contact 



M & A Alexander Productions. 

Inc. 

6040 Sunset Blvd. 

Hollywood 28. Calif. 

Phone— Hollywood 4-3414 



FILM BUSINESS 
{Continued from page 53) 

to la al ' lienta and agencies; <>r the 
sale to local clients directly. \ lot of 
new shows Bold and the majority of 
rerun Bhows fall into this class, and 
represenl an estimated 75' < of the total 
business. < hiel la al clients, according 
to the Bales re« ords of -\ ndicators arc 
in order: auto dealers and dealer 
groups (notabl) Ford and Chevrolet), 
beei companies (local and regional), 
bakeries, dairies, appliance retailers 
and hank-. 

3. N<-\\ t\ Btations one of the chief 
Bales targets of the -\ ndicators — sel- 
dom bave large Bums of capital with 
which to contract for tv film packages. 
However, most of them indie ate a great 
need for good tv film Bhows. Accord- 
ingly, man) film syndicators have set 
up Bpet ial contractual arrangements 
with short-term cancellation clauses so 
that stations can have various types of 
"starter packages." 

► Mtilti'inarki't (leafs 

Because it simplifies hilling, assures 
them an income, and affords a certain 
amount of prestige, syndicators toda\ 
generally approach big national tv spot 
advertisers first when a brand-new film 
package is being launched in syndica- 
tion, or when a top-rated film show. 
formerly on a network, moves over 
into s) ndication. 

This kind of selling is very competi- 
tive The vice president of a large film 
distributor in New York told sponsob 
that he kept close tabs on the expira- 
tion dates of his competitors 9 multi- 
market deals and often planned release 
dates on bis new properties accord- 
ingly. \Ian\ others do the same. 

Some of the multi-market deals are 
indeed ripe contractual plum-. I sually, 
the sponsor places it in at least a do/en 
markets with the distributor offering ii 
nri a syndicated basis in the remainder 
"I I v . markets. Here arc a few of 
the larger spot deal-: 

Interstate Bakeries, now going into 
its fifth year of sponsorship with Zn 
I \ - Cisco KkL televises the Western 
film series on a spot basis in 18 mar- 
ket-. I--,, has recent!) been sponsor- 
ing v - reen Gems 1 Big Playback in some 
15 markets virtuall) its entire mar- 
keting ana. Canada Drj achieved 
near-national t\ coverage in 1953 with 
it- sponsorship of Official Films' 7Vm 
<///</ the Pirates in some 56 market-, 
and plans a -iiuilai deal i alternating 




RELIEF THROUGH MODERN'S 
3-point film traffic and library 
service especially designed for 
agencies, syndicators, producers 

and distributors. 

1. Process control that gives you exact 
information on every program from 
scheduling to return of the film after 
showing. 

2. Editing and film maintenance con- 
trol that keeps your prints in optimum 
condition. 

3. Shipping control that places your 
prints — programs or commercials — in 
the hands of TV stations on time every 
time. 

These plus many other features 
constitute our complete television film 
traffic service. 



MODERN 
TALKING 
PICTURE 
SERVICE 



Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. 

TV' Division 

45 Rockefeller Plaza 

New York 20, New York 

EXCHANGES IN 

Chicago • Los Angeles • New York 



96 



s:o\sor 



every other week with a local adver- 
tiser) on CBS TV Film's Annie Oakley. 

Spotting by regional advertisers on 
a multi-market basis is proportionately 
as large. Phillips Petroleum sponsors 
Ziv TV's / Led Three Lives in 38 tv 
markets. Pure Oil has bought NBC 
Film Division's Badge 714 (formerly 
Dragnet) for spotting in 30 markets 
from Duluth to Miami. Standard Oil 
of California has signed for Roland 
Reed Productions' new Walerjront se- 
ries and will spot it on 14 stations in 
seven Western >tates. Johnston Bakeries, 
since late fall, has been spending vir- 
tually all of its ad budget (and covers 
virtually all of its sales area) with 
United Television Programs' Rocky 
Jones, Space Ranger, spotting the show 
on some eight north-central-U.S. out- 
lets. There are many others. 

However, as mentioned earlier, such 
deals only represent perhaps the upper 
25% of the whole film syndication 
business. 

► Business stability 

A few members of the tv film syn- 
dication business have grown like 
Jack's fabled beanstalk. Here are a 
few examples: 

Guild Films, organized only 15 
months ago by Reub Kaufman, stated 
last month that it did a gross of some 
$2 million last year, and expects to do 
some $5 million, according to Kauf- 
man, in 1954. Guild's first big pack- 
age, The Liberace Show, was launched 
only a year ago but is now scheduled 
(over 90% sponsored) on over 150 
tv stations. 

NBC launched its Film Division last 
March as one of that network's three 
major operating divisions. Since then. 
NBC's syndication offshoot has boosted 
its inventory from two to 14 packages 
and its annual gross billings into the 
$10 million class. In addition, NBC 
has enlarged its services to include 
complete research, promotion and mer- 
chandising facilities for syndicated 
films, and is now participating finan- 
cially in production of new packages. 

Ziv TV, organized in 1948 as a side- 
line to radio syndicator Fred Ziv's vet- 
eran organization. Today, Ziv TV sells 
{Please turn to page 106) 



TV COSTS GOT YOU DOWN? 
The Sportsman's Club 

52 popular, well rated, 15 minute hunting, fish- 
ing and outdoor shows featuring Dave Newell 
and panel of experts. Write for audition prints. 

SYNDICATED FILMS 

1022 Forbes Street Phone: EXpress 1-1355 

Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 



-• 



Pnecisiou 
Mnts 

YOUR PRODUCTIONS 
BEST REPRESENTATIVE 



fe* • * 



j 




■-*• 



CLOSE CHECK ON 
PROCESSING 

Picture ana sound results are held 
to the closest limits hy automatic 
temperature regulation, spray devel- 
opment, electronically filtered and 
humidity controlled air in the dry- 
ing cabinets, circulating filtered 
baths, Thymatrol motor drive, film 
waxing and others. The exacting 
requirements of sound track devel- 
opment are met in PRECISION'S 
special developing machinery. 



YOUR ASSURANCE OF 
BETTER 16mm PRINTS 

16 Years Research and Specialization in every phase of 16mm processing, 
visual and aural. So organized and equipped that all Precision jobs are of the 
highest quality. 

Individual Attention is given each film, each reel, each scene, each frame — 
through every phase of the complex business of processing — assuring you of 
the very best results. 

Our Advanced Methods and our constant checking and adoption of up-to- 
the-minute techniques, plus new engineering principles and special machinery 
enable us to offer service unequalled anywhere! 

Newest Facilities in the 16mm field are available to customers of Precision, 
including the most modern applications of electronics, chemistry, physics, optics, 
sensitometry and densitometry — including exclusive Maurer-designed equip- 
ment—your guarantee that only the best is yours at Precision! 



Precision Film Laboratories — a di- 
vision of J. A. Maurer, Inc., has 16 
years of specialization in the 16mm 
field,consistently meets the latest de- 
mands for higher quality and speed. 



PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

21 West 46th St., 

New York 36, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 



25 JANUARY 1954 



97 



WKY Radio 

thoroughly saturates one 
important southwestern 
market. It is powered and 
programmed exclusively 
for Oklahoma--you need 
not buy waste circulation. 




w: • 

I Tl *580k 



hhom 



" Unties 



Remember, when planning art advertising 
schedule for Oklahoma that WKY, the third 
oldest radio station in the nation, serves 
more Ok'ihoma homes and covers more 
Oklahoma buying power from Oklahoma's 
largest city . . . than any other station! 



fez*"**- 



»ffe Are 



tontai 



. * m INCOME 

'""^ce.. 10,, 



WKY 



Radio Oklahoma City, Okla. 



930 KC 5000 W NBC 



98 



Owned and operated by The Oklahoma Publiihing Componyi Tne 
Doily Oklahomon — Oklahoma City Timet — The Former-Stockman — 
WKY-TV . . . Repreienled by KATZ AGENCY 

SPONSOR 



ry 1954 



RADIO COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK I 



^ONDA 




ey* 90 mtn 
irk, Mogul: 
ek, Burnett 

05 ill das 

Crop. Mxn: 
Cellucotton 

J alt das 

•Klst Tuna 
,w. alt f 
0:30-45 
II li es & D avis 
|r: pepsodent 
i.w. alt f 
10:45-11 
i mn-Erickson 



Cecil Brown news 

co-op 
N m-f L 



|i-ey (cont'd) 
Pibury Mills 

n. w, alt f 
I ett 

i f 11:15-30 

i> up yr Mnd 

; mental Bkg 

m-f L 

s $2875 



lesemary 

: Ivory snow 

m-f L 

I $2700 



ndy Warren 
Fds: mai hst 
m-f L 
$3250 



int 
rer 

B 


Jenny 
: spry 
m-f L 
$3000 


•len Trent 
Home Prodt 
m-f L 
■ay $2800 



Curt Massey time 
Miles: alka-sltzr 
473H m-f T 

Wade $1200 



Capitol comment. 

S C Johnson 
frIL &B m -f" 

Guest time 
N L&T 



gal Sunday 
ehl: anaolnt 
• m-f L 

sv $2300 



ad of Life 
1: Ivorv soan 
I m-f L 
pton $3250 



Cedrle Foster 
news co-op 

Boat m-f L 



la Perkins 
*G: oiydol 
I m-r L 
-S $3250 



ig Dr Malone 
5: crlsco. Jov 
I m-f L 
oton $2850 



Idlng light 

«: duz. Ivory 
f m-f L 

Stun $3000 



N 



Mrs Burton 
': comfettl 
* m-f L 
? $3000 



erry Mason 
'&0: tide 
« m-f L 
1 $3500 



oca Drake: 
Istol-Mvers, 
CSS: Toni 
G $3000 



Ighter day 
&G : cheer 
» m-f L 
I $2850 



itltop house 
»: alka-sltzr 
1 r4-4:15 L 
e m-f $2800 
ouse party 
ever- surf 
I r3:30-45 T 

»0 m.w.f 

tan: fliurt 

I rl3:45-4 T 

$6000 

te-h r s m-t h 
rard of odds 
Tonl Co 
I m.w.alt f T 

shr $3200 



I »w : s 1 i n- 

Fds: 85N-T 
I m- f $1500 
nshine Sue 

t\ Products 
ich m-r I, 
«r $2000 



o rtetwork 
service 



lews 4:55-5 
m-f L 



^'o network 

•ervlce 

m-f 



Faith In our Time 
N 10:15-30 L 



F Sinqiser news 
S O Johnson on 
4B6N 10:30-35 L 
NL&B m sat 

Johnny Olsen 

Show 

N L 

m-f 10:35-11 



Wonderful City 

N in f L 

$3000 

H Engle news 
S C Johnson ivcs 
512C 11:25-30 I, 
NL&B m-sa 



Queen for a day 
P Lorillard: 
old gold rigs 

454H m-f T 
sp 11:45-12 

L&N ihare $5500 



No network 

service 
m-f 12:30-1 



Here's to My 

Lady 
f m-f T 



Welcome travelers 
P&G: splc&span. 
joy, prell. white 

cheer, zest 

1G3C m-f L 

rH6-6:30 pm 



Blow 



$4000 



Bob Hope 
On Kds: jell-ot 
162H in f T 
Y&R $8,000 



Break the Bank 

Miles Labs 
162H m-f T 
Wade $4200 



Strike it rich 

Colgate: halo, col 
gate dental enn 
palmolive. fab 
184N m-f T 
rl:30-2 pm 



Esty 



$3500 



Phrase that pays 
CPP: ajax. velt 
191N rl:15-30 L 
Esty m-f $2500 



Second Chance 
N m-f • L 

The Three Plan!! 



Pauline Frederick 

co-op 
N m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Luncheon with 
Lopez 
m-f L 



Fred Robbins 
m-f 2-2:25 



N 



Singlser news 
R C Johnson in 
505N 2:25-30 L 
NL&B m-saf* 



Ladles Fair 
m-f L 



$3500 wk 



network 
Ice 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Jane Pickens 

[ m-f L 

News 2:55-3 m-f 



Life beautiful 

r'&G: tide, zest 
77N m-f L 
B&B $2750 



TUESDAY 



My trin' story 

Sterling lung 

m-f I" 10:25 

(sec mon) 

D-F-S 



Whlspr'g streets 

Tonl: prom 

home perm 

tu.th 10:25-45 

LB share $4500 



When girl marrie: 
Carnation Co 
in i (see mon) 
Finn. Wasey 



Grand Central 

Station 
Campbell Soup 
in i 11-11:25 
Ward Wh eelock 
Modern Romances 
Ex Lax: ex- lax 
jests 11:25-40 
335N tu-f L 
W&L $ 3000 

Ever Since Eve 
N m-f L 

11:40-5; 
White Hs Report 
\V 11:55-12 X. 



Don Gardiner 



Oklahoma 

Wranglers 

N 12:15-25 T 

Jack Berth 

Prudential Ins 

m-f 12:25-30 

C&H (see mon) 



Godfrey* In 11 ::<0 
Knomark, Mogul 
Kellogg, Burnett 
10-1 0:15 al t da 
Snow Crop, Mxn 
lnt'1 Cellucotton 
FC &B alt das 

Gen Motors 
Frigidaire Div 

tu.th. alt f 
FC &B 

Toni Co 

tu.th. alt f 

10:45-11 

Weiss & Geller 



Godfrey (cont'd) 

Nat'l Biscuit 

tu.th alt f 

Mc Cann-Er lckson 

Pillsbury Mills 

tu.th 11:15-30 

Leo Burnett 



Make up yr Mnd 
Continental Bkg 

m-f (see mon) 
Bates 



Rosemary 
P&G: Ivory snow 

m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



Wendy Warren 

Gen Fds 
m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



Aunt Jenny 

Lever: spry 
m-f (see mon) 
FC&B 



Bill Ring Trio 

Gen Mills 
m-f (see mon) 
Knox-Reeves 



Helen Trent 
Am Home Prods 
m-f (see mon) 
Murray 



No network 
service 



Paul Harvey news 

co-op 

m-f 



Ted Malone 

co-op 

153N m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Our gal Sunday 
Whitehall Phar 
m-f (see mon) 

Murray 



Road of life 

P&G: ivory soap 

m-f (see mon) 

Com pton 



Ma Perkins 
P&G. oxydol 
m-f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Young Dr Malone 

P&G: crisco. joy 

m-f (see mon) 

Compton, Biow 



Guiding light 
{P&G: duz. iv'y S 
I m-f (see mon) 
Compton 



Mary Margaret 
McBrlde 



2nd Mrs Burton 

Gen Fds 
? m-f (see mon) 
B&B. Y&R 



Dorese Bell 

N 2:30-35 T 

tu.th 



Martin Block 

Show 

m-f 2:35-4 



Brighter day 
P&G: cheer 
L&T y 1 f R (see mon) 



dm B Gambling 

m-f 
4 L 



: Road 


of 


life 


: PaG: 


cr 


scot 


I72N 


in 


f T 


Comptor 




$2750 


: Peppei 


Young 


P&G: 


camayt 


175N 


m- 


f L 


3&B 




$2700 


Fit to 


happiness 


\\-G: dreft 


tidet 


I66N 


m- 


f L 


D-F-S 




$3000 



Joe Emerson 
Gen Mills 
■f (SE stns) 
Knox- Reeves 



Afternoon News 

,'ash L 

m-f 4-4:15 



Backstage wife 
IP&G: cheer, zest 
ISSN m-f L 
Y&R $2500 



Mutual Music 

Show 

N m-f T 



Stella Dallas 
Sterling Drugt 
157N m-f L 
D-F-S $2800 



Welcome Ranch 

iVare. 

\fass cn-op T 



Widder Brown 
Sterling Drugt 
lfi2N m-f L 
D-F-S $2800 



Songs of the 

B-Bar B 

Bobby Benson I 

|W L 



3 shows : 
$1500 



Wild Bill Hickok 

Kellogg Co 
100H m.w.f T 

LB $5500 

Cecil Brown news 
C Johnson wis 
i 151 IN 



Martin Block 
(cont'd) 



ick Owens 

m-f 

4-4:25 



Perry Mason 
P&G: tide 
m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



WEDNESDAY 



Cecil Brown news 

co-op 
N m-f 



Faith In our Time 
N 10:15-30 L 



F Singlser news 

S C Johnson 
m-sat 10:30-35 
NL& B 

Johnny Olsen 

Show 

N L 

in f 10:35-11 



Wonderful City 
N m-f I. 



H Engle news 
S C Johnson 
m-sat 11:25-30 
NL&B 



Queen for a day 

Quaker Oats 

539H tu.th T 

S& M share $ 5500 

P Lorillard: 

old golds 

m-f (see mon) 

L&N 



Second Chance 
N m-f L 

The Three PlanH 



Curt Massey time 

Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



Capitol comment 
S C Johnson m-f 
NL &B 12:1 5-20 

Guest time 
N 12:20-30 L&T 



auline Frederick 

co-op 

IN m-f h 



No network 
service m-f 



C Foster news 

co-op 
Bost m-f L 



Here's to My 

Lady 

N m-f T 



Luncheon with 

Lopez 

N m-f L 



Fred Robbins 

m-f 2-2:25 

N L 



F Singlser news 
i S C Johnson 
s m-sat 2:25-30 

NL&B 



Nora Drake 
Bristol-Myers, 

DCSS alt ds 
Toni Co, W&G 



Hilltop house 
Miles Labs 
• m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



House party 

Kellogg Co 

191H tu.f L 



Ladies Fair 
C m-f L 



Welcome travelers 

P&G 

m-f (see mon) 



Blow 



Bob Hope 
Gen Fds: jell-o 
m-f (see mon) 
Y&R 



Break the Bank 

Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



Strike it rich 

Colgate 
m-f (see mon) 



Esty 



Phrase that pays 

Colgate 
m-f (see mon) 
Esty 



N 



No network 

service 

m-f 



No network 

service 

m-f 



No network 

service 
m-f 



Jane Pickens 
N m-f !• 

New* 2:55-3 m-f 



Life Beautiful 
P&G: tide, zest 

m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



John 



LB share' $6000 N 



Pillsbury Mills 
m-th 3:30-45 seg 
LB (see mon) 



B Gambling 
m-f L 



Road of life 
} P&G: crlscot 
! m-f (see mon) 
Compton 



Wizard of odds 

Manhattan Soap 

P79H t.th.f T 

SB&W shr $3200 



Robt Q 
|Gen Fds 
Y&R_ 



Dorese Bell 
4:25-30 

tu.th 



•Sun Sue 4:15-30 
Corn Prods m-f 
C L Miller 



"Woman in house 
Manhattan soap 
195H m-f L 
SB&W $2500 



i Music in the 

afternoon 
(Tar m-f L 



Just Plain Bill 

iVhitehl: anacint 
Murray; Carter. 
Bates $2800 



Tr Page Farrell 
Pharmaeo: DCSS 
Am Home Prndst 

14SN alt das L 
Murray $2750 



Lorenzo Jones 
CPP: fab. tthpst 
186N m-f L 
Esty $2750 



:55-« L ITT 



Pays br Mar. icil 



n-f 



I. 



Austin Kiplinger 
Wash m-f L 



Art & Dotty 

Todd 

H m-f L 



Lum 'n' Abner 
H co-op L 



Musical Express 
X m-f 



Lewis 

4-4:05 

m-f 



No network 
service 



News 4:55-5 
N m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Curt Massey time 
Miles Labs 

m-f (see mon) 



Pepper Young 
P&G : camay. duzt 
| m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



My true story 

Sterling lung 
m-f 10-10 25 

(see mon) 



D-F-S 



Whlspr'g streets 

Gen Mills 
m.w.f 10:25-45 
Knox-Reeves 



When g rl matries 
Carnal i<"i I !o 

m-f (set- I 

Li win Wasey 



T 



Godfrey' 10-11 .ill 
Knomark. Mogul: 
Kellogg, Burnett 
10-1 0:15 alt das 
Snow Crop. Mxn: 
lnt'1 Cellucotton 
FC&B 

10: 15-30 alt das 

Star-Klst Tuna 

m.w.alt f 

10:30-45 

Rhoades & Davis 



Cecil Brown newt 

co-op 
N m-f 1 

Faith In our Time 
N 10:15-30 t 



Grand Central 

Station 
Campbell Soup 
in i 11-11:25 
Ward Wheelock 



Lever: pepsodent 

m.w.alt f 

10:45-11 
McCann-Erickson 



Godfrey (cont'd) 
Pillsbury Mills 

in.w. alt f 
Burnett 



Modern Romances 
Ex -Lax 

ii-i 11 :25- Hi 
Warwick & Leg'r 



Ever Since Eve 
N m-f L 

ll:lu 55 



Bristol-Myers 
m.w.f 11:15-30 
DCSS 



F Singiser newt 
S C Johnson 

m-sat 10:30-35 

NL&B__ 
Johnny Olsen 
Show 

N I 

m-f 10:35-11 



Wonderful 
N m - f 



City 
U 



Welcome travelers 

P&G 

m-f (see mon) 



Cm 



Bob Hope 
Gen Fds: jell-0 
m-f (see mon) 
Y&R 



Break the Bank 
Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



H Engle news 
S C Johnson 
m-sat 11:25-30... 
NL&B Est > 



Strike it rich 

Colgate 
m-f (see mom 



Grand ( 
Stat 
i ampbi 

hi t 11 
Ward Wh 



, 



Make up yr Mnd 
Continental Bftgj 
m-f (see mon) I 
Bates 



White Hs Report 
\V 11:55-12 L 



Don Gardiner 
N m-f L 



Oklahoma 
Wranglers 
12:15-25 T 



Rosemary 
P&G: Ivory snow 
m-f (see mon) 
B&B. 

Wendy Warren 

Gen Fds 
m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



Queen for a 
P Lorillard: 

old golds 

m-f (see mon) 

sp 11:45-12 



Phrase that pays 
day! Colgate 

m-f (see mon) 



L&N 



Esty 



Second Chance 
N m-f L 

The Three Plant 



Modern R 

lA I 

I II I II 

Warwick 
Ever Sil 
N in 

11 :H . 
White Hs 
W 11 v 



Jack Berch 
Prudential Ins 

m-f 12:25-30 
C&H (see mon) 



Curt Massey time Pauline Frederick 

Miles Labs I <»-op 
m-f (see mon) '^' m-f L 

Wade I 



Aunt Jenny 
Lever: BPry 
I m-f (see mon) 

JFC&B 

I Helen Trent 
lAm Home Prods 
Tm-f (see mon) 

JMurray 

Jour gal Sunday 
: Whitehall Phar 
! m-f (see mon) 
Murray ._ __ J 



aul Harvey news p^",^; 1 ^ 

^"■y m-f (see mon) 

Compton 



Capitol comment 
?S C Johnson : m-f - 
NL&B 12:15-20 



Bill Ring trio 

Gen Mills 
m-f (see mon) 
Knox- Reeves 



Guest time 
N 12:20-30 L&T 



No nelwoik 

service 

m-f 



No network 
service 



No network 
service m-f 



C Foster news 

co-op 

Post m-f L 



Ted 


Malone 




Ma 


Perkins 


co-op 




! P&G 


: oxydol 


153N 


m-f 


L 


J m-f (see mon) 








jD-F-S 





\ Here's to My 

Lady 
IN m-f T 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Young Dr Malone 
(P&G: crisco. joy 
: m-f (see mon) 
Compton, Blow 



Mary Margaret 

McBrlde 

co-op 

97N m-f L&T 



Guiding light 
P&G; duz, iVy fl 

m-f (see mon) 
Compton 

2nd Mrs Burton 

Gen Fds 
• m-f (see mon) 
jB&B. Y&R 
i Perry Mason 
P&G: tide 
■ m-f (see mon) 
B&B 



Luncheon with 

Lopez 

N m-f L 



Fred Robbins 
m-f 2-2:25 

IN L 

F Singlser news 

S C Johnson 
I m-sat 2:25-30 
NL&B 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Betty Crocker 

Gen Mills 
m.w.f 2:30-35 

D-F-S 

Martin Block 

Show 

m-f 2:35-4 

N L&T 



Joe Emerson 
Gen Mills 
m-f (SE stns) 
Knox- Reeves 



Martin Block 
(cont'd) 



|Rt to happiness 
IP&G: dreft. tidet 
3 m-f (see man) 
n-r-s 



Afternoon News 
Wash L 



Backstage wife 
IP&G: cheer, zest 
|m-f (see mon) 
;Y&R 



Mutual Music 

Show 

N m-f T 



1 Stella Dallas 
Sterling Drug 
I m-f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Jack Owens - R° b * ? 
m-f L Gen Fds 

4-4:25 Y&R 

Sun Sue 4:15-30 
Corn Prods m-f 



Betty Crocker 
Gen Mis 4:25-30 
m.w.f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



! Widder Brown 
Sterling Drug 
m-f (see mon) 
iD-F-S 



Welcome Ranch 

co-op 
Ware. Woman In 

Mass m-f T Manhattan 



house 
Soap 
m-f (see mon) 
SB&W 



Sgt Preston 

of the Yukon 

Quaker Oats 

450Detr L 

tu.th 



S&M 



$4250 



Sky King 

Derby Fds: 

peter pan prods 

450C tu.th L 

NL &B $ 3200 

Cecil Brown news 

S C Johnson 

m-f 5:65-6 



Just Plain Bill 
Whitehall Phar 

alt tu.th 
Murray 



Fr Page Farrell 
Pharmaeo: DCSS 
Am Home Prods 
Murray alt-das 



Lorenzo Jones 

Colgate 
m-f (see mon) 
Esty 



It Pays to be 
Married 



Nora Drake 
Toni Co 
ln-f (see mon) 
Weiss & Geller 
■■ Brighter day 
P&G: cheer 
I m-f (see mon) 
)Y&R 

Hilltop house 

Miles Labs 

' m-f (see mon) 

Wade 

House Party 

Lever: surf 

m.w.th (see mon) 

sAyer 

j Pillsbury Mills 
im-th 3:30-45 seg 

(see mon) 
L Burnett 



Ladies Fair 
C m-f L 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Jane Pickens 
N m-f L 

News 2:55-3 m-f 



My trui 

Sterling 

in r 10 

see i 



D-F-S 



Whlspr'g 

Tonl 

tu.th K 

Leo Burr 



Whenoln 
Erwm, v> 



Don Ga 

N in 

Oklah 

Wrani 

S 12J " 

Jack E 

Prudentii 

m-f 12: 

C&H (s. 



Bill Rln 

Gen Ji 

m-f (see 

<nox-Ree 



No net 
servi 



Paul Han 

co-< 



Ted M 
co-c 

133N c 



No nel 
serv J 



Mary M 

McBi 

co-i 

»7N m- 



Dorese 

(J 2:30 

tu,t 

Martin 

She 

m-f 2 

N 



Life beautiful j M £ 

P&G: tide, zest I Q en ; 

m-f (see mon) } m .f (SB 
B&B Knox-Ree 



John B Gambling 
■N m-f L 



Wizard of odds 
Toni Co 
m.w, alt f 
Burnett 



Road of life 

P&G: crisco 

m-f (see mon) 

Compton 

Pepper Young 

P&G: camay, duzt 

| m-f (see mon) 

B&B 



Rt to happiness 
ip&G : dreft, tidet 
jm-f (see mon) 

D-F-S 






Lewis 

4-4:05 
m-f 



C L Miller 



Music In the 

afternoon 

far m-f L 



News 4:55-5 
N m-f L 



Austin Kiplinger 
Wash m-f L 



Art & Dotty 

Todd 

II m-f L 



Lum 'n' Abner 
H co-op L 



No network 
service 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Musical Express Curt Massey time 
N m-f T Miles Labs 

m-f (see mon) 



Afternoon News Backstage wife 
Wash Lfc*&G: cheer, zest 

m-f 4-4:15 m-f (see mon) 

Y&R 



Mutual Music 
Show 

N m-f T 



Welcome Ranch 

co-op 
Ware. 

Mass m-f T 



Songs of the 
B-Bar-B 

(Bobby Benson) 
W Lp 



Stella Dallas 
Sterling Drug 
m-f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Widder Brown 
Sterling Drug 
m-f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Jack C 



Dorese 
S 1:25 
tu. 



Woman in house 
Manhattan Soap 

m-f (see moo) 
SB&W 



Just Plain Bill 
Whitehall Phar lAustin K 

alt m,w,f IWasb. 
Murray 



Fr Page Farrell 
harmaro: DCSS 
Am Hi-me Prods 
Murray alt das 



Lorenzo Jones 

Colgate 
m-f (see mon) 
Esty 



Wild Bill Hickok 
Kellogg Co 
m.w.f 5:30-55 
Bur nett 

Cecil Brown news It Pays to be f, 

I S C Johnson Married x- 

m-f 5:55-6 |H m-f ' Lf 



Martin 

(con I 



Music 
after i 
Var ir 



Art 


i 




To, 


1! 


m 


Lum 


V 


" 


CO- 


.. 





PROGRAMS 



THURSDAY 



D a y time 25 January 1954 



I D A Y 



ling 



StrrrH 
ctt 



ilLL 



>ntral 
Ion 

.rlKk 

omancri 
& Lrg'r 

Report 



ilers 

rreh 
I In. 
25 30 

c won) 

• Trio 
(Ills 

man) 
/M 



work 



alone 

i r i 



■MM 

murk, Mogul. 
K«lli>((. Burnett 
lu lo IB ill du 

Mm 

• iiueotion 
FCAB all d» 

Hire 
: ill r 

FCAB 

i Co 

in ih.ni r 

In ; 

Willi A C.rllrr 




SATURDAY 



Godfrey 
N«fl I 

lu III. all f 
McCann-Erlckton 

Mllsbury MIIU 
lu.Ui 11 
Lro Burnett 
Make up yr Mnd 
Ul like. 
I moil l 

lain 



■ 

I"'.'. i 

in f licr muni 
BAB 



WenJy Wirnn 

licit l-'oalt 
m f lire man) 
B4B 



Aunt Jrnny 

■I'M 

f ( ice mon I 
FC&B 



Helen Trent 
A in Il'iine Prodi 
in f (see nii'iil 
Murray 



Jur oil Sunday 
Whitehall Phar 
in f lire mon) 
Murray 



Road of life 

iry aoap 
m-f (tee mon) 
Compton 



Ma Perklni 
f.u; 
m-f (aee mon) 
DFS 



Cacll Brawn newt 
eo- op 

N m • I. 



Faith la aur Time 
H 11:1 



F. Slnglser news 

in ill 
NLiB 

Johnny lll-.n 
Show 

m-f 10 3'. 11 



Wonderful City 



H I nglr m»l 
S C J 

Nl KB 



Uiie- n tor a day 
Quake 

SIM 
P 1 

LAN 



Curt M .i 

I l.aha 

Wade 

Capitol tommrnt 

■.<on: m-f 

vAAB 12:1 5 M 

Guett time 



No network 
senrlce m-f 



C Fotter newt 

co-op 
Boat m f I. 



Here's to My 

Lady 

S" m-f T 



Young Dr Malone 
PAG Tiico. Joy 

f lata mon) 
Compton. li.o. 

Guiding light 

/.. Ir'y fl 
m-f (tea mon) 
Compten 



Luncheon with 

Lopez 

N m f I 



argaret 
Ida 



2nd Mrs Burton 
Oen lis 
m-f (see mon) 
BAB. YAR 



Bell 

h 

Black 

w 

:35-4 
L4T 



I'.rry Mason 


r.vi; 


tliie 


m-f (see 


mon) 


BAB 




Nara Drake 


Tonl 


Co 


m-f (aee 


mon) 


W. lis «. 


Gi Her 



Brighter day 
I'M! rheer 
m f (see mon) 
VAR 



.mis 

■ ttna) 
»et 



Hilltop house 

Miles I-ahi 
m-f (see mon) 

v. ■■ ■ 



Block 
d) 



Ladles Fair 
• ' m-f I. 



House party 
■Jreen Giant Co: 
73H I 
. Burnett_th onl 

m th 3-30 15 i>r 

(sea mon) 
L Burnett 



Wizard of odds 
Manhattan Soap 

i.th. alt f 
BBAW 



Fred Robblns 
m-f I 



Singlscr news 
S C Johnson 
m-«at 2:25-30 
LAB 



Welcome travelers 

I'M. 



u ... 



Bab Hope 

jell o 

in r i». - 

Break tho Bank 
Labs 
in r nee mon) 

ttidi 



,t rich 
/ate 



Esty 



Phras- that pays 
/ale 
m f (ai 



Second Chance 
N m f I. 

The Three Plant 



Grand Central 
Station 

'ard Whrrloek 
Modern Romances 

• A Leg'r 
nee Eye 

White Hi Report 

tA 



Pauline Frederick 

co-op 
N m-f L 



N . i.elu.Hk 

teirlce 

m-f 



No network 

serrlre 

m-f 



Jana Pickens 
N m-f I. 

•. . .,V3 m-f 



lohn B Gamblinq 

in f I. 



lit to happiness 
PaVO di 

at m..n) 
DFS 



No network 

serrlca 

m-f 



My true story 

m-f 1" 
(tea mon) 



DFS 



Whltpr'g ttreett 

w.f II 
Knoi-Rccvot 
When glri marries 



ttMi. 



UUat. 



riadlrcy' 1" 11 M 

Knomark. Mogul: 

Kellnu Burnett 

alt dat 

Mm: 
Int'l Ccilurotton 
FCAB 

Bur- K tat Tuna 
Rhoadet A Oavlt 

','. alt f 

I-everT M r 

WAG 

II alt f 



Godfrey 

lllsbury. LB: 
Vail I'. 

m » f 1 
BCSS 



Make up yr Mnd 
•nl like 
m f i '■ 
lat-s 



Don G-ii iiin. i 
in f I 

Oklahoma 

Wranui 



Jack Berch 
Prudential Ins 

in f 11 
2 AH (see mon I 



BUI Ring trio 

Gen Mills 
m-f (see mon) 
K nox- Reevet 



No network 
lerrlre 



Paul Haryey news 
m-f (tee mon) 



Ted Malone 
ro-op 

f r. 



No network 

lerrice 

m f 



Marv Marqaret 
MeBrlde 



•.i:v 



Betty Crnekrr 

Oen Mills 

m nl 2:30-35 
DFS 

M.irt.n Block 

Show 

m-f 235-t 

I. AT 



Cecil Brown news 
co-op 



alth la our Time 



H I la newt 
m (at II 
NLAB 



Rotrmary 
BAB 



Bueen for a day 

r l.orlllard 

tp 11:45 II 

M 



Wendy Warren 

Fill 
m-f (see mnn) 
BAB 



Aunt Jenny 
T-ecer 
m-f (*• 
FCAB 



^urt M. 

Labi 
m-f Is- ■ 
Wade 



Helm Tr. nt 

B I'rmls 

■ ■ nionl 
Murray 



)ur gal Sunday 
Whitehall Pliar 
I mon) 
Murray 



Road of life 
roi7 aoap 
m-f (tee mon) 

*r,mntftn 



Ma Perklni 

P*G nxviirl 

m-f 'see mnn) 
1-F-S 



Younn Or Malone 

•Hro. |rr» 
... mon) 
Compton. Blow 



Guiding light 
ix, Ir'y fl 
m-f Isee mon) 
Compton 



2nd Mrs. Burton 
Oen 
m-f (see mon) 
".nmntnn 



Perry Mason 
ea mon) 



Nora Drake 
T^nl On 
_ m-f (tee mon) 
W»i<< ». Geller 



Life beautiful 

la. zeat 
in f (tee mon) 
BAB 



Road of life 

PfcO rrlicot 

in f (see mon) 

Compton 



Joe Emerson 

Oen Mills 
-K ttn<) 
Knoi-Reeves 



Pepper Young 
nay. duzf 
f (tee mon) 
BAB 



Martin Block 

,'pmr 



Home party 
Lever: surf 

i-e mon) 
. Burmtt 

Kill me Co 
tn f (<ee tu) 
L Burnett 



Br'nhter day 
I'vi: rheer 
l-f (tee mon) 
YAR 



Hilltop house 

Miles I.ahs 
m-f (tee nv>n> 

Wade 



Welcome travelers | 

i-m; 



F Sing • 

in nl II 
|N1 AB 

Johnny Olsen 
Show 



BUM 

Bab H 

fell-o 

It R 

3rfak the Bank 

Miles I.ahs 
in f (tee mon) 
jtYlfll 



Wend, rlul City 
f I. 



'hraie that pays 

l .Ik-ate 
in f (tee mun) 
Etty 



Second Chance 
: m ( I. 

rh. Tlire. fl.nf 



apltol comment 
LAB 12:15-20 



Guett time 
v , jo 



' -.1 ork 
tervire m-f 



C Foster newi 

co-op 
tost m-f I. 



Here's to My 
Lady 

I 



Luncheon with 

Lopez 

K m-f I. 



Fred Robbins 

N '' 



Singlscr news 
8 C Johnson 
ra-iat 2:25-30 
NLAB 



Ladles Fair 
3 m-f I 



lohn B Gambling 
S m-f L 



Wizard of odrtt 
Tonl To LB: 
Manhattan Soap 
iBiW all f 



40 school today 

I. 



Snaee patril 
ftaltlon Purina: 

L 



Gardner $30'K) 



Str.ke it r.-h 

■ate 
m-f (tee mon) 



sty 



aullne Frederick 

co-op 
{ m f I. 



No netunik 
Of 



No network 
tervlce 

in f 



No network 

ten* ire 

m-f 



Jane Pickens 
* m-f L 

■Jawi 2:55-3 m-f 



Life beautiful 
'AG: tide, zeat 

m-f (tee mom 
BAB 



Road of life 

m-f (tee mon) 
Compton 



Pepper Young 
\t:G : ramay, duzt 

in f (see mon) 
BAB 



Rt to happiness 
I -eft. tide 
m-f (see mon) 



Plattcrbralnt 

I..VT 



All-league 
clubhouse 

T 



01 Ranch Boyt 
.am aster, 

L 



Bill Shadel Newt 
ampana: cosmet 
88N 1^-12:05 L 

IW-F-H $450 



Theatre of Today 
Cream of Wheat 
159N 12:05-30 L 
3BDO $4000 



imerican farmer 
:.\\'ash I. 



Navy hour 
Vash L 



Vincent Lopez 



I. 



Metropolitan 
Opera 

L 
2-5 
Cudner $15,000 



Metropolitan 
Opera 

(coi ' 



Galen Drake 



Robt Q Lewis 

■ 
D4N 1. 

:was 
iiiiu.ii ■ 
lozell A Jacobs 

S8N 11:45-12 !. 

Mir 

Sad $iooo 



Man on the farm 

Quaker Oalt 
ful-o-pep feed 
ISOLlberlyvllle. 
Ill T 



Start over Holly- 
wood 
Carnation Co: 
evaporated milk 
201 H LA-T 



Ifth Army ban-i 
13 I. 



EW 



$4000 



City Hospital 
Cartel 



Johnny Singer's 

Orth 
Clere L 



Bates 



$2500 



Music with the 
Hortnel girls 

anned meats 
!24Var T 



BBDO 



S3C00 



Let's Pretend 
I. 



Report from 
Overseas 



Adventures 

in Science 

TYUb I^cT 



Farm News 
Wash h 



World 
Assignment 




Woody Wood- 
pecker Show 

'uith Mel Bland 
co-op 

H 10-11 L 



F Singlser newt 
S C .Inhnson 
in-sat lu 30 33 
NLAJ 

Woody Wood- 
pecker Shew 
(cont'd) 



Helen Hall 
11-11:15 



Tiny Fairbanks 

Graiul I - 
Steaks 

' N L 

DiNuoscio $500 

H Enq . nrm 

m sat 11:30-35 

IL&B 

US Military 
Academy Band 



^-. St 



$750 



Symphonies for 
Youth 

31 I. 



Symphonies for 
Youth 
(cont'd) 



F Singiser news 
s C l.'hnjon 



NLAB 



101 Ranch Boys 
Harrisburs I. 



Bandstand USA 
N 



Sports Parade 
Phila L 



Breakfast in 
Hollywood 



Mary Lee Tayla, 
Pet Milk 

I 
rH2-2:30 



Gardner 1280i 



My Secret Stor 



Woman In Lovi 



US Marine 
Band 
iVath 



US Army Ban 

' 



National farm 

home hour 

Allli-Uialnieri 

farm eijuipmer 

• ash 

rlI2:3U-3 



Gittlnt 



521 



All-Star 
3 arade of Ba 



Road Shaw 

pin 

i"ar ].. 

I-. new.- 

en.l i 



Road Shot 



iwent 
f L 

25 

"Fell 



flebl Lewlt 
Ren Fdt 4-4 :85 
YAR m-f 

iun Sua 4:15-30 
""orn Prodi m-f 
L Miller 



Afternoon Newt 
I. 
m f I 



Mutual Music 

Shaw 

H m-f T 



Backstage wile 
■ ■er. zest 
m f (>»■ 
YAR 



In the 
lean 

, f I. 



No network 
lerilre 



Newt 135! 

N to f I. 



Welrome Ranch 
Ware. 
Mail co-op T 



Stella r 


aJlai 






m f Uce 




DFS 




Wldder 


Brown 


Sterlmi 




m-f i tee 


muni 


O-F.S 





Jack Owens 
n m-f I. 

Brltv Crocker 
en Ml 
m.w.f (tee mon) 
FS 



Robt Q Lewis 

VAR m-f 

Run Sue 4:15-30 

' 
C L Mlllrr 



Woman In haute 
Manhatii. 

m f • see mon) 
SBAW 



Music In the 

afternoon 

Var m f I. 



No network 
tertlre 



Newt 4:55 5 



Afternoon News 

' 

Mutual Music 
Show 

S m f T 



Welrome Ranch 
co-op 

IVare. 

U m-f T 



Backstage wife 

m-f (see tm.n) 
CAR 



UN on the 
Record 



St. M.i Dallas 


Sterllnl 


Drue 






D-F-S 




Wldder 


Brown 


Sterttnz 


UriiR 


m f (tee 









Operation Music 
1 



Salute to the 
Nation 

L 



Mitropolltan 
Opera 

(cont'-|. 



Road She- 



II house 
Sterling Drue 
m-f (see mon) 



Saturday at 

the Chase 

si 1. L 



Mac McGuire 

Show 

rhlli I. 



iplingrr 

n f L 



Dotty 
Id 
f 1. 




No network 
temleo 

m f 



Sgt Prettaa 

at thi Yukon 

Quaker "alt 

tu.tb (tea tu) 



^M 



Just Plata Bill 
Whitehall. Mur- 
ray: laner I'r. 
Bates alt II 



Auitln Klpllnger 



Curt M.\»> > time 

in f ... 
Wade 



Fr Pat* Farrell 
OCSS 

Murray all I 



Art A Dotty 

I. ,1,1 
II m f I 



Sky King 
Derby Foodt 
tu.th 5 30 .'.' 
NLAB 

Ceeil Brown newt 
R C Johnn.n 
m r 
NLAB 



Lorrn/e Jones 
.lie 

E.tv 



Lur 
II 



'n' Abner 
co-op 1 



It Pan ta 

Married 
I m f 1/ 

Tha Threw 11a 



Musical Ispreis 

! T 



■ r 



Curt Ma- 

MHr. 

m f 
Wad. 



Songs •< the 
B.Bar B 

Waih I. 



Just Plain Bill 

tVhitrhaii. Mur 

ray: Cart 

Bates alt f 



r Page Farrell 
DCSS 

Murray 



Martha Lou 

Harp 

IN I 



Washington 
USA 



Les Higbie Newt 

B C Juhnsim 
R : 

NLAB" 



Wild Bill Hirkek 

m.w.f 
Burnett 
Ceril Brown news 

' 



Jonct 
m f Itti 



Paulena Carter 

1 







It Payt ta ba 

Married 
H n 



Pop C 



Saturday Sports 
Roundup 

Var I 

Daniel Schorr 

News 

Wash L 



Walter Preston i 
s' r* s*"io 

•- 



Sh« 



E Helli i 

5MW 5:55-6 L 
NLAB tat i.my*' 




WGY-Land is Vacationland 

AND RADIO GOES WHERE VACATIONERS GO 

From the first winter snow until the Spring thaw, winter sports 
fans from all over the country flock to upper New York State and New 
England. As in the summer WGY-Land again becomes vacationland for 
millions of people. From Lake Placid to the Catskills, from the Finger 
Lakes to the Green Mountains, wherever people ski or sled or skate, 
WGY reaches an increased audience all through the winter season. 



■:,. 




WGY 



25 JANUARY 1954 



GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION, SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK 

Represented Nationally by Henry I. Christal Company 
NEW YORK— BOSTON— CHICAGO— DETROIT— SAN FRANCISCO 

105 



FILM BUSINESS 
[Continued from page ''. I 

nine majoi film p» kages and expei ts 
to launch more al the rate ol foui each 
»ear. I ateal guesstimate ol Zh I \ - 
annual gross: 125 million. 

However, bu< h rags-to-ri< hes stories 
are u misleading .1- the stories "I 
fabled El Dorado when you • onsidei 
,l„. fibn syndication business as a 
whole. Film buyers, large and small, 
must -till investigate the final* ial 
soundness and reaponsibilirj of film 
prodw ers Bnd men bants. 

La»l year, foi example, I nited tele- 
vision Programs sold out to Gross- 
Krasne and ^rrow Prodi* tions sold 
out to the newly-formed Television 
Programs ol America. It wasn't that 
these companies were marketing .1 se> 
riea of 1 linkers; theii films were good 
and theii planning sound. \- industr) 
reports have it. these 1 ompanies and 
others like them were 1 aught in the 
squeeze between production budgets 
and syndii ation income. 

I Kis is how the squeeze works. 

^ ou are, let's say, an independenl 
prodw ei about to start work on a 13- 
week, half-hour dramatic Bhow the 
most popular type ol fibn pa< kage. II 

youi reputation is g I and youi pasl 

successes obvious, a bank nr an inves- 



1111111111 



1 $1,547,648.16 1 

1 



1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 



YES SI, 547.648 dollars in 
additional radio-TV time 
was sold through Song-Ads 
musical-commercial pack- 
ages in 1953. 

• Increased s "/< a of Prod- 
uct 

• Increased Igency Billing 

• / n C r e a v e d Rodio-1 I 

Spot Sales 

We Can Help You 

OUR CLIENTS USE THE 

SONG ADS S75.00 AUDI 

TION RECORD 

It Works 




> * 1 : 



Sum* Blvd 
gi^" Hollywood 28. Calif. 
HOIIy»Md 1-6181 



1 

1 

1 

1 
rl 

1 
1 
1 

1 



U>i ma) I". in \ . . ii the 130,000 \<>u are 
likelj to ueed foi .1 - I pilot film. 

This doesn't solve your problem. 
Now, you need a syndicatoi t<» sell it 
f,,r you. \'kI- since no -\ ndw atoi 
wants i" I"- ' aught Bhort and fon ed 
to bail "iii a prodw er, the b) ndicatoi 
1- Ukel) i" insist that you -how proof 
of al leasl 1250,000 financing to make 
the initial 13-week package. Reason: 
( In ni- .nid stations insist that the Byn- 
dicatoi guarantee deliver) <>r assume 
the financial burden E01 the -cries. 

I a,-h ii \ ou're completer) financed 
this kind of ii-k venture involves siz- 
able interest on tin- loans. So, now 
you've gol to gel it all back ami that's 
the big problem. Here's what your 
, han< es l""k like: 

Producers and syndicators replying 
to sponsor's Burve) indicated, with few 
exceptions, thai the) < ould hope to re- 
, ovei ii" more than 75' • of their pro- 
duction costs on the firsl run of a new 
package. Most pul the figure al 50%. 
\ikI. a few indicated thai a series shot 
in color as a long-term investment 
might mean a recapture <>l onl) 30- 
1(1' I on the first round. 

In simple terms, this means that pro- 
ducers inii-t be able to turn oul top- 
qualit) films while nol making a nickel 
<>ii them fur a year 01 more. True. 
somi sei ies like G< u iutr$ and / ire- 
side Theatre have played as often as 
five times in some markets and have 
reaped a fabulous harvest <>f dollars. 
\nd. it's true that the success of rerun 
properties has generall) put a solid 
floor under good films. 

Hut it -till mean- thai some pro- 
ducers and syndicators are often peril- 
ousl) close to the margin even though 
the) arc making sizable grosses on 
well-rated films. W hat's the answer for 
admen? I>c~t bet: Uways read film 
contracts carefull) and investigate pro- 
du< er and or s) ndi< ator final 

► Programing Irciid.v 

Lasl month, ll<>llvw<>od tv consul- 



tant Gordon Levo) completed his sixth 
annual poll of over 200 tv admen and 
film producers. These were his kev 
findings: 

1. Filmed programs for television 
are preferred to live shows by a ma- 
joritv of advertising agency men and 
tv < lients. 

2. Admen look upon the tv film n,- 
dustr) as a "more creative source' of 
programing, as compared with t\ net- 
works. 

3. Half-hour dramatic shows of the 
"antholog) t\pe 1 Fireside Theatre i- 
a good example, as are packages like 
Screen Gems' ) our All-Star Theatre or 
MCA-TVs Regal Theatre) are mosl 
favored hv film-minded admen. 

Certainlv. the tv film syndication in- 
. In-: r \ tries to <-'ive advertisers what 
the) want. 

\t latest <ount. something like 50 
major film packages are currently in 
production, including all types and 
lengths. As man) more arc well out of 
the planning stages, hut are not as yel 
in full production. Several producer- 
told SPONSOR that as main as 500 dif- 
ferent program film -eric- are now in 
various stages of production, syndica- 
tion or i reation. 

\\ here does il all come from? Chief- 
|\ . from two primary soui 

1. Producer.-. The majoritv of the 
newest tv film series are still being 
developed l>v independenl producers 
backed l>v hanks or financial houses, 
even though there's a definite trend on 
toward big producer-distributor mer- 
- Sometimes, a tv client will invest 
in a film propert) (network or spot 
in order to share in the residual rights 
in syndicated rerun-. Examples of 
tin- are the financial interests of P&G 
in Fireside 'Theatre. Ballantine in For- 
eign Intrigue and Camel cigarettes in 
Follow That Man I originally Man 
{gainst Crime), among other-. 

One interesting trend here is that 
several important star names have 
turned independent producer or have 



stop ^"onT^up^^^^ *"'*AT lQl 



TV FILMS off all KINDS 
FILMACK STUDIOS 



1111111111 



g* 7 3395 1 

SPONSOR 



invested in tv film series with an eye 
to the long-term returns in residual 
rights. Often, the stars appear (some- 
times at scale) in the productions. 
These personalities include names like 
Dick Powell, Ella Raines, Eve Arden, 
Ring Crosby, and — of course — Lucille 
Rail of / Love Lucy. 

In either case — investment by client 
or by talent to share in profits and 
residuals — the trend is virtually unique 
to tv films. There have certainly not 
been as many examples of it in radio 
or in Hollywood's theatrical films. 

2. Syndicators. In the past couple 
of seasons producers like Screen Gems 
and Gross-Krasne have moved over 
into the sales end (and even into the 
business of making tv commercials) of 
syndication and often handle film pack- 
ages in addition to those they actually 
produce. Others, like Ziv TV and MCA- 
TV have been producer-syndicators 
from the start. And, some out-and-out 
syndicators have recently been edging 
into the production picture by financ- 
ing independent producers, as in the 
case of NBC with Inner Sanctum and 
Dangerous Assignment; CBS with 
Range Rider and Amos V Andy, and 
MPTV with Flash Gordon and Janet 
Dean. 



Of course, a lot of the film products 
that syndicators handle — from ABC 
Film Syndication's Racket Squad to 
Consolidated's Front-Rage Detective— 
are rerun network series. Most of these 
play with no changes in the series ex- 
cept an occasional switch in general 
title. 

But lately there's been a trend to- 
ward the refurbished dramatic show, 
which is often a series of dramas that 
represent the pick of the crop from 
several available rerun packages. One 
example of this is TPA's Your Star 
Showcase — a "new" film series of some 
52 half-hour shows. 

TPA picked 45 shows from a total 
(according to TPA) of nearly 350 
available, made by five different pro- 
ducers. Much of Your Star Showcase 
is actually reruns of Jeweler's Show- 
case and General Electric Theatre. 
However, it is first run in 150 markets. 
In its current form a new introductory 
sequence (featuring Edward Arnold) 
is being shot, and seven new half-hour 
dramas (some of which, in turn, will 
be TPA pilot films) will be added. 

Another example is NBC's Paragon 
Playhouse, which is actually 39 epi- 
sodes of Douglas Fairbanks Presents. 
NBC has added new introductions, a 



la Showcase, Featuring Waltei VJsel. 

\\ iih new t\ stations popping up all 
over the map. mk h pa<'kaj.'e- an- often 

Strong first-i um liet- ainl are < I I 

rerun properties in othei mai \ ■ 

► Tfcrr/KiMi/isitiff 

Practicall) all the distributors ol t\ 
films offer publicity and merchandising 

services to clients, in varying degrees. 

The iiioM ii-n.il form of promotional 
help is a movie-type press book, com- 
plete with glossy photos, some promo- 
tional material, and advertising blurbs. 
A few of the larf:e-t syndicators like 
Ziv TV, CBS Film Syndication — go 
further and offer an extensive crop of 
merchandising aids. These include 
items like counter cards, truck posters, 
window stickers, display material, -helf 
talkers and even premiums. Other 3) n- 
dicators — like MPTV and United Ar- 
tists — have developed merchandising 
angles in connection with franchised 
merchandise (cowboy suits, space hel- 
mets, rocket pistols, sweaters and such- 
like I . all of it tied into a syndicator- 
distrihuted show. 

A complete list of merchandising ser- 
vices available to advertisers from film 
syndicators is impossible in this brief 
i Please turn to page 112 l 



Fum* 11 






otfM 



>L 



BUT T//E PEOPLE Of 
NEW ORLEANS LOi/E 

OUR CKAIG KENNEDY, 
CRIMINOLOGIST 

BETTER,,. JUST 
LOOK AT THIS 
TELE PULSE 
RATING/ 



TELEPULSE November, 1953. 

New Orleans, Louisiana 
CRAIG KENNEDY, CRIMINOLOGIST 50.5 

I Love Lucy 48.5 



These TOP MARKETS on this outstanding y^-hour mystery- 
adventure TV film series still open for FIRST RUN SPON- 
SORSHIP* 

NEW YORK PITTSBURGH 

BALTIMORE MILWAUKEE 

ST. LOUIS BUFFALO 

WASHINGTON, D. C. MINNEAPOLIS 

BOSTON CINCINNATI 

"Contact us TODAY for MORE success stories and other available 
markets 

LOUIS WEISS AND CO. 

655 N. Fairfax • Phone WEbster 8-5287 • Los Angeles 36. Calif 



25 JANUARY 1954 



107 




KQV now tops even its own 

top rating in program "Firsts" 

In the List Pulse ratings. KQV broke all previous records 
in program "firsts" in Pittsburgh. And now, the new 
( k toher-No\ ember ratings shou v. e'\ e climbed e\ en higher! 
Monday through Friday. 6:30 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.. KQV 
now has almost three times as many top rated shows as its 
nearest competitor. In the Sunday through Saturday ratings 
we more than double the second station. And more and 
more of KQV s nighttime ratings have climbed up to 
6.0's and 7.0's! Here are the latest Pulse report ratings 
for Pittsburgh: 

Number of Program Firsts by Quarter-Hours* 

6:30 A.M. to 11 P.M. 

Station Firsts 

KQV 143 

Station "B" 56 

Station "C" 55 

Station "D" 26 

It's just another way of saying — if you want to sell the 
dynamic NEW Pittsburgh market, your key is KQV. 




Total V* hours measured — 330, Monday through Friday 



CBS Radiol I in Pittsburgh 

National Representatives: WEED & CO. New York • Boston • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco • Los Angeles 



108 



SPONSOR 



iit<lt>\' 




I 




si>< <mul hull. ro/fff#f*' 7 





JULY TO 




DECEMBER 


V / 


19 5 3 




Issued every 6 months 



Advertising Agencies 

Showalter "Biul" Lynch. Showaltei Lynch Adv., 13 July p. 60 

Eric Eisner. Maury, Lee & Marshall, profile 27 July p. 62 

T. Ralph Hart. Spitzer & Mills, Toronto, profile. 10 Aug. p. 43 

Eugene Lessere, Win. H. Weintraub Co.. profile 24 Aug. p. 56 

Edward H. Weiss, Weiss & Geller. profile . 7 Sep. p. 68 

Agencv part in tv entertainment creation 21 Sep. p. 8 

Roger ' Pryor, FC&B. profile 21 Sep. p. 68 

Duane Jones. Duane Jones Co., profile . 5 Oct. p. 48 

J. Scheideler. Scheideler, Beck & Werner, profile 19 Oct. p. 62 

Is the 15% agency commission system outmoded? 2 Nov. p. 32 

J. C. Dowd, bond. Redfield & Johnstone, profile 2 Nov. p. 62 

Should air media recognize agencies? 16 Nov. p. 29 

What admen put on bulletin boards 16 Nov. p. 32 

George Wolf, Geyer Adv., profile 16 Nov. p. 64 

Louis W. Munro. Doremus & Co., profile 30 Nov. p. 50 

Michael Levin. Envin. Wasey & Co., profile 14 Dec. p. 57 

Top 20 agencies by '53 radio-tv billings 28 Dec. p. 28 

Alfred J. Scalpone. McCann-Erickson, profile _ 28 Dec. p. 51 

Appliances 

Has sponsoring Bishop Sheen sold for Admiral?- 24 Aug. p. 31 

How Lewyt gets dealers to up radio-tv use 30 Nov. p. 36 

Automotive and Lubricants 

Liqui-Moly. car oil supplement, goes national with 

aid of radio-tv spot 

Ford one-day sales crackle via saturation radio.. 

Emil Mogul tests media weekly for Rayco 

Automobiles on the air 



Donald C. Marschner, Shell Oil, profile 

Firestone gets maximum yardage from simulcast 

Broadcast Advertising Proble 
Developments 

Hot radio and tv trends for fall '53 

Forum: what trends should air advertisers watch? 
Network radio : outlook, audience, tandem plans, 

merchandising, flexibility . 

Out-of-home listening, national status 

Spot radio: outlook, availabilities, rates 

FM radio: status and outlook 

Transit radio: status and outlook 



Is era of spot radio rate "deals"' ending? 

Moving day on Madison Ave. . 

Advice to tv job-seekers 

Twelve fallacies about nishttime radio 



Ex-magazine man, Ed Lethen, looks at radio 

How ABC will compete with other nets 

Agency recommends nighttime spot radio to client 
NBC invests S5 million in network radio comeback 

The network radio ferment 

Forum: To what extent do you use rating services 

to measure media effectiveness? 

Why new clients are buying radio 

Should a tradepaper boost nighttime radio? 

TV becomes tv in sponsor . 



Free & Peters clinics mull spot problems 

How 12 big spot clients use the medium. Part I: 
Six spot radio case histories: Life. Pall Mall. 
Esso, Mennen, Shell Chemical, American Air- 
lines 

Year-end report on major '53 radio-tv topics 

N. Y. newspaper strike: role of radio-tv 

Radio-tv resolutions suggested for admen, reps 

How 12 big spot clients use the medium: Part II: 
Six spot tv case histories: Nabisco, Anahist, 

Bulova, Ronson, Borax, Kools . 

How to get the most out of an independent station 
Forum: How can advertisers and agencies use in- 
dependent radio stations to best advantage?- 
Top 10 radio and tv advertisers, '53 

Clothing and Accessories 

National Shoes: radio and tv push sales up 500^0 
Brown Shoe gets tv show on 203 radio stations 



7 Sep. 


P- 


36 


19 Oct. 


P. 


30 


19 Oct. 


P- 


36 


16 Nov. 


P- 


43 


30 Nov. 


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20 


14 Dec. 


P- 


14 


tits anil 




13 July 


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31 


13 July 


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52 


13 July 


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68 


13 July 


P- 


69 


13 July 


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102 


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134 


13 July 


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138 


27 July 


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27 July 


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10 Aug. 


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24 Aug. 


P- 


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21 Sep. 


P- 


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21 Sep. 


P- 


34 


5 Oct. 


P- 


30 


19 Oct. 


P- 


27 


19 Oct. 


P- 


64 


2 Nov. 


P 


27 


2 Nov. 


P- 


36 


30 Nov. 


P- 


34 


30 Nov. 


P- 


44 


14 Dec. 


P- 


30 


28 Dec. 


P- 


27 


28 Dec. 


P- 


30 


28 Dec. 


P- 


33 


28 Dec. 


P- 


39 


28 Dec. 


P- 


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28 Dec. 


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62 


28 Dec. 


P- 


99 


"S 

21 Sep. 


P- 


42 


14 Dec 


P- 


40 



Commercials and Sales Aids 

Film commercial talent, SAG rati si de 13 July 
Status of t\ 1.1). commeri 13 juK 
S arch for new t\ commercial announoi- July 
Forum: Are jingles irritating? 27 July 
What do viewers think oi your tv commercial? 10. ! 
1- ive ways to cut tv commercial costs 
Commercial approach used bj Galen Drake 21 - 
Starch reveals new tv commercial noting figures 16Nov. 
Forum: Should sex appeal be used in air com- 
mercials? |, 
Modern art comes to tv film commercial- 14 Dec. 
Dichter outlines features of effective commercials 1 1 Dec. 



Costs 

Transcribed radio program cost- 
Cost-per-1000 homes of net radio shows by type 
Typical talent-production costs for net radio shows 
"ft hat can typical budget- buy in spot radio? 
Tv network cost trends, fall '53 
1 Dions and tv costs: status and outlook 
S V.G rate scale for film commercial talent 
Rate structure of new tv stations 



1 o-t-per-1000 homes of net tv programs by type 
Typical talent-production costs for net tv shows— 

Five ways to cut tv commercial costs 

1\ show costs leveling off, sponsor survey shows 



13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
13 July 
21 Vug. 
21 Sep. 



Block Drug redi- 



Drags cnicl Cosmetics 



rs radi 



Joel Y. Lund, Lambert Pharmacal, profile 
Anti-enzyme war on the air 



Norman Jay, Hazel Bishop, profile 



Farm Railio and Tv 

Farm radio and tv: 1953 

\^ hat advertisers, agencies say about farm air 

Farm radio listening increasing ___. 

Farm tv reaches every fifth rural home 

Farm market: four key facts for admen 

Farm radio results 



19 Oct. 
19 Oct. 
19 Oct. 
19 Oct. 
19 Oct. 
19 Oct. 



Foods and Beverages 

Ruppert broadens air use via radio-tv spot 

Morton Salt likes nighttime spot radio . 

James Bergman Jr.. River Brand Rice Mills, pro- 
file _ . 

Kraft adds second hour-long show to tv schedule . 

Rubel Baking builds public relations via radio 
show 

Dr. Pepper wins with radio giveaway show _ 

The sugarless pop revolution 



How big Baltimore bakery uses radio and tv 

Vi h> Pan American Coffee Bureau uses spot radio 

How GF gets most out of tv for Minute Rice 



7 Sep. 
21 Sep. 

5 Oct. 

5. Oct. 

J Nov. 

2 Nov. 
16 Nov. 
30 Nov. 



p. 200 
p. 5 i 



Foreign and International 



Foreign language radio: status and outlook 

Forum: Why is Canadian radio a good buy? 

Canadian radio and tv, 1953: 

Canadian market : more money to spend 

Canadian radio leads in penetration, gets results 

Canadian tv makes bid for big league 

How U. S. sponsors use radio in Canada . 

Canadian Basics: charts and statistics on scope 
of the market including listings of all Cana- 
dian radio stations and reps, U. S. advertisers, 

agencies in Canada radio and tv 

A rep goes to Alaska, gives market lowdown 

Rating muddle in Australia 



32 
40 



p. 58 
p. 42 
p. 62 



p. 110 

p. 167 

p. 167 

p. 169 

182 

188 

193 

195 

230 

232 

36 

29 



Si p. p. 34 

21 Sep. p. 18 

21 Sep. p. 38 

16 Nov. p. 23 



p. 69 

p. 70 

p. 72 

p. 76 

p. 82 

p. 84 



27 Julv p. 28 
10 Aug. p. 28 



p. 16 

p. 20 

p. 33 

p. S4 

p. 30 

p. 43 

p. 36 

p. 40 



13 Julv 
10 Aug. 
10 Aug. 
10 Aug. 
10 Aug. 
10 Aug. 
10 Aug. 



10 Aug. 

5 Oct. 

30 Nov. 



130 
54 
59 
60 
62 
66 
68 



70 
37 
58 



insurance and Finance 

Milton Fox-Martin, Kidder, Peabody & Co., profile 27 July 
Bache & Co. gets leads via radio 27 July- 
Why all 11 banks in Kingston use radio 30 Nov. 

Arizona bank uses tv to reach youngsters 28 Dec. 



22 
36 
32 
24 



25 JANUARY 1954 



109 



Ji'tvt'lrti and Watches 

Sp i.l.l spends 100* oi budg< i on h 

Joseph Robots, Jacques Kreislei Co., j p r . .f 1 1 «- 2Noi 

>f<»r<'li«iit(fisiii(; (ind Promotion 

Men bandising •* I ins • . il • • r 7 Sep i 

Portabli i\ "•'■!-" merchandi * ibowi 

fUseeUmneomt Products inul Se r v i c e * 

Movii companiei • . . 1 1 1 1 r > u »• promotion! vi In p. 24 

Elliot) Plowe, Petei Paul Inc., profile il) p. 26 

W li\ American Machine & Foundr) uaa rt I J) p. 1- 

Bernard Dwortzan, Ronaon \n Metal, profile In tug p. Il 

Morehead Patterson, M an Machini I Food 

dry, profile • t, p. 16 

Clayton llul-h. Glamorene In... profile 19 Oct p 

l>. Im discovers radio and i\ <an -.11 2 Nov, 

Magea iporl itorea up udea $2 million w ith t\ 16 Nov. p, U 

Howard Dietz, M-G-M Pictures, profili 14 Dec, p. _'l 

Ned Pines, Pines Publications, profile p 22 

Programing. General 

\\ li.ii happens to summei ail "tryouts?* 1 13 July p 

Top 10 availalil'- programs on each radio network 13 Jul} p. 85 

I se "I same program formal on both radio and ft In Vug. p. -'1 

I 1^' minute network radio shows largelj new* tats 24 Vi 
Forum: What should advertisers know about N< 

pro audit i" i radio ' 21 \ug. p. 58 
WOR buys 11,000,000 worth of radio drama Bhows 24 lug. p 62 
\. .mi Radio Vi i lion fa< t-. figures on the market, 
buying habits, brand preferences, Negro lis- 
tening, -in,... stories, tips on selling 21 Vug, p. 65 

Football nil ill. 5< |). p. 40 

\i. children's programs harmful? S p. p. 42 

Homemaking shows most populai with ladies Sep. p. 66 

VBC program strateg) in network competition 21 Sep. p 

Di ike: radio's highest paid copywriter 21 Sep. p. 36 

Negro-appeal soap opera intrigues adverlis I L p. 18 

Wh.it sponsors can learn fruin I. MI clinics 2 Nov. p. 40 

■ii ideas re. pp. jr. mi n ilities 10 Nov. p. 10 

sponsor station program guide to aid timebuyers l4Dec. p. 11 

P rituruiui :}<;. Television 

aing trends, t.ill '.">', I 1 .1 nly p. 18~> 

W l()l'-T\ t..i -how -mash lnt in one week 27 Jul] p. 6 1 

Humor group develops corned] talent L>r t\ 7 Sep. p. 66 

Hour-long t\ dramas gel results for Kraft 21 Sep. p. 20 

Progi anting to hit sj >1 class* - let, p. 10 

Behind-scenes Btorj ..I i t\ drama (The Web) 190ct. p. 

Western should be noisj to l» success 2 Nov. p. 50 

raining aids ad message reception 28 Dec. p. II 

Research 

I- Life's media stud) fair t.. radio and tv? 13 July p 

Multiple-eel radio listening, latest research 13 July p. 82 

Radio Basics: charts and statistics on radio's cir- 
culation, audience, listening, costs, billings 13 Jul) p. 1">7 

\\ Basics: charts an. I statistics on dimensions ol 
t\. viewing halut-. audience composition, r» 
membrance impact, costs, billings 13 July p. 219 

Media research pitfall-, in trap-: Part 7. All- 
Media Stud) -'7 Jul) p. 38 

I . ii basii findings oi new Christal radio stud) 10 Vug. p, 

Media research pitfalls, In." t<. gel your research 

money's worth; Part B, ill-Media Stud) 24 Vug. p. 35 

Hon 72 advertisers evaluati media; Pari 9, A 1 1 - 

Media Stud) 7 Si p. p. 27 

II..U 94 agencies evaluate media; Part 10, All- 
Media Stud] 21 -. p. p i : 

Hon BBDO evaluates media; Pari 11, VU-Media 

Stud) I ■ 

D.ptli research pi. I.. ial lion to in Ocl 

How t.> teal media weekly; Pari 12. Ml M 

Stud) 190 i. 

Don'l make ibia mistake in ranking tv markets \ 

Facta on the youth market for admen 2 Nov. p 

\\ i,\ ;i advertisers don'l tuv the air: Pari 1 .. 

Ml Media Stud) 16 Nov. , 

Will Starch ti figures upael buying strati 16 Nov. p. 10 

\N \ lurvej shows new ad expenditure trends p. 12 

Beware .>t misuses oi Starch t\ figures NBI \ p. \2 

Radio "indiapenaable'' medium, Politz atudj shows 14 Dec. i 

What"- wrong with the rating servtcee? Pan 14, 
Vll-Media Stud) 



110 



Retail 

Storecasting status ami developments 13 July p. 136 

;! store uses own talent to pare tv costs . 21 Sep. p. 66 

Forum: Why don't department stores use more 

radio an.! t v V 30 Nov. p. 56 

Radio and tv sell for department stores during 

N. "\ newspaper strike 28 Dec. p. 30 



Soups ci ii cf Cleansers 

Hon Lifebuo] cured it* own B.O. 

Jr., B. T. Babbitt, profile 



13 Jul) p. 

24 An-, p. 



34 
26 



Television 

Network tv trends: one-station market problem, 
network size ami t\ set growth projections, 
ulif. cosl trends, programs, audiences, mer- 
. bandising, color t\. unions 

I hf: status and outlook 

^p..i tv: availabilities, rates, color t\. I.D.'s, syn- 
dicati 

l\ stations in 225 metropolitan county markets 

l\ Basics: charts, statistics on dimensions of w. 
viewing habits, t\ \-. railio. audience compo- 
sition, remembrance impact, costs, billings 

How ti stop- brand-switching: NBC T\ -tu.l> 

KING-TA meets a.l emergenc) in newspaper strike 

I hf: one yeai later 

Vlternate-week ami split sponsorships in tv 

Forum: Hon can uhf sel conversion be stimu- 
lated? 
tv: a. Kami lips to admen 

Forum: How can a. limn prepare for color tv? 

Il..w Vmerii t's social classes read to t\ 

\ ill.-. . tape i- t\ H-bomb 

I • - handicap: inflezibilit) 

Forum: Who should do tv set census? _ 

I hf facts brought "P to date 

d-circuit tv meetings on the increa-e 

Should there 1" i Tr Vdvertising Bureau? 

Video tape recorder: meaning to sponsors 

I- tv over-commercialized? 

Television Film 



SPONSOR-TelePulse ratings of top spot film shows: 
chart 



W h\ advertisers use spot tv him program cam- 
paigns 



13Julv p. 171 
13 July p. 180 



lv f 1 1 lit -how- available for syndication: listinj 

ll'.w to get the most out of -lock tv film 

Time Buying 

Market differences timebuyers should watch 
Peril- i time salesman 

Pit) the gal timebuyer 



j n commends nighttime spot radio to client 

Mi' - n. w radio sales plans 

Electronic spot buying: NBC Spot Sales new 

"audition" buying method for timebuyers 

m: How does \..iir agency train timebuyers? 

rimebuyers love t.. see station manager-, but . . . 

tnebuyers: a job profile 
What timebuyers want for Christinas _ 

ition program guide will aid timebuyi rs 

Tobacco 

Porti ow ing i igarette controvers) 

W ill ( lamels go king-size? 



Transcriptions 

rranacribed radio shows: Btatus, costs, trends 
librar) -. r \ i. ■• developments 



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p- 


10 


• v ' I'- 


p- 


18 


13 Jul) 


p 


106 


13 July 


p- 


110 


SPONSOR 



top service ^^l£, ...top selling ability on KCMO Farm Rad 




10 



and how it grows in Mid-America 



The KCMO Community Corn Club Contest 

is just a single example of Jack Jackson's 

stature among Mid-America farm groups. 

Jack, who is KCMO's Director of Agriculture, 

organized the first contest of its kind in 

Mid-America three years ago. 

Since then, scores of rural and small-town civic 
groups have sponsored thousands of farmer- 
contestants in the competition to grow 
more and better corn. 

This kind of progressive farm radio service has 

brought Jack numerous honors, including the 

current presidency of the National Association 

of Television and Radio Farm Directors. 

Jack and his staff are either on the air or on the 

road the year round, serving the Mid-America 

farmer . . . and making sales grow for 

a number of sponsors. 

His associates, Bruce Davies, Market Reporter 

and George Stephens, Farm Reporter, 

constitute an active, completely coordinated 

department operating full-time on KCMO-Radio. 

Call KCMO or your Kntz man for the full story on 
KCMO Farm Radio. 



KCMO 

radio 

50,000 watts at 810 Kc. 

125 East 31st Street, Kansas City, Mo. 
or The Katz Agency. 

"It's a Meredith station' 



25 JANUARY 1954 



111 



spa< e. Sponsors interested in merchan- 
dising should discuss the mattei with 
disti ibutora and "i stations. 

S< mi.iI admen, however, sounded •« 
familiar warning. Said one New ^"ik 
film buyei at a top ad agenc) : "Mo^ ie 
merchandising i- like thai ol radio. 
Some "I it is '.'"'"I and some "I ii is 
lous] . Men handising ma) mean 20 
different things to 20 different syndi- 
. ators. I" anj < ase, you're supposed 
lo l»- buj ing a good film propertj and 
not shopping t"i tree point-of-sale 
material. ' 



There's plentj of talk about RCA - 
new video tape rei order in the t\ film 
indust] j . Most prodm ers plan to use 
it i n some form oi othei when it be- 
comes available. V tually, more pro- 
du< ei - see it as a possible threat to the 
| on o esiduals "I « olor films than 

,,.. a , ompetitoi in the near future to 
black-and-white film production. 

But, at the moment, then- are no 
majoi ( banges in tin- industry's pat- 
terns ol produ< tion oi Belling as a re- 
sult of the VTR. 



* • • 



now! 



WICHITA AREA PULSE 




<32J 



TOP 15 NIGHT SHOWS 



*To assure on occurote 
KTVH area survey. Tele 
pulse Report was made 
in Wichita, Hutchinson, 

and Winfield. 



TOP 10 MULTI- WEEKLY 



KTVH . . 
STATION X 







KTVH . . 
STATION X 



Wind), the bright spirit ol TV in Central Kansas, is jump- 
ing with joj over the first Kansas Telepulse Report. He's 
mutiny sales-wise advertisers to chart a rising curve with 
Kl\ H . .Nighttime ratings of 53.6 to 35.5 and multi- 
weekly ratings of 29.7 to 14.3. KTVH sales offices . . . 
Wichita and Hutchinson; studios in Hutchinson, Howard 
Peterson, General Manager. 



KTVH 

HUTCHINSON -WICHITA 



CBS BASIC -DU MONT -ABC 
REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION, INC. 

COVERS CENTRAL KANSAS 



FILM COLOR 

(Continued jrom page 55) 

color. Color will have the same effect 
..ii television that Technicolor has had 
on the movie-going public. Color will 
enhance the value of '•>•">', of all pro- 
grams and the COSt will he little more 
than black-and-white as far as the actu- 
al productions arc concerned." 

Not all producers, however, are as 
enthusiastic ahout the rainbow-hued 
future of television. Here, for example, 
are the thoughtful comments <»f Her- 
schell (•■ Leu is. top producer of Chi- 
cago's Lewis \ Martin Film-. Inc. 
Lewis, who produces film commercials 
a- well a- BUch film -cries as Oklahoma 
Chuck Wagon Boys and What's Your 
Eye-Q? warned: 

"Color has ^<me backward in the last 
three months. For ahout a year, we 
experimented with color, at the insis- 
tence of clients who were afraid that 
color tv would make their spots obso- 
lete. Then, with the realization that 
color tv for practical, commercial pur- 
poses has largely faded out as an im- 
mediate, imminent development — at 
best two vears away — the demand for 
color has slacked off to almost nothing. 
Everyone is waiting for a new develop- 
ment that will either tone up the color 
film in existence or evolve a new color 
film especially for tv use. Many of us 
in the producing end are annoved with 
the cloak-and-dagger approach taken 
in color film. We'd like to know exact- 
K where we stand."' 

Q. What does shooting in color 
add to the costs of syndicated produc- 
tion? 

\. It all depends. Some producers 
have literally spent a fortune on color 
for experimental purposes. 

Ziv TV. for example, has shot sev- 
eral episodes of Favorite Story in color 
and black-and-white at the same time, 
with the cameras side-by-side. Object: 
to determine whether black-and-white 
prints made from the color negatives 
looked as well on t\ closed circuits as 
black-and-white prints made from the 
regular panchromatic stock. Naturally, 
this isn't a cheap test 

However, some color figures can be 
evolved today. SPONSOR discussed the 
question of color costs with a number 
of different producer-. These were the 
averages: 

1. If a producer shoots a normally 
budgeted (about 827.(11)0 per episode) 
half-hour dramatic show in color, the 
additional price on top of his budget 



112 



SPONSOR 



just to get a finished color negative 
(no prints) will be about 25%. From 
this, a black-and-white negative can be 
made, and regular prints made in the 
usual way. The color negative can be 
stored in the vault pending the day 
when color prints will be needed. (Inci- 
dentally, the color stock used in the 
example above must be one of the 
simpler color stocks, like the new East- 
man Negative-Positive Type 5248, or 
Kodachrome, or Ansco. Technicolor — 
a three-color process — would jack the 
price to about 33% over normal bud- 
get.) 

2. If a producer wants to go whole 
hog and make 35 mm. color prints of 
his show as well — which can be tele- 
vised very successfully in monochrome 
(black-and-white) on the standard sys- 
tems of tv projection today — his costs 
will really jump. Don McClure, asso- 
ciate producer of Owen Murphy Pro- 
ductions, estimated for SPONSOR that 
to shoot a tv film on color stock, and 
then to make 35 mm. color prints 
(since the reproduction quality of 16 
mm. color prints today is often erratic) 
will jump the costs by 50%. 

At this point, it should be clear to 
any adman that tv program film pro- 
duction in color involves heavy invest- 
ment — and perhaps a long wait for a 
return. 

Q. Why are color film stocks and 
color prints so expensive? 

A. Color film involves the most care- 
ful laboratory control during manu- 
facture. The materials which go to 
make up the color dyes and color emul- 
sions cost several times what they do 
in black-and-white films. 

To process color film, too, is expen- 
sive. Even in great quantity, color 
prints cost about three times as much 
per foot as do black-and-white prints. 
The actual figures — and this is an in- 
dustry average — are about six cents 
per foot for color, vs. two cents for 
monochrome. 

Producers find it nearly impossible 
to beat those prices, either, since they 
represent the standard prices of ma- 
terial and union labor. They may drop 
somewhat in the future when color tv 
production really hits full output, and 
possibly when RCA's new color tv tape 
recorder represents a serious competi- 
tive threat to the standard methods of 
filming in color. 

Q. What is being done to develop 
new color film for tv? 

A. The laboratories of even major 
film manufacturer have latelv been 



tackling this problem. Eastman, Ansco, 
duPont, Technicolor and the foreign 
film manufacturers have been involved. 
So far, the research has developed 
along two lines: 

1 . Faster, cheaper films: The biggesl 
single step lately taken in the develop- 
ment of a better color film stock was 
the development by Eastman of its new 
Eastman Color Negative-Positive, Tung- 
sten Type 5248. This film stock, first 
released about eight monhts ago, has 
begun to find wide use in both the tv 
and Hollywood movie industries, i 20th 
Century-Fox's The Robe, for example, 
was shot on this stock.) Developed 



primal il) foi indooi work undei ni ir« 
normal film lighting | its speed is .il- 
most that of a fine-grain black-and- 
white), it can be used outdoors with 
• "i reel filters. Excellenl black-and- 
white prints can ultimatelj be made 
from it, as well a- color prints. Prob- 
lems oi makeup, costuming and l<.< ale 
are simplified with its use. 

2. Bettei rotor prints: This i^ a real 
bottleneck. For years, the industry has 
been able to turn out good 35 nun. 
prints in color, since the film has bet- 
ter definition because of il> larger size 
and because the chemical nature of the 
stock is more stable. Making good "re- 




Channel 5 

BISMARCK, NO. DAK 

Add KFYR-TV to your list of "impact" stations 
in key market areas. Telecasting from the heart of 
the oil-rich Wiitiston Basin into the wealthy 
Midwest farm belt, KFYR-TV combines the top-rated 
programs from three networks with superior 
local shows— your unconditional sales guarantee 
of a large, loyal and profitable audience for 
your sales story. 



* 



NBC 



CBS 




DUMONT 



KFYRtv 



BISMARCK, NO. DAK. 



Gficuutml 5 

Represented Nationally by JOHN BLAIR 



25 JANUARY 1954 



113 



You'll find thenP 



P- ; 



. 



.Ljocal station newscasters, sporl 
casters, disc jockeys, women coi • 
mentators, etc., etc., — a great m 
selling force at work today across t 
nation. This force has grown up 
gradually that you have perhaps n 
realized the strength of its influen< 
It is the power of the local personalil 
The men and women in each comm 
nity whose voice on the radio has w ' 
a loyal following and whose selli 
suggestions cany the influence of 
known and trusted friend. 




Lao 

:: 



■ferry Marshall, master of ceremonies on WNEW's Make Believe Balhv 

•ids of local station personalities u ho make Spot Radio succeju- 



every town 



The Station Advisory Board 
of the Crusade will consist of: 



'his local influence, among other 
igs, is what has made Spot Radio 
powerful force it is today. This is 
r Spot Radio is shooting up year 
;r year. 

jid because this selling force is so 

e understood, the radio stations of 

erica and their station represen- 

ves a year ago organized The 

\ isade for Spot Radio to tell the 

j >t Story to advertisers and their 

i ncies. The Crusade carries its mes- 

19 directly to the top executives — 

l he people who decide what media 





1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


: 000,000 














: 000,000 














000,000 














,000,000 














,000,000 














,000,000 














194 
194 
195 
195 
195 


B $ 

9 


104,800,000 
108,300,000 


D 


118,800,000 


1 


119,600,000 


2 


124,400.000 


195 


3 


135.00C 


1,000, e: 


t. 



Spot Radio time sales have grown in volume 
consistently for 18 years. 



will be used. It supplies the factual 
data on which the agency can prepare 
a nation-wide spot program. The Cru- 
sade isn't selling any one station or 
group of stations — it is an industry- 
wide service. It is designed to stretch 
the advertiser's dollar by helping him 
make the most effective use of this 
powerful selling force. 

In its first year, supported by 318 
of the more forward-looking radio 
stations, The Crusade has been most 
successful in winning many new con- 
verts to the national spot medium — 
more advertisers; more markets; 
more saturation campaigns on more 
stations. 

With more stations backing its pro- 
gram, The Crusade can do an even 
more effective job. For the advertiser 
and his agency, The Crusade can help 
in the effective use of this great, new 
selling force. For the station, The 
Crusade can serve in the broadest 
possible sense in industry-wide pro- 
motion of this medium. Remember, 
The Crusade is the only organization 
selling national spot radio on an in- 
dustry-wide basis. 

Based on the outstanding success 
of The Crusade in its first year of 
operation, the newly appointed Sta- 
tion Advisory Board, comprised of 
the prominent men pictured, has al- 
ready met in New York to plan and 
launch a vigorous expansion program 
for 1954. 




^ ^ru£ade 



FOB SPOT RADIO 

Sponsored by 

The Station Representatives Association, Inc. 

101 PARK AVENUE • NEW YORK CITY 17, N. Y. 




Robert B. Jones, Jr., 

WFBR 

Baltimore 




Leslie L. Kennon, KWTO 
Springfield, Mo. 



Richard H. Mason, WPTF 
Raleigh 




Philip Merryman, WICC 
Bridgeport 




William B. McGrath, 
WHDH 
Boston 




Charles F. Phillips, 

WFBL 

Syracuse 




Odin S. Ramsland, KOAL 
Duluth 



Ben Strouse, WWDC 
Washington, D. C. 




^UhJVVfi't> i%J ■ 



Your Best 
Buy to Sell 
The Rich 
Pittsburgh 
Market 



Every day more and 
more advertisers are 
learning it's >;ood 
business t o sell 
America's eighth 
largest trading area 
through W K.J1-TV— 
Pittsburgh's pioneer 
I II 1 teles ision sta- 
tion, lb. it's because 
WKJi-TV offers its 
ever-growing audi- 
ence outstanding net- 
work shows plus 
strong local pro- 
gramming. 

In case you're look- 
ing for a way to get 
more than your share 
of the 2 ' | billion dol- 
lar Pittsburgh market, 
you'll find it pass to 
use W KJI TV. Want 
proof.' Contact our 

national representa- 
tives, Weed Televi- 
sion, or w r i t e us 
todaj . 



WKJF-TV 

(fyatuteC 53 

PITTSBURGH 

\\ . 

Nat. Rep. WEED TELEVISION 

OUTSTANDING 
NBC PROGRAMS 




• In- tion prints" ' 35 mm. down to 16 
nun. i i- another matter. Eastman, as 
yet, baa nol pei fet ted a L6 mm. color 

I nint BtOt k which i- a- good a- it- I s pe 

5248 negative mentioned above, al- 
though a spokesman in tin- I asl Coast 
Division ol Eastman kodak told spon- 

Milt that a good L6 nun. i oloi print 

stock "will !»<■ available in tin- near 
luiiii- 

Uthough this ma) sound like -•■ 
much tei hnical folderol to admen, the 
quest l"t good H> nun. coloi is ex- 
tremel) importanl to tin- future of color 
video films. Onl) the network origi- 
nation < entei - and a handful ol t\ sta- 
tions in major cities like New York, 
( In. ago, I Detroit, Los Angeles and 
Philadelphia ' perhaps a dozen in all i 
have 35 nun. projection equipment for 
black-and-white. Most stations have 1'' 
nun. equipment. 

No individual station, a- set. has 
projection equipment for color in an) 
size. 

Officials ol RCA and IVIc limine — 

two equipment firms currentl) supply- 
ing nearl) all of tin- color conversion 

equipment for t\ stations told spon- 
sor that the emphasis initial!) in man- 
ufacturing < "lor film projection gear 
would be in H> mm., apart from special 
orders lor network origination equip- 
ment. 

In other words, the film industr) 
must have a good H> mm. color print 
-toik that will look consistent!) good 
on color i\. and which can stand the 
wear and tear of normal ts film use. in 

ordei to become a major factor in the 
development of color s ideo soon. 

Q. \\ hat will the pricing formula 
he for syndicated color t\ film shows? 

\. sponsor put this question to sev- 
eral leading film distributors, found: 

1. Nobod) in the film business has 
yet worked out a rate caul, either for 
advertisers ami agencies or 1 . . i sta- 
tions, based on color film -hew-. 

'2. \\ hen a tale card comes, ii ma) 
look something like this: 

/ oi //en $hou •>.' 'I he same |>i i< ling 
Formulas will appl) a- the) have in 
black-and-white. That i-. a considera- 
tion will he made based on (a) the 
show - total ■ "-t-. plus i "-I- ul selling, 
' h i the number of color sets in a mar- 
ket, (< ' the time charges of the station. 
Don't forget that color shows will be 
seen in black-and-white under the < om- 
patible bj stem now in force, -<> an ad- 
vertist i - audien e i- not limited to 
those who have i oloi sets. \ prodw er, 
therefore, will price hi- show at least 



at the level of a black-and-white film 
in a market, and try to pro-rate his 
color costs as best he can. 

For rerun shows: This problem has 
set to he encountered, hut it soon will 
be. Ziv I \ . for instance, is shooting 
/ Let I Three Lives, Boston Blackie, 
ClSCO r\it/ and Favorite Story in color. 
\ll of the episodes of United Artists 
Television's (tut boy G-Men (plus the 
26 now in production i an- originally 
on color stocks, i United Artists has 
recentls -one out of business. This 
and other I \ properties are up for 
sale, i Guild Films, earlier this month, 
-witched production of its Liberace 
shoss to color, and plans to make Life 
with Elizabeth and Joe Palooka in 
color. \- mentioned earlier, the Frank- 
lin Productions series are all in color. 
Dynamic Film-' Speed Classics, Winik 
Films' Famous Fights, Ml' I \ -s ndi- 
cated Janet Dean and Paris Precinct — 
among many others (see list page 67) 
— are in color. 

\\ hat happens if these shows eventu- 
ally rerun in color in some markets? 
Is this a rerun, to he priced according- 
ly? Or, will it he considered a first 
run? So far. nobody know-. Best bet: 
Like the shoss which is first run on 
both hlack-and-white and color sets in 
a market, rerun color shows will prob- 
abl) he priced on the basis of a normal 
rerun scale for the black-and-white por- 
tion of the market, plus an added cost 
to oner color prints land to help the 
producer recapture his original color 
investment) based on the number of 
color receivers in the area. 

Q. What effect is the color Video 
rape Recorder likely to have on the 
ts film industry? 

\. I llimatels. perhaps, a great effect. 

As SPON-oK went to press, there was 
a great deal of speculation in the film 
industr) surrounding RCA's recently- 
released \ TR. But. so far. nothing has 
changed, and nobody has anv definite 
plans concerning it. 

One producer, who declined to be 
named, visualized a great deal of fu- 
ture color ts production on tape. As 
he sass it. production studios would be 
equipped \sith "some version of a tv 
camera chain" which fed into the VTR. 
Then, production would take place — 
with the costs of film stocks dra-tically 
reduced — in a manner familiar to 
mos ie men. 

"'Don't think." he said, "that we're 
going to let the creation of syndicated 
color packages slip out of our hands 
because of the VTR." * * * 



116 



SPONSOR 




In Washington, D. C, WTOP Radio's 

Eddie Gallaher is a man of monu- 
mental influence, with a record of 
astronomical popularity. Morning, 
afternoon and night, he occupies top 
) position: his programs command a 
30.1% greater average audience than 
any other local programs during the 
same periods.* In fact, Gallaher is the 
most listened-to local radio personal ity 
in the area . . . and has been for years. 

On the Washington scene — 

His influence is 
monumental 

He's right up there when it comes to 
results, too. In a recent premium offer 
pushed by eight local radio and tele- 
vision personalities, Gallaher out- 
pulled his nearest competitor by five 
to one ... all competitors combined by 
two to one! 

Your place on any of Eddie Gallaher's 
programs — Sundial, Moondial or 
Moondial Matinee — will put your 
product head and shoulders above the 
rest. For details call CBS Radio Spot 
Sales or WTOP, Washington's only 
50,000-watt radio station. 



"I'ulse, Sc/iti win r-< • 



WTOP RADIO 

The Washington Post-CBS Radio Station 




SCRANTON, PA. 

ABC TELEVISION NETWORK 

Antenna: 1244 Ft. Above Averoge Terrain 
333 Madison Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
Hotel Sterling, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Represented Nationally by 
GEORGE P. HOU/NGBFRY CO. 




Footi .Cone&Belding 

American Chicle Co 

(■ I 1 I H IDVF.MTISINC I M 



Earl M. Richards. Foot*. 
Cone & Belding 
". . . our sincere thanks for 
the wonderful cooperation 
. . . R. L. Harris Advertising 
Manager. American Chicle 
Company. 

"Once again I want to en- 
press our appreciation for 
the excellent manner in 
which you have followed 
through . . ." Wright Nodine, 
Geyer Advertising, Inc. 

"Effective Promotion in- 
cludes: 

• 24 Sheet Posters • Te«as 
Size Post Cards • Newspa- 
per Publicit> and Ads • P. 
O. P. Displays • Courtesy 
Announcements • Sales 
Meetings • Promotion Reports 

jfectiie promotion 



KROD-TV 

CHANNEL 4 • EL PASO. TIXAS 



RODERICK BROADCASTING CORP. 

Dorranc* D. Roderick Val Lovo-r*nc» Dick Walli 
Chrm. ol Board Pr»». 4 G»n. Mgr. Sale. Mgr. 
THE BRAHHAM CO NAT I REPRESENTATIVE 




RATINGS 

I < ontinued it<"i< page 35 > 

bra dure, "Are 'i ou Looking oi Listen- 
ing?" Following that, a Bel of n-li.i- 
liilii\ charts \\ .1 ~ produced, showing 
thai the ridiculousl) low Bamples i j — t - . 1 
bj \ irtuall] everj resean hei produced 
ratings without significant differences 
in most i ases. 

The charts appearing with this arti- 
cli ■. praphit all\ illustrate some of the 
variations between the measurements 
prodw ed bj different Ben i< es. Thej 
appl) equall) to l'<'tli radio ami televi- 
sion, a- the problem is not < onfined 
in i iili.i medium. In the radio indus- 
try the b1 ting is just about over: 

I be majoritj of Btations Btibst tibe to 
tli*- Pulse radii, reports. I rendex, Inc., 
produces telephone coincidental radio 
ratings in Borne of the larger markets 
tlii- i- primai ilj part of their agemrj 
service), and Hooper does the same. 

in television, however, there are 
more national rat inu services than in 



• •If the qualitj of agency service i- to 
In- improved a> maefa a- we think it 
should hi- to meet today's competitive 
conditions, advertising media will have 
.ii important part to plaj in recognis- 
ing onlj qnalified agencies. A qualified 
advertising agency i» independently 

owned, -mindly operated, adequately 

staffed and financial!) solid." 

FREDERIC R. GAMBLE 

President 
MM 



radio. We have access to \I!I'.. Hoop- 
er, Telepulse, \ ideodex and Conlon. 
i on uill note that at h'ast four of these 
services are compared in one of the 
accompany ing charts. 

Despite these problems with ratings, 
during the past two years, I've heen 
impressed with the fact that I'm deal- 
ing with happy people. The t\ spot 
salesman is a happy guj today with 
I reason: Business is good. Every- 
one wants to get into the t\ act. Every- 
one knows about the tremendous sue- 
- of main tv advertisers. 

But what of the radio salesman? 
\\ hj is he -u« h a happj gu) ? 

Speaking only for our own organi- 
zation (though I believe the same ap- 
plies in ever] other radio rep firm, as 
well), it's because business is good. 

\- a matter of fact, the billings for 
our ladio i ompanj rea bed an all- 
time high durin- the pasl year. \ud 
this happened in Bpite of all tin- proph- 
ets "f gloom who were expounding 
their own dire predictions thai radio 



was dead back in 1948 and 1949. 

What does all this have to do with 
latings? 

Simpl) this. Both radio and televi- 
sion produce tremendous results for 
the advertiser. 

Radio, in Bpite of ratings that have 
declined over a period of \ears from 
previous standards, continues to do a 
magnificent job for the advertiser who 
u-e- it at all properly. Any spot radio 
-all-man can give \ou innumerable 
success -lories for radio. Many radio 
— Stories appear in SPONSOB reg- 
ularl) . 

We do not believe that am rating 
service yet devised ran show the user 
or prospective u-er of the medium it- 
full sales effectiveness. Even the "ideal 
rating system" mentioned in the De- 
cember 28 SPONSOB is. in my humble 
opinion, far from ideal in this respect. 

No rating s\-tem can approach an 
ideal unless it contains some element 
exposing the medium's sales effective- 
ness. \nd this is the main reason why 
advertisers should use ratings as onlv 
one of many, many yardsticks in mak- 
ing wise program bins. * • • 



BAB SERVICES 

i Continued from page 29 I 

specifically, is what this service con- 
-i-i- of: 

I! AB supplies almost any kind of in- 
formation about radio and selling 
goods on radio. This service can be 
generally divided into two categories: 
ready-made and tailor-made informa- 
tion. The categories sometimes cross. 
Information gathered for a specific 
advertiser's use is usually made public, 
though not until the client has had a 
decent chance to capitalize on it. 

During the fiscal year ending last 
March B \l! made 860 major presenta- 
tion- to advertisers and agencies. In 
addition, it filled 1,650 requests for in- 
formation from advertisers and agen- 
( ies. [his does not take into account 
information sought bv BAB members. 
much of which is passed along to sta- 
tion and network clients. 

The read\-made information for ad- 
vertisers consists of a long list of re- 
sean h studies, success stories, presen- 
tation-, digests, a newsletter, reprints, 
product information sheets and so 
forth. The 1953 index to BAB ma- 
terial li-t- almost 6,000 reports on 
ever] aspect of radio's audience and 
radio'- abilitv to sell. 



118 



SPONSOR 




STORM COM1NC" BY CLYDE BROUN 



efe. yjUL^B^OLrLTrijirL 
|ffL RAmJlajjilLikA. 



lODAY, at the beginning of another year, 
thousands of farm families are ready to 
turn to the advertiser . . . for the products 
their well-earned money will buy. 

How can the advertiser most effectively 
send his sales message directly to the work- 
ing families in the Midwest? Naturally, 
through the media that has helped build this 
market by serving its people. That media is 
. . . WLS! It has given these working fami- 
lies the kind of entertainment, news, mar- 
kets and other services that have won their 
complete confidence and loyalty. 

Yes, it's time for the advertiser to reap 
the harvest that awaits him when he con- 
centrates his sales message in the Midwest 
. . . through the powerful selling of WLS! 



7 £%£^£%wa>ee^SfcZ%ri 




CHICAGO 71 
"890 KILOCYCLES, 50,000 WATTS, AMERICAN AFFILIATE REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR AND COMPANY. 



25 JANUARY 1954 



119 



Some examples : 

• ( Cumulative audiem e studii 
l!\l! has gathered r^t < I i > > circulation 
figures f«>r man) kind- ol programs 
.mil situations. [Tie) show what size 
audience you can ge! with di-k j ■ .< k»- \ 
shows, soap operas and news aats 
a pei iod "f weeks. I he) show the 
total audience foi .1 national spot cam- 
paign > onsisting ol five annoum ements 
.1 week "i _' I announcements per week 
in i\ markets only. ["he) show radio's 
total cumulative audience ' 11.2 mil- 
linn home- during an average week) 



or the < umulath e audien< e 01 the 
dominant station in a market 

• Prodw t information sheets : 
These are one-page summaries of the 
salient facts .il">ut products Buch as 
dentifrices, » - J * -« 1 1 i « blankets. While 
the) are made up to ji\«- Btation sales- 
men .1 five-minute !>iu-li-ii|> 1 ourse, 
in u business departments oi agencies 
have also found them useful. 

• Radio's bonus audience: Working 
hard in ii. rease the advertisers aware- 
ness "I the changing nature of radio 
listening, BAB has gathered and put 




together in easily-understandable form 

the broad facts about auto (27 million 
radio-equipped tarsi and extra set 
'two-thirds of all radio homes are 
multi-set homes) listening. I he re- 
search has been done 1>\ Pulse. 

The tailor-made information runs 
the gamut from a two-minute library 
job to THE TREATMENT. \ recent 
example <>f the latter 1 in this case the 
client asked BAB in 1 is described by 
Sweene) : 

"While we ua\e tin- gu) the works, 
this treatment isn't going to be ex- 
ceptional in the future. We expect to 
do more of this. Of course, were not 
going to spend a lot of time and money 
unless there's some radio business in 
the offing. 

*'In this case we prepared an origi- 
nal transcribed presentation, complete 
with professional actors, which took 
60 man-hours to create and put to- 
gether. It was a half hour long. We 
spent $600 to buy research from 
March. We analyzed the client- t\ 
advertising. We spent time checking 
his dealer organization. We surveyed 
radio stations to find out the attitudes 
of his dealers to radio." 

Some of the most important tailor- 
made information gathered by BAB 
has developed out of its media effec- 
tiveness tests. They involve compari- 
sons of radio, tv and newspapers. More 
than 00 markets have been tested, all 
of them b) ARBI. By the end of March 
BAB will have plunked down $30,000 
for them. 

BAB has learned a lot about media 
evaluation from these tests. It knows 
enough, for one thing, to realize that 
comparing media effectiveness is no 
simple proposition. There are lots of 
complications aad results are not al- 
ways conclusive. But BAB feels that 
sales effectiveness is the best measure- 
ment of what an advertising medium 
can do and it is determined to get more 
saw) on this central question. 

Most of the media effectiveness tests 
have been doue locally for large retail- 
er-. They include the Kroger super- 
market chain and Block and Kuhl. a 
chain of 10 department and junior 
department -tores in Iowa and Illinois. 
Ml the local studies compared news- 
papers and radio. In addition. BAB 
financed four separate tests for two 
national advertisers of packaged prod- 
i" I-. In these tests t\ was -tudied as 
well as radio and newspapers. Total 
cost for the four tests: $12,000. 

Much of the media effectiveness in- 



120 



SPONSOR 



formation has already been published 
and eventually all of it will be. Besides 
the studies which BAB has financed, 
it has published a media effectiveness 
study run for Sears, Roebuck, which 
the retail chain paid for itself. 

So far BAB has not come across 
any advertiser who insisted that the 
media effectiveness material never be 
made public. The client, however, 
usually specifies the length of time 
the study be kept secret so that no 
competitors will benefit from the con- 
clusions before it does. 

As an example of how BAB sets up 
more opportunities for radio business 
while serving the advertiser and agen- 
cy, take the case of the airlines. Until 
BAB looked into the situation at the 
request of an airline agency, there 
wasn't any material around listing 
reasons why airlines should use radio. 
BAB found that ( 1 I because airlines 
depend primarily on passenger revenue 
they are bigger advertisers than rail- 
roads, (2) airlines and their agencies 
need some knowhow in the field of 
airline radio advertising and (3) little 
is known about the listening habits of 
businessmen, the airlines' best custom- 
ers, since they make up 75% of stand- 
ard fare passengers. 

BAB has already filled in two of 
these gaps and sometime next month 
will send out to its members a study 
of businessmen's listening habits. 
The survey was made at nine major 
airports across the country and is 
based on interviews of passengers get- 
ting on and off airliners. 

All these services comprise a steady 
operation at BAB. They are not in- 
termittent. At the end of 1953 BAB 
had in its shop 51 assignments from 
advertisers for various kinds of data 
and advice. 

Examples : An advertiser who spends 
$600,000 a year in radio co-op ( and 
$6 million in national non-broadcast- 
ing media) wants BAB to take a look- 
see at its co-op copy and recommend a 
way it can check on whether its dealers 
actually run the radio advertising they 
say they do. 

Another advertiser, a radio in-and- 
outer, wants to know how to run a 
contest properly on the air. It tried 
once, didn't have much success, is now 
convinced there's a right and wrong 
way to do it. 

After servicing the advertiser for 
three years, BAB has some pretty defi- 
nite ideas about him. BAB, you might 
say, has psychoanalyzed the attitudes 



of advertisers toward radio. 

Says Sweeney: "There air two kinds 
of advertisers we meet fairly often. 
There's Advertiser A who thinks radio 
is dead or else says, 'Yeah, radio's 
great for some people but not me. I 
couldn't get any use out of it in a mil- 
lion years.' Advertiser A I if he'll 
listen) gets a complete treatment, start- 
ing with spoon feeding and going up 
through kindergarten and then the 
advanced course. 

"Advertiser B is the guy who feels 
he can make sales from radio adver- 
tising but doesn't know where to start. 



Sometimes In- 8 < ompletel) new to ra- 
dio. Sometimes he's used radio I" 

but it didn't work OUl Well and he 

think- he did something wrong. We're 
prepared t" be more specific with bim 
than with Advertise] \. We either 
pi) him with information already made 
up which In- can use or, il the billings 
potential is big enough, we'll finaiu e 
a specific resean li anil analysis job. 

"One tiling often strikes me. '1 line- 
are so man) guys in advertising who 
know absoluti'U nothing about radio." 

Because BAH has learnt a lot about 
advertisers' reactions to radio and 



CRACK 

THE EASTERN 
KANSAS MARKET J 




More listeners, more hours than any other station in 
Topeka .... and a go-getting merchandising plan that's 
won national honors. Add 'em up and it spells sales for 
you in Eastern Kansas. (We're talking about our better 
half, incidentally) 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 




5000 Watts— ABC 



Weed & Co. 



25 JANUARY 1954 



121 



\- hat ilic\ want to know ii - developed 
all kind- of presentation approaches. 
Most of the prepared presentations 
are in the form of slides. B\B now 
has a fellow \s 1 1. . does nothing else 
but work "ii tin- t\ pe of \ isual pit 
tation. I here - even a presentation 
for the big -li"t ex« utive who doesn't 
have time i" learn about the in- ami 
outs <>f media. 

( tvei ami above tin spe ific educa- 
tional lai k- I! \l! takes I" m in ..\ ei 
individual types "f advertisers to radio 
.in tin- broad outlines of B\B- cam- 



paign to -piead tin- ^o-pel of radio and 

attract those groups who are, bj tra- 
dition, no) radio users. 

The objectives foi f i — < ;i 1 1953-54 
are: I . [*o sell more nighttime radio. 
I ii develop more ei iden< e of the 
tei sales effectiveness of radio. A. 
To influence the national advertisers' 
distribution organizations, through a 
concerted campaign involving local 
Btation solicitation. I. To convince the 
ki\ retailers of the country that radio 
desei ves a mm Ii Lai gei Bhare of then 
budget. 5. To make more presenta- 



dffltk 



has grown even faster 

than one of America's 

fastest growing 

markets. 



continues to be the 

WAY OUT IN FRONT 

favorite of successful 

radio advertisers 




IN LONG ISLAND'S BIG BOOMING 
NASSAU COUNTY 



RETAIL SALES 



$838,171,000 



(Sales Management) 



Greater than 12 states 



WHLI 



"THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND" has a larger day- 
time audience in the big booming major Long Island Market 
than any network or combination of independents . . . (Conlan) 



WHLI 

HEMPSTEAD 
LONG ISLAND. N. Y 

Paul Godofsky. Pres. 

Represented by Rambeau 



AM 1100 
F M 98 3 






tions to national advertisers by sub- 
slantialK increasing the size of BAB's 
-ales force. 6. To increase the sta- 
tion membership in B\B to more than 
1.000 station- 1>\ spring 10.i4. 

Woven through these objectives are 
the minor and major -trands of BAB's 
Btrategy. If there is one big st«.r\ 
BAB i- telling, it's the story about 
radio listening outside the living room. 
the clock radio stor\. the bedroom and 
kitchen Listening story, the l>i;j radio 
production Btorj i 13 million radio sets 
in 1953, more than in 1952 I. In other 
words, extra sets. 

BAB is also selling the virtues of 
seasonal advertising on radio. It 
want- to be Bpecific in it- promotional 
selling and that means that some ad- 
\t-iti-i -r- just can't he approached with 
the usual stor\ about the tangible bene- 
fit- of using radio .~>2 weeks a year. 
I! \li also reali/c- that in the past some 
52-week radio advertisers spent more 
mone) on other media with Beasonal 
peak advertising than the) did in ra- 
dio. And \er\ often radio, satisfied 
with a 52-week client, didn't go after 
the seasonal monc\ . 

As to the above stated objectives, 
Sweenej feels that the BAB has be- 
gun to dent the large retailer — radios 
big holdout. 

"Of the 10 largest department stores 
in the country, jn\e or take one or 
two," he said, "four are now working 
with BAB on specific radio proposals. 
Now, that may not sound like a spe- 
< ifi< advance, hut it is. It'- big. It's 
like Noahs Ark or the Chicago Fire. 
\nd that's not all. The AMC stores 
a-ked us to appear lie fore the annual 
promotion managers meeting January 
1"). Thej asked us. We've been trying 
for two years to .net just one WI(' 
store to listen to us. 

The J. C. Penne) organization. 
which concluded a radio test in more 
than 100 markets la*t month after 
being outside radio's pale for almost a 
decade, was brought into the test 
through BAB. 

BAB- drive to influence the national 
advertisers' distribution organizations 
has been helped by the local sales com- 
mittees made up of BAB member- in 
various markets. There are commit- 
tee- in 21 major markets at present 
and Sweene) hopes to extend this to 
(•5 market-. 

The committees were not set up 
specificall) to influence national ad- 
vertisers' distribution organizations. 
I he\ will function as general local 



122 



SPONSOR 



i 



radio sales committees. BAB headquar- I 
ters expects them to be especially use- 
ful in keeping up pressure on adver- 
tisers who have been given presenta- 
tions by BAB itself. 

The kindling of local dealer en- 
thusiasm for radio is considered vital 
by BAB, which has come up against 
advertisers who are keen for radio 
themselves but hold back because the 
dealers either show a lack of interest 
or direct hostility. Of course, it works 
both ways. If BAB can sell the dealer, 
the national advertiser will be im- 
pressed. If BAB can sell the national 
advertiser, the local co-op radio bud- 
get will be affected. 

While national and local promotion 
needs often run parallel and are some- 
times indistinguishable from one 
another, BAB retains the distinction. 
In its outgo budget, for example, direct 
expenses for local and national promo- 
tion each account for about one quar- 
ter of the total. (Another 10% is for 
selling activity. More than 30% is for 
overhead and administration. The rest 
goes for membership activity, adver- 
tising and to the bank.) 

While little has been said about the 
services BAB provides its members, 
they are legion. In the year ending 
last March, 622 sales tools were sent 
to each member, 3.228 requests filled 
for individual stations, BAB personnel 
toted up 92,000 miles of travel to speak 
at clinics and sales meetings. Judging 
by BAB's growth, all this suits the 
members fine. * * * 



WHEATENA ON RADIO 

{Continued from page 31) 

the extra energy of Wheatena lasts 
the whole morning, too. Remem- 
ber, if you want your family to 
eat a good, hot breakfast, make 
breakfast good! Serve 'em 
Wheatena. Wheatena tastes good." 
Other Wheatena commercials tell 
about the ways you can eat the cereal 
— with honey or berries or raisins. 
Most of the commercials are designed 
to whet the appetite and accomplish in 
words what a recipe spread in a wo- 
man's service magazine does with 
photographs. 

The Wheatena verbal pictures are 
painted on between 100 and 110 radio 
stations. The company is buying two 
regional networks— 45 Don Lee net- 
work stations, on the West Coast, and 
29 Yankee network stations, in New 




HON**""" 



WBE/v 



Mike Mearian 

TOPICAL SATIRE 4 MUSIC 



Break!*** 

Audience 



x *e Sheraton 



you*, ^biane 

RELAXING SLUMBER TUNES 



'Clint BuefiU 



*'<&< 



R «lf>b Hubbell 

10c ^ P o R tcast dean 




Vw K t l\ ' ,as P ersona '' nes — plus. They add personal punch to 

your sales message. Buffalo-area audiences believe WBEN personalities. 

Call or Write any CHRIST AL Office in New York, 
Chicago, San Francisco, Boston or Detroit. 



EVENING NEWS STATION 



\e£ 



TEXAS' LARGEST SPANISH- 
LANGUAGE MARKET! 

PASSPORT 



( time on KCOR. San 

Antonio, lex*, q{ 69 i,493 9V vr(VBi Texas' 

. aps County market on KCO K, 

th£ f This Passport is S^/fJ^ge station. 

P e ° P /'ost powerful Spamsh-langu g 

first and most p J J0t^ 



KCOR* 1 NC - 



Write for New Belden Survey 
of San Antonio Market 



>, 



ot, s 



or contact 



Raoul A. Cortez, President 
San Anotonio, Texas 



Richard O'Connell 

Nat'!. Adv. Dir. 

40 E. 49th St. Plaza 5-9140 

New York, N. Y. 

Harlan J. Oakes & Associates 

Los Angeles, San Francisco & Chicago 



25 JANUARY 1954 



123 



I ngland as well as single stations in 
in.uiv df the nation's largest < ities. 

Right now it- schedule includes the 
following majoi markets: New ^ < »i k 
(Wl BS, \\ NBC); Chicago (WBBM, 
WLS); Philadelphia (WCAl . \\ I II.. 
WIP) : Los tngelee (KHJ, KNX) ; 
Detroil «\\\\J. WXYZ) ; Baltimore 
<W BAL, \\( \n, : ( leveland (WG Mi. 
W UK. \\ I Wl i : Washington, D. ' , 
V\ \l \l . \\ R( : Boston (WEEI, 
\\ 111)11. \\ \ \( . WVDA); San Fran- 

i i K( BS, Kl IK k\i:< i : Buffalo 

(WEBR, WGR) : ( olumbus (WBNS 
Providence (WEAN, \\ I \l«. WPRO) j 



Syracuse (WSYR) j Ubanj (WPTR) ; 
S. ranton (WGB1 I ; Tro) (WTR'i I, 
and Hartford (WDR( 

The r> < ' u 1 1 1 currentl) does not figure 
in Wheatena's spot ra<li<i plans because 
sale of 1 1 • • t i ereals lags there. 

Wheatena's agenc) is Brisacher, 
Wheelei & Staff. 

\\ beatena usu ill\ buys "grasscutter'' 
schedules. "Grasscutter" means a 
program >>i Bpol schedule on one sta- 
tion three days a week Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday and another 
- bedule, often on anothei station — on 
[uesda) and Thursday. In "lirass- 



for quick, easy reference 
to your copies of 

SPONSOR 

get the durable new 
Sponsor binder 



look* likr a million 



costs only 



$4_ 



SPONSOR 

40 E. 49th St. 
New York 17 



G 54 one binder 
] S7 two binders 



Please send mc Binder holding li issues ami bill me later. 

Same 

Firm 

Address 

( ity 



'/.one State 



cutting" an advertiser reaches more 
homes 1>\ rotating his audiences. I 

There are exceptions, but most fre- 
quentl) \\ beatena buys 26- to 39-week 
schedules which usuall) begin in late 
\nj.'ii-t or September. The company 
i- especiall) partial to five-minute 
new-, asts. 

Women.- programs are used by 
\\ beatena in San Francisco and Chi- 
cago. One veteran industry observer 
told SPONSOR the cereal company was 
probabl] aiming for wider distribu- 
tion in those cities. He pointed out 
that many advertisers use women's 
Bhows B£ part of their initial effort 
because they have a loyal following. 

On the West Coast Wheatena uses a 
"grasscutter" schedule on the Don Lee 
stations in this wa\ : On Monday, Wed- 
nesday and Friday of one week. 
\\ beatena suonsors Bob Green I news- 
caster I at 8:15-8:20 a.m. The follow- 
ing week it sponsors the same program, 
l.ut on Tuesday and Thursday. The 
Don Lee schedule started in September 
and will run through April. This is 
the usual \\ beatena schedule — again, 
with exceptions. In New York, for 
example. Wheatena was on WCBS" Bill 
Leonard program I This Is New York i 
>'):(H) a.m. i as early as August. 

One radio industrvite told SPONSOR 
it was his understanding that ''if 
\\ beatena gets a five-minute news show 
in the morning, they get 25 r r more in 
sales in the particular market than 
with other time periods and program 
types. I suppose the over-all idea of 
their campaign is that mamma and 
poppa are looking at the kiddies while 
the announcer is talking about how 
healthy Wheatena is." 

The sales rank of hot cereal firm- is 
generally hard to determine. But. in- 
formally, sources in the food industry 
li-t cereal manufacturers in this or- 
der: Quaker Oats Co. (Quick Quaker 
Oats. Quaker Oats. Mother's Oats. 
Quick Mother's Oats i : Cream of 
W heat Corp. I Cream of Wheat ' : 
Ralston Purina i Instant Ralston Cereal. 
Hot Ralston \\ heat i : Best Foods I H-0 
Oats, H-0 Cream Farina i : Wheatena 
Corp. (Wheatena); Campbell Cereal 
Co. I Malt-O-Meal) ; and Maltex Co. 
(Maltez, Mayp] Oats'. Interestingly 
Maypl Oats is also using morning ra- 
dio and most other- use air. too. 

\\ beatena is a Eamily-owned corn- 
pan) with it- plant in Rahway. N. J.. 
almost under the shadow of New York 
-k\ -< rapers. 



124 



SPONSOR 



Wheatena used spot television in a 
small campaign hack during the 1951- 
'52 season hut hasn't bought tv since. 
Reason? The company's budget is 
small and it probably feels that circu- 
lation is more important to it than 
visual impact. 

Back in Wheatena's network radio 
days, the firm tried a great variety 
of programs. 

In 1931 and '32 Wheatena sponsored 
Raising Junior, a thrice-weekly show 
on NBC. The next year, also on NBC, 
the firm had another thrice-weekly 
program. Wheatenaville. 

During 1933 and '34 the company 
sponsored a daily program, Billy 
Bachelor, and the 15-minute Ye Happy 
Minstrel. 

The next year Wheatena stayed with 
Billy Bachelor, dropped Ye Happy 
Minstrel. 

From September to March in 1935- 
'36, the firm sponsored Popeye the 
Sailor three nights a week on NBC. 
The next year Popeye moved to CBS, 
where Wheatena continued sponsor- 
ship (from August through February) 
on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 

During the 1937-'38 season, Whea- 
tena was on Mutual three times week- 
ly, from 5:45 to 6:00 p.m. It spon- 
sored Mutual 's Children's Corner from 
September to March of 1938-'39 (5:45- 
6:00 p.m.). 

The 1939-40 season saw a change 
in Wheatena's strategy. Switching 
from children's programs, the company 
sponsored Hilda Hope, M. D., a half- 
hour Saturday morning program on 
NBC. Schedule ran from October 
through March and the program was 
the beginning of Wheatena's shift from 
seeking juvenile audiences to mostly- 
adult audiences. 

Since World War II, Wheatena has 
used general magazines and newspaper 
supplements from time to time. 

In 1946 it spent $4,200 in general 
magazines; the following year, $17,- 
300, according to PIB. 

During 1948 and '49, Wheatena used 
both newspaper supplements and gen- 
eral magazines; $6,400 for newspaper 
supplements in '48, $66,670 in '49; 
$4,700 for general magazines in '48. 
$10,996 in '49. 

Newspaper supplements were used 
in 1950, getting a $25,535 appropria- 
tion. Newspapers do not figure heavily 
in Wheatena's recent activitv, under- 
scoring the importance to it of spot 
radio. • • • 



PROGRAM MAIL 

(Continued from page 33) 

A mail offer on WPIX, New York, 
caught attention, too, and the card 
went out 1 October. The offer, a book- 
let on how to change a fuse, was made 
on an evening news show sponsored by 
Consolidated Edison. Our booklet ar- 
rived in a week accompanied by a 
printed form note. 

Obviously it's not possible to come 
to any sweeping conclusions about the 
handling of viewer mail from the 30- 
odd cards in this informal test mailing. 



It could be, for example, ili.it Bome of 
the mail handlers pa) less attention to 
postcards than the) do to letters. Ii 
may be, also that in the summei months 
mail is not handled as carefull) a- dm 
ing the other three Beasons. I lour of 
the postcards unit oul in mid-July, -i\ 
during the first week ul September.) 

The fact that few major clients 
seemed to make it a policy to repl) to 
fan mail does, however, suggest a few 
questions. 

• Are the clients who ignore fan 
mail aware as a matter of polic) that 



D0NT BE FOOLED 




ABOUT ROCHESTER 



IN ROCHESTER Pulse surveys and rates the 427 week- 
ly quarter-hour periods that WHEC is on the air. Here's 
the latest score: 

STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION STATION 





WHEC 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


FIRSTS 


274 


...112 


6 





n 





TIES 


34 


... 34 


2 





n 




Station on 
'til sunset only 



WHEC carries ALL of the "top ten" daytime shows! 



LATEST PULSE REPORT BEFORE CLOSING TIME 



BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING:- 



WHEC 



Ktpr*ttntativt%: EVERETT- McKINNEY, Inc. Ntw York, Cfccogo, IEE F. OCONNELL CO., lot Ange/es, Son Fronc.ic 






NEW YORK 
5,000 WATTS 



25 JANUARY 1954 



125 





...BIG CHANGE 
AT WVET 



, l < I, tin xl.lt Kill Willi llli il e lill ,ll 

at i ounts than an) oth< i I 1 1 Rl I 
R.o( Ik -i< i stations pin togi tha 
has join* il Ym< i i< as livt -i in i 
work I K( miIi ini|iiii\ i (I | > i • • 
gramming evei ini reasing 

audience . . . bettei than < v< i 
Ihi\s loi advi nisi h in the 1 i< h 
Rot hi --ii i \\ i -n i ii New York 
in. it k< tl 

. . 5000 WATTS • 1280 KC 

Change^ 

~ UTXbc 



IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE BOILING COMPANY 




W t» 



"■"Mill 




■ | Reasras Why 

^^ The foremost national and local ad 

^0 vertisers use WEVO year after 

WgM year to reach the vast 

2 Jewish M.iikel 

^^ of >lc( i <i|miI i ( i ii Nch ^iiil, 
I. Top adult programming 
^ I 2. Strong audience impact 

^g^m 3. Inherent listener loyalty 

H^S0 4- Potential buying power 

Send for a copy at 
"WHO'S WHO ON WEVO ' 
HENRY GREENFIELD 



117*119 1 <■•< I'uli Bi 

M>na|ln| IHrrrlor 




tin- i- being done? <>i baa the ques- 
tion "I what i" 'I" ivith mail been cub- 
byholed in the press "f other activities 
ami let go b) default? 

• Do those clients who fail t<> an- 
swei viewei mail also fail to keep a 
box w ore on rea< lions tn then pro- 
gram as Bhown in mail? (Such a box 
score has value as a guide in keeping 
the show sensitive t'> public taste, i 

• \n those < lients \% 1 1 < < have made 
a . I. in-, hi .Ii- ision mil in answer new- 
er mail i'ia< tii ing false econom) ? 
( ouldn'l ii I"- argued thai anj \ iewer 
who writes in i<> -a\ In-"- seen 1 1><- show 
i- more than usuall) i ipe to I"- favora- 
liK influent ed toward the product b) 
a note in replj ? 

sponsor has no pat answers t<> these 
questions but they're ones well worth 
stud) b) agent \ and advertising fii m 
executives. 

For \iiur guidance, then, in taking 
lip tin- question of audience mail, here's 

some added background on the ma- 
chiner) of handling mail. 

At the networks: Mail that comes 
into New York Cit) stations of the net- 
works is sorted on the premises l/\ net- 
work employees; mail that comes t" 
outside New York affiliates is usuall) 
trans-shipped to N<\s York or to Hol- 
lywood. Mail i- then routed to agen- 
■ ies "i in some cases directl) to the 
client "i- I" a mailing service hired to 
handle the client - mail. It's up to the 
client, the agenc) and the pa< kager be- 
tween (lifin as to \\ li< > gets the mail. 

/.' : Handling of mail \ ai ies 

between agencies and within an) given 
agi n \ it h ill \ar\ with the account. 
Most agero ies i ha. ge clients a fee if 
ih<-\ answei mail or send <>ut pictures 
i.l the - ast. It's up to the client wheth- 
<■! be want- this public relations serv- 
ice oi not. 

In addition to filling requests for 
pictures <>r information about ili<- show, 
the agenc) will often make up a box 
-i ore "ii mail n-a limi. Letters and 
cards deemed important will be passed 
tip the line in account executives and 
then to the < lient. 

Sometimes mail resj se to an air 

• ampaign serves as a valuable guide to 
the i lient in avoiding publi relations 
mi-take-. Ii. I . ll.ii i ig, advertising 
manage] of Vmei it an < ln< le Co., tells 
a Btoi \ about how a prayei b) the late 
President Roosevelt was followed up 
ovei the ail b) an announcement foi 
\hk r K an < hit le. Letters < oming to 
the ■ ompan) pointed out that the juxta- 
position was in had taste and Harris 



unite tu stations reminding them not 
to place commercials for the company 
next to material of a religious nature. 

Harris Bays that his arrangement 
with Chicle's agency, Dancer-Fitzger- 
ald-Sample, i- that routine letters and 
< aid- i oncerning the firm's -hows need 
not he passed on to him for reply. He 
take- up onl) those few letters which 
have direct relation to the company and 
usually these come in addressed direct- 
K to Chicle. 

Thus SPONSOR'S card to the Date 
U nli Imlx program, mentioned pre- 
viously, would not normally be an- 
-wired. 

Singer Sewing Machine Co.. which 
sponsors another of the programs from 
which no answer was received, does 
have a procedure for answering all 
mail. Young t \ Rubicam, it- agency, is 
paid on a fee basis to answer and keep 
a record of letters. Personnel at the 
agei C) -aid that letters or card- of a 
special nature i such as SPONSOR'S card 
requesting literature about the Sil 
machine) are passed on to the client 
for handling. The advertising depart- 
ment of Singer said that its procedure 
ordinaril) i- to answer all Biich re- 
quests as the one we sent to them. 

The agenc) for another client whose 
-how had been written to without re- 




OMAHA 




Insurance Building 

JOHN BLAIR & CO., Representatives 



126 



SPONSOR 



ply said: "Maybe the network still has 
the mail." If this were so, it would 
mean that deliveries of mail from the 
network to this agency were running 
six months behind. While the four net- 
works between them get about 35.000 
pieces of mail daily I radio and tv to- 
gether! it's doubtful there are six- 
month backlogs. 

If \ou want to delve further into the 
matter of mail, here are dates when 
sponsor did previous reports on lis- 
tener mail: 

On the subject of pressure groups 
and what you should know about mail 
from them, see the 13 August 1951 is- 
sue, page 30. 

On mail handling and what organi- 
zations will do it for advertisers, see 
11 March 1949 issue, page 25. 

And if you want to have some fun 
and get a personal look at the subject. 
go out and buy yourself some post- 
cards. * * * 



49TH & MADISON 

[Continued from page 15) 

CIGARETTE STORY 

Your story. "The cancer scare: Is 
cigarette copy making it worse?" [11 
January 1954, page 40], in my opin- 
ion, was a very clear and complete 
summary of the present picture in the 
industry. I think the most effective 
thing was the emphasis put on the dual 
dilemma that faces the business. The 
first dilemma is that the health claims 
in advertising obviously have a bad 
effect on the industrv as a whole 
although they have also obviously 
brought sales success to some of the 
users. Second is the dilemma that faces 
the business due to the fact that few 
people evidently believe any type of 
cigarette advertising. 

On the one hand you may conclude 
that most cigarette advertising, includ- 
ing health advertising, is not believed 
and that perhaps health advertising is 
the greatest cause for this. The other 
side of the picture is that health claims 
must be believed due to sales. 

When someone solves this paradox 
which the article delineated so well, the 
industry will be in a much saner 
position. 

Name Withheld on Request 
Executive in agency with 

cigarette account 
I Please turn to page 131 1 

25 JANUARY 1954 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S /SKMte&l RADIO STATION 



Them that has . . . 

GITS.' 

There's an extra punch in your advertising dollar 
on WDBJ! To demonstrate, look at these Promo- 
tion figures for the Fall Campaign (Aug. 30-Nov. 

30): 

Newspaper ad Lineage 31,195 

Newspaper Publicity Lineage 7,057 

Spot Announcements 545 

Downtown Display Windows 14 

plus stationbreak trailers, dealer cards and letters, and 
"Drug Briefs" and "Grocery Briefs" published monthly 
for the area drug and grocery stores! 



Established 1924 • CBS Since 1929 
AM . 5000 WATTS . 960 KC 
FM . 41,000 WATTS • 94.9 MC 

ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



WHBF 
+CBS 



I 
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Les Johnson, V.P. and Gen. Mgr. 



t>^'» 




WHBF 

TEICO BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

Represented by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



BMI 



MILESTONES 

BMI introduce* a new 
...ri,.* of 1951 program 
continuities entitled "Mile- 
stones" . . • complete halt- 
hour shows — ready for im- 
mediate u«< — smooth, well 
written continuity for a 
variety of uses. 
"Milestones" is serviced to 
ail BMI-licensed nations 
once each month, four to 
-ix weeks in advance of 
program date. 
"Milestones" for January: 
"The First Civilized American" 

Benjamin Franklin 
•Our Friends Across the River" 
Robert E. Lee 

"Milestones" for Fehrnar? : 

A Few Remarks at Gettysburg" 
Abraham Lincoln 
"St. Valentines Day" 
"Washington at Yorktown 
George Washington 

•Milettonu" ;- avaOabU far com- 

mercial sponsorship see your 

loral station for details 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



127 



* t 

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there are more than 2 

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for complete information 



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"Oregon Country 
Happy Hunting Ground 
for Smart Advertiser." 

Take it from KWJJ — Chief of 
the Northwest Independents — 
there s good hunting for adver- 
tisers who want buyers with 
"plenty wampum '. Advertisers 
plenty smart who use KWJJ tor 
spot announcements with "big 
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ROUND UP 

I ( ontinued ii<>m page 19 > 

tora disi ussed \>\ the social st ientisl 
and a panel <>i the agent \ - i restive 
-ulf. Weiss said copj approaches sub- 
mitted ai the opening meeting includ- 
ed some very productive ideas, al- 
though the agencj was -<-<-kiii'j creative 
thinking more than ideas pei te. 
• • • 

I In- iii • and out of farm radio were 
covered in New ^ork recentlj at a 
meeting "I the National Association "f 
Radio Farm Dire tors. Among the 
successful u~«-i - of farm radio adver- 
tising i- iIk- Ralston Purina Co., which 
Iii- . harts showing whj it uses radio. 
Show inn the picture looking ovei Bome 
of these charts are H to r.) Phil 




Vlampi, past per idenl of NARFD; 
Bill Brown. Purina radio-tv, Gardner 

Advertising Co., St. Louis: Harold E. 
Fellows, president of National \--..- 
ciation of Radio \ IVlevision Broad- 
casters; Norman R. Glenn, editor and 
president of sponsor, and Mai Hansen, 
president, \ \RI-'I>. 

• » • 

Fen reasons whj advertisers and 
agent ies w ill want to sei ure rights to 
show the / Uapix Feature Theatre are 
outlined in a coloi lul promotion piece 
whit li when opened is about three feet 
wide. I lie reasons are listed, with ap- 
propriate cartoon-type illustrations, on 
.t Bep rate at i ordion-folded strip. I he 

\ itapix ( orp., New ^ ml will -end 
copies ot tin' folder to anyone request- 
ing a copy. 

• • • 

Is a sidelight to it- uhf promotion 
preparatory to going on the air, 
WROW-TV, Ubany, conducted a 
- mi. li in the Capitol Distrit t area Foi 
people whose initials were '"ulif.'" I r- 
Bula llartnett Fitzgerald, I rban Henr) 
loiitain and I rsula Houle Forth, who 
responded to the Bean h, were each 
aw. iid. -.1 the title <d Btation mascot Ml 
three partit ipated in the opening da\ 



ceremonies and received a gift from 
the station. 



\ii views of eight cities covered bv 
WREX-TV, Rockford, III., have been 
sent to advertisers and agencies by the 
Btation. The cities are pictured in a 
booklet labeled. "St imething new un- 
der the sun. ' Cop) explains that the 
new \ hf Channel 13 station serves one 
million people "iii the first lug market 
west of Chicago." Market data facts 
are included. 

• • • 

\\ II H. Baltimore, announces it has 
signed one of the largest department 
-tore schedules yet run in Baltimore. 
The Ma\ Co. recentl) signed for 3.000 
announcements for a 52-week period. 
I sing a saturation technique, the an- 
nouncements are being allocated dur- 
ing the week to the best selling days 
based on \olume percentage. Kauf- 
man-Strouse is the agency. 
» * « 

WION. Ionia. Mich., today hauled 
out the "S.R.O.' sign for its Opera- 
lion Sunda\ Punch following the sign- 
ing of Fran Warren Sings by the C H. 
Gladding Food Co. of Saranac. Oper- 
ation Sunday Punch is built around 
sponsorship of transcribed shows on 
Sundays plus announcements during 
weekda) -how-. The Sunday shows run 
from 12 noon to 5:00 p.m. The plan 
allows advertisers to tailor schedules 
to their needs, provides for weekday 
on-air promotions of the sponsor's 
Sunday feature. 

• • • 

When the National Association of 
Secretaries of State held its 36th an- 
nual convention in Seattle recently 23 
of the secretaries wanted to send re- 
ports of the convention to radio sta- 
tions in their home states. The Wash- 
ington State Association of Broadcast- 
ers pro\ ided the equipment and free 
transcriptions were made. On each of 
the 23 transcriptions, interviewing of 
the secretary was conducted by Carl 
Downing, manager of Washington's 
Radio News Bureau. 



Salesmen of the "XL" stations — 
KNIA. Spokane, KNI.. Portland and 
other affiliates of the Pacific North- 
wesl Broadcasters - leave a booklet 
with new prospects after making sales 
- alls. The booklet sums up how ad- 
vertising polic) "dire, t- a great pow- 



128 



SPONSOR 



er" -the power to generate sales and 
profits. The XL stations, according to 
the booklet, want the advertiser "to 
receive the most for his advertising 
dollar" anil have published the book- 
let as a service to advertisers. 

« * * 

WNAX, Yankton, S. D.. is sending 
to advertisers 20 letter heads. They're 
the letter heads of companies which 
have advertised over WNAX and 
"show loyalty — not blind loyalty but 
loyalty fostered by real measurable re- 
sults over a period of at least 14 years 
of continuous use . . . 

* * * 

In keeping with Hollywood's motif, 
the White Advertising Agency, Tulsa. 
Okla., used what looked like a giant 
strip of motion picture film to an- 
nounce the opening of its Hollywood 
office. In black with white lettering, 
the "film strio" announced that Miss 
Betty Newell would be secretary-man- 
ager of the office, located at 6351 Sel- 
ma, Hollywood 28. 

* * ♦ 

Wendy Barrie, motion picture ac- 
tress since 1932 and pioneer television 
star, left New York to star in her 




la 



RING AROUND A ROSY 

A pocket full of posies 

Last one down's o cry-babyl 

The KMBC-KFRM Team has 
welded a ring around the 
"rosy" Heart of America. And 
the pockets full of posies are 
the nice green-backed kind that 
always look good in the 
pockets and purses of 
advertisers who use The Team. 
If your sales are down and 
you feel just a little like 
weeping, call KMBC-KFRM, 
Kansas City, or your nearest 
Free & Peters office, for time 
availabilities on The Team. 
The folks who can fill 
your pocket with posies in the 
great Kansas City Trade Area 

aren't crying— they're too 
busy buying the things 
they hear about on 
the radio station they 
listen to most . . . 



own program over three Midwestern t\ 
stations. The program made debut 
11 January, i> being seen on WHIO- 
TV. Dayton; WKRC-T\ Cincinnati; 
WTNV-TV, Columbus. \li» Barrie 
signed a long-term $250,000 contract 
with the three stations for the program. 
« * * 

Walter R. Hennessey, a member of 
the Craftsman In.-urance Co. board of 
directors, stopped by the firm's ad 
agency one day recently to watch the 
filming of some new tv commercials. 
There was a delay in the shooting, 
however, because one of the actors 
failed to show up. Finally Ramon H. 




KFRM 



Silton. tv director of Silton Bros., Inc., 
the insurance company's agency, pre- 
vailed uDon Hennessey to play the part 
of the insurance expert. Hennessey 
consented, and now viewers of Pleasure 
Playhouse, aired over WBZ-TV, Bos- 
ton, see the sponsor himself deliver 
the sales message. 

* * * 

Celebrating the 28th anniversary of 
Grand Ole Opry program, originating 
on WSM, Nashville, the station held 
the Second National Disk Jockey Fes- 
tival. About 400 disk jockeys from 
40 states took part in the festival, 
along with 100 representatives from 
publishing and recording companies 
and music publications. 

* « * 

The second annual sales promotion 
meeting for advertisers was held by 
WTRY, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, ear- 
ly this month. The station showed the 
film, It's Time for Everybody, heard 
R. David Kimble, director of national 
promotion of BAB, give a radio pitch 
and then deliverd WTRY's own sales 

story. 

* * * 

KGUL-TV advertisers soon will have 
their choice of origination points for 
programs they sponsor. The station is 
building a new studio on the top floor 
of the 19-story Prudential building in 
Houston. Main studios will remain in 
Galveston. * * 



j Within l5Mil* 
i ofthfe tower 



v/ p " lives ihe greatest 

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\ top programming 
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-Forjoe 
for details 




Town to Town 
local Coverage 



KDKD 



GREATER KANSAS 
CITY TRADE AREA 

KOKO 



UDl— KANSAS CITY 
KOKO — WARRENSBURG 
KDKD— CLINTON 



25 JANUARY 1954 



129 



WTVP 

CHANNIl 17 

DECATUR. ILLINOIS . 



SOLID COVERAGE 
IN THE HEART OF 






PROSPEROUS 
CENTRAL ILLINOIS 



WTVP 

CHANNEL 17 
DECATUR. ILLINOIS * 



DELIVERS ONE OF THE 

FASTEST GROWING 
MARKETS IN AMERICA 

SELL IN... 

THE MARKET THAT 
MARKETING FIGURES 
CAN'T KEEP UP WITH! 



WTVP 

CHANNEL 17 
DECATUR, ILLINOIS m 



National ftepreientative George W. Clork, Inc. 







(icori/c B. Storer. / resident of Storei Broad- 
easting ( a., hi sponsor's presstime was preparing 
in assume control ni WXEL, Cleveland, and KI'Tl 
Portland, Ore., about 1 Mart h pending FCi 

I'll. Storer bought Empire Coil Co., which 
Owned the stations and also makes electronic parts, 

lot u/miil SID in Minn . Storer will Sell One ill I 

outlet in meet FCC multiple ownership rules, 
(f hen still in college Storer began nun gas station 
business; sut i essfid use ol radio advertising led to 
purchase <•< WSPD, Toledo. 



fliiriiif Join's, following action ol Ve« York 
State's ( mill nt Appeals in sustaining a jury 
award nt $300,000 i-sued in 1 ( J.">2 against eight 
former employees ut Junes, now is starting equity 
action against Scheideler, Beck & Werner. Inc., 

ml agency formed b\ some of the tanner employees. 

Jones' suit against SB&ff was separated from 
the suit again si the individuals b\ court order. In 
the neu. separate action against SB&W, Jones' 
attorneys will seek a court order compelling an 
account nt profits on business taken trom Jones. 



V. ill id in H. If rutin is a newly-elected vice 
i'ii sident o) Free & Peters, radio and ti repre- 
sentation firm. Bryan has been manager of the 
Detroit office of F&P lor the past 10 years. 
II. Preston Peters, president of F&P, in announc- 
ing Bryan's election following a Veil Year's 

meeting of the hoard of directors, said. "This 
recognizes the im reused importance ol the Detroit 
urea as n major center lor national snot broad- 
casting business, and reflects our confidence in 
the continued prosperity of Midwest advertisers." 



Eugene %«•<•«*•. formerly director of network 
radio evelopment tor ABC, last month 

uas appointed head of the neul\ i (instituted sale* 
promotion department lor HU Radio. Shortly 
iSuming his neu post, iccas told sponsor: 
till Radio is a flexible network. If e change 

- to attract \iu\d\'~ audience. I[ , 
ahange sales patterns to nltrmt large and smiill 
:is,rs. . . . 4BC Radio is a liam operation. 
■Ill work in synchronization to produce an efficient. 
network. This is no change." 



130 



SPONSOR 



49TH & MADISON 

I Continued from page 127 I 
RATING SERVICES 

I appreciated very much your 
"What's wrong with the rating ser- 
vices?" article in the December 28 
issue | page 34 1 . 

Would you be good enough to send 
me 25 reprints of the article? Thank 
you. and keep up the good work. 
Joseph L. Tully 
Radio and Tv Director 
John C. Doud, Inc. 
Boston 

• IVo reprints of. "^'hat'-. wrong with the rating 
services?" are available. A limited number of 
extra copies of the 28 December issue can be bad 
at 50c apiece. 



PROGRAM GUIDE 

We have noticed with interest in 
your December 14 issue of sponsor the 
notification about your new program 
guide | "New sponsor program guide 
will be tool for timebuyers," page 44]. 
We are very interested in receiving 
five copies of this "1954 sponsor Guide 
to Station Programing" as soon as it 
is available. 

At present we are only taking two 
subscriptions to SPONSOR, so that if the 
additional three copies cannot be sent 
free of charge, will you please inform 
us how we might obtain them. 

Duane R. Day 

Librarian 

Campbell-Mithun , Inc. 

Minneapolis 

• Every subscriber to SPONSOR will receive a 
copy of the "1954 SPONSOR Guide to Station 
Programing" free of charge. Additional copies 
cost $2 each. 



TVAB 

Your article. "Should there be a 
Television Advertising Bureau?" [30 
November 1953, page 29], is very in- 
teresting. 

There is no question in my opinion 
that the television industry must have 
its advertising bureau, if it expects to 
do a good, un wasteful job for adver- 
tisers and agencies. 

If a TVAB can do as good a job 
with this medium as Kevin Sweeney 
has done for Broadcast Advertising 
Bureau it will be a highly successful 
operation. 

Don Searle 

Executive Vice President 

KOA, Denver 



pmii ii 






LOOK 



what a single year of SPONSOR brings you . . . 



55 

14 

12 
13 
91 
91 

26 

26 
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carefully-researched case histories containinq the dollars-and-ccnts 
values of radio and tv advertising. 



articles on media evaluation — how advertisers select media and 
markets; testing methods used; relative merits of each ad medium; 
which media give you the most in relation to cost. 

major stories on radio and tv research. 

feature stories dealing with programs, costs, talent, trends. 

capsule tv case histories 

capsule radio case histories 



network comparagraphs (13 tv and 13 radio) showing the complete 
log of network programs, time segments, costs of shows, sponsor and 
agency of each. 

sparkling comments on radio and tv commercials by Bob Foreman 
who also reviews commercials for SPONSOR readers. 



SPONSOR- Telepulse ratings of syndicated films in markets ranging 
from one tv station to seven. 



AND 



<t dozen other important tools and sen-ices to 
Jielp you use and understand radio and Ir better. 

Make sure you own your own copy of SPONSOR 

even/ issue. It is your best guarantee to slay ahead 
in the fastest-paced business in America today. 
Simply fill in and mail the order card below. 



SPONSOR 40 E. 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 

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25 JANUARY 1954 



131 




Dcpt. stores and tv 

If everyone followed the logic ol 
Bernice Fitz-Gibbon, recentl) resigned 
advertising director <>f Gimbela New 
101k. television would be a medium 
without advertisers. Instead, television 
can l<>"k back on a 1953 in which it- 
billings < ame close to half a billion. 

Said Miss Fitz-Gibbon in speaking 
<>f a medium which has reached this 
billings figure in little more than five 
years "I commercial operation: 

"The commercials are an intrusion, 
an outrageous interruption in the en- 
tertainment which i- the primarj busi- 
ness of television. The commercial is 
a grim penalty. 

Mi-- Fitz-Gibbon made ilii- scathing 
observation while telling tin- 13rd an- 
nual convention "f the National Retail 
I)r\ Goods Association that depart- 
ment stores Bhould avoid "dipping a 



tentative toe into television." Stick to 
newspapers, she advised, for they are 
"the best advertising medium on earth 

or in the air." 

Admen long experienced in radio 
and television would be inclined to 
throw up their hands at Miss Fitz- 
Gibbon's attitude. She is speaking 
more I i k •- a retiring academician than 
.1 retiring veteran of hard-sell retail 
advertising. 

v ln- 1- projecting her own dislike for 
commen ials as an "interruption" into 
hei judgment of television as an ad- 
vertising medium. This i- the most 
fundamental mistake \ou can make 
about radio or television. Miss Fitz- 
< > i I >1 >• 1 r i should j u;|o e the medium on 
the basis of what it has done for ad- 
\erti-ers not on the basis of her per- 
gonal viewing tastes. 

To sa\ that department stores make 
a mistake when they dip a "tentative 
toe" into television is to condemn ex- 
periment. This is hardly a point of 
view which goes in keeping with Miss 
Fitz-Gibbon's own personal back- 
ground as an innovator and experi- 
menter of renown in the field of re- 
tail copy. 

• • • 

Crusade for Spot Radio 

After nearU one year of existence 
the accomplishments of the Crusade 
for Spot Radio were revealed to a 
nine-man station advisory hoard meet- 
ing in New York in mid-January. 

The report was presented b) Reg 
Rollinson of the Station Representa- 
tives Association, sponsors of the Cru- 



sade. The resu!i was the decision to 
attempt to raise 860.000 by volunteer 
radio station subscription, approxi- 
mate!) three times as much as the 
122,000 1953 budget. 

In his crisp factual report Mr. Roll- 
inson presented a number of case his- 
toric- involving a soap product, a 
farm product, a food product and 
others which were shown the wa\ to 
a l>i«i«zer and better use of Spot Radio 
as the re-ult of Crusade activity. 

He also pointed to the effectiveness 
of the Spot Radio clinics which helped 
account executives, ad managers, and 
heads of large firms to explore the 
possibilities of Spot Radio. As another 
facet of Crusade accomplishment 
numerous service assistance to agent tea 
and advertisers, including 12 such 
examples to a single large agencj in 
one week were revealed. 

All this convinced the station reps 
who are back of the Crusade, and the 
newly appointed Advisory Hoard, that 
the growth of Spot Radio from about 
$105 million in 1943 to $135 million 
in 1953 is just the beginning. Crusade 
proponents believe that BAB, despite 
its outstanding efforts on behalf of the 
radio medium, can not do a pin-pointed 
job for Spot Radio. The Crusade was 
created to fill the gap, and BAB has 
helped it materially. 

Radio is not yet fully geared to its 
top selling job. But indications are 
that because of the BAB. the Crusade 
and outstanding individual efforts by 
reps and stations, this deficiency is 
fast fading. 



Applause 



Film is $60 million business 
In ju-t eight -lioit years, the h film 
syndication industry bas grown from 
absolutely nothing to become a major 

entertainment bu-inc--. 

\fier rounding up the business fore- 
casts of dozens of major producers and 
syndicators in a two-month stud) of 
video films, sponsor predi< ts that the 
gross business in t\ film (nol counting 
film commen ials I during 195 1 will 
bit an all-time high of $60 million. 

Main problem- have been ta« kled 

and solved. \ whole new pattern of 
film selling has developed. New prop- 
erties, new companies and new stai 
nam.- have appeared on the scene. 

(Sec -e<lion On t\ films, page 51.) 



Producers have faith in their film 
products, and in the future of t\ . Manx 
have invested heavily in color film 
production, and are waiting for the 
da) when the number of color-equipped 
Btations and t\ homes will catch up 
with them. Others are looking into 
the possibilit) of producing tape-re- 
corded -how- fur s\ndication. 

Syndicated films are now an integral 
part of the national advertising scene. 
too. \ number of leading national 
and regional clients arc now basing 
sizable percentages of their broad, a-t 

advertising plan- on the use of first- 
run non-netWOrk t\ film. Others are 

buying well-known rerun packages for 
multi-market spotting. 



Creative research on the part of 
sellers of syndicated tv films has done 
a lot to establish tv films and to help 
ad agencies in their planning. The 
big business in reruns todav, for ex- 
ample, stems largely from the uphill 
selling job the film industry tackled 
in order to prove to clients that a pre- 
sponsored show was often a good bu\ . 
Creative sales planning, such as the 
""-tarter package" evolved by some 
syndicators, is helping many a new tv 
station to gel on the air with top-qual- 
it\ shows and a sponsored schedule. 

SPONSOR is happy to salute in thi- 
i-siie the main pioneers who have 
helped build this still-growing seg- 
ment of the U.S. film industry. 



132 



SPONSOR 



It's the physicist's yardstick for a unit of 
energy or work. A single erg is pretty 
small. It would take many trillions of them 
to measure the amount of money-making 
work that goes on here in the 
industrial heart of America. 

Within the 114 counties that WSAZ-TV 
(and only WSAZ-TV) covers, you'll find a 
prodigious concentration of the nation's 
busiest manufacturers. Their steady 
payrolls swell the buying power of this 
area to over four billion dollars — a happy 
hunting ground for all kinds of advertisers. 

More and more of these advertisers are 
putting extra ergs into their budgets by 
enlisting WSAZ-TV to reach the 
prosperous families of this wealthy region. 
Why don't you do the same? 





TELEVISION 
Huntington-Charleston, West Virginia 

Channel 3—100,000 watts ERP— NBC-CBS-DuMont-ABC 

Affiliated with Radio Station WSAZ. 

Lawrence H. Rogers, Vice President <£ General Manager, WSAZ, Inc. 

Represented nationally by The Katz Agency 




You've got to 





1/2 sponsorship of Washington Senators 

Baseball Games on radio now available! 

This is the hottest buy in Washington, D. C. It's 
going to be snapped up in no time. You'd better 
act fast. Call your nearest John Blair man— listed 
below ... or HERMAN PARIS, collect, STerling 
3-3800, Washington, D.C., for details. Don't dilly- 
dally. This can't last long! 



The sports station in the nation's capital 

WWDC 

Represented nationally by John Blair & Co. 

BOSTON — Statler Office Building, 20 Providence Street, Boston 16, Massachusetts Phone — Hubbard 2-3163 

CHICAGO — 520 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1 1, Illinois Phone — Superior 7-8659 

DALLAS — Rio Grande National Building, Field and Elm Streets, Dallas, Texas Phone — Randolph 7955 

DETROIT — 524 Book Building, Detroit 26, Michigan Phone — Woodward 1 -6030 

LOS ANGELES — 6331 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles 28, California Phone — Granite 6103 

NEW YORK — Chrysler Building, East, 150 East 43rd Street, New York 17, New York Phone — Murray Hill 2-6900 

ST. LOUIS — 1037 Paul Brown Building, St. Louis 1, Missouri Phone Chestnut 5688 

SAN FRANCISCO — 30 1 2 Russ Building, San Francisco 4, California Phone — Douglas 2-3 1 88 



s P » *. - i 4 

MISS Ml LL«£D L JOY 

n-C-ROOM 274 

30 ROCKCFCLLtR PLAZA 

NC * YORK 20 N Y 



lagazine radio and tvi advertisers use 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



50< per copy« $ 8 per year 




1954 TV FILM 
COMMERCIALS 



Producers predict '54 
tv commercials will he 
$15 million business 



ommercial pro- 

is chart; clients, 
addresses, contacts 

page 50 



Baltimore 
different! 

. . . atul smart radio 
time -buying is different 
in this compact market! 



Baltimore's big population is packed mostly right inside the city 
limits. The number of Baltimoreans who live outside the city in the 
metropolitan area is unusually small. \\ That's this mean to the people 
w ho use and buy radio advertising? Just this: 

^Af~l~T"H covers this highly concentrated market 

efficiently! You don't need — you don't have to pay for— a big, 
powerful, expensive radio station to reach the people of this rich 
market effectively. W-I-T-H will do the whole job for you— at a 
traction of the cost! Overlapping coverage of network stations 
from their own affiliates limits their effective coverage to just about 
the area W-I-T-H itself completely serves. 

Nielsen proves !Af-|"T"H'S superiority in the 
Baltimore market! The latest Nielsen (overage Service shows 
that W-I-T-H leads every other radio and television station in 
town— regardless of power or network affiliation— in weekly day- 
time circulation in Baltimore City and Baltimore County. That's 
only one big fact that came out of this amazing survey. Get the 
whole story. Let your Forjoe man prove to you that the best buy 
in Baltimore is W-I-T-H. 




TOM TINSLEY, PRESIDENT 



REPRESENTED BY FORJOE AND COMPANY 




Nielsen plans 
local ratings 



Why did Nielsen 
enter field? 



Anti-commercials 
gadget buys ads 



One-bill system 
for spot buys? 



Arthur Nielsen has thrown his hat into local ratings ring. Proposed 
Nielsen ratings for local markets would get started late summer or 
early fall — if industry buys them. Nielsen will use diary method 
essentially in local ratings. To (1) make sure people fill in diaries 
on time and (2) check on whether they had set on as long as diary 
claims, Nielsen has new device called Recordimeter. Diary reports 
will be quality-controlled by Audimeters in national sample as well as 
Recordimeter. 

-SR- 

What prompted A. C. Nielsen Co. to enter local ratings field when it 
is now serviced by 5 other firms? Here are some of Nielsen's answers: 

(1) Demand from his clients has been insistent over period of years. 

(2) Need seems to exist because 5 services disagree frequently, do not 
measure whole coverage area of radio and tv stations. (See article 
page 34. ) 

-SR- 

Gadget which turns off commercials, called Blab-Off, plans advertis- 
ing expenditure of $75,000 for first 6 months 1954. Firm says that 
in addition to "professional people," many of its customers are ad- 
men. Blab-Off was even in one advertising trade paper, with ad placed 
right next to ad for tv s t ation. 

-SR- 

With spot radio billings running currently at estimated $135 million 
and tv spot at $110 million, anything that can make buying spot easier 
for agencies gets keen attention. SRA's Reg Rollinson had rapt audi- 
ence recently when he told Advertising Agency Financial Management 
Group about his plan for s pot "clearing house." Under plan agency 
would get one bill from clearing house for campaign, pay by one check. 
Clearing house would pay stations. Plan is in talking stages only 
with someone needed to poll stations, agencies for willingness to 
finance operation. Plan could increase spot billings by making it 
easier, cheaper for agencies to buy spot. 



Tv talent costs of network shows range from $1,160 to $70,000 

Leave It to the Girls, ABC TV 

Dollar a Second, Du Mont. . .. 

Suspense, CBS TV 

Roy Rogers, NBC TV 

My Friend Irma, CBS TV 

Your Hit Parade, NBC TV 



Lowest cost daytime network television show listed in SPONSOR'S Corn- 
paragraph is "Ding Dong School" on NBC TV at $1,160 per half hour. 
Lowest cost nighttime show is "Life Begins at 80," Du Mont, at $2,500. 
Highest cost shows are "Colgate Comedy Hour," "Milton Berle Show" 
and "Bob Hope Show," all hour-long stanzas on NBC TV, at $70,000 each. 



For some typical talent costs (excluding time) of network tv shows, see 
selection at right. Complete roster of tv show talent costs with name of 
sponsor, agency, network, time, number of stations carrying show, ap- 
pears in Comparagraph located this issue page 99. 



$ 4,500 
$10,500 
$13,500 
$22,000 
$28,000 
$32,000 



_J 



SPONSOR. Volume 8, No. 3. 8 February 1951 Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications. Inc.. a! 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md. Executive. Editorial 
culatlon Offices 40 E. 48th 8t.. New York 17. $8 a year In V. S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 January 1949 at Baltimore. Md postofflce under 



Advertising. Clr- 
Act I March 1878 



r 



KHMIHI TO SPONSORS for 8 I (-Itruarv l«).»l 



Texaco buying 
spot radio 



Texaco, which had bought little new on air after dropping Berle show 
on tv at end of last season, has lately begun spending in spot radio 
at current rate of about 510,000 weekly. Firm is buying nighttime 
news- and sportscasts to reach men. Texaco is looking for tv show 
but meanwhile may increase spot radio spending. Among Texaco buys 
since December: 27 stations of Columbia Pacific Network; KMOX, St. 
Louis; WTAM, Cleveland; VYMAQ, Chicago. Agency is Kudner. 



-SR- 



Film commercials 
big business 



Film commercials will be $18 million business in 1954. That's SPON- 
SOR estimate after close study of field and survey of leading produc- 
ers, service firms. Hectic pace of commercial production is less 
ulcerous than in day when Hollywood-fresh personnel crossed swords 
with film-green admen. But you still hear tales of admen who want 
impossible last-minute changes and filmers who play "artiste." (See 
film commercials section, page 43.) 



-SR- 

Filmer converts Novel filmmaker is Caldwell Audio-Video Productions of Toronto. Cald- 
pitch for Canada well's specialty: "Canadianizing" U.S. film commercials. He converts 
English dialogue to French-Canadian; inserts Canadian price; substi- 
tutes Canadian version of U.S. brand's label. 

-SR- 



Tv circulation 
study delayed 



Future of NARTB's proposed tv circulation study is just as foggy as 
ever. Television Board decision in Phoenix to create 2 committees 
(one to mull over pilot study of complicated "Cawl formula," another 
to study ways of raising money for pilot) may well push off study un- 
til next year. Delay points up lack of unity among tv broadcasters on 
circulation study. Decision to finance pilot study outside NARTB in- 
dicates many operators are opposed to study. Pilot study, if done, 
might take 3-4 months, is expected to test workability of Cawl formula 
as well as indicate cost. 

-SR- 



Tv set count 
out in few days 



While tv circulation issue remains unresolved, com plete up-to-date tv 
set cou nt w ill be released b y CBS in about week or 10 days. Count was 
done by Nielsen, whose proposed NCS No. 2 has been pushed farther in 
future. Delay in NCS No. 2 is linked with NARTB's study in that many 
broadcasters want own circulation counting body, don't want to buy 
figures from outside industry. 



JVetc national spot radio and tv business 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS-MARKET 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Triangle Publications. Seventeen Mjg 

NY 

Whitehall Pharmacol Bcncfax 

Co. NY 

Bristol-Myers. NY Butfcrin 

White Sewing Machine White All Stitch Z.g. 

Co. Clevc lag Sewing Machine 

American Homo Foods, Clapp t Baby Food 

NY 



Al Paul Lcfton. NY 

Harry B Cohen. NY 

Y6R. NY 
BBDO. NY 

Y&R. NY 



10 metropolitan mkts 

Mc. NC 

8 maior cities 

31 tv mkts covering 77 cities 

■>5 radio mkts 



Radio one. 5-. 10-. 15-min partic on 

dj shows; mid-Feb; 3 mos 
Radio: mm anncts; 1 Feb; test wk by wfc 

Radio: min anncts: 29 Jan; 3 wks 

Tv mm partic in dayti women's shows; 

15 Feb: 8 to 10 wks 
Radio: min partic on women's and cook- 
ing shows: 25 (an; 13 wks 



SPONSOR 



you 




participation 



as 



ow 



as 



^r 



A per thousand* 



on 



am 



for prices 

and packages 



can now 




fm 



N.Y. 



BArclay 7-3260 



N.J. 



Mitchell 2-6400 



1020 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 

*based on N.Y Pulse-December-52 week contract 



National Representatives 



WEED and Co. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 




Volume 8 Number 
8 February 1954 



ARTICLES 



DEPARTMENTS 



HIiij are ratlin rates low? 

Radio lost its chance to raise rates after World War II, now has lowest cost-per- 

1,000 of any major medium. Here's history of radio rates — •' 

If on to aet i In- mo.vf out of baseball sponsorship 

National Brewing Co. got one million ballots in its contest to name favorite 
Washington Nationals player. Story gives valuable tips to sports sponsors •> — 

Vielsen expunda into loctil rofciiu .s«*«*n<* 

A. C. Nielsen is considering expansion of service in fall to embrace local rating 

picture. Here's what this development would mean to sponsors, agencies •>■* 

How to launch u coffee that costs .><• i»ior<* 

Chock full o Nuts restaurant chain pegged ad drive for its new coffee on fact 
restaurant coffee is "superior," got 95% N. Y. distribution in two months •JO 

21-article media series hook to he published 

SPONSOR is now taking orders for book containing its 21-part All Media 
Evaluation Study. Volume will be out later this year -tit 



TIMEBUYERS AT WORK 

49TH & MADISON 

AGENCY AD LIBS 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR, Irving Gottheimer 

P. S. 

NEW TV FILM SHOWS 

NEW TV STATIONS 

ROUND-UP 

AGENCY PROFILE, Howard Connell 

RADIO RESULTS 

FILM NOTES 

SPONSOR ASKS 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

NEWSMAKERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



lf>.Vl TV FILM < Q>l>ll IU I \l S SECTION 

\> I sphish in tv iilm <*oiiiiti<'r<*inf.v: .S'f.> milium 

Producers SPONSOR surveyed predict 20% business increase this year over 

1953, more emphasis on "visual sell," fewer new faces t-t 

10 tips on ftou* to aet alona with producers 

How to save money, improve quality of tv film commercials / (,' 

11 li«( i/oii shoultl hnotv about film service firms 

Specialty organizations can help speed production, distribution fff 

Tv film commercial producers listina 

Eleven-page directory includes addresses, phone numbers, some accounts .'jfj 

Tr i if in service firms list 

Geographical list of labs, sound recording studios, title services, others JJ2 



COM I NC 



itattle of couuh syrups 

Pertussin, only national cough syrup till 1952. upped radio budget last year to 

meet competition from Vicks, well-heeled newcomer U2 f\>(). 

Tips for beginners on maliinu tv cinnmercials 

This article is designed to help novices cross the two most difficult hurdles in tv. 

inexperience and high production costs '*'* heb. 



Editor & President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glen 
Editorial Director: Ray Lepice 
Managing Editor: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair. Alfred J. 
Department Editor: Lila Lederman 
Assistant Editors: Evelyn Konrad, Joan 
Marks, Keith Trontow 
Contributing Editor: Bob Foreman 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. C 
(Western Manager), Wallace Engelll 
(Midwest Manager), Homer Griffith (S 
west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Produio 
Manager), Ed Higgins 
Vice-President-Business Mgr.: Bernard PI t 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo 
Secretary to Publisher: Augusta Shearma 
Office Manager: Olive Sherban 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS I 
combined with TV. Eiecullre. Editorial. Clrculalk 
Advertising Offices: 49th & Madison (40 E. 49UI 
New York 17. N. T. Telephone: MTrray Hill 
Chicago OrUce: lfil E Grind Are. Phone: 811 
Dallas Offlre: Ioterurban Building. 1500 .1 
St. Phone: IUndolph 7381. West Coast Offlre: 6Mj 
set Boulerard. Los Angeles. Telephone: Hollywood 
Printing Offlre: 3110 Elm Are . Baltimore 11, Md.,1 
srrlptlons: United States 18 a year. Canada and 
$9. Sin tie copies 50c Printed In V. S. A. Addil 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St.. New Tort 17. , 
Ml rray Hill 8-177S. Copyright 1953. SPONSOR I 
LICATIONS INC. 




IvNViVii reaches 223% more people than 



ill other Shreveport 
stations combined! 




AVERAGE DAILY LISTENERS 



More people listen regularly to KWKH than 
to all other Shreveport stations put together. 

In fact, KWKH delivers a 22.3% bigger Average 
Daily Audience than all other Shreveport 
stations combined — yet costs 44.2% less than 
that four -station competitive group! 

These audience figures are from the new 
Standard Station Audience Report — the more 
conservative of the two recent audience surveys 
made in this area. 

Ask your Branham representative for the 
whole KWKH story. 

KWKH 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



A Shreveport Times Station 



lexas 



~^ 



SHREVEPORT f LOUISIANA 



The Branham Co., I ArScAHSAS 
Representatives ^BKS^E 

Henry Clay, General Manager 
Fred Watkins, Commercial Manager 



It was a Happy New Year! 

Only the second fur XBIG, bat It fore- 
oasts a big '54. Here's a salute to this 
peak list of 137 sponsors, already con- 
tracted to cover the stlll-expandlng' South- 
ern California Community radio-wise In 
1954 via The Catallna Station. 



A 

Ai- 

■■ ■ .1 Chtm i b 

of si. 

BUti 

Bra hbUl Co. Oalifon 

Pop ■ , 

John Clm 

lonial 

II,.., 

Trad Dean Van Unas, I • 

Downtown Baslni isn f 

Ft-li\ i !.--. relet .i H I Ini 

I 
Foreman a. Clark Po tnighl Magazine 

Gallen Km | l.„ ail , 

Go igb indnetrl 

OledhiD l>o<l/p. Greet n Sand] 

Hi Una Bal ktaid Bit ,,i 

Mix. lliiuBP nf Nine, Hub .\ Ret Pun 
Hunt Trail l 

J'fl'- Pn .lai Alai G 

Janus Bales K 

Pord Kennln Foods, Kern Foods, Day's Fnrni- 

'.!.■. n Kini;. &angendorf Baking I u 
P» r » i B Hair On, !.n a] Loan, Loa 

Label, Lyon Van \ 
M ii thy Llnro P A McKensie 

Ford, Ma millan Oil, M.i 

Brew. opolitan Savinzs & 

Loan, M <. i . 

Lonii Milan! Pooda, MiraHar Beetanranl Mis- 
sion Pak sTorthrop Air. rift. Ok- 
ritt i >■ im.'r I , . I mT. Owl Dm P 

Oitrna Pn d Pai Luc Soan, Pa 

Papennate Pens, Pavo Turkeys, Pep Boyi Pico 

Loan. Pine View Lodge Po 
Papei Prod R 

Rende/. mis Ballroom, Republic Van & Bti 
Bheem Mfg Bohr Ail S 

San ■ 1,. ,kcr. Seaboard Finance, Security 

Paint. Bimple 

Pies. Shedd Bartnach F Is, Bkycoach, \v ,\ ,i 

Sloan, Sn.. r R ac . 

ing Assn., Speedwriting, Sturdy 

Young Sc Brown. T 

Tillamook Cheese. Raj Thomas, Thriftimart-Fita- 

slnimon^ Stores, Town Talk. Trailer Coach 

Th- Tralbj Restaurant Union Mortgage, ; 

oil, rjnion Pacific, United Western Disti ii.utors, 

Ton's Grocery, Wallich'a Mum.- City, W 

L'i.i tronii i, A. 0. Wei 

ment, WeaUnghouse, Weal Ooaal Packing 

ern Holly. WUdroot, WrjJard Tablet, Williams 

Chevrolet, atowiiaii Clothing 

Tor Coverage, Impact and Dollar Value, 

KBIG is The Giant Economy Package of 

Southern California Radio. 



10,000 WATTS 
AT740 



KBIG 



STUDIOS IN AVALON 
AND HOLLYWOOD 




GIANT 

ECONOMY 

PACKAGE OF 

SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 

RADIO 



The Catalina Station 

John Poole Broadcasting Co. 
KBIC . KBIF . KBID TV . KBIC-TV 

6540 Suntat Blvd.. Hollywood 28, Calif. 

HOIIywood 3-3205 

Not. Rep. Robert Meeker Associates, Inc. 







H iffittiii T. Tieman, Atherton & Currier, 
Veil York, feels standardization of station rate 
i urds for both radio and tv would cut a timebuyer's 
work considerably, "As it is" he explains, "some 
stations have same rate day and night, others three 
or more rates. Some guarantee their rates for a 
year, others don't. Now if radio stations standardized 
their rate cards, a national spot radio campaign 
would be both easier to set up and easier to 
sell to a sponsor." Among his accounts: Eno's 
Fruit Salts, Scott's Emulsion, Cuti'ura. 



\«»rim» Freeman, media director of Yambert, 

rs, says that minute participations in 
tinmen's programs do the most effective job jor her 
Gallencamp Shoes account, since most of the sales 
volume is in women's and children's shoes. "Besides 
90 announcements a month over various California 
stations" Vorine explains, "we also use daily 
Vi-minute Segro and Spanish shows on KOWL 
to cover the Los Angeles area." On the air since 
I September, the client has been so satisfied 
■i-newed schedules through 1954 



F.tlu-ard A. Fonte. Ruthrauff & Ryan. Hem 
) ork, says that the combination of early-morning 
and late-afternoon radio announcements during 

dted months plus year-round 20-second tv 
films in Class A time gets top results for Sun Oil Co. 
"II ith our radio announcements we reach the 
i nr an ners on their nay to or from work," Ed 
explains. "Our top tv program adjacencies in 60 
mar Lets assure us the maximum viewing audience. 

"se adjacencies ranging from strictly male- 
appeal to family-type programing" 



Frances \ elthuxis. WcCann-Erickson, Nam 

nighttime lv l.D.'s as a means of 
getting more clients into choice tv time. "But," 
says she, "the use of these shorter commercials 

lor creative and production 
problems due to varying lor mats, even though 
much progress has been made in standardization of 
mechanical requirements for these 'quickies.' " On 
the other hand, she adds, there's still room for 
improvement in eliminating lonlusion and high 
production costs. Among her accounts is Pertussin. 



SPONSOR 




orning 





fternoon 



vening 








(( 



THE PULSE OF GREENSBORO" REPORT 



Previous opinions now proven facts in this survey 

Bob Poole is established as the top radio personality in Greens- 
boro. "Poole's Paradise" is the favorite locally produced early morning 
show by a wide margin. 

WBIG is the station local listeners tune in most ... morning, 
afternoon and evening ... to hear a carefully balanced program of 
our own plus network shows. 

In popularity, WBIG is a 2 to 1 favorite when its rating is com- 
pared to the combined average of all Greensboro competition. 

We will never be satisfied with less than the No. 1 spot. 



GREENSBORO, N.C. 




Contact Hollingbery, our national repre- 
sentative . . . get the revealing facts front 
"The Pulse of Greensboro" report. 



In 28tk Year of Broadcasting 



CBS AFFILIATE 5000 WATTS 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 




Busy Market . . . 

If you want a picture of the business going on in the front 
of the store, glance at the cartons out back. By and large, 

they'll be these, the brands you've heard about most. 
They're all on CBS Radio.* And they've been there, on the 
average, eight years . . . ivhere America listens most: 

THE CBS RADIO NETWORK 




'January SI, 1951 



NOW 

10,000 



M&xhtjan and 
f/l&xhtm bmniim 

mwikriA 4 
S outf^/m Cali\fywxa 

- - mow tfutn 

1000.000 bui|cwl 




e^ 



"An even smarter 
buy in '54!" 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY: 
George W. Clark. Chicago, N. Y. 
Daren F. McGavren, San Franciico 
Dora-Clayton, Atlanta. 

OR WRITE 

KOWL, Pico at the Ocean 

Santa Monica, Calif. 

TE»i 0-SI52: Dunkirk l»0t 




fill! 

MADISON 

bponbor Invite* letter* to the editor. 
Addreu iO E. 49 St., New York 17. 

FILM REVOLUTION? 

\\ .• are greatl) indebted to \<>u f<.i 
the wonderful stor) on \ itapix in your 
January II issue, "Will Vitapix create 
n film revolution?" page 42], and, 
on behalf of the company, I want to 
express our appreciation foi tli<* most 
complete and accurate rtorj on the 
compan) that haa been published to 
date. We espe iallj appreciate the fac- 
tual manner which the writer used and 
youi taking the editorial responsibility 
on yourself for Borne conjectures as 
to our future operations. 

We have had m> manj requests for 
information about Vitapix that this 
;uti< le answers that we arc sending it 
to a great main of our friends who 
have wanted to know more about the 
company. I am sure that the article 
will do \ ita|ii\ a great deal of good, 
and Boh Wormhoudl and I thank you 
foi an excellent job. 

Frank E. Mullen 

President 

I i In J >i v Corp. 

New York 



RADIO PROMOTION 

I can't resist writing \ ou a note to 
compliment you on the fine job that 
SPONSOR is doing in promoting radio. 
, 1 our pa cut editorial, "1954 can be 
radio's biggest," [28 December 1953, 
page 100], and \our comment* in the 
January 1 1 issue. "The hidden audi- 
ence," | page 104 1 . were parti<ularl\ 
outstanding. 

We certainl) appreciate this kind of 

BUpporl and thought you would like to 

know it. 

John Karol 

/ tee President in < harge 

Network Sales 
CBS Ratlin 



Once again you have done a most 
interesting report on the results of the 

I'olil/ -link for 11 Christal stations 
"\\ ho listens . . . where . . . when. . . 
why," 11 December 1953, page 36]. 
as well as the report on how six clients 
use spot radio "112 big spot clients: 



how they use the medium," Part one, 
14 December L953, page 30]. 

I ha\e read both of these with a 
great deal of interest and would again 
like to distribute these to some of our 
prominent advertising men in the city 
Will \ou please send along 100 of 
each? 

I am sure if we continue to feed 
tlii- sort of literature to advertising 
people they will realize that radio is 
far from dead. 

Frank G. Revoir 

President 
WAGE, Inc. 

Syracuse 

• It. print, of Who li.l.n." and "12 biff »pat 
elfmtSI ho* ill., u-. ih.- in. -ilium." Part one. are 
2t>e apie<-e. Quantity prior* on nqueit. 



PROVED CIRCULATION 

The popularity of sponsor was rather 
forcefully called to my attention by 
your January 11 issue. 

Under your "New and Renew" de- 
partment, my former affiliation is listed 
as WCAN, W CAN -TV. Milwaukee, and 
in\ new affiliation as New York busi- 
ness manager of WTVT, Belleville-St. 
Louis. This has created considerable 
embarrassment as I am still very much 
associated with WCAN and WCAN- 
TV. I nder my new setup I am acting 
as national rep for the Milwaukee sta- 
tions and, in addition, I am handling 
New York business matters for WTVT, 
Belleville-St. Louis. 

I would suggest that you personally 
call up every timehuyer in New York 
advising them of your error, or. now 
that you have proved your circulation, 
maybe an insertion in your next issue 
will serve the same purpose. 

Alex Rosen m\n 
New York 



NEWSPAPER STRIKE 

The article on, "What happened on 
the air when N. Y.C. newspapers went 
on strike," is a fine thing [28 Decem- 
ber 1953, page 30]. 

Please quote price on reprints for 
100, 2(10 or 600. That's what I like 
about sponsor — you go to work and 
come ui' very quickly with a story that 
i- -till news. Keep it up. 

Joe Milsop 
WCPA 
Clearfield. Pa. 

• No rr print- of the -trikc story are available. 
l\tra ropic* of the 28 Drcrmbrr bjBM ro»t 50c 
■ pi«-<-c. C— I for 10<> rop,c* would he 23c apiece. 



10 



SPONSOR 



KNX RADIO 
IS RAISING 
ITS DAYTIME 




And high time. Since the last increase in KNX daytime rates 
(March 1946), the number of radio homes in the Los Angeles area 
has increased by 38.8% . . . and the daytime audience actually 
delivered by KNX has more than doubled (up 108.2%). 

Small wonder, then, that KNX is raising its daytime rates 
effective January 31, 1954. A new rate card, number 13, will be 
mailed shortly to advertisers and agencies from coast to 
coast. Meantime, you're invited to call KNX or the nearest CBS 
Radio Spot Sales office for complete details. 

And remember, KNX daytime is better- than-ever time today. 
For KNX daytime audiences have increased seven 
times faster than rates! 



CBS OWNED • LOS ANGELES • 50,000 WATTS 



KNX 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 n 




12 



SPONSOk 



TV BILLINGS 

Would you be kind enough to lei 
me have a record of the tv hillings of 
the 10 major U. S. agencies for 1953? 
1 1 you also have available hillings 
for these agencies outside of the United 
States proper, i.e. in Hawaii, Canada. 
South America, I should he grateful to 
receive details on these figures, as well. 
Copies of sponsor on our renewal 
subscription are just beginning to 
reach us and we find the magazine as 
interesting as ever. 

J. W. Jackson 
Managing Director 
Jackson, Wain & Co., Ltd. 
Sydney, Australia 

• SPONSOR'S "Year-end report" in the 28 Dp. 

ccinbcr 1053 issue, page 27, includes a list of 
the Top 20 U. S. agencies by 1953 radio-tv bill- 
ings. No information on activity ouside the V. S. 
is available, however. 



POSITIVE SELL 

I have devoted man) \ears to ad- 
vertising and promotion — both news- 
paper and radio — so am quite familiar 
with workings and results accomplished 
by each. A letter to the editor by Carl 
W. Vandagrift. general manager of 
WOWO, Fort Wayne, in your Decem- 
ber 14 issue motivates this letter. 

His final sentence was: "Natural 
curiosity, however, demands an answer 
to the question: Why Starch reports 
for tv I and maybe radio ) but not for 
newspapers?" I wonder how many ra- 
dio folks missed the full impact ol 
these words! It began long ago and 
has continued over the years while 
newspapers sat back and laughed — and 
profited. I mean the silly idea of audi- 
ence surveys and research. The radio 
industry as a whole is guilty. 

Did you ever learn of any newspaper 
conducting a survey to learn how many 
readers saw or acted as the result of 
reading the ad or ads of any one store 
or concern in a newspaper? Absolute- 
ly not. Newspapers are too wise to call 
attention to. or accent, any weakness. 
Yet, radio continues to do so. A news- 
paper points to the fact that everybody 
reads a newspaper, their many features 
not on radio, etc.. and if need be, men- 
tions their ABC circulation figures. But 
they make no effort to pinpoint the 
number of readers of any one ad or 
series of ads. 

They know I as radio should know 
by now) that regardless of sincere ef- 
fort expended, no such figures portrav 
the true story. With all respect to 
Hooper. Pulse. Nielsen and Starch. I. 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 



for one believe no survej can give a 
true picture: so whj does radio con- 
tinue to use such poor, weak selliim 
points which onl\ place an\ salesman 
on the defensive and make potential 
buyers skeptical as in value received 
for dollars expended? 

We in radio have placed ourselves 
on a most unpleasant spot. Let's get 
off by forgetting surveys. Everyone is 
exposed to radio daily, same as news- 
papers. Radio is the best buy, so let's 
sell positive. Let newspapers make the 
surveys. 

I \\\ii; \\ ii iiini.i) 

• While it is true that newspapers are far lc* 
research-conscious than other media, reports on 
newspaper readership of ads are available. Daniel 
Starch & Staff, for example, has a newspaper 
advertising noting service. 



REPRINT PERMISSION 

Our editorial committee would like 
to consider using two tables as pub- 
lished in a recent copy of "Radio Bas- 
ics" (14 July 1953, page 157]. They 
are tables one and two under the title, 
"Dimensions of radio's audience." 
Could you grant permission to use the 
diagram material, adapting some of 
the explanation to meet our needs? We 
would be glad to use a credit line. 
Mildred Grandbois 
Associate Editor 
The Voice of Prophecy 
Los Angeles 

• SPONSOR is happy to grant permission to 
reprint material from the magazine providing 
credit is given and permission is requested in 
w riting. 



TV STATION BREAKDOWN 

We are interested in knowing what 
percent of the television stations in the 
country have kitchen shows; what per- 
cent of the kitchen shows are done by 
women; and what percent of them are 
commercially successful. 

I know this is a tall order but, for 
all I know, you may have this in your 
files or know where to get it. 

I would be grateful if you could have 
someone send me this information or 
any part of it that might be available. 
Vincent A. Francis 
General Manager 
KGO-TV 
San Francisco 

• 62% of the nation's television stations have 
local kitchen shows, almost all of them conducted 
by women. 23% have none. The rest have plans. 
Facts like this are recorded in the forthcoming 
1954 SPONSOR GUIDE TO RADIO & TV STA- 
TION PROGRAMING. Other categories: Farm 
programing, Negro. Foreign. Sports. Tv film ei: 

slide specs, and many more listed station-by- 

station. The GUIDE will be available free to 
subscribers. 

(Please turn to page 110) 




H 






M 



the electronic magazine f\ 



FOOD 




DECORATION 

FASHION 

BEAUTY 

CHILD CARE 

FAMILY AFFAIRS 

HOME ENTERTAINMEN 

GARDENING 






men 



home will be the most practical television 
program ever designed for women. True to 
its name, HOME will deal with everything of 
importance to every woman who has or hopes 
to have a home (as well as to her husband > . 
Beginning March 1— from 11 a.m. to 12 noon, 
NYT, every Monday through Friday on NBC 
Television, HOME will present the new, the 
good, the useful in fashions, beauty, interior 
decoration, architecture, food, family affairs, 
child care, leisure entertainment, gardening 
and anything else that interests women. Just 
as in "Your Show of Shows" and "Today," 
NBC has created a totally new pattern for 
television. 

home's editors are outstanding authorities 
in their fields. And behind the scenes will be 
batteries of sub-editors ferreting out and 
testing HOME'S subject matter. HOME's 
performing editors make up a Who's Who of 
women's service experience. 

poppy CANNON, HOME's food editor, has 
been food editor of House Beautiful and 
Living. She wrote "The Bride's Cookbook" 
and "The Canopener Cookbook." rose franz- 
blau, psychologist and human relations col- 
umnist in the Neiv York Post, will edit the 
family affairs and child care department. 
eve hunter, HOME's editor of fashion and 
beauty, comes with plentiful radio and tele- 
vision experience in San Francisco and New 
York. For HOME's department of interior 
decoration, the editor is SYDNEY smith, TV 
star of the "Swift Home Service Club" and 
"Ask Miss Smith." estelle parsons, a grad- 
uate of "Today" is roving reporter and "new 
brides editor." (She was married in Decem- 
ber). At a later date the editor-in-chief will 
be named. 



handle a pack of cigarettes. It will even gen- 
tly ripple drapes and curtains if rippling is 
in the script. HOME can even make its own 
weather. At will in a special effects area, it 
can produce rain, fog, sleet, snow or hail- 
perhaps even sunshine. Some of those gad- 
gets may sound a trifle strange, but they are 
designed to allow HOME's staff the greatest 
creative latitude for imaginative staging. 

TO ADVERTISERS: 

home's products star in every program. 
The basic concept of HOME is that commer- 
cial presentation and program content are 
woven in the same fabric. HOME's spectacu- 
lar new staging has a very special advantage 
for you. It means that you don't have to have 
special announcers, film commercials or ex- 
pensive commercial sets. HOME's facilities 
are at your service. HOME provides the per- 
fect mood and setting for selling your 
product. 

home's audience will be a screened audi- 
ence. Every woman who watches will watch 
because she's interested in improving her 
home, her family life and herself. It stands 
to reason, then, that HOME's audience is 
made up almost exclusively of prospects. 
And those prospects will see your product 
at the best time, in the best setting. 

home's economy is evident in its sponsor- 
ship plan. HOME offers eight one-minute 
participations per program. As with "To- 
day" you may buy one participation or as 
many as you want. HOME, then, is a perfect 
place for young products, and for limited 
budget advertisers who want big time tele- 
vision. 



home's home is a machine for selling. 
It's a 60-foot rotunda surrounded on its 
perimeter by a translucent plastic skin for 
front and rear projection or special lighting 
and color effects. In its center are two con- 
centric, revolving turntables. In its various 
stages are a kitchen, a testing laboratory, a 
how-to-do-it workshop which can accommo- 
date everything from a crochet hook to a 
compound lathe, a small garden (with the 
richest earth in television.) On the floor will 
be three regular television cameras, but high 
in the ceiling is NBC's aerial camera, a re- 
mote control camera mounted on a telescop- 
ing arm which can cover any position in the 
rotunda, giving camera flexibility never seen 
before in television. 

For displaying HOME's editorial matter and 
advertiser's products in new ways, some new- 
devices are needed; like the "tumbler." The 
"tumbler" is a mechanism for handling 
heavy objects : for example, to show the con- 
struction of an easy chair, the "tumbler" will 
whip it upside down, tilt it or spin it effort- 
lessly and quickly. Then there is a "picker- 
upper," a mechanical arm which can lift and 
unroll a rug or bolt of cloth as easily as you 



home's charter client plan gives you a 
full hour program without extra cost. This 
special "merchandising program" can be 
scheduled to correspond with the launching 
of a new product, a new line or a new pro- 
motion. All eight commercials on the Charter 
Client's "merchandising program" are de- 
voted to his product. Charter Clients also re- 
ceive two more invaluable assets: (1) 
exclusivity in their product category in all 
HOME programs for the rest of the year 
(2) a color franchise in HOME. To become 
a HOME Charter Client, you buy 52 partici- 
pations, non-cancellable, between March 1 
and December 31, 1954. 

Your NBC representative has all the details 
of sponsorship including the participation 
price. He can also tell you more about 
HOME's plans. Suggest you call him today. 



TELEVISION 



ice of Radio Corporation of America 





^ <•>. iii Pennsylvania, 1 buy 
covers 3 . . . when that one bin 
is WJAC-TV, Johnstown. 
Based on October '53 Hooper 
Btandings, WJAC-TV is . . . 

FIRST in ]ohnstoun 
i a 2-station market I 
SECOND in Pittsburgh 
ia 4station market I 
FIRST in Altoona 
I a 2-Station market I 

If you want to blanket the rich 
southwestern Pennsylvania mar- 
ket . . . and do it for the mini- 
mum amount <>f wampum . . . 
Inn the I that covers 3. . . . 





Send up m •mokr •inr 
(,rl full clrl.ll. fr..li. 



by Bob Foreman 

Let's have a chat about money. 

Perhaps you"\e heard: Money i- the root of all evil. You 
can'l take it with you. \Ione\ won't buy happiness. 

The foregoing saws, however, achieved their eminence in 
the world ot cliches before television. Television, by com- 
ing up with a thing called series-on-film, has made it neces- 
sary to rewrite these axiom-: to wit: 

Money i- the root of all tv films. You can't take it with 
you but you can leave it with your heirs via residuals. Fur- 
thermore, money will buy happiness as I will endeavor to 
prove right now. 

In other words, the drachma is the prime requisite of all tv 
film operations and comes in way ahead of aesthetic and dra- 
matic values. Let us examine some cases in point. 

You come to me with a pilot film, saying you will provide 
me with 38 more films in a series of equal quality. Your 
negative cost per film, you whisper, is $30,000. But if I 
purchase a firm 39 shows for use on a network of 60 stations 
or for spot buys in 60 markets, you will deliver this series to 
me at a cost of only $25,000 per episode. (You are still 
whispering.) 

Being new in the business, inquisitive as well as naive, I 
say: "How come you are doing me this favor, chum? I have 
never met you before and had no idea of the depth of my 
charm. Your pilot film is terrific — just what I need and it has 
s name player, Toodles DuFeur. whom I never hoped to be 
able to afford. How come?" I stammer blushingly. 

^ ou put your arm around me and order another brandy. 
Not domestic stuff. The real old liquid direct from la belle 
France. "Feller.** you say. "don't worry about my problem-: 
I'll come out all right on the markets you don't use and on 
reruns. I wanna do you a favor. It's as simple as that." 

It is as simple as that and. being as simple as I am, I shake 
hand- on the deal. 

Then thing- happen. First. I discover you made this $30.- 
000 pilot film at an out-of-pocket cost of $8,000. most of 
which you borrowed from your mother-in-law. The remain- 
ing costs were deferred -lab costs, talent costs, director's 
fee ( over -cab- 1. etc 

It might be worth mentioning here that even if you had 
paid all these charges, they wouldn't have added up to $30.- 
()()() but closer to $25,000. The last $5,000 i- a mythologi- 

i /'lease turn to page 68 I 



16 



SPONSOR 



YOU GET 




When You Buy KRNT, Des Moines 

HOOPER LEADER MORNING, AFTERNOON, EVENING 



75 Firsts, 11 Seconds out of 87 Periods 

(Including 3 ties for first and 1 for second) 



• KRNT-CBS does it again . . . delivers the BIG audience, according to the latest 

Hooper report for Des Moines, Iowa (October, 1953). 

• KRNT is first in all 23 morning periods. KRNT has 
23 firsts, I second out of 24 afternoon periods. KRNT 
has 13 firsts (3 ties) and 6 seconds (one tie) out of 20 
evening periods. KRNT has 16 firsts and 4 seconds 
out of the 20 rated Saturday daytime periods. 

• Talk to a Katz man about KRNT, the only Des Moines 
station that can talk Hoopers! 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 





THE 

REGISTER 

AND 

TRIBUNE 

STATION 



17 



In its 15th year— 
and STILL GROWING! 






from 



16 KW 

832 feet above 

average terrain 

channel 4 

Very 

High 

Frequency 




to 

93 KW 

1020 feet above 

average terrain 

channel 6 

Very 

High 

Frequency 






On January 4, 1954, WRGB increased its power from 16KWto 
93 KW; its antenna height from 832 feet to 1020 feet above aver- 
age terrain, and, at the direction of the FCC, switched from 
channel 4 to channel 6. Now transmitting with the maximum 
signal permitted by the FCC, WRGB still sells the rich capital 
district, as it has tor more than 14 years, plus Northeastern New 
York and Western New England. The more powerful signal adds 
some 10,000 square miles and more than 500,000 people to the 
old coverage area thai previousl) delivered $01, "50 sets. 



The General Electric Station 
Schenectady, N. Y. 



WRGB 

CHANNEL 6 



Represented Nationally by 
NBC Spot Sales 



18 



SPONSOR 



New and renew 




8 FEBRUARY 1954 



1 



2. 



Sew on Radio Networks 

SPONSOR AGENCY 



Campana Sales, Batavia, II! 
Dodge Div, Chrysler Corp. 

Detroit 
Ex-Lax, Inc. Brooklyn 



Minnesota Mining & Mfg, 

St Paul, Minn 
Mutual Benefit Health & 

Accident Assoc, Omaha 
Pharmaco, Inc, Kenilworth, 

Nj 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Wallace-Ferry-Hanly, Chi 
Crant Adv, Detroit 

Warwick & Legler, NY 



BBDO, NY & Mpls 
Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha 
DCSS, NY 



CBS 174 
NBC 201 

ABC 335 

CBS 202 
CBS 207 
NBC 148 



Julius La Rosa; M 7:35-45 pm; 18 Jan; 52 wks 
Roy Rogers Show; Th 8-8:30 pm; 28 Jan; 52 wks 

Modern Romances; Tu-F 11:25-40 am; 19 Jan; in- 
creased sponsorship from 3 to 4 days a wk; also 
new time slot 

Arthur Godfrey Time; M, W, alt F 10-10:15 am; 
22 Feb; 52 wks 

Robert Q. Lewis; M-F 4-4:05 pm; 20 Jan; 52 wks 

Front Page Farrell; M-F 5:15-30 pm; alt days; 
11 Jan; 13 wks (alt with Amer Amer Homo 
Prods! 




Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


Campana Sales Co, Ba- 


Wallace-Ferry-Hanly, Chi 


CBS 195 


tavia, III. 






Christian Science Publ 


Walton-Butterfield, NY 


ABC 30 


Society, Boston 






Church of Christ, Abilene, 


Martin Co, Chi 


ABC 250 


Tex 






Ceneral Foods, NY 


FC&B, NY 


CBS 100 


Cruen Watch Co, Cinci 


McCann-Erickson, NY 


ABC 325 


Lever Bros, NY 


J. Walter Thompson, NY 


CBS 187 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Shadel & News; Sat 12-12:05 pm; 23 Jan; 52 wks 

Christian Science Monitor Views the News; Tu 

9:45-10 pm; 23 Feb; 52 wks 
Herald of Truth; Sun 1-1:30 pm; 7 Feb; 52 wks 

Robert Q. Lewis; M-F 4-4:05 pm; 20 Jan; 52 wks 
Walter Winchell; alt Sun 9-9:15 pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 
Lux Radio Theater; M 9-10 pm; 4 Jan; 52 wks 




i See page 2 for New National Spot Radio and Tv Business) 



National Rroadcast Sales Executives 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 


Samuel 1. Abelow 


CBS, NY, adv, sis prom dept 


BAB. NY, asst dir local prom 


Howard Anderson 


WFAA-TV, Dallas, film dir 


MPTV Feature Film Div, Dallas office acct exec 


Addison Armor 


Lang-Worth Feature Progs, NY, regl sis mgr 


ABC Radio, NY, dir prog sis 


Ralph M. Baruch 


Consolidated Tv Sis, NY, acct exec 


Same, eastern sis mgr 


Elisabeth Beckjorden 


O. L. Taylor, NY, chg publicity, prom & research 


MPTV, NY, publicity-publ rels stf 


Chester T. Behrman 


WEHT, Henderson, Ky, prog dir 


Same, dir tv opers 


Ceorge A. Bernstein 


WOL, Wash, DC, station mgr 


WLIB, NY, sis mgr 


Charles W. Besosa 


A. C. Nielsen, NY, client serv exec 


Same, acct exec NTRI 


John H. Bone 


WLW-TV, Cinci, sis mgr 


WNEM-TV, Flint, Mich, gen mgr 


Richard P. Buch 


Consolidated Tv Sis, Atlanta, southeastern sis mgr 


CBS TV Film Sis, mgr Atlanta office 


Lawrence H. Buck 


Du Mont, NY, sis stf 


WABD, NY, acct exec 


Robert P. Canavan 


MCA, NY, sis rep tv synd dept 


ABC TV Sis Dept, NY, mkt coverage specialist 


W. Richard Carlson 


WLYC, Williamsport, Pa, gen mgr 


Same, vp 


Lindell Christell 


CE Supply Corp, Omaha, adv, sis prom mgr 


May Bdcstg Co, Omaha (KMTV, KMA), natl sis stf 


Edward Codel 


Katz Agency, NY, tv dir 


Same, bd of dir 


Bruce Collier 


WMAL-TV, Wash, DC, sis acct exec 


MPTV Film Synd Div, Dallas, sis mgr 


A. H. Constant 


KONA, Honolulu, mgr 


KAFY, KAFY-TV, Bakersield, Cal, mgr 


William N. Davidson 


NBC Radio Spot Sis, NY, natl mgr 


NBC-owned Cleve stns (WTAM, WTAM-FM, 
WNBK), asst gen mgr, dir radio-tv sis 


Mitchell DeCroot 


ABC, NY, chg adv, prom 


ABC TV Net, NY, dir adv, prom 


Jack Denninger 


Blair-Tv, NY, acct exec 


Same, eastern sis mgr 


Ceorge Dietrich 


NBC Spot Sales, NY, eastern radio sis mgr 


Same, natl radio mgr 


William P. Dix 


WTAM, Cleve, sis mgr 


WOR, NY, sis mgr 


Jack Dubberley 


KLMO, Longmont, Colo, pres, gen mrg 


KLZ, Denver, sis rep 


Eldon Durand 


WNOE, New Orleans, prodn, mdsg dept 


Same, prodn, mdsg mgr 


Neal J. Edwards 


WTTC, Wash, DC, sis mgr 


WMAL-TV, Wash, DC, sis mgr 


Joseph B. Elliott 


RCA, NY, vp 


Same, exec vp chg new Consumer Prods Div 


Leonard Evans 


Negro market consultant 


Natl Negro Net, NY, pres (40 E 51 St) 


Louis Faust 


H-R Reps, NY, acct exec 


John Blair, NY, sis stf 


Robert Feiner 


20th Century-Fox, stf member 


MPTV Feature Film Div, Dallas office acct exec 


Donald F. Fischer 


vVQAM, Miami, prog dir 


WCBS, Miami, prog mgr 


Alvin C. Flanagan 


XETV, Tijuana-San Diego, Cal, prog, sis dir 


KCOP, LA, asst mgr 


Bob Franklin 


KCW, Portland, Ore, prodn mgr 


Same, prom mgr 


Ceorge H. Frey 


NBC TV Net, NY, vp, dir sis 


Same, vp chg tv net sis 


Don Frink 


Shupe Food Brokerage Co, Honolulu, exec 


KCMB, KCMB-TV, Honolulu, mdsg coordinator 


Jack Fritz 


Lever Bros, Pepsodent Div, NY, prod mgr, Shadow 


Biair-Tv, NY, acct exec 


David Froh 


Wave 
WILS, Lansing, Mich, prog dir 


Same, stn mgr 


John Ceddes 


Edward Petry, NY, acct exec 


WNEW, NY, acct exec 


H. J. Crenthot 


Katz Agency, NY, asst treas 


Same, bd of dir 


Mark Criffin 


ASCAP, Northwest branch mgr 


KCMB, Honolulu, acct exec 


William D. Hamilton 


ABC Radio, NY, eastern prodn mgr 


Same, eastern prog mgr 


Jerome B. Harrison 


ABC TV, NY, acct exec 


Same, eastern sis mgr 


Edward E. Hewitt 


Movie Adv Bureau, United Film Service, west coast 
mgr 


MPTV Film Synd Div, SF, sis mgr 





(Continued next page) 

In next issue: New and Renetved on Television (JSeticork) ; Advertising Agency Personnel 
Changes; Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



tX umbers after 


names 


refer to New and Re- 


new category 




nle! 


(3) 


H. J. Grenthot 


(3) 


A. P. Jaeger 


(3) 


George Frey 


(3) 


1. Flanagan 


(3) 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



19 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



Xea- and renew 



3. 







\utiotml Broadcast Stiles Executives (cont'd.) 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



|jy H • 

R C H: 

WjIIki Hutchinson 
Wallil S Ivy 
Frederick (acobi |r 

- P |acgcr 
|uli.ln M Kaufm.in 
lohn | Kchoc 
R David Kimble 
Willwd L Kline 
Willi im M Koblenzcr 
flm. i W Lower 
William Z McDonald 
|ohn McPartlin 
Monroe Mendelsohn 
Don P Molony 
Hinild L. Morgan |r 
Fred Morrison 

W Moss 
No rr.in Nelson 
i im. s M Orchard 
|ohn W. Owen 
Chirks Philips 
John Reed Porterficld 
St. -ling C Quintan 
Willum H Quinn 
Wiltnm Rimblc 
Fdward L Saxe 

I Schuebel 
Fr. d D Shavor 
Clcnn Sh.iw 
Birr Sheets 
Jimmy Simpson 
St inky S Simpson 
Edgar T. <Tcd> Sisson 
Earl Snuffer 
Larry Stevens 
Donald A Stewart 

Robert C Walker 
Theo H Walworth |r 
W. Walter Watts 
Joseph Woltman 
Harry Woodworth 
|ohn M. Wyatt 



WICC, WICC-TV. Bridgeport, Conn, sis prom dir 

KHO El Paso, acct exec 

|ohn Poole Bdcstg Co Cal, tv prom mgr 

| Writer Thompson. NY acct exec 

NBC Film D.v NY future writer 

Prockter Synd Intl. NY vp chg sis 

KPHO-TV. Phoenix acct exec 

KCRA. Sacramento, sis mgr 

BAB NY. dir natl prom 

KEFO El Paso, stn mgr. sis dir 

Du Mont, NY acei 

CBS TV Wish DC. dir news 

WDSU, WDSU-TV, New Orleans, sis rep 

WNBQ, Chi, sis mgr 

UTP NY. sis prom mgr 

WEHT Henderson Ky, asst gen mgr 

ABC. NY vp cln> tv prodn services dept 

Chicago Bears, pro football player 

WVBC-TV. NY. prom stf 

bCBA. Hywd, mng dir 

CBS TV Film Sis. Atlanta office acct exec 

Edward Pctry. NY. prom dept 

WNBK, Clove, dir sis 

WSEE TV Fall River. Mass. gen mgr 

WENR. WBKB. Chi, pen mgr 

A C. Nielsen NY. client serv exec 

KLAC-TV LA, natl sis mgr 

CBS Inc. NY, controller 

Wvatt & Schuebel. NY. partner 

WO'-TV. Ames. Iowa, asst dir prog devel 

KCCC-TV, Sacramento, asst mgr 

KNXT Hvwd. exec 

WNAO, WNAO-TV. Raleigh, sports dir, slsman 

KCOK. Tulare, Cal. sis mgr 

NBC Film Div, NY, assoc dir 

D'imond Match Co. NY, mdsg stf 

KGMB. Honolulu, stf ann:r 

Du Mont L.-'bs, East Patcrson, N). natl mgr new 

mkt devel 
W^EB Mobi'c. Ala, prog dir 
NBC Spot Sales, NY, sis exec 
rtCA. NY. vp 
WOKY. Milw. sis mgr 
ABC Ra-iio Net. NY. acct exec 
Wyatt & Schuebel. NY. partner 



NEW AFFILIATION 



WJAR WJAR-TV. Bridgeport, prom mgr 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Same, also sis rep KBID-TV, Fresno 

Katz Agency. Dallas office sis stf 

Same, press mgr 

Screen Corns, dir NY sis 

XETV. Tijuana-San Diego. Cal. gen mgr 

KCCC-TV. Sacramento, sis mgr 

Same, dir local prom 

KLYN, Amarillo. gen mgr 

Same, eastern sis mgr 

Same dir news & public affairs 

Vitaplx Corp, southeastern sis rep. hq New 

MPTV. Chi. acct exec 

Guild Films. NY. sis prom dir 

WTSK-TV. Knoxville. Tenn. vp 

Same, vp & comptroller 

WTVN, Columbus. 0. sis stf 

CBS TV Film Sales. NY, asst sis prom mgr 

KFWB. Hywd. natl sis mgr 

Same, acct exec NY office 

Avery-Knodel, NY. mgr sis prom 

WOR-TV. NY. sis mgr 

WNET. Providence. Rl. vp. gen mgr 

WBKB. Chi. vp in chg 

Same, acct exec NTRI 

Vitapix Corp, LA. western sis mgr 

CBS TV, NY. vp. asst to pres 

Also Natl Negro Net. NY, vp 

WTRI (TV), Schenectady, prog dir. prodn 

KDYL Salt Lake City, sis mgr 

CBS TV Film Sis. acct exec Chi office 

WNAO. comml mgr 

KCOK-TV. mgr 

Same, dir 

KMOX, St Louis, mdsg mgr 

KCMB-TV, sect exec 

KCTY. Kans City, gen mgr 

WNOE New Orleans, prog dir 

WNBK, Cleve, tv sis mgr 

Same, exec vp chg new Electronic Prods Div 

Same, exec vp 

ABC TV Net. NY, acct exec 

Also Natl Negro Net, NY, exec vp 



20 



5, 



Xeu- Agency Appointments 

SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



B.-ownell & Field, Providence, Rl 

Eastern Venetian Blind Co, Baltimore 
KPTV Portland. Ore 

Manhattan Soap Co. NY 
Parker Pharmaceutical, Chi 
Pollard Bros Chi 
Prepared Prods Co. Pasadena 

Trade Winds Co. Thunderbolt, Ca 
Waterman Pen Co, Seymour, Conn 
WJAR-TV. Providence, Rl 



Autocrat coffee, tea, coffee syrup 

Curtain, drapery hardware div 
Program, adv promotion 

Sweetheart Cosmetics line 

Nitocin tablets 'to relieve tobacco cravingsl 

Steel factory equipment 

Dixie Fry, Inglchoffer Mustard; also new 

type cereal to be introduced 
Trade Winds. Pan-Redi frozen shrimp 
Pens, domestic advertising 
Station promotion 



Kastor. Farrell. Chesley & 

ford, NY 
Joseph Katz. Baltimore 
Pacific Natl Adv Agency 

land Ore 
Dowd. Redfield & |ohnstor 
Bozell & Jacobs, Chi 
Bozell & Jacobs. Chi 
Ross Roy, Hywd 

Blame-Thompson Co. NY 
Fletcher D. Richards. NY 
Ceorge T. Metcalf Co. Pre 
dence. Rl 



\ew Firms, \ew Offices, Changes of Address 



Alan's Advertising Agency. Tulare. Cal. new agency formed 
by | Alan Rmehart. ex-asst to gen mgr KCOK-TV 

B own Adv. Columbia. Mo. new address. Miller Bldg- new 
dir radio-tv, Fred M Mullen 

I M Hickc.scn Inc. 2021 Crand Ave. Des Moines, new ad 
a3ency formed by consolidation of Blakemore Co Walter 
E. Battenfield Co. of Des Moines, and |. M. Hickcrson NY 

KCCC-TV. Sacamento. new LA office, 1610 N Argyle Ave 
Hywd. mgr George E. Ledell |r 

KSTM-TV. St Louis, new address 5915 Berthold Ave 

M.ira,hon Newsrcel, NY. new address 10 E 49th St 

• I Adv Agency. Chi. new offices 8 S. Michigan Ave 

Esc ett A Mitchell Adv. Terminal Sis Bldg. Portland Ore 
n * agency 



Irwin N. Roscc Co. NY. new address 510 Madison Ave 

rels. tv prodn firm' 
Stars Natl, radio-tv reos. NY, new branch offices a' 

Beverly Blvd. LA: 681 Market St. SF 
Stromberger. La Vene. McKenzie Adv. new address 

Lafayette Park PI. LA 57 
Venard Inc. 444 Madison Ave, NY. new radio-tv station 

firm formed by Lloyd Ceorge Venard. ex-pres of ( 

Taylor; Chi office. 35 E. Wacker Dr. mgr How 

Meyers; West Coast offices. Mills Bldg. SF and 297 

shire Blvd. LA; mgr Duncan A. Scott 
Western Adv. LA. new address 4848-60 Wilshirc Blvc 

is adding Henry Gerstenkorn Co. mdsg. fd spccialis 
White Adv. Tulsa, new address 2010 S. Utica St. Tu 



Numbers after minus 

■ I AY 







Wallis S. Ivy 




Don /'. Molony 




1 s /lr/!< 




Fred )■ 




i 1 Behrman 




Ihin truth 




.Im 1. 1 > 




li Hut ' 




\1 I'll 




J,n II 







1954 is a year-long Birthday Party in the Midwest 
Empire. This year is the 100th birthday of Omaha, 
and the 100th anniversary of the organization of 
Nebraska as a territory. Everybody in the nation 
has been invited to the party, and thousands are 
expected in Omaha for the many colorful pageants, 
sports events, cultural programs and historical dis- 
plays. Naturally Big Mike and KPAB are playing 
an important part in the Centennial activities, just 
as they always play a big part in farming, industry, 
commerce and transportation in the vast Midwest 
Empire. Of course you are invited to visit the 1954 
Centennial, to meet Big Mike, and to learn first 
hand more about one of the nation's great markets. 
Or you can get the Big Mike-KFAB story from 
General Manager Harry Burke or Free and Peters. 



Big Mike is the physical trademark of KFAB — 
Nebraska's most listened-to-station 



MEET ROBB 

(Two Bs, It You Please) 

THOMAS 

He might offer you another 
explanation, but to his spon- 
sors thoso two "B's" moan 
Big f uslnoss. 




Popular miurie, personality interviews) 
frequent news and sports reports and 
pleasant chatter about Milwaukee 

event thai*- the "R.T.*' formula on 

Rolil»'« mid-morning "Record Shop" 

and late afternoon "1340 ( luh."' Mil- 
waukee loves it. loves WEMP*s round- 
the-clock disc-jockey perso n a l ities. 

And so do these national advertisers: 
Oxydol. Swan's Down, Omar 
Baking, Maut: Paint, Robert 
Hall, Wonder Bread. Household 
Finance, Halo Shampoo. Nesbitt, 
Howard Johnson's. Mustcrolc, 
Bluctonc Fuel Oil and others. 

Join them and find out liow WEMP 
delivers up to twice the Milwaukee- au- 

dienee per dollar of Milwaukee net- 
work stations.' (all Beadley-Reedl 

'Bised on latest available Pulse ratmo 
ard SROS rati s 



WEMPwEMP-FM 

MILWAUKEE 

HU6H IOICE, JR.. 6m. Mgr. 
HEADIEY-REED. Nstl. R«p. 



HOURS OF MUSIC. NRWS. SPORTS 




firing fiottheimer 

Director of Advertising 
Vitamin Corp. of America, Newark, N. J. 



The Vitamin Corp. of America has quadrupled its annual sales 
in three years. What boosted sales of vitamins from some S2 to S3 
million in L950 to 110 million in 1953? 

"Advertising," says lr\ing Gottheimer, VGA's advertising strate- 
gist. "Advertising carried through 1>\ point-of-sale merchandising.* 1 

Gottheimer stresses that merchandising clinches the sale. VCA 
usi a radio and tv to educate the consumer to the need for vitamins 
iI\\l)iitol and Juvenal i. "But its the druggist who actually puts 
lJ\!nitol in the customer's hand," he adds. "Of course, it works 
Loth ways. The druggist is more likely to push a product that's 
hacked with heavy national advertising." 

\\ itfa the consumer education angle in mind, VCA's been increas- 
ing its national advertising budget steadily from S1.2 million in 
L951 i fir-t bin \ear in national media) to over S2 million in 1954. 

Here's how this budget breaks down: 60% into tv, 20 r r into 
radio. 20' < into newspapers. But \ CA follows no fixed or rigid 
rules in allocating money to the various media. "We spend for a 
promotion when we feel the time's right, and the campaign is keyed 
to our national market. -a\> Gottheimer. 

VCA's market? The women, particularly housewives in the mid- 
thirties and older. Not that the product is designed for only wo- 
men « use, I'Ut because women are main buyers of drug products. 

VCA doesn t believe in waste circulation. Emphasis in tv and radio 
; like is on women- or famil\ -appeal shows. 

On 23 January VCA's new tv show went on the air: On Your 
Way. MJC IA. Saturday 7:00-7:30 p.m., starring Kathy Godfrey 
1 \ i.i BBDO). [his is a quiz show built around contestants' need for 
funds to make urgent trips. 

In L951, when VCA first came out with Juvenal, a vitamin prod- 
net for youngsters between two and 1(> years of age, VCA launched 
the new product with Junior Frolics, a W VIA. Newark show. Hcaw 
merchandising backing and i\ programing aimed at developing the 
youngsters' own demand fo] Juvenal helped soar the product's sales 
. t "in modest national beginnings to 984,000 in the New i ork metro- 
politan area alone l'\ it- second season. 

Gottheimer's own formula for stopping "that four o'clock let- 
down"? Rybutol, of course, * * * 



22 



SPONSOR 




When it's time to sell it's 



time 





Lola, Lloyd, Barbara 



Here's a Monday through Friday parti- 
cipating program that offers hard hitting, 
daytime selling. 

Teletuue Time highlights music played 
by Toledo's popular Lola Smith at the 
console organ and sung by the lovely 
and talented Barbara Krall. Novelty 
touches are supplied by Lloyd Thaxton 
and Sanford, Lloyd's talking parakeet. 

"The Mail Bag", a regular feature of 
Teletune Time, gives a personal touch 
which brings the hundreds of viewers 
closer to the inner workings of 
WSPD-TV. 



Teletune Time is an action packed show in a market 
now boasting 279,029 television sets. Contact your 
nearest Katz agency or call ADams 3175 in Toledo. 




AM-TV 



TOLEDO, OHIO 



Represented Nationally by Katz 

TOM HARKER, NAT. SALES DIR.. 118 E. 57th STREET, NEW YORK 




8 FEBRUARY 1954 



23 



"AN 

INVESTMENT 
IN 

KNOWLEDGE 
PAYS THE 
BEST 
INTEREST"... 

Benjamin Franklin 




is of January 16, l ( >.~>t 
we have invested 

65,331,060 TV SECONDS 

in the business "f television broad- 
casting. Eai h "[ these sei onda bas 
iin reased out knowledge. I his we 
share »itli out i lients for ilu- benefit 
of .ill . oni ei ned. 

This knowledge has been built only 
through pioneering. The results? 
Some i:r<';it. most good, a few bad 
\ii«l each result bas contributed to .1 
battel over-all operation. 

Your investment in KNIU1 1- an 
investment in knowledge . . . pays "IT 
in sudieni <■ interest .""I produi 1 Bales. 

Contact KMIII. Holrri I 01 NBC 

SPOT SALES. 




Vc»ir developments on SPONSOR stories 

S<»<»: "The video tape recorder: *hat it 

means i<> - 1><» n~«»r~" 
"I In- r;i<li" station of the future" 

Issue: 30 November 1953, p. 38 

21 ipril 1952, p. 23 

Still j «'*•!: The use of tape recording in 
programing 

I in- semi-automatii radio station requiring onlj one man to oper- 
ate 1- now a reality, according to Stephen I'. Temmer, vice president 
and • liii-l engineer ol Gotham Recording Corp., New York. 

In 1I1-1 1 il.iiiL' the i'1'iiaiioii of KEAR, San Francisco, Temmer 
says the station operates with a full staff during regular office hours. 
Bui al five o'clock everybodj goes home, leaving onlj one engineer 
to keep watch ovei two tape machines and apparatus for operating 
the transmittei b) remote control. Actually, said Temmer, the engi- 
mil could go home, too, but he hangs around to make sure the 
lape machines don't break down and to meel FCC regulations which 
require an engineer on dutj . 

During the daj the KEAR staff records the nighttime programing ; 
en one reel of tape th< • record music, and on the second announce- 
ments, station breaks and commercials. \ high-pitched tone, which 
the human eai can'l hear, is recorded on the firs! tape at certain 
intervals. \\ hen the tunc is reached, it automatically stops the music, 
tarts the second tape with it- commercials. The same principle 
operates in reverse to starl the music again. 

During L953, Temmer said, almost 90$ of all I . S. radio shows 
were recorded in advance, in whole or in part. He predicts that an 
even greater percentage of programs will be tape recorded this year. 

He added that tape programs will be placed on stations on a spot 
rather than network basis. * ■*■ * 

"Negro Market Section"" 
"P. S." 

2 1 iugusl 1933. ]». 65 
3 October 1933. p. 18 

Negro programing on a syndicated, 
network lia«i« 

I wo weeks ago the National Negro Network began broadcasting 
it- first dail) program. It was a good beginning; Pet Milk and 
Philip Mot 1 is have signed t" sponsor the -how. Story of Ruin J (den- 
tine, and have one-year contracts. The first program series to be 
aimed at a Negro audience on a national basis, Ruby I alentine is 
being broadcast over in stations which specialize in full-time or 
part-time Negro programing. Two-third- of the stations are in the 
South, l>ut the major Northern Negro markets Washington, Balti- 
more, Philadelphia, New York, Detroit and other big cities — are 

al- \ ele, I. 

The new network, which uses transcriptions rather than telephone 
lines (as doe- the Keystone Broadcasting System), is headed b\ 
President Leonard Evans, Negro market consultant: Jack \\\att 
executive vice president, and Reggie SchuebeL vice president 'part- 
ner- in Wyatl S Schuebel). Evans said t\ had little effect on "the 
radio-minded Negro audience. Now. with NNN. the average Ni 
no longer will be confined to bebop music and quartets singing spirit- 
ual-. We will give him the best in radio programing on a national 
scale, and emphasize realism, informativeness and artistic and tech- 

nil al pel fei lion." 

Evans reported two other programs will soon be released: Cathy 
Stewart starring Hilda Simms (set to debut in mid-March) and 
lis (i Mystery, Man. with Cab Calloway. Other programs planned 
•••i 13 million Negro listeners include news, sports, drama, panel. 
• jui/. variety, musii and 1 ommentary. Ruin Valentine is a 15-minute 
Bve-day-a-week soap opera starring Juanita Hall. • •• 




24 



SPONSOR 



Now grown to full power 
and coverage . . . 




,-«q»l» 



MICHIGAN 



\XS*$&\ 



"^VW* 




FT. WAYNE 



INDIANA 



OW\0 



INDIANAPOLIS 



wowo 

FORT WAYNE 



INDIANA'S ONLY FULL-TIME 50,000-WATT RADIO STATION 

COVERS 20 ADDITIONAL COUNTIES 

1,700,000 MORE PEOPLE 



Here's complete coverage of 69 counties in one 
of the Midwest's richest farming areas. With 
a 5 -fold increase in power, WOWO's new 
quarter-million-dollar transmitter now reaches 
3,701,600 people — including those in Indian- 



apolis, Ind., and Toledo, Ohio. This dominant 
coverage — with greater intensity and clarity 
than ever before — is yours for audience action. 
Another great example of Westinghouse's con- 
tinuing faith in radio! 



WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, Inc. 

WBZ • WBZA • KYW • KDKA . WOWO • KEX . WBZTV • WPTZ | 

National Representatives: Free & Peters 






**V 



•» 



**v< : 









"•— . 






> * 







/?7f.<? « blanket of snow . . . 



atr.i»' 








r 






5^ 













No coverage is more complete than a blanket 
of snow. And many advertisers say the closest 
thing to it in broadcasting is the coverage 
Storer stations provide in Detroit, Toledo, 
Birmingham, Wheeling, Miami, Atlanta and San Antonio. 




STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

WSPD-TV WJBK-TV WAGA-TV KEYl-TV WBRC-TV 

Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. San Antonio, Texas Birmingham, Ala. 

WSPD WJBK WAGA KABC WBRC WWVA WGBS 

Toledo, Ohio Detroit, Mich. Atlanta, Ga. San Antonio, Texas Birmingham, Ala. Wheeling, W. Va. Miami. Fla. 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Soles Mgr. 

118 East 57 Street, New York 22, Eldorado 5-7690 * 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, FRanklin 2-6498 




,v>" 



c* 



* 



Gao&uufe to- Malclt live. MaAJzet 

Represented Nationally by CBS Radio and Television Spot Sales 





WBT-WBTV 



CHARLOTTE, N. C 



The Radio-TV Services 
of the Jefferion Standard 
Life Insurance Company 



The signs of Charlotte are signs of a market 
bigger by far than city population indicates. 
Take air traffic, for example: 

In air passengers per thousand population, Charlotte 
ranks fourth in the nation, surpassed only by Miami, Dalla 
and Atlanta — surpassing such air travel centers as 
Washington, Kansas City and San Francisco-Oakland. 

Charlotte's bulging, pre-war air terminal gives way 
to a plush, new $1,500,000 terminal building due for 
dedication this spring. 

Such busy-ness cannot be accounted for alone by the fact 
that there is no rival commercial airport for 60 miles 
in any direction but only by the additional fact that 
this 60-mile area is densely populated with prosperous 
people who depend upon Charlotte for air travel 
and myriad other services, including — 

— Radio and television. Charlotte's great area stations 
WBT and WBTV unite hundreds of populous textile 
communities into one integrated market ranking 
in the first 25markets of the nation. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 





RADIO DELIVERS 1,012 people per $ spent 



TV DELIVERS 391 people per $ spent . . . 



i 



MAGAZINES DELIVER 337 people per $ spent . 




And NEWSPAPERS DELIVER 213 people 




Source: BAB, CBS Radio 









Why are radio rates low ? 

Broadcasters feel they let opportunity to raise rates slip through 
their fingers after World War II. The reason? Too many fears 



il recent story on advertising expenditures in the ad- 
vertising column of The New York Times noted that ra- 
dio's dollar volume was "unexpectedly" up 4.3% in 1953 
over the year before. 

Just why this increase was unexpected was not explained. 
It was certainly not unexpected to the radio industry and 
those close to it. 

But the increase, obviously, was a surprise to those con- 
vinced that radio is on the way out. 

This radio-is-dying psychology has been the despair of 
broadcasters during the past few years. They believe it 
has not only scared away advertisers who could put radio 
to good use but has been a powerful factor in either forc- 
ing rates down or preventing them from going up when 
economic logic dictated increases. 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 



In this article, based on weeks of conversations with 
both buyers and sellers of radio, sponsor takes a broad 
look at the reasons why broadcasters, as well as advertisers, 
feel radio is an unparalleled buy. But more than that it 
reveals for the record what the slings and arrows of out- 
rageous fortune have done to radio's rate card, especially 
the networks' prices. 

In discussing the logic (or lack of itj in radio rates, 
broadcasters often start off on this tack: 

Advertisers might now be paying 10 to 20^ more for 
radio — and accepting this higher level without complaint 
— were it not for a series of historical developments after, 
and before. World War II which made the radio industry- 
slow to raise its rates when it should have done so. 

Why didn't it? 



29 



4 AGES OF RADIO AND HOW THEY OPERATED TO KEEP THE RATE CARD LOW 




1 



EASY-SALES Kit A (1SS7-4S) 

The halcyon days of radio. Stations were relatively few; there 
was business enough for everybody and relatively little concern 
about rates. Anti-trust atmosphere tended to dampen rate hikes 




3 



TV-SCARE EllA (STARTING 1918) 

Advent of commercial video shattered radio's faith in future 
temporarily. Aggressive selling attitude faded, radio failed to 
capitalize on the extra-set and out-of-home listening trends 



Right after the war product-starved consumers were in 
a big buying mood. Radio was booming. Not onlv were 
consumer- replacing old. w urn-out radios in record volume, 
hut the number of new radio home- was growing at a 
fast pace. 

The cost of everything was rising. The boom led to in- 
flation. New-papers and magazines openly raised rates 
on the basis of increased co-ts. Radio pushed through 
moderate increases but. 1>\ and large, held itself in check. 
\\ hx ? 

There were main reasons. One of the most important 
was a new FCC concept The government agem \ was ap- 
proving new stations b) the hundred-. Radio stations on 
the air went from 940 in l'Mo to about 2,500 today. 

I hi- new FCC polk] called for radio service t>> everj 
commnnit) in the land without regard ti> it- ability to sup- 
port the Dumber <>f stations the FCC granted. Those who 

attended FCC hearing- both before and after the war were 

struck b) the new emphasis in FCC thinking. During the 




2 



MANY-STATION ERA (STARTING 1946) 

Liberal FCC policy toward new stations raised total from 940 
in 1946 to 2,500 today. Fear of competition, as well as fear 
of economic slump, held rates down though radio was growing 




H 






4 



NET RATE-CIT ERA (STARTING 1951) 

Spearheaded by ANA and such clients as P&G, advertisers 
forced network rate cuts in '51, '52. Local rates affected also 
though spot growth made stations resist announcement rate cut 



30's the FCC was concerned with practical economics. 
W ould the market's purchasing power be able to support 
another station? If not, the would-be broadcaster was 
turned dow n. 

But by 1946 the FCC's greater concern was to provide 
competitive programing in the public interest. 

The established stations, not sure what this new com- 
petition would mean, acted cautiously on the rate issue. 
Main felt no pressing need to raise rates, anyway. The\ 
had been making a lot of money. They could afford to 
make a little less. I nlike newspapers and magazines, radio 
was nol -addled with heavy plant and equipment charges 
and it- operating costs were Largelj kept under control. 

Besides, radio's customers were not accustomed to being 
told that rates would have to be raised because wage in- 
i reases or the cosl of coal made it necessary. Radio adver- 
ti-er- were asked to understand only rate increases based 
on bigger audience or increased power. 

I he fear of competition was reinforced bv other fears. 



30 



SPONSOR 



Broadcasters are ashamed to admit il now but some of 
them were afraid of a depression, or were waiting for main 
of the new stations to fold. Dire predictions of impending 
failures for hundreds of new stations (or old ones unable 
to meet the challenge) were frequent. 

Then there were fears of new technical developments — 
even before these developments matured into full-scale com- 
petition. Some of them, like facsimile and fm, never did. 
Tv eventually did. of course, but broadcasters emphasize 
that video acted as a brake on rising radio rates even 
before it became a commercial fact. When the prophetic 
voice of RCA's David Sarnoff advised NBC's affiliates in 
1947 that now was the time to get into tv, it seemed to some 
that the knell of doom had indeed struck for radio. 

Some of the factors acting as a deterrent to increased 
radio rates are not easily definable. A rep executive with 
long experience in the radio business told sponsor: 

"Take the case of a good-sized market with a dominant 
newspaper which owns a dominant radio station. The 
market has the usual complement of network stations plus 
one or two independents. Naturally, the newspaper is the 
chief consideration of the publisher. It grosses more than 
the station, has a more impressive tradition and has great- 
er meaning in his life. 

"Being dominant, the newspaper-owned station sets the 
rate pattern in the market. But its rates may have been 
held back because it was doing well anyway, because the 
ad department of the newspaper so requested, and for other 
such reasons. The other stations obviously find it hard to 
raise rates if the dominant station keeps rates pegged at 
the same level. 

''This situation, though not too widespread, was a factor 
in helping keep rates down after the war." 

One analyst long familiar with radio told a sponsor 
editor: "I find an inferiority complex among radio people. 
It may have something to do with the backgrounds of 
station managers. Or maybe radio people don't consider 
themselves as big business. Or maybe it's because they 
don't have that long continuity of tradition that newspapers 
have." 

The sum of all these factors appears to have dulled ra- 
dio's selling and promotion in the crucial postwar years. 
Radio was hampered by the lack of network unity as well 
as station unity. The webs and stations sold themselves, 
but thev didn't sell radio. There was nothing to compare 
with the general media presentations put out by news- 
papers and magazines. 

This situation is being remedied by the growing aggres- 
siveness of such groups as BAB and SRA. But there is still 
fertile ground to plough and there is still much that indi- 
vidual stations can do. One medium-sized Pennsylvania 
agency complained to sponsor that it has been almost 
begging for a genuine radio presentation for almost a year. 
And it still hasn't gotten one. 

As an example of weak promotion and selling, broadcast- 
ers pinpoint this fact: Radio was slow to capitalize on the 
discovery that, even before tv, listening in and outside the 
home was spreading out. There were plenty of secondary 
bedroom and kitchen sets in the late 40's (as sponsor. 
probably the first to do so, persistently pointed out dur- 
ing that time). And when America's increasingly prosper- 
ous family bought an automobile after the war. nine times 
out of 10 it bought a radio with it. 



Radio knew, in a rough way, whal was happening. Bui 
it told its advertiser- with a generous wave ol the hand thai 
secondary and auto set- were jusl velvet, Qiey'ri 
gratis, no charge. Actually, radio didn't know much aboul 
listening on these "bonus" sets. \lin all. if radio wasn'l 
charging for them, whj should it paj to measure them, 
or be concerned how the) wen- measured':' 

\ml so radio's chance for a higher rate base wenl down 
the drain. When the rale cuts did come, saj the i idiomen, 
the) were thus cut from a level that had been too low in 
the pre-tv era to start with. 

In evaluating rates toda\ one of radio's strong argu- 
ments is that it can reach the consumer more cheapl) than 
any other major medium. While comparing media < osts 
can lead to treacherous mathematical shoals, the advertise] 
who wants or needs such a comparison will usuall) be told 
by his researchers that radio will deliver his message at a 
rock bottom cost-per-1,000. 

A research executive at one of the top 10 agencies told 
sponsor: "There is no question in my mind that, among 
the major media, radio is still the cheapest \va\ to reach 
people." 

A media analyst at another top 10 agency said: "In 

terms of a good workhorse medium, able to reach people 

at low cost, radio has always been a good bu\ . I don't 

think there's any dispute about that." While the agencies, 

(Please turn to page 122 I 



EDITORIAL 

W H Y A R E RADIO UA 7 E S L W .' 

How much should an ad mi ilium chargi .' 
That's a question thai won't find a ready 
answer at even the largest ad agencies, for 
the value of one medium vs. anolhi r is 
immeasurable. That radio is considered 
the "cheapest" of the major ad m< din is 
both a compliment and an insult. A com- 
plimt nt because it represents a bargain 
bun: an insult because radio rate levels 
have been too long based on sloppy selling, 
soft business tactics, and fears. In tin 
article <>n these pages sponsor uncovers 
the cycles and triads that havi com- 
bined over llu past 1.") years to depress 
radio rates. The study is useful fal- 
si n rat reasons : (1) It explains factually 
mini radio, generally speaking is a bargain 
bail for tin advertiser; (2) it gives n 
litlli -known history of radio rating phi- 
losophy. To every sponsor and his ag 
we say. Read tliis one carefully. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



31 



How In get the most out of basebi 

National Itoh puis 350 ",, of ail budget in Iv. radio. Contests and othor promo 



PP . I ~ 1 l I I I — I < ill. I ). ( - l.|||\ |l>< ,ll l||-. • 

linn last m;ii was conducted bj a beei 

• ompan) and ii pulled more than .1 
million ballots. 

I In- elo tion \\ as in name the ia\ oi 
ill- player mi the W ashington Nationals 
ball club .iihI (In- winner, .1- an) \\.t»li- 
ington fan can tell you, was center- 
fielder Jim Busby. But the real prize 
wenl to the Bponsoi of the Washington 
Nationals baseball broadcasts and the 
favorite player election, National Brew- 
ing Co. 

For a relativelj small expenditure, 
National Brew ing got : 

• lin reased interest in the team and 
hence in it^ broadcasts due to the pro- 
fessional!) dynamic hoopla attending 




Norman A'mony, Boh's 
dd mgr., has seen firm 
grow rapidly under im- 
pe!us of effective sporf 
sponsorship year round 



the favorite player election. 

• Point-of-sale impact oi tin- most 

attention-catching kind through ballot 

boxes placed in taverns and retail 

stores. 

I he vsliole promotion added up to 
intelligent use of radio and television 
baseball sponsorship a- the keystone 
tin an advertising-merchandising-pro- 



motion parla\. National's approach i- 

one to do some thinking about if you 
now Bponsor or are considering buying 
baseball — minor league or major. 

Promotion. ho\\e\er, is not the enl) 
wa) in which National Brewing 
squeezes the most out of baseball spon- 
-orsbip. The compan) also takes these 
two important steps: 

1. It expands outward from the 
market in which it sponsors baseball 
to cover surrounding territory as much 
as several hundred miles awav with the 
radio ballcasts — and does it without 
spending an extra cent. 

2. It maintains the continuit) of ad- 
vertising pressure and fan interest b> 
earning awav-from-home as well as 



One million people voted 



Boh's election to name Nats' favorite player. Below, ballots brought on field before name M 




lonsiirship 



Kite extra fan excitement 



home games, and on a live basis. 

Though National Brewing uses every 
means of adding to the punch of radio 
and tv. it's not one of those companies 
putting a limited sum into the medium 
and trying to spread the dollars with 
gimmicks. National actually is one of 
the major spenders proportionately 
among U. S. brewers. It puts about 
80 r /c of its budget into radio and tele- 
vision and traces much of its rapid 
growth in the past five years to results 
from heavy tv sponsorship year 'round. 
The company has shot up at least one- 
third in sales over the five years since 
it has had tv. 

National Brewing's advertising man- 
ager during recent years has been Nor- 



man S. Almoin. \\- agencj is Kenyon 
& Eckhardt, New York. 

Although National Brewing's 1953 
baseball approach shows the experi- 
ence of a veteran, the coinpam never 
had actually sponsored baseball broad- 
casts until last season. Wrestling, local 
variety shows and packaged I re had 
been its previous programing. 

The company has been bottling beer 
since 1885 from headquarters in Balti- 
more. It has two brands, National 
Bohemian and National Premium. Pre- 
mium has a limited ad budget and cur- 
rently is using newspapers and maga- 
zines. It just started sponsorship of 
/ Led Three Lives, WBAL-TV, Balti- 
more. It's a higher-priced brand 
which has distribution in markets as 
far away from Baltimore as Los An- 
geles and Chicago. Bohemian, on the 
other hand, is a popular-priced beer 
sold regionally in Maryland, Pennsyl- 
vania, Virginia, West Virginia, North 
Carolina, Delaware. Florida and the 
District of Columbia. 

It's National Bohemian that is the 
heavy advertiser. Bohemian — better 
{Please turn to page 1161 



IBS BEAT MILWAUKEE! 




MMMl ATTENDANCE 

1.826,397 




• 



Wm tanar Umi 10%. t* <**.• M t>l 
Bi > k r w«MfclmitM-<w 

NATIONAL BOHEMIAN 

"O/i boy- what o 6««a" 




Bill Veeck, former Browns owner, says Jerold 
Hoffberger, National Brewing president, is one 
of three men most responsible for bringing 
team to Baltimore. Even in wintertime brewer 
is active on radio, tv, in newspapers. Ad above 
is part of Boh's current campaign to excite 
fans, sell season tickets to Orioles' games 



|| Wint16r! thC SpOnSOri National Brewing credits tie-ins with baseball sponsorship as having big part in making fans Boh enthusiasts 



wsaamm 






m 



■■-""■■ - ■■:. ■ """'■■ 




) 



I*. 



>N 



a 



\ t 






lew Nielsen local ratings plai 

l siii» diary technique and aew automatic* control device, Nielsen hoj 



Ma ist week, veteran researchei \\ 
thin C. Nielsen told tin- radio-h Indus- 
tr\ thai In- could come up with a new 
U> il area i ating -<-i \ u e !"i radio-t\ 
one thai would give timebuycrs every- 
thing ex< epl tin- kitchen -ml. il the 

indii-li \ w.i- H tiling t" y v l"i it. 

\\ th tlii- announcement, Nielsen 
dropped anotl ei r< Bear< li blockbustei . 

\iti-i measuring national radio and 
t\ listening for man) years with the 
automatic, patented Vudimeter acost- 
K ele ti"ni' measuring de\ ice Niel- 
sen revealed that In- proposed new lo- 
< .il sei \ i< es would be based pi imai ilj 
nil the use "I resean li dial ies i ailed 
"Audilogs. rhese would be f 1 1 1 « -• 1 out 
l>\ listenei 3 or \ iewei - I one diary per 
set measured I . I bej would then be 
"qualit) controlled" b) Vudii tetei data 
and by data from a new Nielsen device 
called the !>'• :ordimetei .1 sorl "I jun- 
ior-grade ludimeter, 

Nielsen thus tossed his Homburg in- 
to the In. ,il resean li 1 ing w bere such 
1I1 oi ganizations as Mil'.. Hoop- 



er, Pulse I rendex and \ ideodex have 
pro* ided their often < onflicting rat- 
in:- He also joined Mil!. Hooper and 
\ ideodex in the use of diaries — a re- 
- 11 h method the Ni< Isen organization 
li 1- nol v iewed h itli Favor in the past, 
baving often claimed that diaries are 
subject t" "considerable human error." 
Nielsen's main reason for a partial 
about-face on the subject of diaries i- 

1 

research 

llllllllllllllll 



apparently a matter ol costs. \\ ith a 
I... al human panel keeping a diary re - 
ord (d radio-t\ shows, the costs are 
much lower than those with a local 
Uidinieter sample. \nd, unlike the \u- 
dimeter, a diary < an pro> ide data on 
audience composition, Ion ; a useful 
time! uying tool in pinpointing air au- 
diences. Moreover, with his new Re- 
cordimetei Nielsen feels he has found 



;i waj oi compensating for some of the 
shortcomings of the diary method. 

Niel-en 's proposed local ratimi- 
would i;i\e admen: 

1. \ service to measure both radio 
and t\ u-im_' similar diaries and re- 
search techniques. The diaries would 
|, f . cross-checked for accuracy with the 
existing ludimeter sample. And the 
new Recordimeter, which acts a* a 
"prompter" will also help to make sure 
the diary i- nol filled in falsely (see 
explanation next to picture at right). 

2. Report- covering at least 30 of 
the country's top radio-tv market-, to 
be issued on a minimum basis of four 
times a year (more, if the industry is 
willing to pay the costs). Each report 
would cover around-the-cloek listening 
and viewing in a probability sample 
thai would include the correct propor- 
tion of single and multiple-set homes 
(by Nielsen's reckoning I. Reports 
would cover eight weeks of listening 
and viewing. 

3. Research methods designed to 



NATIONAL Nielsen ratings use the Audimeter 
only, with no human measurements needed 

Advantages: ludimeter is mechanical device attached to 

It automatically records length oi time listened and to what sta- 

This reduces human error to minimum. Person with Audi- 

meter in his home need only mail tape rerun! of listening to com- 

l*in\ bi-weekly. Minute-by-minute, 2A-hour record 0) tuning is 

provided. Panel •< hi< h is - establishing long-term 

With availability of minute-by-minuti .ning. 

ludimeter fit thou flou oj audience into and out 

of shows. I irtually all chance of human error is ruled nut. 



warn 

LOCAL Nielsen ratings will use diary filled 
in by panel members plus new Recordimeter 

Advantages: Recordimeter is simple, cheap. It gives warning to 
panel member that it is time to make entry in diary: For tv light 
flashes on; ior radio liaht flashes on and buzzer sounds. This 
warning comes ei >ery half hour set is on. Re< ordimeter purpose is 
to help see that diar\ is filled out simultaneous with use of set, 
not long alter. Device also measures total time set is on. This 
provides check. 1 1 diary and Recordimeter differ, diary is thrown 
out. Thus false listening records can be weeded out. Melsen 
diary, like other diaries, yields valuable audience composition. 



Disadvantage*: ludimeter measures tuning only, not whether 

people iiere actually listl [though studies have 

shou n set tuned in generally indicates attention to set). H 

ol dei -ample and has kept 

ratings except in feu major markets. Out-of-hom* 

not me,, Mued uith Audimetei I 'lumber of 

multiple-set homes is ■-till underplayed in • en sample. 

-•r of multiple-set >■■ 
01 1 r to '"» bnal rating service using Reno, 



34 



Disadvantages: Veu \ etsi method -nil does not entirely elimi- 
nate human element. Panel members may be inaccurate in giving 
audience composition figures. Or they may feel so curious about 
presence in hon 'dimeter device and diary that they tune 

radio and tv set more than is their usual custom. < Melsen has 
g this tendency, however.) Since Recordimeter 
does not record what station is tuned, it can't give minute-by- 
minute audience flou figures as in completely automatic -ludimeter 
system. Audimeters will l»- used to check new local ratings. 

SPONSOR 



hat you should know about it 

provide area ratings that measure all local clialiii" 



Latest Nielsen electronic gadget, RecorrJimeter, is key to new diary study t 



st like something 



"It looks ju 
dreamed up for George Orwell's 
book 1984," said an agency research 
chief last week as he ivas shown 
the small grey gadget pictured 
at right. It ivas Nielsen's new 
"Recor dimeter," a device which 
will be used, along ivith existing 
Audimeters, to cj'oss-check the accu- 
racy of diaries submitted by mem- 
bers of local Nielsen rating 
panels. Gadget is actually a sort 
of Audimeter Jr. It has an on-off 
switch (which panelist turns "On" 
at start of week of diary record- 
ing), a Veeder counter (which 
records the total amount of time 
set is actually on), a flashing light 
and buzzer (to remind panelist every 
half hour to fill in Audilog diary). 
Diary is seen hanging from set. 

avoid "short-changing" stations that 
reach out beyond the metropolitan 
areas in which most of the local rating 
services (like Pulse and Hooper) now 
do the bulk of their measurements. 
Thus, local Nielsen ratings would be 
good for a station's whole coverage 
area and give a count on all the homes 
reached by a particular program on a 
particular station. This would be done, 
said Nielsen, by selecting large areas 
around metropolitan centers — an av- 
erage of 10,000 square miles — in which 
to plant the Nielsen diaries. 

4. A report which would give time- 
buyers a wide range of data, including 
audience size and composition, cumu- 
lative audience, station shares, both 
the metropolitan-only and whole cov- 
erage area audiences. Nielsen feels 
his data will enable timebuyers to cal- 
culate accurate cost-per-1,000 figures, 
avoiding the pitfalls of such popular- 
but-inaccurate methods as the "half-of- 
home-countv" and "509c formula" in 




which arbitrary cut-offs are used in 
projecting local ratings against cover- 
age information. His radio figures may, 
by the way, include out-of-home listen- 
ing in cars as an "optional" feature. 

5. Local research data which, in 
many ways, will be an extension of the 
network-level NRI and NTI services. 
Admen, for example, would be able to 
get a picture of how a network show 
behaves at the local level in some 30 
leading markets, and how these local 
raitngs compare with the national av- 
erages. Nielsen feels that his local ser- 
vices will be generally compatible 
with the national Audimeter data since 
the research methods I fixed sample of 
homes on probability basis, etc.) are 
similar. 

Those are the highlights of Nielsens 
proposals. The new Nielsen local rat- 
ings will start late this summer, or 
early this fall — if enough agencies and 
stations buy them. Nielsen has field- 
tested his new diary technique and 



has detailed plans for putting local rat- 
ings in operation, but the go-ahead 
time depends on industry reaction. 
Nielsen may well modify some details 
of the local ratings plan in response 
to suggestions, after the industry has 
had a chance to study his plans. 

As Nielsen sees it. his main cus- 
tomers for the lo«'al ratings will be 
agencies, who will use this service in 
(Please turn to page 125) 



.\ielsen joins 5 others 
in local rating" race 

At the moment, no less than five 
ratings firms are providing local 
radio and/or tv research data. 
They are: American Research Bu- 
reau, Hooper, Pulse, Trendex and 
Videodex. (For details see "What's 
wrong with the rating services? ", 
SPONSOR, 28 Dec. 1953 issue.) 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



35 




Restaurant firm's ad strategy: 

1. IS'eu Chock full o'.Xuts coffee is same you get 

in its eating places. Peg for entire advertising cam- 
paign: restaurant coffee is "superior" coffee. 

2. To hit potential customers with utmost frequency 
firm narrowed air drive to single radio and tv 
station in tlie New York area, used them often. 

3. Catchy jingle, repetition of "heavenly coffee" 
theme hastened brand identification, got coffee 

( >.V J distribution in A. ) . area in just two months. 



How In launch a coffee 
that costs .")i more 



\.Y.C'. chain stressed air. made asset of price 




by Jonn Murks 

j 4 ,,r the lii-i three days "I < !h<x k 
full o'Nuts coffee's advertising drive 
you < ouldn't buj the brand am n here 
in tin- New ^ ork market. 

The New \ <<ik < it\ restaurant firm 
purposel) -tailed advertising it- new 
< offee earl) i" help fon e disti ibution 

I{ca-un: Tli ffee industry - highb 

competitive, baa plentj of well estab- 
lished l-i. iikI-. IT- tough for tin- new- 
comer i" liii super market shelves un- 
less a lot i«f ' u-tomera are ai tivel) a-k- 
ing for the particular brand. 



36 



Chock full o'Nuts coflFee created this 
demand from consumers with a hard- 
hitting radio and t\ campaign backed 
up bj newspaper and car card adver- 
tising. It's new spending over half of 
it- estimated $500,000-plus annual 
budget on the air media. 

Results? According to the firm, it 
achieved '''■> distribution in the New 
"*» « ■ i k area in just two months. ' \ll 
major chains except \\l\ which 
pushes it- ow n brands of coffe 

Now tli.it it'- on the gn> <i \ store 



shelves the new coffee seems to be well 
on the way to reaching its second goal: 
making enough sales to stay there. This 
quick headway has come despite the 
fad that the new brand costs five cents 
Mini,- than most other coffees. 

Chock full o'Nuts is a chain of 25 
snack bars (the firm calls them "res- 
taurettes") in the New York area spe- 
cializing in hurry-up meals. V\ illiam 
Black, owner of the chain, had long 
felt the success of the restaurettes was 
iluc large!] to their coffee. This past 

SPONSOR 



fall he decided to gamble with pack- 
aged coffee identical to that served by 
the restaurettes. 

Black faced two main problems: 

1. It's virtually impossible for a new 
coffee brand to survive unless it has 
some distinctive feature which the old. 
established brands lack. 

2. In this era of can-opener cook- 
ing, speed is replacing other considera- 
tions in meal planning. Housewives 
are turning to the instant coffees. That 
hurts the chances of a new regular 
coffee. 

Chock full o'Nuts coffee got the fla- 
vor of newness by building on an old 
established notion: to stay in business 
a restaurant's got to serve good coffee. 

Here are the main points used by the 
new brand's agency, Frederick Clinton 
Co., in air and print advertising: 

1. A restaurant's reputation is as 
bad or as good as the cup of coffee 
it serves. The finest meal goes unap- 
preciated when topped off by an in- 
ferior cup of coffee. The average res- 
taurant, therefore, serves a much better 
cup of coffee than the average house- 
wife. 

2. To make this better cup of coffee 
restaurants buy a better grade of coffee 
than can be purchased in a grocery. 
Chock full o'Nuts packaged coffee is 
the same coffee that is served in its 
restaurettes. Because of its superior 
quality its costs a few cents more than 
regular coffee. 

3. To insure home consumers of 
getting the same cup of coffee as is 
served in the restaurettes every tin con- 
tains a plastic coffee measure and in- 
structions. 

The brand's advertising drive — in- 
cluding radio, tv, newspapers and car 
cards — was designed to put over these 
selling points as quickly and as effec- 
tively as possible. The agency wrote 
an easy-to-hum jingle for its air drive; 
used attention-catching colors and bold 
type faces in its newspaper and sub- 
way ads. 

Incidentally, the coffee's over-all bud- 
get — over $500,000 — is a much bigger 
chunk than is usually spent to adver- 
tise a new product in its initial year of 
distribution in a single market. Rea- 
soning behind the expenditure may be 
that the restaurant chain, in advertis- 
ing its packaged coffee, is also adver- 



case history 



in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiimi! 



Restaurant chain 
got start during 
depression days 




William Black 



Harold Rieff 



Chain was born in L920 when William Black (1.) opened nut stand. When 
depression hit lie converted in stands into low-priced snack liars Today. 
25 restaurettes gross $10 million annually. Black now plots ail strategy 
for new coffee with Harold Rieff (r.), exec. vvp., Frederick Clinton agencj 

IlllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 



tising its 25 restaurettes. 

Although the plugs for the restau- 
rant are always indirect, they are, 
nonetheless, strong facets of the copy. 
The announcer never says, "Come to 
any of Chock full o'Nuts 25 restau- 
rettes and you'll get delicious meals as 
well as the coffee that made the chain 
famous." But the continuous mention 
of the fact that the restaurettes' coffee 
is superior coffee is almost as pointed 
as a direct pitch. 

The ad budget, therefore, is serving 
a dual function: launching the new 
coffee, and getting more business for 
the restaurettes. 

Here's how Harold Rieff, executive 
vice president of the Frederick Clinton 
Co. and account executive for the 



coffee, and William Black, owner ol 
the restaurant chain, approached the 
radio-tv campaign: 

• To get the coffee into stores fast 
Rieff and Black wanted to make a hard 
corps of consumers actively demand 
the brand. The best way of achieving 
product identification is through repe- 
t il ion. For this reason they decided to 
concentrate fire on a single radio sta- 
tion and a single tv station, hitting the 
audience of each as many times as the 
budget would allow. 

• To get the most yardage out of the 
radio ad outlay within the limits of 
the single station Rieff selected an- 
nouncements and participations instead 
of confining the schedule to a single 

i Please turn to page 110) 



In addition to announcements firm sponsors tv show, "Jerry Lester's Late Date" (WNBT) which 
reaches adults (Sat., 11:15 to midnight). Jean Martin, singing star (below), is sponsor's wife 





|B Jii3 J 


jW ^m^ ' raff 


Tf/T-«K . .' 


^e jI\{ EH w&i 

: 

1 " ml 

1 * ! \ 


\ nHc 


1 \ 





8 FEBRUARY 1954 



37 




MI-MI III \ l\ tf.I \IIO\ IIOMtn MEMBERS read 

articles before publication, give suggestions. Top, from left: George 
Abrams, ad dir., Block D r ug, Jersey City; Vincent Bliss, exec. v. p., 
Earle Ludgin, Chicago; Arlyn Cole, pres., Mac Wilkins. Cole & 
Weber, Portland; Dr. Ernest Dichter, pres., Inst, for Research in Mass 
Motivations. Middle, from left: Stephens Dieh, v. p., Hewitt, Ogilvy, 



Benson & Mather, N. Y.; Ben Donaldson, ad & sales prom, dir., Ford, 
Dearborn; Marion Harper Jr., pres., McCann-Erickson, N. Y.; Ralph 
Harrington, ad mgr., General Tire & Rubber, Akron. Bottom, from 
left: Morris Hite, pres., Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas; J. Ward Maurer, 
ad dir., Wildroot, Buffalo; Raymond Morgan, pres.. Raymond R. Mor- 
gan, Hollywood; Henry Schachte, v. p., Sherman & Marquette, N. Y. 



21-artMe media series: 

It off f/off can use it in your tvork 



J^ vei since sponsor began publishing it- 21-articl< series 
evaluating media, demand l"t reprints bas poured in. Thi 

Mi-Media Evaluation series has proved "I keen interest to 
executives in ever) cornel "I .iii advertising: account men; 
.id managers; timebuyers; research men: Btation and net- 
work executives .ill have written "i phoned to a-k Eot 
back copies oi reprints. Vctuall) no reprints are available 
iuse when the series is completed it will be published 
in book Form. (Man) orders foi the book have already 
been recei\ ed. I 

The Ul-Media series has had -if h will'- acceptance be- 
cause it does a job thai had never previous!) been done 
anywhere. Is boils <l>>\\n the characteristics of each ma- 



38 



jor medium; probes the methods bj which admen select 
media; takes apart the research tools used in picking 
media. It- virtually a refresher course for advertising 
men ami media people on ever) level. \t the same time 
it provides analysis which main have found stimulat- 
ing and helpful in understanding day-to-day media prob- 
lems. Part IT in series will appear 22 February. 

Perhaps in the pre-- ,,f events you have missed one or 
more of the 1(> Ul-Media articles published to date. Or 
you ma\ have tead one of the articles and forgotten tin 

issue date. \« help you in continuing to use the series 
in your work you'll find a summary of each part with 
i--ue dale stai tinu al right 

SPONSOR 



PART 1. "'Why evaluate ad media?" Ten pages of 
charts including 30 tips to advertisers, agencies and media 
on evaluation. Two-page chart spells out how typical agen- 
cy analyzes each major market. Another chart gives figures 
through years to show how all major media complement 
each other after initial period of competition (all prosper 
or show revenue declines simultaneously). Article shows 
why media selection still is in "cave man stage," cites ex- 
amples of various yardsticks (20 April 1953 issue I . 

rft fift *ft 

PART 2. "Media Basics I." Two pages, including one 
full page of charts and figures, are devoted to each of the 
following media: newspapers, direct mail, radio and maga- 
zines. Advantages, limitations, biggest clients and growth 
charts are given for each medium. Spokesmen for each 
medium tell why advertisers should include their particu- 
lar media in total advertising schedule. (4 May 1953 issue) . 



* ¥ 



* 



PART 3. "Media Basics II." Two pages, including one 
full page of charts and figures, are devoted to: television, 
business papers, outdoor and transit. Advantages, limita- 
tions, biggest clients and growth charts are again given for 
each medium and media spokesmen tell why advertisers 
should include their particular media in total advertising 
schedule (18 May 1953 issue). 



PART 4. "I. How to choose media." Different agencies 
use different yardsticks in selecting media for ad campaigns. 
The various techniques are discussed here. Tips from spon- 
sor's All-Media Advisory Board and executives of research 
organizations are given on setting up research, choosing 
objectives. Chart comparing billings of magazines and air 
media rebuts Life's claim that it leads media parade in an- 
nual billings (1 June 1953 issue). 

Wp. rfr •}» 

PART 5. "II. How to choose media." Debate on wheth- 
er some advertisers' newspaper backgrounds and complex- 
ity of air media create bias in favor of print. Twenty-six 
advertisers, agencymen and researchers discuss factors they 
personally consider most important in selecting and rec- 
ommending media 1 15 June 1953 issue). 

•T* V V 

PART 6. "What sponsors should know about Life's new 
4-media study." Article debates whether Life's study is 
really impartial, reprints charts from study to show mis- 
use of statistical data. Network researchers' and agency- 
men's opinions on the study are quoted. Highlights of the 
report are given with comments by air and print experts 
on various points I 29 June 1953 issue). 

«g« ^r* 2$ 

PART 7. "Beware of these media research pitfalls!" 
Why both the print and air media are guilty of over- 
reaching in their research. Various media sales tests — 
including tests made by radio networks — are examined to 
show validity or non-validity. Four principal methods of 
measuring sales effectiveness are given, with their weak- 
nesses. Chart points up 10 media research traps for the 
unwary (27 July 1953 issue). 




m 



Here are excerpts from letters 
to SPONSOR on Media Study 

COMMUNICATIONS RESEARCH DIRECTOR. Albert 
A. Shea, director, Communications Research, Toronto: 
"The tremendous mass of facts on all media is being 
presented in clear and highly digestible fashion. The 
layouts are excellent. The articles are full of meaty 
pieces of highly valuable material. I am certain that 
there has never been so complete, thorough, objective 
and highly useful a collection of information 
about media in America . . . Congratulations!" 

ADVERTISER. E. S. Schulman, sales promotion, Shell 
Oil Co., New York: "The chart giving facts about 
the ratirg services is, in my opinion, the most 
concise and informative reference I have ever seen. 
I would like permission to reproduce it for 
distribution among various people in Shell Oil. . ." 

MEDIA DIRECTOR. R. F. Hussey, vice president and 
media director, Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago: 
"Sincerest congratulations on a lively and remarkably 
impartial handling of the highly competitive American 
media scene. You do full justice to broadcasting 
but you also recognize newspapers, outdoor and 
magazines as features of the scenery. This is 
remarkable broadmindedness. . ." 

NETWORK EXECUTIVE. John Burr, assistant manager 
of advertising and publicity, ABC, San Francisco: 
"Your article on the Emil Mogul weekly media tests is 
packed with the facts and figures — and clear thinking — 
we need to sell San Francisco Bay Area retailers. 
Therefore, I was wondering if you are planning 
to have reprints made of this one article. . ." 

COLLEGE PROFESSOR. Herb True, assistant professor 
at the University of Notre Dame: "Your All-Media 
Evaluation Study looks like the greatest thing you, or any 
other publication, for that matter, ever attempted. . ." 

RADIO-TV DIRECTOR. Miss Dee Freiday, radio-tv 
director of Gibbons Advertising Agency, Tulsa: 
"Your current series on Media Basics is, in our 
opinion, one of the finest yet — congratulations!" 

BUSINESS PAPERS EXPERT. John B. Babcock, manager 
of information service, The Associated Business 
Publications: "We were quite impressed with your 
series of media evaluation articles. You did an 
especially good job on business papers in the small 
space that you were allotted. I'm wondering in what 
shape the entire study might be reprinted later on. . ." 

TRANSPORTATION EXPERT. George B. MacGlennon, 
managing director of the Natl. Association of Transpor- 
tation Advertising: "I realize there must have been a 
tremendous amount of work that went into this series 
and I think you have made a real contribution. . ." 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



39 



I* MIT ii. "II. Beware of these media research pitfalls!" 
Entire text of Advertising Research Foundation's criteria 
foi advertising and marketing research is reprinted. Dis 
< ii— ion of "Mediamatics" (attempt i<> reduce media selec- 
tion to a mathematic formula). Twenty-one researchers 
ocymen, advertisers and .iii experts tell how thej Bel up 
tests and use media research (24 Vugusl 1953 issue). 
jf. if. jf, 

I* HIT it. "Hon 72 advertisers evaluate media.' 1 Foui 
pages of charts tabulate answers each of 72 advertisers 
gave to sponsor's L6-parl questionnaire on media evalua- 
tion. These advertisers spend total "I J137 million annu 
all) on advertising. Questions are explained and sponsor's 
conclusions given. Includes information on advertisers 

Sources foi media data: methods of di-l.-iinii.iiiL: media ef- 
fectiveness; which medium advertiser consider- -i ef- 
fective. Includes list of II mosl important fa< t- learned 
in Burvej of 2,000 advertisers '7 September 1953 issue). 

2ft 2f 2ft 

I*. HIT 10. "How ''I agencies evaluate media." Foui 
pages of charts tabulate answers each <>f oj agencymen 
gave to sponsor's L6-parl questionnaire on media evalua- 
tion. Includes information on agent ies' Bources for media 
.lata: methods of determining media effectiveness; which 
medium agenc) considers mosl effective. Background of 
admen answering questionnaire is also given. List of 10 
mosl important facts learned in this survej of 1,000 agency- 
men 1 21 Septembei 1953 issue). 

2ft 2ft 2f 

riKTII. "How BBDO evaluates media." Bernard C. 
Duffy, president ol Batten, Barton, Durstine ^ Osborn, one 
of world's largest agencies, gives personal opinions on the 
various media, tells what in- agencj want- t>. know about 
media before planning an advertising campaign. Included 
are specific examples of which media are best to fill special 
needs ol certain products (5 October 1953 issue) 

2ft 2ft 2ft 

P.1KT 12. "How l-.mil Mogul tests media weekl) for 
Rayco." Customers till out cards while the) wait t>> get 
their auto seat covers fitted. These cards indicate what 
mad.- customer come to Rayco for -eat covers and in what 
m.-.lia they've noticed Rayco ads. Article gives results oi 
such tests, with detailed explanation of how a<iencj can lm> 

about Betting up Bimilar system for it- own clients. Full 
page of charts -how- how you can profit |.\ being aide to 
check media on weekl] basis '10 October 1053 issue). 



I» HIT IS. "Whj these 31 advertisers DON'T use air 
media." Results of inail-and-phone survey of 199 advertis- 
ers win. are non-users of the air media. Easy-to-read chart 
li-t- name of company, product it manufactures or dis- 
tributes, agency, 1953 advertising budget and the reasons 
it gave for not u-ini! air media. Among reasons most 
commonl) cited: product "unsuitable' 9 for air advertising: 
radio and 01 t\ are "too expensive"; radio <iives too much 
coverage where product isn't being sold: radio and/or tv 
"flopped" in past, firm hasn't tried them since. C 10 No 
vembei 1953 issue). 

2ft 2ft 2ft 

I*. HIT II. "What- wrong with the ratine services." 
Comprehensive reference (hart gives point-by-point com 
parison of the rating services from the standpoints of basic 
data Bupplied; techniques; sample bases: limitations, and 
advantages. Includes sponsor's own ideal rating system 
and how the -i\ existing services compare from aspect of 
-ample -i/e. breakdown of figures given, and so on. In- 
cludes -even important DONT'S in using ratings 1 28 De- 
cember 107)3 issue). 

2ft 2ft 2ft 

PART 15. "What- wrong with print measurement ser- 
vices?" Facts about the three readership services includ- 
ing their sampling methods, questioning procedures and 
how much each one costs. List of basic questions adver- 
tisers raise about readership services. Article includes 
opinions of researchers on the services, explains why know- 
ing the fa<ts; about each one is vital to advertisers and 
agencies Ml January 1034 issue i . 

2ft 2ft 2ft 

I*. HIT l(i. "How different rating services varv in the 
same market." Ward Dorrell, research director of John 
Blair & Co. and Blair Tv. station rep organization, points 
out the fact that different services often come up with 
widelj divergent ratings and sets-in-use figures for the 
same market. Dorrell underscores importance of usin<: 
other criteria besides ratings when planning advertisinc 
campaign. Three easy-to-read bar charts give examples of 
variation in same markets i 23 Januarv 1054 issue i . 

2ft 2ft 2ft 

COMING: Part 17. "How to set up an ideal media sales 
test." Part 18, "Psychological aspects of media." Part 19, 
"Sales impact of radio and tv." Part 20. "New media 
evaluation and research developments." Part 21. "spon- 
sor's conclusions on media evaluation." 







in!iiiiiimii:!!ii;:iii!iiiii 



STI l>V TO HT PI BUSHED IV BOOK TOIMI later on this 

. in responsi to many requests by readers. No singU articles 
will b< reprinted separately. Book will contain entirt 21 articles which 
comprisi tin All-Media Evaluation Study originally printed in 
spons 20 April 1953. including all graphs, charts and 

pici tmpanying tin articles. Volunu will bi invaluabU source 

ol for advertisers and agencymen. You may reservi 
your copy now by writing to sponsor, 10 East 4!' St., New York 17. 






40 



■hi mm 

SPONSOR 




NEWS 



makes 



NAMES 





WFBR 




WrDRi 



Yes, indeed! While the reverse is still true, it's a fact that WFBR's 
skillful news-handling is rapidly building the good names of our 
local and national news sponsors! 

At WFBR in Baltimore, we know that hot news cools fast and, 
like explosives, must be handled expertly with a sure, deft touch. 

Our full-time news director works on nothing else but news. Our 
handling of on-the-spot news has become a "buy-word" in Balti- 
more. Advertisers, fully aware of the commercial value of this 
kind of effort, are buying WFBR newscasts in increasing numbers. 

We are now happy to announce the most comprehensive sponsor- 
ship of newscasts in WFBR history. 

CURRENT WFBR NEWS ADVERTISERS 
MOBILGAS — 24 Newscasts Weekly 

ESSO — 24 Newscasts Weekly 

ARROW OIL— 1 Newscast Weekly 

BETHOLINE-SINCLAIR — 6 Newscasts Weekly 

DAVIDSON TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. — 3 Newscasts Weekly 

FIDELITY STORAGE CO. — 3 Newscasts Weekly 

J. NORMAN GEIPE — 6 Newscasts Weekly 

S. & N. KATZ — 3 Newscasts Weekly 

SAVINGS BANK OF BALTIMORE — 6 Newscasts Weekly 

PARTICIPATING SPONSORS 

FORD MOTOR CO. — 14 Participations Weekly 
MUSTEROLE — 5 Participations Weekly 



The station that has EVERYTHING! 

5,000 WATTS IN BALTIMORE, MD 



ABC BASIC NETWORK • REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 
8 FEBRUARY 1954 41 




SCREEN GEMS 

Producers of 
Film Commercials 
for TV for 

AMERICAN TOBACCO 

COMPANY 
AMOCO GAS 
BORDEN'S 
CAMELS 
CAMPBELL'S PORK 

AND BEANS 
CARLINGS ALE 
CHEVROLET 
CHESTERFIELDS 
CHRYSLER 
COCA-COLA 
CROSLEY 
DUMONT 
ELGIN WATCH 
ETHYL CORP. 
FORD MOTOR CO. 
FORD FOUNDATION 
GENERAL MOTORS 
GERBER'S BABY FOODS 
GORHAM SILVER 
HELENA RUBINSTEIN 
IMPERIAL OIL 
IPANA 

JERGENS LOTION 
LEES CARPETS 
LIGGETT & MYERS 
LUCKY STRIKE 
MOTOROLA 
OLDSMOBILE 
PALL MALL 
PEPSI-COLA 
PIEL'S BEER 
PLYMOUTH 
PROCTER & GAMBLE 
PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE 
SCHAEFER BEER 
U. S. STEEL CORP. 








CHRYSLER 



SECOND 
YEAR ,N - 



**c%M* 



W ** Tf£*» poU 




CAMNGS 

Ud Cop A). 



Bt TELEVISION 



index 




Project editor: 
Charles .Sinclair 



Over-all looh: Latest sponsor survey of film commercial 
producers and film service firms reveals an $18 million tv 
film outlook for 1954, up some 20% front last year. Latest 
commercial trends are analyzed in this extensive report. 



page II 



10 tips from producers: Want to cut down your tv 
film commercial costs? Want to improve the quality of your 
filmed video selling t Here, many of America's top tv film 
producers reveal tricks of the trade, give practical hints. 



page 40 



Service firms: A sponsor's film commercial operations 

can run a lot more smoothly if he {and, his agency) know 
their way around the tv film service firms. Hen 's a report 
on how such firms provide everything from lab work to music. 



page 48 



Directories: Results of a two-month survey of the video 

film industry. Eleven pages list producers, facilities, 
and production credits, as well as service firms and the 
film specialties these firms provide agencies and clients. 



page 50 



This section covers tv film commercials. Last issue: film programs 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



43 




INDUSTRY HAS MASTERED TEAMWORK. CAN TOSS OFF COMPLEX COMMERCIALS LIKE TRANSFILM BATH TUB SCENE FOR PSGS ZEST 

1D54 splash in Iv film commercial 

Producers see 20% business Increase this year over 1953 levels, but small fit 



g i oui words summarize tin- Btatua of 
i< >da\ 'a t\ tilin i ommercial industry : 
L. Bigger. 

2. Slit ker. 

3. Progressive. 

I. ( H--I-. on* ious. 

I hat's the adman's eye-^ iev emerg- 
ing f i < • 1 1 1 ;i three-month SPONSOR study 
of filmed tt-|.-\ ision commen i.d~. 

To gathei its fa t-. sponsor surveyed 
nr interviewed more than I- 11 video 
commercial producers, fi<>m industry 
toppers i" regional film makers. In 



44 



addition, sponsor contacted the lead- 
in- film service companies, from film 
laboratories I" Btock shot libraries. 

The results of the survey appear in 
this over-all report and in the two « 1 « - - 
tailed articles you'll find later in this 
section. In addition, there are two sets 
of directoi j listings: i I i Produce] - 
in mi names, sen i es, < redits • starting 
on page > n : (2) sen u e < ompj nies 
I names Bpei ialties, 1cm ations i starting 
on page 92. 

I "i .i report on the booming busi- 



ness in syndicated film programs, see 
section in the 25 January issue of spon- 
sor, i 

Here are the highlights of SPONSOR'S 
film commercial study : 

• T\ film commercials, like filmed 
programs, are a big-time business. In 
questionnaires sent out by sponsor 
producers of film commercials were 
asked to reveal in confidence their 
L953 grosses derived from video as- 
signments. 

Some l( npanies 'representing 

SPONSOR 







nID color problems still bedevil producers 



15 million 



ii find the going tough 



about a third of the industry and about 
half of those replying to the survey) 
gave answers. Their total: $8,432,000. 
A projection to the whole industry, 
based on the size of the reporting com- 
panies, industry growth rates in the 
past two years and other factors, re- 
sults in a 1954 guesstimate for all tv 
commercial producers of about $15 
million. Adding in the estimates of 
the tv work done by service firms, the 
grand total comes to nearly $18 mil- 
lion for the present year. 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 



• Nearly all tv sponsor?- use film 
commercials of one form <>r another. 
A recent study of 1953 tv films b\ Ross 
Reports on Television showed that 1. 
750 film commercials were made last 
\ear for 750 products of 543 sponsors 
local and national, through some 215 
ad agencies. This represented "more 
products for a greater number of spon- 
sors represented by a larger group of 
agencies than reported in pre\i<m- 
years." said Ross Reports. 

• The 1954 business outlook in t\ 
film commercials is good, producers 
and service firms feel. Nearly seven 
out of 10 firms replying to sponsor's 
survey said they anticipated a husi 
ness increase this year as against last. 
Estimates ranged from 10 to 50% in- 
crease. Consensus: Tv film commer 
cial business activity, spurred on by 
the emergence of many new tv markets 
in recent weeks, is likely to be up as 
much as 20% this year. 

That's the broad picture at the mo- 
ment. 

Here is a topic-by-topic report on 
other key trends and developments in 
the multi-million dollar tv commercial 
industry . 

»► Main trends: These trends, among 
many others, were cited most frequent- 



and to make more oi them. Both trends 
stem from the SAG code, linn'- also 
a trend toward originality and Fresh 
ness." — Harry W. McMahan, presi- 
dent, Five Stat Productions. 

"The trend in t\ film commercial* 
is for greater production value pin- 
immediate eye appeal, with a tendency 
to establish advertised product as Boon 
.i- possible .mil maintain ilii- identity 
throughout the entire commercial." 
Charles Michelson, president. Charles 
Ylicliclson. Inc. 

"Another noticeable trend is toward 
good qualitx tv commercials. Sponsors 
and agencies have learned that tin i 
simply are no short cuts to making 
good tv spot commercials. It takes 
time, effort and money. The fooling 
around with cheap, single-system 
sound-on-film spots and the effort to 
get something for nothing are gradu- 
ally disappearing. In their place there 
is a growing realization that good t\ 
film commercials are worth more than 
the money they cost." — A. E. Wright 
Jr.. president. Condor Films. 

"We predict that sponsors, particu- 
larly local and regional sponsors, will 
become critical of the quality of the 
commercials they used during 1953. 
These advertisers have gone through 
their educational period and will now 
ly by producers: be searc hi n g f or film commercials that 

1. More visual "sell," with fewer combine qua i itv witn economy."— J. 
commercials that could be described Du „ Alexander, president. Uexander 
as "radio with pictures." Film Co 

2. Fewer actors and fewer unfamil- .. The mogt not i cea ble trend in tele- 
jar faces in tv commercials, since vision commercials on film is that feu- 
Screen Actors Guild (SAG) re-use pay- (Please turn to page 94 I 
ments are a major cost factor today. 

3. A high interest, if not a high pro- 
duction level, in tv color film commer- 
cials for the near future. 

4. More concentration of tv com- 
mercials in the hands of fewer tv film 
producers, with many firms switching 
back to production of business films 
and not seeking new tv activity. 

5. More imaginative use of the tech- 
nical tricks of the film trade (wipes, 
opticals, animation ) , although some 
commercials are becoming gimmicky. 

These were some of the comments 
from film producers: 

"There are actually two trends evi- 
dent now in our tv commercial work. 
In spot commercials (for non-program- 
ing use) the tendency is to make the 
films more costly and more complex 
and to make fewer commercials do 
the job. In program commercials, the 
tendency is to make them simpler 
I such as the simple 'personality' pitch ! 

45 






Fewer "new Saws" among tv 
commercial talent, more aiirf 
more emphasis on "visual sell" 



Trends: Product rs and aditu » today 
are striving to keep film costs 
dud production quality up. Not all 
succeed. SAG scales have meant that 
in w tali nl seldom i/it.. a break. On 
most occasions "substitutes" art 

Outlook: More production of ' 
sion film commercials is likely to b- 
done by fewer firms 



10 lips to agencies on 

lion to got along with producers 

Money mil ht» saved it' .i«Iiih*ii work <•. > i<io.n l\ w iih film makers 



^ff osl i\ admen today have hari 
plenty ft bask training in the prob- 
lems of putting commercials thai ><-ll 

nil Illlll. 

But film producers -till i un into sit- 
uations like t f U-~f : 

• \ produce] in a large Southern 
<ii\ recently received a film commer- 
cial — « i • | • t f i €.111 ,i meat packer's ad 
agency. According to the Bcript, the 
commercial was to open with a shol 
of hundreds «>f hams hanging in a huge 
smokehouse. Laboriously, the produc- 
er had to talk the agency into a simpler 
shot. "To build and lijmt this smoke 
house scene," he later t ■ » 1 * 1 sponsor, 



"would have thrown the sponsor's en- 
tin- t\ budget way out of line." 

• In \i u York a large commercial 
producer recently received a call from 
the ihw I \ appointed film executive of a 
medium-sized ad agen<\. Without hat- 
tin- an eyelash, the agencyman asked 
the produce] if he would be willing to 
make *a couple of minute commercials 
with synchronous dialogue and stop 
motion for v (>m» apiece." The produc- 
er — who normally charges around 
15,000 each for good minute commer- 
cials of this sort declined with no at- 
tempt at politeness. 

In it- extensive survey of leading 



film commercial producers, sponsor 
asked film executives for their advice 
to t\ agencymen and sponsors on get- 
ting the best in tv film commercials. 

A wide variety of answers were re- 
ceived, ranging from the ABC's of the 
hu-iness to valuable, money-saving tips 
concerning the latest film techniques. 
SPONSOR presents below a round-up of 
10 of these tips from men who mako 
films to the men who buy them. 

1 . Do business with reliable, estah- 
lished producers. This bit of basic ad- 
vice ran through nearly all of the com- 
ments of the film producers responding 



Pre-production conferences are the key to smooth agency-producer 
liaison, producers feel. At this stage, changes are relatively simple 



Later, a change can cost thousands. Here, Biow tv commercial super- 
visor Sol Dworkow discusses Joy commercial with Eira Baker of IMPS 





Color film commercials will require new techniques, close co- 
operation of film makers and admen. Above (I. to r.) Peter 
Elgar, producer; Joseph Noble, Film Counsellors; Abbott Spen- 
cer, Tom Vietor of SSCB discuss commercial for Pall MjII 



Explaining the complexities of film commercial production to admen is a 
necessity for smooth operation, say producers. Telepix Corp. (L.A.) recently 
built a cut-away model of their firm's floor plan to :how advertisers and 
agencies the step-by-step processes involved in making commercial tv films 



to sponsor's questionnaires. 

This remark from L. P. Mominee, 
vice president of Atlas Film Corp., was 
typical: "Carefully check a producer's 
facilities and experience and make sure 
you are dealing with a reputable or- 
ganization." 

This sounds on the surface like pa- 
tronizing advice and perhaps a knock 
at the smaller producers. Not so. All 
of the producers — including Atlas — 
were quick to praise others in the busi- 
ness, large and small, who are doing 
a good, creative job. 

2. Producers can be judged to some 
extent by their credit lists — that is, the 
commercials they've made. 

Such a checkup at least shows the 



caliber of the clients served. (See list 
of producers and commercial credits, 
starting on page 50. 1 

Several producers also suggested to 
sponsor that a tv client about to make 
some tv commercials would do well to 
scan through credit lists to look for a 
film producer who has done several 
commercials for accounts that are in 
the same business as he is. In other 
words, a bakery client should look for 
producers who have made bread and 
cake commercials. 

Reason: Although a client would 
never dream of having his ad account 
handled by an agency that already had 
a competing advertiser in the shop, this 
philosophy does not necessarily apply 
to tv film commercials. Producers who 



have done several commercials for a 
specific product category — cigarettes 
or beer, for instance — have usually 
worked out all the minor production 
headaches that go with handling any 
cigarette or beer film. Such problems 
might include everything from prepar- 
ing a list of models with attractive 
hands (to hold the cigarette) to know- 
ing how much light you can use on a 
glass of beer I before the "head" col- 
lapses) . 

Knowledge like this on the produc- 
er's part enables him to advise agency 
and client in the planning stages re- 
garding certain general production 
problems with particular product types. 
Also, it enables him occasionally to 
l Please turn to page 97 I 



11 fin* producers say about agencies 

► Chief gripe of producers is that they are "always 
being rushed " by ad agencies who want top-quality 
film work on a "disaster basis." This, film makers 
say, invariably results in upped budgets and tempers. 

► Some agencies try to get around the sizable costs 
of tv film production by shopping for bargains in tv 
film work. Losses must be made up eventually by the 
producer, or else the sponsor will get poor quality. 

► Admen witli little film knowhow are sometimes placed 
in high authority at agencies, producers complain. This 
can result in exasperating and costly experiments while 
high-priced camera crews and talent stand around idle. 



How agencies reply to producer gripes 

► Advertising business moves a lot faster than the 
usual pace of movie business, admen state. Sometimes, 
fast deadlines are necessary when a new television cam 
paign is breaking. Producers are compelled to adjust. 

► Producer bids on film jobs sometimes have no rhyme 
or reason, some agencies complain. Even the most 
detailed storyboard can bring a dozen or so different 
bids from a dozen or so different producers, admen say. 

>- Film' executives occasionally tend to make a "big 
mystery" out of the normal processes of tv film job, 
making it most difficult for admen to learn all the 
routine steps of commercial television film making. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



47 



What vim should 
know about film 
service firms 



.\c»i»il release priii Is in ;i hurry? 
Waul a Stock shot? Titles? This 
report will show you whoro to look 




DEVELOPING: 



Firms like Movielab are geared to handle all 
of iaborator^ work, from negatives to finishe 



#* ew admen will recognize mosl oJ 
the names i>l lilm Bervice companies 
listed in the director] which -tart- on 
page 92 of tlii- issue. 

Fewer -till bave seen with their own 
e\es the extensive, often complex ma- 
chinery and equipmenl used b) these 
Bervice firms, Bome of which is illus- 
trated in the pictures on these pages. 

^i ft film Bervice organizations arc 
an integral, important cart of the busi- 
ness of making t\ film commercials. 

\< cording t<> estimates of Beveral 
exet utives in this field, these linns will 

do about - t, nun WO rth of business 

in handling filmed video fare for pro- 
ilu< era, agent ies and sponsors this year. 

\\ hat exactl) is a t\ film Ben ice 
In m? 

Roughl) Bpeaking, these specialties 
bear about the same relationship to the 
i\ film industry that painl Bhops, body* 
and-fendei repair, motor tune-up, parts 
shops and Beat-covei installers bear ti> 
the automotive industry, these film 
Bpei ialties are Listed and di* ussed 
brief!) above and in tin- box al right. 

For the mosl part, the) duplicate 
mam of the sen i< es thai the majoi 
commen i.il film prodw ers alread) bave 
in their studios. Or else the) dupli< al 
t<> some extent, t> film art departments 



and shipping Facilities of the leading 
ad agencies. 

Big commercial producers and big 
.id agencies of course save some mone) 
in the long run by handling most, 
though not all. production and ship- 
ping details themselves, since sendee 
firms are in business to make a normal 
profit on their work. And. a self-con- 
tained producer can exercise complete 
control, step-by-step, in his film com- 
mercials something which you can'l 
always do if the work is parceled mil 
all over tow n. 

But not all producers are giants, and 
not all ad agencies have the space (oi 
the t\ billings) to set up their own 
large-scale film operations. 

That's where the film service com 
pan ies come in. 

\ small producer with limited fa 
cilities can b) having his animation. 
Bound recording, titles, lab work and 
othei details handled l>\ independent 
contractors turn oul some prett) fan- 
i \ i ommen ials. Medium-sized agen 
cies can move quickl) in setting up 
big multi-markel t\ spol < ampaigns 
with filmed programs and commercials. 
I ven big organizations, caught in an 

isional rush job or needinj 
unique spe ialty, call on service firms. 



Here are just a few recent examples 
of how film service companies aid tv 
producers, ageneies and sponsors: 

• Last December, the Ford Motoi 
Compan) began work on a huge spo". 
t\ campaign to plug its 1954 models. 
So main commercials had to he routed. 
packed, shipped and stored that the 
agenc\ — J. Walter Thompson — turned 
to a firm that specializes in distributing 
film. Modern Talking Picture Sendee. 

\i < ording to Alex Leslie. N.V. man- 
ager of MIPS. "Six thousand Ford 
film commercials were shipped to over 
300 tv stations in two weeks." The 
campaign started right on schedule. 

MTPS, incidentally, handles man] 
big i\ shipping jobs for ad agencies 
which include: Y&R, McCann-Erickson, 
Y \\ . \\er. Leo Burnett. Compton, 
Benton S Howie-. Weintraub and FCB. 
Services include inserting commercials 
in filmed programs, inspecting, ship- 
ping and film storage. 

• Main a film commercial and/oi 
program has been damaged 1>\ inex- 
perienced handling at agencies and tv 
-i.it on-, or 1»\ being projected and 
wound on faulty, dim equipment. V 
cordingly, film treatment firms — lik-; 
Peerless, Comprehensive, and Vacuum- 
ate are toda\ doing a sizable tv film 



48 



list of fi/in ge rvl ee firms starts on pane ft'J 



SPONSOR 




lATING: 



Video films last longer when toughened by special high- 
vacuum process of Peerless Corp., New York, Hollywood 



SHIPPING: 



Modern Talking Picture Service can store and route as many 
as 6,000 tv commercials in two weeks for a sinale tv client 



business in addition to their business 
film and theatrical contracts. 

Such "treatments" are primarily 
processing steps applied to the final re- 
lease prints, and often to original nega- 
tives. They range from high-vacuum 
vapor processes that toughen and elas- 
ticize the film emulsion to scratch re- 
moval and cleaning. Results: Tv film 
prints last longer and can be "bicycled' - 
between tv station? with less chance of 
disrupted schedules due to damaged 
films. This actually cuts down replace- 
ment costs, and often pays for itself. 

Several commercial producers — like 
Jam Handy, Wilding, Sarra. Reid H. 
Ray, Fordel and Byron — have been 
licensed by the film treatment firms to 
process tv film commercials right in 
the producer's own shop. And, severa' 
program svndicators — including Ziv- 
Tv, UTP, NBC and Guild Films— have 
program prints treated before ship- 
ment to stations. 

• Late last season, P. Ballantine & 
Sons placed an order for tv commer- 
cials with Caravel Films, a New York 
producer. Theme of the commercials: 
"It's always winter in your refrigerator 
where you store your beer. But Ballan- 
tine is deep-brewed for flavor — flavor 
(Please turn to page 108) 



SOUND: 



Firms like Cinesound, RCA Victor, Sound Masters maintain 
elaborate sound studios where producers and agencies can 
add music, narration, dialogue to films and tapes of all varieties. Such ■firms 
aid film men greatly in adding extra production polish to tv commercials. 



ADTIOAI Q« Only the largest commercial film producers have com- 
Ul I IVnLOi plete facilities for fancy opticals — special effects, laps, 
wipes, miniatures, trick shots, etc. — which have become a fairly standard 
ingredient of hard-hitting tv spots. Many producers sub-contract opticals. 



ANIMATION: 



Like opticals, limited and full animation often adds 
sock to tv film commercials when a client is trying 
to establish a brand name or trademark. An expensive specialty, animation 
is often done on sub-contract by firms like Cineffects, Cartoonists, Kleidon. 



TITI CO» ^° create tiile effects, "crawlers," brand name slugs and he 

I LLiOi like, firms such as Graphic Arts Workshop and QQ Motion 

Picture Titles maintain shops equipped with artists, printing presses who can 

work on all backgrounds, from acetate to formica, for video commercials. 



STOCK SHOTS: 



Need a few feet of bathing beauties, busy high- 
ways or the Eiffel Tower for a tv commercial? 
You can find almost anything you can think of at nominal prices in the libraries 
of NBC TV Film, Telenews, others where 157 million "stock" footaqe exists. 



RJI||0|/V Mood and bridge music of all types for all kinds of tv com- 

IiIUOIwb mercials can be located quickly and purchased by producers 

and agencies in the libraries of firms like Audio-Master Corp., Columbia Tran- 
scriptions, Thomas J. Valentino. Catalogues range from fanfare to endings. 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!! 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



49 



TV FILM COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS: includes list of their 1952-53 accoun 



NAME OF FIRM. LOCATION AN (J SAL E S CON TACT FACILITUs INCLUDE: 

Anifrillon Color S ilpplnc 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS OURING 1952-53 SEASON 



ACADEMY FILM PRODUCTIONS INC 

cmcAoo hi. 

BERN \HH HOW Mill Mil IIIGAN 



ALEXANDER FILM CO 

kVDEH I MM l:i ILD 

coum Mm BPRINOg i hi ii 

J mis M i \ win i: Ml I HOSI 



ALL vCOPE PICTURES INC 
I \ BIA ll 

HOIXTV) i CAL 

GORDON - Mill III II WYOMING 



Holsum Bread, Melody Hill Wine, Chesty Potato Chips, Col-R-Com Pop-Corn, Cunningh 
Drug Stores, Hannah & Hogg Wine, Chuckles Candy, Kayo Chocolate Drink, Pfeiffer's E 

Un on Pacific Railroad, Hudson Cars, Continental Airlines, Seven Up, Walter Kendall ll 
Food, Mrs. Baird's Bakeries, Bowman Biscuit Co., Duffy's Drink, Feature Ring Co., 
Audograph, Morton Foods, Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Co., Pfaff Sewing / 
chines, Prince Dog Food, Ardcn-Sunf rcze Creameries, Calgon, Inc., Central Nebraska Pack 
Co., Lindcman & Hovcrson Co., Budweiser. Frigidaire, Maytag, Elgin National Watch Co. 



X •":'- X S.O.S., Tuffy, Louis Milani's Salad Dressing, Rancho Soup, Goebel Beer 



AMENIC TELEVISION AGENCY 
TllU II! I III 
SPRING] II I I. Mil 

■ 



AMERICAN FILM CO 

INI B 
l-IIll ll'l I I " 1 1 1 \ PI 

HICK P W'EINI R u ' 



AMERICAN FILM PRODUCERS 
'in M>U \V 

OROSti P] \ ■ \ 



CLYDE ANDERSON 

33 1 \ 

B M I L MM. CITi I T Ml 



LEONARD ANDERSON 

IIS WEST I 1 II ST 

\K« rORB \ ^ 

l.i ONARD kNDI RSOX, I'l. \/.\ : 1162 



ANIMATED PRODUCTIONS. INC 
l"i' BROADWAY. 
M u YORK N ^ 

M. BTAH1 i hi. i Ml. i - J953 



H- %• H- S. E. Dobbs, Holsum Bread, C. Meek Lumber Co., Mono Mfg. Co., Springfield Grocers Ccj 



XXX (Not reported) 



XXX 



Marcal Paper Products, National Guard Recruiting, Stokely & Van Camp Foods, Arm 
WAC Recruiting, Prudential Insurance Co., U. S. Army Nurse Corps, Sylvania Electric 



%. # %. Country Club Potato Chips, Fisher Baking Co. 



X X Coro Jewelry, Buitoni Macaroni, Vaseline, Flit, C-N, Geritol, Serutan, Nunn-Bush Shoes 



XXX Listcrine, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Hazel Bishop Lipstick, Cannon Towels, Roosevelt Rac> 



ATLAS FILM CORP 

1111 SHI Til r.lll l.l.\ Mtl> 

OAK PARK II. I- 

LAN ( I.IMh.I l-l M STIN 



AUDIO PRODUCTIONS. INC 
Mil \\K 

mh VORK n ^ 

\l 1 i in I UB - 



Sunbeam Appliances, Greyhound Buses, Budweiser Beer, Pure Oil Co., Kellogg Cereals, 
Washers & Dryers 



Campbell's Catsup, Mott's Apple Products & Prunes, Birdseye Products, International : 
Co., Singer Sewing Machine 



BALL PRODUCTIONS A TELEVISION FILMS. INC. 

5 u THIRD w I. 
MIAMI. II \ 

II - IOS1 IH -. 



* 



Cities Service Gasoline, P&O Steamship Cruises, Pabst Beer, Maule Concrete Products, < 
Cola 



GEORGE BLAKE ENTERPRISES. INC 
ITfl I' IRK \\ i: 
NEW l'ORK 17, N ■» 
DICK DONNER ' II. i I I 



X X Necchi Sewing Machines, Prestone Anti-Freeze, Ben-Gay 



THOMAS I. BARBRE PRODUCTIONS 
ISIS E 1ST VIRGINIA IV] 

, in i, 
TH08 i BARBRI R M I 



JOHN H BATTISON PRODUCTIONS 

nil 
BETHESDA MU 
lulls II BATTT80N 



X X Colonial Fuel & iron Corp., Gates Rubber Co., Publix Cab Co., C.F.&I. Co. 



X X i Not reported) 



BEACON TELEVISION FEATURES. INC. 

DN - r 

M[|| - VXDI II.SIIN . 



BENSON PRODUCTIONS 
BROADW 11 

K \\- \- i IT! Mil 
A \ Bl SSON v v 



BLINKEY PRODUCTIONS 
In. WEST END ' 

rORK N I 

\II RR \<i KING • SN \ 



Marshmallow Fluff, Salada Tea, Lewis Candy Grandmother's Mince Meat, Barbo's FurrB' 
Pontiac Dealers Ass'n, Glcnwood Range, Avon Soles 



3f> %• Kraft Foods, Rusco Windows, Majc.tic Steak House 



X X Amazo Instont Dessert, Scvcn-Up, Tv Time Popcorn, Jr. League of Arkansas 



M WBOLS X '/"> avaik -- , y . • -, ort mailable on facilities. 

< hart ciMiiiniics page 7 I 



,z 



FIRST WEEK 

ANDARD OIL 

' WESTERN STATES 

SALTEST ICE CREAM 

I MARKETS 

UL CITY BEER 

I MARKETS 

AVAILABLE-in 
any markets 



UTP Proudly Presents... A distinctly New and 

Authentic I s * RUN Family-Situation Adventure 
Series. . .with a Salty Tang! 





starring 

PRESTON FOSTER as Cap'n John of the good tug Cheryl Ann 

ATERFRONT* with its authentic locale really lives. The people 
the docks, the tugs, the gulls, the noises, and the smells 
the wharf all come alive as you work, fight, worry and 

ve with the men and women who are all part of this 

jlorful WATERFRONT. 




•TERFRONT— The only TV film series today that 
Id not possibly be done live. (It was shot on 
;tion at picturesque Los Angeles Harbor, San 
ro, California.) 



jH 



TERFRONT— with the largest running cast of 
Jrring characters of any TV series, live or 
led. 



TERFRONT— where every foot of film was shot 
ecially for this production. 



TERFRONT— the only TV series available whose 
le and characters develop an endless supply 
ction-adventure and family-situation plots. 

TERFRONT-IS A PRESTIGE BUILDER FOR THE 
OLE FAMILY. A NEW SERIES, STARTING WITH 
FIRST RUN 1/2 HOURS, FRESH AND ALIVE 
H REAL PEOPLE. 



HOME OFFICE 

650 NORTH BRONSON • HOLLYWOOD 
HO. 9-8321 • TWX-LA 1432 

NEW YORK-444 MADISON • PLAZA 3-4620 
CHICAGO-360 N. MICHIGAN • CENTRAL 6-0041 



VATERFRONT is a ROLAND REED PRODUCTION 

'RODUCERS OF: My Little Margie, Beulah, The Stu Er win Show, Rocky Jon es, Space Ranger 







Tv film shows recently made available for syndication ( 

Programs issued since October 1953. For complete list see 25 January 7954 issue. Next chart will appear 8 March 
, nMMM>M || |M | | , MM ^ 



Show name Syndicator Producer Length Price Range' No. in series Show name Syndicator Producer Length Price Range 1 No. 



luagle Macabre 



ADVENTURE 



Guild Film. 



Radio & Tv 
Packages Inc. 



s WW 



CHILDREN S 



Animal Time 
Junior Science 



Sterling Tv 
MPTv 



The Cinnamon Bear Fit/ 4 Auoc. 

Terry and tho OtTltlal Filmi 
Plrate» 

The Birth of the Foundation 

Sandman' Film. 



Sterllnt Tv 



Junior Science, 15 mln. 

Inc. 



Gllwln Prod. 15 mln 

Dougtalr Prod. 2G mln. 



on regueit 



Telorana Prod. 



Tlato for Beany Consolidated Tv Boh Clamper! 
Sale* 



15 mln. 
30 mln. 



COMEDY 



Duffy's Tavern MPTv Hal Roach Jr. 30 mln. 

Father Knows BesM Screen Gems Cavalier 30 mln. 

My Hero Official Films Ed Beloln 30 mln. 



104 
39 



50°. of Class B 26 

30 

on recjurst 13 

unlimited 



39 
26 
39 







MUSIC 








Werner Janisen 
Series 


George Bagnall 
A Assoc. 


Janssen 


15 mln. 


on 


request 


NEWS 


Drew Pearson's 
Washington 
Merry- Go- Round 

Fulton Lewis Jr " 


MPTv 

United Tv Pro- 
grams 


Charles Curran 

United Tv Pro- 
grams 


15 min. 
12 min. 







SPORTS 



= Tho Reteree 



K ling 



Kllng 



Vitapix Champion. 


Vitapix Corp. 


Val. 1. 


Llnd- 


60 min 


ship Wrestling 




berg 




30 min 



DOCUMENTARY 



Health & Happl- Tv Exploitation 

ncss Co. 



Tv Exploitation 
Co. 



Wonders It tho Sterling Tv 

Wild 



Jack Sch»artr 4 mln. 

5 mln. 
15 mln. 



Natl. Video 
Prod. 



Borden Prod. 



DRAMA. MYSTERY 



Capsule Mysteries Charles Michel 
son 



Charlis Michel- 5 mln. 



Colonel March 


Official 


Films 


Panda Produc- 
tions 


26', ml 


Damon Runyon 
Theatre* 


Screen 


Gems 


B n n Gems 


30 min. 


Ellery Queen 


TPA 




Norvln Prod. 


30 mln. 


Flaah Gordon 


MPTv 




Inter. Continen- 
tal Tv 


30 mln. 


Janet Dean. Regis 


MPTv 




Cornwall Prod. 


30 min 


tered Nurse 











Joe Palooka Story Guild 

Mr. D.A.i j|» Tv 

Paragon Playhou.r NBC TV Film 
Racket Squad 



ABC Film 
Syndication 



Secret Chapter 
Tho Playhouse-' 



Guild Films 



ABC Film 
Syndication 



Guild 2C' .. mm 

Phillips H. Lard 30 mln. 

Sound Masters .1" mli 

Hal Roach Jr. 30 mln. 

Ron Ormond 15 mln. 

Meridian Corp. 30 mm 



IS MO 



130 
26 



39 

26 

26 
52 
39 



U 
M 
N 

18 

H 



TRAVEL 



Hawaiian Paradise George Bagnall Franklin 
4. Assoc. 



Holiday 



Safari 



Tv Exploitation Filmakers 
Co. 



This Is Hawaii George Bagnall Franklin 

& Assoc. 



15 mln. wi request 



30 mln. 



Sterling Tv Sterling Tv 15 mln. on request 

30 mln. on request 



This World of Ours Sterling Tv Dudley Pictures 11'/, min. on request 



VARIETY 



Your Star Showcase TPA 



Ray Forrest Show Sterling Tv Sterling Tv 30 mln. on request 



WESTERN 



Annie Oakleys CBS Tv Film Annie Oakley 30 min. 

Prod. 



The Tim McCoy MPTv 

Show 



■Where price range is not given, it has not vet been fixed, of syndicator prcf-rs to give price only on request Canada Dry is sponsoring this film in 80 

markets semi-monthly. Separate scries is available for local sponsors in these vi-nc markets on alternate weeks Available in color. 'Available in lunc. 'Run 

onginilly under another title now being re released Available early in April Carter Products has 20 markets. Samsonitc Luggage has 35 markets. Rest avail- 
able for local sponsors SPONSOR invites all tv film syndic.itors to send information on new films 



52 



film /,.>: 



SPONSOR 



he's taking lessons 
from 15 champs... 




STARRING: 
Sam Snead 
Julius Boros 
Lloyd Mangrum 
Lew Worsham 
Cary Middlecoff 
Jackie Burke, Jr. 
Al Besselink 
Jim Ferrier 
Earl Stewart, Jr. 
E. J. "Dutch" 

Harrison 
Ted Kroll 
Johnny Palmer 
Tommy Bolt 
Doug Ford 
Ed "Porky" Oliver 



Right now, comfortable and relaxed in his own living room, he's getting a tip from Champion 

* Sam Snead on how to improve his swing. Next week Lloyd Mangrum shows him the secret of long iron 
play. Then "Doc" Middlecoff gives him pointers on fairway woods. It's expert, 

entertaining instruction he couldn't buy at any price. He loves every minute of it ! 

PLAY GOLFTCHAMPIONS 

* is a unique series of thirteen 15-minute TV film programs with powerful appeal for the growing 
millions of golf fans, both men and women. They're in black-and-white or color, with music 

and narration. Comedy sequences alternate with instruction to hold the "fringe" audience. 

* Produced by SPORTSVISION, INC., makers of the popular football series, All-American 
4 Game of the Week. For prices, availabilities, write, wire or phone . . . 



SPORTSVISION, INC. 



Dept. S , 233 Sansome St., Sati Francisco, Calif. • EXbrook 2-3837 

Hollywood: Dept.S. 1161 No. Highland • Hollywood 1,-9205 
Chicago: Dept. S, 20 No. Wacker Dr. • CEntral6-8955 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



53 



Are you getting the most 

out of this SPONSOR feature? 

On this page, in evei \ issue oj sponsor, you will find 
a handy, up-to-date listing oj neu ii station grants 
[see belou i. Included is the name of the company 
receiving the < ./*. the technical facilities granted 
and othei appropriate facts. 



Beneath the compilation of those who have received netq 
c.p.'s is another important listing -all the stations 
which have gone on the air with commercial programing^ 
during the tn<> weeks preceding cadi issue of sponsor. 
The box score, at the bottom of the page, is a succinct 
summary of television's status in the I nited States 
today. Information includes the total number of stations 
on the air ami the number of I . S. tr homes. 




HI III HJKI11K Tf 1T1TIII 




I. \etr construction permits 



CITY & STATE 



ALCANY, GA. 
DURHAM, N. C. 

HIBBING, MINN. 
HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 



CALL CHANNEL 

LETTERS NO 



DATE OF 
GRANT 



ON-AIR 
TARGET 



POWER IKWI' 



STATIONS 



VISUAL AURALl 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

<000> 



PERMITEE 4, MANAGER 



WALB-TV 10 
WTIK-TV 11 



12 Jon. 
21 Jan. 



1 June 



50 
316 



25 

170 



10 13 Jan. 

9 20 Jan. 

KCOM-TV 4 21 Jan. 



10 5 

12 6 

100 50 1 



NFA 
NFA 

NFA 

NFA 

80 vhf 



Herald Publishing Co. 
James H. Grey, pn s 

Durham Bc-lg. Enter- 
prises. Inc. 
Harmon L Duncan, pres 
Floyd Fletcher, v. p. 

North Star Ty Co. 
O. J. David, pres. 

Southern Newspapers Inc. 
Clyde E. Palmer, pres 

KCOM Bcstg. Co. 
Diitrich Dirks, pres. 



RADIO 
REP' 



II. Xeiv Millions on air* 



CITY 4. STATE 



BAY CITY, M/CH.i 
FRESNO, CAL. 
NEENAH, WIS.- 

SCHENECTADY, N. Y.* 



CALL CHANNEL ON-AIR 

LETTERS NO DATE 



POWER (KW)' 
VISUAL AUR 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

I 000 1 



PERMITEE &. MANAGER 



WNEM-TV 5 
KBID-TV 53 



24 Jan. 
13 Feb. 



WNAM-TV 42 27 Jan. 



WTRI 



35 



15 Feb. 



24 12 

470 235 

16 8 

214 112 



Du M, NBC 



CBS 



69 vhf 

80 uhf 

NFA 

53 uhf 



North Easfrn Mich. Corp 


Hcadley- 


James Genty. Jr.. pres. 


Reed 


John Bone, mgr. 




John Poole Bcstg. Co. 


Mtekcr 


Jo n Poolr. pres. 




Rcbirt H. Weison. mgr. 




Ncemah-MtRasha Bcstg. 


Gee Clark 


Co. 




Srmuel N. Pickard. pres. 




Don C. Wlrth v p -gen 




mgr. 




Van Curler Bcstg. Corp. 


Headlty- 


Col. Harry C. Wilder. 


Reed 


pres. 




Richard B. Wheeler, gen. 




mgr. 




Paul Jaconson. trcas.-a$st. 




mgr. 





ill. Irlffctifla to previous listings 

Since sponsor's II [anuarj 1954 issue »i\ more television >ta- the number of stations which have returned c.p.'s to the FCC to 4| 
lidii grantees relinquished theii construction permits, fhis raises Nine were for vhf outlets, 32 were for uhf stations. The deletion? 



CHARLOTTESVILLE, V a ., WCHV-TV, uhf eh. 64 
GREAT FALLS, Mont.. KMON-TV. vhf ch. 3 



GULFPORT, Miss., WGCM-TV, uhf ch. 56 
MARION, Ind.. WMRI-TV, uhf ch. 29 



MT. AIRY, N. C, WPAQ-TV, uhf ch. 55 
ST. PAUL, Minn., WCOW-TV, uhf ch. 17 



BOX SCORE 



Tiilnl I . s stations on air. 

incl. Honolulu and Alaska (29 

Jan. '54) 

Vi of marketi 



:tr,u 



grant- 
ed {excluding 28 educational 
grants; 29 Jan. '."> 1 1 

' grantees on air 



No. tv homes in L'.S. (1 
fan. >h 27.500.000$ 

188 Percent oj all l.S. homes 

2.1 1 with tv sets <1 Jan. '54) 60",,$ 






Mti.th Mil cp.'l and iiatl>>n« colnr on the air II 

IM air when romn 

I ' ' 
In marl 

in<l Vlannlns 



' a radio station which Is granted a c.p. also represents the n 

. utions of mi 

stranter- BPONSOB - the reps of the radio stations in Ihls ,-olumn (when • radio station t 

SFA S Hgnrei available al presstime <-r sets In mark 

\ 
s ^ 




New RCA single-unit Sync Generator tales less than 
one-third the rack space needed by other sync systems 



Smallest, finest Studio Sync Generator ever built! 



RCA Type TG-2A 



Only RCA's TG-2A has these features 



U U I 



c 



yOMPLETELY NEW THROUGHOUT — and in- 
corporating a revolutionary new multivibrator 
circuit — TypeTG-2A is, we believe, the ultimate 
in synchronizing generators. It combines all 
synchronizing functions into a single chassis (includes a 
Genlock, a Dot Generator, a grating generator, and a regulated 
power supply). It takes only 21 inches of rack space (one-third 
that required by other sync generators) — is so compact you 
can easily install two of these units (one a stand-by) and an 
RCA changeover Switch MI-26289 in a single rack. It uses 
fewer tubes than other sync generators (38 miniatures, 2 
rectifiers). And, of course, the TG-2A can be operated in 
conjunction with a Color Frequency Standard. 

RCA Type TG-2A's are now available for all TV stations — 
VHF and UHF. For technical details and delivery information, 
talk to your RCA Broadcast Sales Representative. 



• In a SINGLE standard 
chassis it includes: 

— a synchronizing generator, 
Genlock, dot generator, 
grating generator, 
regulated power supply 

• Entire unit takes only 21 
inches of rack space 

• Only 4 operating controls 

• Adjustable pulse output 
voltages 

• Pulse outputs have sending 
end-terminations 

• Adjustable "front porch" 
width 

• Operates with Color 
Frequency Standard 



• Can be remotely-switched 
to Genlock operation 

• Provides Dot Convergence 
Pattern 

• Fewest tubes of any sync 
generator (38 miniatures, 
2 rectifiers) 

• Test jacks for circuit 
checking 

• Pulse widths and delays 
STABILIZED against 
tube aging 

• Choice of 5 ways to control 
basic frequencies 

• Characteristics more than 
meet FCC and RETMA 
standards 




RAD tO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT 



CAMDEN. N.J. 




Fitz-tiihhon ami i'ul'l' tlisaarve on ratlia. tv value 



I wo answei - to the old question 
"Win don'l department stores use 
more radio and television advertia 
ing ? were .n en to the nation - n-- 
tailers last month. Hie first answei 
< ame from Bei ni< e I it/-< ribbon who 
told wh) -In- personally < I i -I i kt< 1 radio 
;uul tv during .1 session i»f tin- National 
Retail I >i \ I foods \— >>< iation • onven- 
ii<m. II. 1 answei 1 ame "in- da) before 
Ihi resignation a- advertising director 
of Gimbels department Btore, New 
York. 

I In- Becond answei was provided 1»\ 
Sam Cu£F, radio and television consul- mentspei item to hit weekend shoppers, 
tant fin Ulied Stores. He sought to It also buys announcements for Btore 
clarifj the reasons whj department wide sales held periodically throughout 
stores fail to utilize air media In-fore a tin- year and runs them for four days 
-air- promotion meeting of the Vrk preceding t lie -air. 



don't know how to use ail media. 

Louis fannenbaum, Ma< \ b advertis- 
ing manager, replaces \Ii-- Kilz-Gib 
bori .1- advertising director at Gimbels 
1 n I March, 

SPONSOR'S I Ma\ 1953 issue, page 

22, reported on Macy's use of rmlio 
ami t\ under Tannenbaum. The store, 
on radio \ irtuall) ever) Fi idaj -in< e 
lu e I''")!', used one-minute announce- 
ments ovei WOK and or \\ NBC, with 

\\ VBC on Bome weekends. Macy's 
typicall) selects one or two good items 
foi plugging and uses 15 announce- 



wrighl Merchandising Corp. The \rk- 
wright meeting was held tin- daj fol- 
lowing tin- conclusion of the Nl!l)<;\ 
convention. 

Mi— Fitz-Gibbon described tele- 
vision commercials a- "an intrusion, 
an outrageous interruption in the en- 
tertainment, which is the primary busi- 
iii'-> of t\. The commen ial i- the mini 
penalt) one pays to hear Luc) 01 Fred 



During New York's newspaper strike 

la-t December, Macy's was one of tie 
heaviest department store air users. 
(SPONSOR, 28 December 1953, page 
30.) Si\ radio and one tv station were 
utilized with from 40 to 150 announce- 
ments aired dailj on the seven outlets. 
Gimbels used little air advertising. Be- 
fore the -trike Mai v '- had signed with 
1 i< oh for Santa Clous at Macy's 



H \f-JW vheers parents 
up for 2:00 a.m. feetlina 

I hat totally ignored audience of par- 
1 nl- awakened at 2 a.m. ever) morning 
to gjve their new-born infants the post- 
midnight bottle has been recognized. 
Starting la-t week. Beven sponsors of 
bab) accessories began sponsorship of 
the 12:00-1:15 a.m. portion of Milk- 
man's Mutincr on \\\l.\\. New York. 

The sponsors- — Clapp's Baby Foods, 
Mennen Babj Products, Borden Prod- 
in t-. Q-Tips, Lullaby-Lite, Electronic- 
Baby Sitter and the Continental Insur- 
ance Co. each has the program one 
night a week. 

The show. m.c.'d b) Art Ford 1 who, 
incidentally, is a bachelor 1. starts off 
with fairly hrijdit music to help wake 
up the parents. 

I'art wav through the show he read- 
hints for parents from Parents Maga- 
zine, and toward the programs end 
starts playing lullaby music to sooth 
the bahy back to sleep. 

I v pica] commercial starts off this 
wa\ : 

"Gosh all hemlock. That milk really 
goes down, doesn't it. And look at 
him. He's been putting on weight 
hasn t he. No diet for that little man 
of vour life; no siree. Bottle at 2:00 
a.m.. and come tomorrow that wonder- 
ful menu for a growing little fellow — 
Clapps Bab) Food ..." * * * 



Waring. Imagine how distressing it ;' daii) 15-minute pre-Christmas pro- 



< 



For -i'On-or's opinions on Miss Fitz- 
Gibbon s statement on television, see 
25 January 1954 issue, page 132. 



would l>e to have \ our N '» ) ork 
Times snatched awa) by, -.i\. Gulden's 
mustard, who would say, "Now you 
can't read Meyer Berger 01 Vrthur 

kioi k unle-- you listen to a mustard 

commercial f"r three minute-. Sup- 
pose VOU had just Bettled down with i 
Walter Kerr dramatic review when 1 

-hrill 'Better bu) Birds Eye' would 
beat in on vour ear drums? Tell me, 

would that he a g I climate in which 

to -end out \011r Belling messa 

\t the Vrkwrighl meeting, Cuff told 
the group: 

"Berni< e Fitz-Gibbon's remark- yes- 
terday, at the NHI)()\ convention, 
were most interesting for what was 
omitted. Hei statement i- interesting 

for what it didn t -a\ . 

"Mi— Fitz-Gibbon didn't gel up and 
say, 'Radio and television don't -ell. 
Cuff -aid department stores don'l 

use radio and l\ niainU \<f< .111-e th--\ 



* • • 



gram telecast over W \BD. 

Memphis depart meni store finds tr outpulls Santa 




Not even Santa ( llaus 1 an < ompete 
w 1 1 1 1 a telrv ision -in . 

Fred Goldsmith, director of J. C.old- 
-niith & Sons Co. department -tore, 
told W lllin |\ he would consider a 



t\ advertising schedule if it could be 
proved to him that tv could pull in 
-tore traffic. 

\ good te-t case, the station decided. 
would involve the appearance of one 



56 



SPONSOR 



of WHBQ-TV's children's programs 
stars at the department store. 

The star selected for the test, "Wink" 
Marlindale, conducts Mars Patrol, a 
program which includes studio inter- 
views with children on a "space ship." 

Two announcements about Martin- 
dale's appearance at the store were 
made on his show. Between 10:00 
a.m. and noon on the first Saturday in 
December, more than 400 children 
came to see him. The station reported 
no signs had been erected in Gold- 
smith's pointing the way to Martin- 
dale. In spite of this the line of youngs- 
ters waiting to see him was much 
longer than the line in front of Santa. 

The following week, with more time 
for preparations, announcements about 
Martindale's appearance were made on 
the Mars Patrol program daily. On 
the second Saturday, the line of 
children waiting to see Martindale was 
more than 200 feet long when he ar- 
rived at the store. In the two-hour pre- 
noon period, he talked to more than 
1,300 youngsters. 



• • • 



Free & Peters personnel 
visit WPTZ, WBZ-TV 




Messrs. Griffin, Witting, Baudino, Swartley 

Free & Peters men are speaking from 
first-hand experience when they give 
agencies information on WPTZ, Phila- 
delphia, and WBZ-TV, Boston. 

Before F&P assumed national rep- 
resentation of the two Westinghouse 
stations on 1 February the rep firm's 
top personnel were taken on an exten- 
sive tour of the two stations. 

Programing, talent, facilities, opera- 
tion and sales policies of both stations 
were covered in meetings held in 
the studios. Rolland Tooke. WPTZ 
manager, presided at the Philadelphia 
meeting, aided by A. Q. ("Bink") Dan- 
nenbaum, sales mgr. ; John ("Chick") 
Kelly, prom, mgr.; Stan Lee Broza. 
prog, mgr.; Raymond Bowley, chief 
engineer; Sam Stewart, sales service 
{Please turn to page 128) 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 




WSLS-TV 

bridging your product 
to 223,945 TV sets in 
63 counties 

Virginia North Carolina West Virginia 
296,000 WATTS 

CHANNEL 10 

Roanoke, Virginia 



AFFILIATE |M 

INTERCONNECTED 



TELEVISION 
ABC 



Shenandoah Life Stations, " " 

WSLS AM FM TV 
Represented Nationally by Avery-Knodel. Inc. 






CHANNEL 36 
The South f s 

Finest 
UHF Station 





agency profile 



ffoirarrl Council 

V.P., Dir. of Radio and Tv 
Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, New York 



^' .11 it- of the mos! provocative print ads in years have come out 
of the Hewitt, Ogilvy, Benson ^ Mather shop. To wit: the man with 
the eye-patch who wears a Hathawa) Shirt: the iiirl in the ditto shirt 
who smokes cigars; the man with the beard who came to New ^ ork 
to -'II Schweppes quinine water. 

\ Former college pro! I no 1 eard i in a pink Hathaway, who smokes 
cigarettes while twirling the remote control knobs of his office tv set. 
i- the man wlm'- been assigned to give HOBM - air advertising the 
same touch. He is Howard Connell, v.p. in charge of radio and tv. 

"The agency's known for the famous print ads — hut. b) mid- 
Man h. we estimate 5095 of our billings will be in radio and tv," 
says Connell. (Last year's birjings total: $11 million, i 

Vmong the agenc) - top radio-u accounts are Rinso, Good Luck 
Margarine, Dun hill, Helena Rubinstein, the British Travel Associa- 
tion. Schweppes Quinine W ater. 

Connell s theories on producing effective t\ commercials are nu- 
merous. Imong them: "The indispensable prop — that's part of 
IK MINI print advertising I like beards and cigars and things) — and 
there's no reason to think it wouldn't he effe tive on tv. 

"lake a mobile, For example. Thai could he an interesting prop 
around which to build a tv commercial. 

"Now it the art directoi bas a pel mobile or painting that gives 
him ideas for a commercial, lei him suggest it. \fter all. there's 
no inflexible rule thai says the initial idea for a commercial must 
originate with the writer. The art director's a creative man too. 
So's the lighting man or a chap in production. Let them contribute 
their ideas." 

To help carr) out his own idea* Connell bas recruited a iiroup of 
young radio-t\ people who, he feels, will be able to cut through the 
"pal. cliche-ridden formula- of t\ selling." \nd when he says 
"young," he mean- it: \i II. he's the second-oldest man on the 
staff of HOBM. 

Says he: "Youngsters are the mosl critical segment of the tv 
audience. Iliey're quick to spot a phony." 

I onnell carries his respect for youth home to Scarsdale with him 
ever) night. His own juvenile jur) consists of his 11-year-old daugh- 
ter, and hi- -on. age -even. * * * 



58 



SPONSOR 



tiest 



Over Puget Sound! 



Z 

£ 

o 




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© 



BREMERTON 



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EVERETT 



SEATTLE 






TACOMA 



OLYMPIA 



Don't buy PART when you can get it ALL 

KTNT-TV 

Covering Seattle, Tacoma and the Puget Sound Area 

125,000 WATTS • CHANNEL II 




AFFILIATED WITH CBS and DUMONT TELEVISION NETWORKS • CONTACT WEED TELEVISION 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 59 




Q/j<zte£ &De^4t 





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li 


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SPOT RADIO I 


1 

EAST, SOUTHEAST 




1 
1 


WHZWBZA 


Boston-Springfield 


NBC 51,000 


WGR 


Buffalo 


CBS 5,000 


KYW 


Philadelphia 


NBC 50,000 1 


p KDKA 


Pittsburgh 


NBC 50,000 | 


I WFBL 
WCSC 


Syracuse 


CBS 5,000 1 

i 


Charleston, S. C. 


1 

CBS 5,000 


WIST 


Charlotte 


MBS 5,000 


WIS 


Columbia, S. C. 


NBC 5,000 1 


WGH 


Norfolk-Newport News ABC 5,000 


\\ PTF 


Raleigh-Durham 


NBC 50,000 


WDBJ 


Roanoke 


CBS 5,000 

| 


MIDWEST, SOUTHWEST 




| 


WHO 


Des Moines 


NBC 50,000 


woe 


Davenport 


NBC 5,000 


WDSM 


Duluth-Superior 


ABC 5,000 


WDAY 


Fargo 


NBC 5,000 


WOWO 


Fort Wayne 


NBC 50,000 


WIRE 


Indianapolis 


NBC 5,000 1 


| KMBC-KFRM 


Kansas City 


CBS 5,000 I 


1 W AVE 


Louisville 


NBC 5,000 I 


I KFAB 


Omaha 


CBS 50,000 i 


WMBD 
KFDM 


Peoria 


CBS 5,000 | 


Beaumont 


ABC 5,000 


KRIS 


Corpus Christi 


NBC 1,000 


WBAP 


Ft. Worth-Dallas 


NBC-ABC 50,000 


KXYZ 


Houston 


ABC 5,000 1 


| KTSA 


San Antonio 


CBS 5,000 1 


MOUNTAIN AND WEST 




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KDSH 


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CBS 5,000 


KVOD 


Denver 


ABC 5,000 


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Portland 


ABC 50,000 1 


KIRO 


Seattle 


CBS *>" nr, ~ 1 






:i?wwwrrt7T!!»7TTb7wrfi^^ 





ADIO 



"Choice of Audiences- 
The Ones You Want" 



by JAMES M. WADE 

Manager, Atlanta Office 

We have no doubt (and you probably don't, either) 
that some men do buy foods, soaps, etc. — that some 
women buy pipe tobacco — that some city men buy 
farm implements. Etc. But if you were selling tractors 
(say) we'll bet you'd want a really rural audience for 
your advertising efforts, and a male audience at that. 

"Choice of audience" is certainly the most funda- 
mental requirement in any selling effort. 

Spot Broadcasting, more than any other mass medium, 
permits you to select your audience — to reach the 
people you want most to reach, with a minimum of 
waste. You select the markets, the time, the pro- 
grams, the stations that are logical for- your prospects. 

Spot Radio is "beamed radio" as contrasted with 
"umbrella radio". It is efficient radio, and it costs 
less than any other mass medium you can use. 






^TEW YORK 



REE & Jr ETER 

INC. 

Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 

CHICAGO ATLANTA DETROIT FT. WORTH HOLLYWOOD SAN FRANCISCC 



At newscasts give station 




GOOD 

PROFIT 

MARGIN 



...sponsor buys more 



Everybody agrees that if a deal is profitable to both 
buyer and seller, the relationship will be a long and 
happy one. 

At Pleasantville. N. J., Station WOND proposed 
a package of 4 daily newscasts to the Atlantic 
Cadillac & Pontiac Company, for used car specials. 
Price of the cars was reduced slightly each day until 
sold. So effective has been the program that the 
sponsor repeatedly has renewed the schedule and, 
in addition, has bought a one-hour Sunday show 
plugging new Pontiacs. 




Says John (r. Struckell, general and sales 
manager for WOND: 

"Program ideas come and go, but with AP news 
in our station, we feel we always have a salable 
feature. And, too, the cost per program of AP 
news is so low, in comparison with other program 
material, that the station can realize a profit 
from newscasts with little effort." 



and from still another station — 



Station KOCA in Kilgore, Tex., reports the 
following experience with AP news — 

O In 1953, AP news consumed only 11% of 
station's broadcast time. 

^J In same year, AP news accounted for 
28% of total station revenue. 



© All of the stations special AP features 
have been sponsored since February, 1953. 



Says the station manager: "Our advice to 
any sister station having revenue trouble is to 
just dig into their goldmine — AP." 




•I 



If your station is mil yet usinii Associated 
/Visv service, your II' Field Representative 
can give you complete information. Or write — 



m *®OCMBPff SS A 



Those who know famous brands . . . 

know the most famous brand in news is JP 







62 



SPONSOR 



EMPLOYMENT AGENCY 


OFFICE EQUIPMENT 


SPONSOR: Frietsch Employment AGENCY: Standart-O'Hern 

Services 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Frietsch Employment 
agency ran a series of 17 announcements over KUDL, 
Kansas City, during three consecutive days. The an- 
nouncements asked listeners to call BABE-24* for informa- 
tion about the agency. Schedule cost the sponsor $5. The 
first day, Frietsch reports it received a total of 431 calls; 
the day after that, an additional 582 calls were recorded 
and on the final day the agency got 597 calls requesting 
information. It gives KUDL a large share of the credit 
for attracting the total of 1,610 queries. 

KUDL, Kansas City PROGRAM: Announcements 


SPONSOR: National Servici \'.l A< -> K 
I \l--i l.K « VSE HISTORY : 11 hen the Seaboard Oil ( 
opened its new office in Billings, Man/., they needed 
office equipment badly l>ut didn't Ln<m which were tin 
best local dealers to buy from, iftet hearing an institu 
tional announcement ovei KGHL foi the Sational Set 
vice Co., Seaborn d\ representative placed an ordei i<n a 
$560 calculator and a $92 portable typewriter. s a\s the 
National Service Co.: "These two sales would more than 
pay for our year's ml schedule on KGHL." Sational uses 
one announcement a week. 

KGHL, Billings, Mont. PROGRAM: \ ncements 





results 



W$Mir : - i > 



DEPARTMENT STORE 



SPONSOR: T. Eaton Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Last winter, the T. Eaton 
Co. bought a daily 15-minute program to sell specific 
merchandise throughout its various departments. When 
the contract reached its expiration date and it was 
planned to drop the program for the summer, department 
managers said they would prefer to see the money neces- 
sary to keep the shoiv on the air cut from their news- 
paper budgets because they had gotten "definite sales 
results" whenever they had advertised on the program. 
Daily cost of the program is $20. 

CJVI, Victoria, B. C. PROGRAM: Let's Go To Eaton's 



PIANOS 



SPONSOR: Lester Piano Co. 



AGENCY: Dittman & Kan< 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Nine years ago the Lester 
Piano Co. scheduled a quarter hour of live piano music 
at 10:00 a.m. over WIP, five days a week. A year later 
the sponsor added a second series of across-the-board 
programs (1:00-1:15 pm.) . They next increased the 
morning show to 30 minutes. The broadcasts have con- 
tinued for the past seven years. Says the sponsor: "More 
than a third of our business comes directly from WIP. 
A piano is a high-priced unit, and careful records are 
kept to show what kinds of advertising pay off. WIP has 
sold more than its share." Cost of the radio schedule is 
under 3% of the firm's total budget. 



WIP, Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: Keys to Happiness 



• 



: 



f\ I 






PARAKEETS 



SPONSOR: B&I Sales Co VGEN< 1 : Dire< 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The B&l Sales Co. sponsoi > 

a 15-minute program Friday nights on K \l() called 
Jungle Macabre. On 27 November one of tin 1 three < om- 
mercials in the program was used to advertise parakeets 
which were being placed on sale at $4.95 each. Within 
three days 805 parakeets were sold. The sponsor figures 
that since the whole program costs $244. one commi-n ial 
on it is worth about §81.33. This single commercial pro- 
duced a gross return of S3.984.75. 



KMO, Tacoma 



PROGRAM: Jungle Macabn 



AUCTION 



SPONSOR: AUentown Sales V-uction 



\(,i:\n : Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Six days before AUentown 
Sales had scheduled an auction in the Lehigh Valley area 
it began advertising on WAEB. The firm bought four five- 
minute participations daily in disk jockey shows, plus 
announcements: total cost was $155. Radio was the only 
advertising used except for tuo newspaper ads (one tin- 
day before opening; one on opening day). Despite <> 
heavy storm which hit the area on the day the auction 
opened, a crowd of nearly 10,000 people was present. 
The sponsor attributes 9(Y/c of the crowd to WAEB. 



WAEB, AUentown 



PROGRAM: Participations 
Announcements 



HANDLE BAGS 



SPONSOR: Von's Grocery Co. AGENCY: Mogge-Privett, Inc. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Twenty- five thousand "trick- 
or-treat" handle bags were used by this sponsor to test 
the pull of radio. Von's, a chain of 19 super markets in 
Greater Los Angeles, made two announcements on il< 
news show stating the bags were available at all its stores. 
Within 24 hours after the newscast the entire stock was 
gone. Says X. H. Bolstad. of Von's: "The greatest share 
of the response to our offer came from the radio an- 
nouncements." Von's sponsors Homemakers' Edition ot 
the News Monday through Friday at 10:25 a.m. U eekly 
cost of the program is $U< 



KBIG, Los Angeles 



PROGRVM: Homemakers' Edition ol 
the News 





1 



\ 



I 



i 



/A/tftf^/AI-READY SOLD 
/flf/CfC// IN 14 MARKETS! 

' 52 weeks firm in NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, CHICAGO, 
SAN FRANCISCO. LOS ANGELES, CINCINNATI. CLEVE- 
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HOUSTON, BALTIMORE, AND WASHINGTON! 
Hurry} A q* vr market! 



1 OUTSHINES 
THEM ALL FOR DRAMA, ACTION, REALISM! 

Inside a real INTERROGATION ROOM 
Inside a real SHOW-UP ROOM 
Inside a real COURTROOM 
Inside a real CRIME-LAB 






\ SALES-MINDED ADVERTISERS! 



* 






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Champion of 
the people, 



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truth, guard- 
|ian of our 
fundamental 
rights to life, 
liberty and 
fhe pursuit 
of happiness 



HOLLYWOOD'S DYNAMIC 



Meet Mr. D. A. Himself 



Technical supervision 
thru the cooperation of 
the Los Angeles law 
enforcement agencies. 




He looks, he acts, he IS MR. D. A. 






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TELEVISION PROGRAMS, INC. 

MADISON ROAD, CINCINNATI, OHIO 


* 


.YORK HOUYWOOO 



WTVP 

CHANNIl 17 
DECATUR. ILLINOIS - 



SOLID COVERAGE 
IN THE HEART OF 






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PROSPEROUS 
CENTRAL ILLINOIS 



WTVP 

CHANNIL 17 
DECATUR, ILLINOIS ^ 



DELIVERS ONE OF THE 

FASTEST GROWING 
MARKETS IN AMERICA 

SELL IN... 

THE MARKET THAT 
MARKETING FIGURES 
CAN'T KEEP UP WITH! 



WTVP 

CHANNEL 17 
DECATUR, ILLINOIS a 



Nofiono/ Repreienlo'ive George W. Clark, Inc. 



1MO 
911 Mill 




Mr. Sillerman 



> 



-„"',.■ i ■ " ■ 1 1 ■■ muni! mis 

Kisc itf lr film xi/mf icniioii 
•tmiitirulh'lt'tl' in l'..S. lii*lori# 

(.•, \l,,l,.,.i M Slllrrmam, ....i./n. vlt* pretUanl, 

I.I, i m, in l'ni-jriim» ill tniiriin 

["here ia universal 
i< • ognition of the 
importance tele 
\ ision baa as the 
most Bpectacular 
method <>f enter- 
tainment and 
Bales in I h«* his- 
tor) "f American 
life and industn ■ 
Analysts, poll- 
takers, survej ors, 
Boothsayers — all have combined in 
celebrating television's development 
and growth as the most phenomenal 
mas- medium and most intimate con- 
tact between producer and consumer, 
[his year will inaugurate the com 
ing into it* nun of the decisive instru- 
ment of television programing: film 
syndication. 1954 will he a \ear of 
ever-increasing demands for the syndi- 
cated product, for better program qual- 
it\ and fni vital inarket-hv -market sales 
and merchandising techniques. 

I iicre are now over 350 t\ stations 
on the air and over 200 additional 
station- have construction permits. At 
present, there are 350 television film 
distributing companies and Tim film 
production companies. 

The phenomenal spurt of distribu 
lion and production organizations in- 
volved in film syndication for tele- 
vision is most significant. Never be- 
fore in t lie ln-torv of \meri<an busi- 
ness has there been the spectacular 
rise of a segmenl of an industry to 
compare with the development of tele- 
vision film production and syndication. 

One hundred million viewer- each 

■ lav mean- one hundred million po- 
tential customers daily. Film syndica- 
tion supplies that exclusive and incom- 
parable requirement for American 
business: It can intimate!) dramatize 
properties of specific products for the 

■ ustomer. 

Film syndication enables local and 



regional sponsors to obtain top caliber 
programs equal and often superior to 
— national network programs. And all 
this i- in prime time period-. 

Uready, production plans for '54 in 
the t\ film syndication field point to 
further advances at the Bame fast pace 

in the realms of quantiu and quality. 

Television Programs of America's film 
production budget for this year calls 
for a five million dollar net investment 
in our forthcoming properties. 

In previous rears television produc- 
tion and sales syndication firms pre- 
Bented sprawling and sometimes cha- 
otic organizations. Today, as the re- 
quirement- of American business de- 
mand more effective solutions to re- 
gional and local advertising problem-, 
and as the machinerv of live network 
television falters in the fulfillment of 
these basic mi — ions of the medium 
film syndication and production are 
emerging as the decisive factors in 
idcv ision. • • * 



First film manual: The \ \IM B is 
helping l\ stations eliminate trial-and- 
cii or tactics in telecasting film pro- 
graming. 

Its first annual Television Station 
Film Manual, recently mailed to all 
active \ \RTB t\ station members, re- 
flects lessons learned by pioneers in 
the use of film on television. 

There is information on film pro- 
graming hours and costs, case histories 
and do's and don'ts of film practi' • ■-. 

The hours and costs data were based 
on a sur\e\ of tv stations grouped ac- 
cording to the number of television 
families in area. One result of BUrve) : 
disclosure film programing hours ex- 
ceed live in all categories of stations 
reporting. Film shows cost more than 
live programing: The average live costs 
for one hour in all groups came to 
for film. S126. 

Case histories on film policies and 
operations of si\ tv stations selected 
according to size and geographical lo- 
cation include information on film 
purchasing, personnel, equipment, l.D. 
specifications, engineering techniques 
and programing. There are diagrams 
of the six -tations" floor plans as well 
as drawings of forms used in schedul- 
ing, routing, and filing films. I he 
-i\ stations reported on are K.GNC-TV, 
\marillo: KKTV, Colorado Springs; 
KRON-TV, San Francisco; \\ \ KM, 
Baltimore; WBTY. Charlotte, and 
\\( \l -TV, Philadelphia. * * * 



66 



SPONSOR 










Leaning Over Backwards Department 

It appears to us that, all things considered, there 
are probably fewer tv viewers in our audience 
at a given time than there are in, say WCBS-TV's. 



But we'll match 'em, audience for audien«e and 
no holds barred and throw in the New Yorker's 
too, for ferocity. 

WMT-TV 

Channel 2 - CBS for Eastern Iowa 

Mail address: Cedar Ha /nils 
S'ational Kepi: The Katl Agency, which see lor bared fangs 




8 FEBRUARY 1954 



67 




Every day more and 
more advertisers are 
learning it's good 
business to sell 
America's eighth 
largest trading area 
through WKJF-TV— 
Pittsburgh's pioneer 
UHF television sta- 
tion. That's because 
WKJF-TV offers its 
ever-growing audi- 
ence outstanding net- 
work shows plus 
strong local pro- 
gramming. 

In case you're look- 
ing for a way to get 
more than your share 
of the 2 1 i billion dol- 
lar Pittsburgh market, 
you'll find it pays to 
use VC'KJF-TV. Want 
proof? Contact our 
national representa- 
ti\es, Weed Televi- 
sion, or write us 
today. 



WKJF-TV 

&ui*i*ejt 53 



PITTSBURGH 



Not. Rep. WEED TELEVISION 
\ 



OUTSTANDING 
NBC PROGRAMS 




[Continued from page loi 

cal sum obtained by including personal expenses such as I us- 
iness overhead, -alary to your mother-in-law, etc. 

It might also be worth mentioning that as each successive 
film come- out of the lab, the negative co-t has become pro- 
gressively lower due to a finagle known a> production savings 
which really mean- (heating on what you deliver. 

But I don't worry — yet. Things don't really look as black 
as all this implies. I've got a pretty darn good show featur- 
ing Toodles, that great star of the silver screen, as narrator 
and sometimes participant. I'm happy with the ratings which 
are -tailing to come in and are better than I dared to expect. 
So now I am a big man in my league and the people at the 
Welatka Country Club in Rolling Ridge, N. J., knowing that 
I am a tv entrepreneur ask me questions about the medium. 
Now / buy the brandy. 

Then it happens. I get a letter from a California lawyer, 
saying that film number 17 in "my series" will be the last. 
The corporation 1 have been dealing with is bankrupt. The 
negatives already existent have been attached. The corpora- 
tion I was dealing with discovered the hard way (and at my 
expense) that the cost of selling to the other markets add- 
almost 50' ! to the cost of each negative. Reruns are difficult 
if not impossible to market. Unions ask increases. Bank- 
want their money back. Etc.! Etc.! All thanks to the simple 
arithmetical fact that by going out of pocket several thousands 
of dollar- each film, you have already accumulated a tidy 
debt of 17 times that sum. 

\nd here I am with time bought in the middle of a cycle 
of 13. The crushing blow, however, i- this: I understand 
from a friend who was out on the Coast recently that you 
were seen driving around in a new Chrysler Imperial. Hmm! 

In conclusion may I -a\ I hate you and may I paraphrase 
once more; — money i- the root of all happiness. 



• • • 



Matters to Bob Foreman are weleomed 

Do you always agree with the opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
presses in "Agency Ad Libs"? Bob and the editors of spon- 
sor would be happy to receive and print comments from 
readers. Address Rob Foreman, c o sponsor. 40 E. 1 ( ) St 



68 



SPONSOR 






T. f. story board 

A column sponsored by one of the leading film producers in television 

SARBA 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICACO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 










1 
3** 


;Sr>*T|^S 






"Whispering Power" is the theme of new one-minute TV spots for Evinrude's 
Fleetwin outboard motor. Gay, informal outdoor shots invite carefree boat- 
ing fun. You hear the difference as the sound track picks up the quiel flew "I 
power from Evinrude's Fleetwin, and the voice-over tells a hard-hitting sales 
story backed up by close-ups of the motor's mechanical advantages. A smooth 
blend of happy promise and convincing demonstration planned by SARRA 
with Evinrude Motors and its agency, The Cramer-Crassett Company. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



TV spots created by SARRA for Bell & Howell's movie camera have every- 
thing it takes to clinch a sale: a featured price and strong product identifica- 
tion ... a demonstration in close-ups of exclusive advantages . . . and emo- 
tional appeal through such human interest sequences as baby's first steps 
which dramatize the message — "Don't let moments like this pass you b\." 
Created for Bell & Howell Co., through McCann-Krickson, Inc. Another ex- 
ample of how SARRA "shoots to sell." 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 

In a new one-minute commercial for Jergen's Lotion SARRA merges anima- 
tion with live action for effective selling. In an animated sequence winsome 
fingers prance to the household tasks they do with detergents and a parade of 
laundry, dishes, pots and pans ties in with the theme of Jergen's magazine 
campaign. In live action lovely hands smooth on the lotion, give a close-up of 
the bottle. A final romantic flash shows hands meeting as the voice-over 
underlines the message: "Don't let your hands let him know you use deter- 
gents." Produced by SARRA for Andrew Jergens Co., through Robert W. 
Orr 8c Associates, Inc. SARRA Inc 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 
Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



VIDE-O-RIGINAL is Sana's name for a quality-controlled motion picture 
print made in SARRA's own photographic laboratory. This print is the pay- 
off on your entire investment. Whether you order one — or one hundred — 
each VIDE-O-RIGINAL of your Sarra-produced TV commercial is custom- 
made to give maximum fidelity whenever, wherever your message appears on 
the home TV screen. 

SARRA, Inc. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



69 



WHAT'S 
DOING 

IH 

CHICAGO 

RADIO 




» 



PLENTY! 

In this second television market of the nation, one of the 
four major radio stations — AND ONLY ONE — has in- 
creased its audience since 1950 . . . the period of greatest 
TV growth. 

The average daily Monday -through -Friday rating for 
Station WMAQ (Pulse, Sept. -Oct. 1953) is 13 per cent 
GREATER than it was during the same period in 1950. 
Meanwhile, Station A has DECLINED seven per cent, 
Station B 11 per cent and Station C is unchanged. 



In addition, Station WMAQ is the ONLY station of the 
four to register average rating gains in each of the three 
periods of the day — morning, afternoon and night. 

Once again, proof that more and more Midwest radio 
homes — now 12 per cent greater in number than four 
years ago — turn to 



'4 



e 



Qu Al\Ji STATION f u 



'♦ 



*'/, 




Quality Programs 
Quality Services 
Quality Audience 

Represented by NBC Spot Sales 





I 



o o o 



(i forum oti i/iH-sf iona of current interest 
fo m'r advertisers and their agencies 



Uo sponsors need « well-known star to attract large 
ratlio and tr audience* and sell effectively 



THE PICKED PANEL ANSWERS 




Mr. McNe 



This i- a< luallv 

two questions, bo 
let's treal it as 
-in h. First, the 
need for a well 
known stai per- 
sonalit) to gather 
a large radio or 
tv audience. 

\n\ star will 
be a failure with- 



out the proper 
showcase, yet a good show can Btand 
without a big name personality! 

\\ itli or without star talent, the spon- 
sor must have a show guided h\ • 
sound format. pood writing and e\- 
ceptionall) one talent i not necessarily 
big stars i. Since the question posed 
deals with that which the sponsor 
"need-." then I musl opine that those 
elements I've mentioned are the most 
needed. 

You can attract a large radio or t\ 

audience with or without a Btar. Man) 

of our better-known radio and l\ -how 
properties have made the talent into 

Btars, while there are jusl as mam 
othei programs which have been made 
famous b) the big-name personalities 

|)la\ ing in them. 

In television, there i- another, and 

newer, element to consider: Promo- 
tion! Not -how promotion as we've 
known it in the past, but well planned 
campaigns. Network and independent 

stations alike are alloting n d ad 

vertjaing and promotion budgets t" 
capture audience as intensel] competi- 
tive programing realrj gets underway. 

Naturally, the use id a stai name i- 

going to be an aid in such a promo 

tion. hut not a necessit) , 

So, the sponsor does not need a well- 
known -tai. If the tv pe of show in- 
quire- the talents "f a big name: if 



Mm want the little extra push in pro- 
nation that a star name affords, then 
bj all means use them. But, they're 
not needed a- long as the sponsor has 
the benefil of a good creative staff who 
can give the public a show the) want 
to see or hear in their homes. 

As for effective selling, hip-time per- 
Bonalities are much less a factor for 
effective -ale- in radio and television. 
I he product should be the star. Unless 
Muii current campaign actually in- 
vokes a copy theme about star en- 
dorsements, there i< no need to detract 
from the package. This is particularly 
true on tv where everv wide shot you 
take of a person not involved in dem- 
onstration is a picture wasted. Build 
up the product and not the person 
talking about it ! 

1 believe a show can do well with 
or without big-name personalities. Tv 
make- it- own stars, just as radio ha- 
th me for vears. And while v nu're en- 
tertaining the audience, make sure 
your product is so interesting in its 
presentation that it will be remembered 
favorahlv in connection with the -how 
— a star in its own right. 

Edw \mi) H. M< Xkii.i.y 
Enterprise Advertising 
Los Angeles 



\\ ithout a doubt, 

no lame ma-- t\ 
or radio audience 

can he dev eloped 
without a top 
name -tar a- the 
main attraction 
I hat i-. of course, 
unless the -pon 
-■•I i- willing to 

wait out an al- 
mo-t unbearable 
period during which time the veiv ex- 
cellence of the -how it-elf can he felt 




Mr. Yambert 



On radio this frequently can be done. 
On tv. due to the size of budget re- 
quired, it is almost impossible. 

For the local or regional advertiser. 
it is therefore better to sponsor a pack- 
aged or participation show in which 
he can afford the lustre of a top-name 
-tar. This will almost insure an im 
mediate audience for his show. 

Size of audience, however, is no sure 
indicator of a show's sales ability, in 
my opinion. Here in Los Angeles there 
are numberless examples of the low- 
budget shows on both tv and radio, 
which have paid off rather handsomely. 
Some of these are on stations which 
sometimes fail to show up stronglv on 
the rating charts. 

The reason fer such results, it seems 
to me. is that the sponsor has con- 
sistently stuck to his guns, and has 
accomplished a good selling job to hi;> 
smaller-sized audience. 

It's great to have a big audience. 
But that alone is no substitute for good 
salesmanship. 

Ralph Yambert 

President 

) amhert, Inc., Advertising 

Los Angeles 



Show business 
provides a few 
generalizations, 

but the question 
can only he an- 
-wered if applied 
to specific < - - 
\ "well-known 
star" is just one 
element of a pro- 
Mr. Cavallo -ram. The need 
for such a star 
will \ar\ according to the strength of 
the other elements. Obviously, the 
-trouper each link in the chain of at- 
traction values, the better. If an im- 




72 



SPONSOR 



mediate success is demanded of an 
unknown show, however, performers 
with high puhlic acceptance are neces- 
sary. On the other hand, a well-known 
show may be cast with unknowns who 
will then gain stature by appearing in 
a popular vehicle. 

When Rogers and Hammerstein in- 
troduced South Pacific, they cast two 
stars, Pinza and Martin, as leads. The 
show proved to be so good that these 
stars gained in stature by playing in 
it. When thev left the cast, performers 
of much less importance replaced them 
but the show continued to sell out. And 
the replacements enjoyed much greater 
prestige as a result of appearing in the 
show. 

It stands to reason that a tv and/or 
radio audience likes the star of a show 
that it watches continually; the star is 
an important element of attraction. 
Therefore, a sales message delivered 
by that star surely gets more attention; 
personal endorsement by the star has 
more weight. 

The use of a star, however, does not 
eliminate the need for a sound sales 
message properly presented. The star 
is just one element in the commercial, 
and as such, is needed in varying de- 
grees according to the strength of the 
other available means of persuasion. 

Peter A. Cavallo Jr. 
/. Walter Thompson Co. 
Chicago 



There is ample 
evidence that a 
sponsor does not 
"need" well- 
known stars to 
attract a large 
enough audience 
to make his in- 
vestment in ra- 
dio or television 
profitable. The 
use of a name star should not be a 
pre-determined requirement. A sponsor 
can enjoy large audiences with a vehi- 
cle utilizing the talents of a little-known 
performer. Such performers are fre 
quently skyrocketed to stardom. For 
example, many people have for years 
been enchanted by the stories of Wallv 
Cox. Yet his nightclub performances 
and occasional guest appearances on 
radio and tv shows would not alone 
bring millions of people to their tele- 
vision sets each week to watch him 
{Please turn to page 127) 




impson 



WFBG-TV 



Channel 10 



.i 1 6,000 watts 



Covers Central and 
Western Pennsylvania 



You Need No Other Station Betiveen Pittsburgh 
and Harrisburg to Cover This Important Market 




Here Is Selling Power PLUS 



SET COUNT 



418.798 as of January 1, 1954, and it's sols thai 
count 



TOWER HEIGHT 2727 feet above sea level, 990 feet above aver- 

age terrain on Wopsononock Mountain 

RADIATED POWER 316,000 watts on Channel 10, the maximum al- 
lowed by FCC on any VHP' Channel 

RICH MARKET 640.000 families spending over SI. 9 billion in 

retail sales 

SUCCESS STORY 6115 pieces of mail in response to 4 Santa 

Claus programs 



CABLE BROADCASTING CO. 




ABC 
NBC __ 
DU MONT 



Altoona, Pa. 



Channel 10. 316. OOO walls 13 40 kc. NBC 



Represented Exclusively by H-R Television, Inc. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



73 



TV FILM COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS: continued from page 50 



NAME LF FIRM LOCATION AND SALES CONTACT » » C I L I Tl I - I r.CLUDE : 

Animation Color Shipping 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING I952-53 SEASON 



If I 






WM F BROIDY PRODUCTIONS 

I i i HLVD 
inn I 1 WOOD U, CAJ 
WM I BBOIDI HOLLYWOOD 



LOU BUNIN FILM PRODUCTIONS 

MM 

sht\ rOBK 19 s i 

■ 



BYRON. INC. 

. [8< us-i\ \ \ I. 

\\ L8IIING I UN I. I 

Dl I'll \ — I -it i II i 



CALDWELL AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 

CAN IDA 
s KHEPARD KIM. ■>!• II I 



X Kcllogg's Sugar Corn Pops, Lux Flakes, Meister Brau Beer 



Franco-American Spaghetti, Doeskin Products, Howdy Doody Ice Cream 



DuBois Beer, Jenny Gasoline, Briggs Pork Products, Capital Airlines, Hals Beer, Tipon 

U S. Treasury Savings Bonds, Gunther Beer, Esskay Meats, Motorists Mutual Insuranc 

I ' 

Robin Hood Flour, Borden Co. of Canada (Starlac, Ice Cream, etc.), Wcstinghouse Pre 
Kolynos, Aero-Shave, Post Cereals, Anacin, Dentyne, Chiclets 



, 



I 



S W CALDWELL LTD 

1 i;\ i- ~r 
TORONTO ON I LBIO C UfADA 
(. \ MACKENZIE KIN08DA 



LARS CALONIUS 
hi-i m> BT 
M« YORK 19, N. 1 
LABS i LLON11 9 < lit' I I 



X Wcstinghouse, Consumer's Gas Co., Government of Canada (Postal Dept.), Remingtoi 






XXX Borden's Buttermilk, Sal Hepatica, Mott's Apple Sauce & Prune Juice 



CAMERA CRAFT 

EXINOTON w I 
BOLLYWOOD - CAI 

ROB1 li r i K \u I OBD, Ml MS II Mi 6856 



CAMPBELLCAHILL STUDIO 
rs EAS1 WA< KKB DK 
i ii n LOO : III. 
JERRI i LMPBELL I'll 



CAPITOL FILMS (SUBSIDIARY OF TCAl 

CONNECTICUT IVI 
u 18IIINOTON Hi 



.;•..•;••-':'. Temco Products Skeeter, Relaxicisor, Clapps Foods, Apex Magic Wand 



rf* wf» *f. 



Fould's Macaroni, Kosto-Pudding & Mixes, Rand Shoes, Hartman Luggage, Manor 
Coffee 



X X (Not reported) 






CARAVEL FILMS. INC. 

I I 1 1 \ \ B 
\iw rOBB N 1 

< M inn \ \l' Ki \\ rim LI 7-6110 



CARLA PRODUCTION INC 

N FHOHLANTJ \\K 
BOLLYWOOD - I \1. 
ill LBLES LABBAIN, \\ CBS . I . 



CASCADE PICTURES OF CALIFORNIA. INC 
-i MOTON BLVD 

i I l.\ I R i m i M. 

K \ r.K<>\\ N \ I. » -■!>"■ 



XXX 



Ballantine Beer, Borden Co., Bufferin, Coca Cola, Fab, E. I. duPont de Nemours, Gi 
Kent Cigarettes, Ivory Flakes, Ivory Soap, Mobilgas 



.":'. •':'■ .';'. Faygo Beverages, Sunbeam Bread, Peter Pan Bread, Kelly Kar Co., Bluhill Products 



Hallmark Greeting Cards, Toni's White Rain, Dial Shampoo, Liquinette, Kellogg'sCe 

XXX flakes, Pamper, Grand Prize Beer, Frigidaire, Roma Wine, Post Toasties, Cresta an 

Oldsmobile, Sunnybank Margarine, Clorox, Hi-Lite 



CENTRAL TELEFILMS. INC 

OB ) B SHERIDAN KH 
PEOB1 \ II- 1. 
II U Ml I II J 161] 



CHARTER OAK TELE PICTURES 

- . ~i \ I \l II \\ I 
M « YOBB 19. N. 1 

I m is c \\ HI ' mi I.K • 



LEW CHATHAM ASSOCIATES 

I II MM \\l I 

n Mil KOBE «'KI. \ 

I. \ « II \ I II Wl 



JACK CHERTOK PRODUCTIONS. INC 

..mi II LAS I- M.M v- \\ I 
ilui 11 WOOD I M- 
PAUL lfcNAMABA HEMP8EAD 5106 



FRANK CHRISTL A ASSOCIATES 
511 LA CIENEQA Bl I D 
LOfl INOELE8 II C M. 

1 it \NK i ni^ri. CBB8T1 n w 



CINECRAFT PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
, it \nm.in w I 

OHIO 

BAY < I l.l. M si l-Htliilt 1 : ■ " 



XXX Manbeck Baking Co. 



X X Liqui-Molly, Socony Mobilgas 



*fm rf. wft 



'V Hr 3r 



Oklahoma Tire & Supply Co., Oklahoma Roads for Oklahoma, Gov. Johnson Murrt R 
Turner Bond Program 



Merita Bread & Cakes, Gillette, Phillips Petroleum, Nat Buring Packing Co., Sa^on 
Luggage, Peter Pan Peanut Butter 



%•%•*(• Silvcrwood Dept. Store, Roper Range 



XXX 



Stondard Oil Gas, Oil & Service, Leisy Beer, White Sewing Machines, Seiberling Tirefub 
General Tire Tubes 



S3 MIIOI S * mean* COmpaH} has this facility mailalilr. — nt> not hute this facility, ¥ means no report ami/able on facilities. 



VIDEO PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
Mill CONN 
GARO \V RAY, 2-6590 



J ro 



';tm 



OF FIRM. LOCATION AND SALES CONTACT FACILITIES INCLUDE: 

Animation | Color | Shipping 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING 1952-53 SEASON 



TELE PRODUCTIONS 

iANTA MONICA BL1 D. 

YWOOP, CAL. 

Y LEHMAN, BOLLYWOOD 5-3376 



LAMPETT 
MtTII BKONSON 

Y\V > 38, CAL. 

■OCERINE, GRANITE 0522 



:, m MAN FILM CO. 
V " IAPLE AVE, 

.•,nc \s tux 

SHAPAItn. JUSTIN 3692 



GE W. COLBURN LABORATORY. INC. 
JRTll WACKER DR. 
LGO 6. ILL. 

I UslII.ll.MA. STATE 2-7316 



IERCE PICTURES 
)YDRAS ST. 
ORLEANS 3. LA. 
RT WIEGAND, MA 5026 



State of California, Air National Guard, Helms Bakeries, California National Guard, Calo 
Dog Food, Drumstic, Optimists Club 



^ (Not reported) 



* * ¥ Bell Foods, Nehi Beverages, M. P. Hood Dairy, Leigh Foods Orange Juice, Sunbeam Bread 



* * Chill Chest, York 



XXX Red Band Flour, Sterling Beer, Try-Ade, Wheaties 



Jahncke Service, Home Finance Service, Southern Tailoring Co., Surc-Klcan, Progrcsso Foods, 
Barth Appliances, Louisiana Insurance Co., Surcpine, Welsh's Baton Rouge, Fair Grounds Corp. 



IODORE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
)RTH LA C1KNEGA BLVD. 
YWOOD 46. CAL. 
'ER WHITE. JR., CRESTVIEW 1-7106 



X (Not reported) 



OR FILMS. INC. 

•LIVE ST. 

.vuis 1, MO. 

WRIGHT JR.. MAIN 8876 



Budweiser, Michelob Draft Beer, Wabash Railroad, Stag Beer, Griescdieck Beer, U. S. Air 
X X Force, Phelan Paints, Red Goose Shoes, Golden Dipt Breading, Old Crown Beer, Modular 

Homes 



TON W. COUSENS PRODUCTIONS 

EST 78TH ST. 

YORK 24, N. Y. 

TON W. COUSENS, TRAFALGAR 3-5870 



Lustre Cream, Dorothy Gray, Canada Dry (Spur), Cutex Lipstick, Desert Flower, Kiss Me Katn, 
XXX Cameo Hosiery, Ad. Fed. of America, Gunther Ale, Tussy Cosmetics, Colgate, Imperial 
Wallpaper 



RION FILMS. INC 
fLE. WASH 



¥ *£■ # Portland General Electric Co. 



Gu 



'ICTURES 
TEUBEN ST. 
NT, N. Y. 



U. x. x. Fitzgerald Brothers Brewing Co., Saratoga Harness Racing Association 



IUS CULHANE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

iST 37TH ST. 

YORK 16. N. Y. 

(US CULHANE, MURRAY HILL 2-8243 



DM E 



Bab-O, Barbasol Co., BC Remedy, Buckingham Cigarettes, Campbell Soups, Vaseline Hair 
Tonic, Ajax, Zerone, Zerex, duPont Sponge, Esso Standard Oil, Genesee Brewing Co., Holland 
House Coffee, Jack's Tasty Snack Corp., Chesterfield Cigarettes, Colonial Stores, Lipton's 
Tea, Martinson's Coffee, Masland Carpets, Mennen Skin Bracer & Spray, Omar Bread, Crisco, 
Duz, Quaker Rice, Quaker Wheat, Schlitz Beer, Wm. Schluderberg Meats, Tenderleaf Tea, 
Thor Appliances, Muriel Cigars, Halo 



IS PRODUCTIONS 

\RK AYE. 

YORK 17, N. Y. 

tENCE R. CURTIS, PLAZA 5-6333 



XXX Save By Tv (Broiler), Surgitube, National Brands, Waite-Less 



I. PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
5ST 45TH ST. 
YORK 36. N. Y. 
RICE T. GROEN, MURRAY' HILL 2-0040 



* ¥ # (Not reported) 



Mum 



ENES'. INC. 

A BUTTONWOOD STS. 

ADELPHIA. PA. 



%.}{.%. Sani-Flush, Lee Tire & Rubber Co... Jacob Reed's Clothing 



ion 



CTO FILMS. INC. 
T.ST ".1TH ST. 

YORK 19, N. Y. 
i HANDS. COLUMBUS 5-7620 



Tin 






X X Puss 'n' Boots Cat Food, Clearasil, Coronet Magazine, Minute Rice, Piel Brothers 









IEAN DUROIS CO. 
WENTY-FIRST ST. 
ER 2, COLO. 
P. DUBOIS, EAST 8122 


X 


(Not reported) 


DUNN STUDIOS 

CHICAGO AVE. -, 
AGO. IT,L. X 
DUNN, WH 3 2424 


X X 


Coolerator Refrigerators & Ranges, Bendix Washers, Canadian Ace Beer 


I'BULS X means company has this facility 


available. 


— means company does not have this facility. >(• means no report available on facilities. 



NAME OF FIRM LOCATION AND SALES CONTACT 



FACILITIES INCLUDE : 
Animation Color Shipping 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING I952-'S3 SEASON 



DYNAMIC FILMS. INC 

. ui --i -.ni -r 

M W ^ ■ >IIK N \ 

S Mil IS /.I c 1.1 It I 11 M M... 



PI II « ILGAR PRODUCTIONS. INC 
- » \ - I RD BT 

\ s 

I UO Ml Ml llll KV Hill ■ 



ELLIOT. UNGER i ELLIOT. INC 

a 8T 

M.w YORK N \ 

HEN I I l.lul n. DBOM 



Arrid, Flexees, Anacin, Dolly Madison, Westfield Trojan, Jumping Jack Shoes, Charles 
Formula 9, Fastabs, Lanolin Shampoo, Bardahl Top Oil, Shawmut National Bank, B 
Perfume, Nash Cars, Chicago Pneumatic Jack 






Bosco Co., Glance, Palmolive Chloro., Gulf Oil Co., Jergen's Lotion, Woodbury Shampoo, 
tenne, Life & Viceroy Cigarettes, Remington Rand, inc., Samsonite Luggage, Hills 
Coffee, Zippo Lighters, Good Luck Margarine, Colgate Dental Cream, Minute Maid Or 
Juice, Super Coola, Royal Instant Pudding, Pall Mall, Phillip's 66, Bayer Aspirin, I 
Army, American Radiator 

Ponds, Tide, Colgate Shaving Cream, Hinds Hand Cream, Pan American, Vicks, Scott P 
Florida Citrus, Revlon, Helena Rubinstein, Spry, Pall Mall, Chesterfield, Drene, Good 
Margarine, Lilt, Chlorodent 



FAMOUS STUDIOS 

- \M.-~i ; ni - r 
Ml R i"iu> • s i 



PAUL J FENNELL CO 

104 SOUTH LA (II M ., \ i:i.\ I. 

LOS LNQELES II C u. 

I'M I. I I INN] [J , ID .1 \ || U 



XXX 5-Doy Deodorant Pads 



Campbell's Soup, V-8 Vegetable Juices, Schmidt's Beer, Cheerios, Palmolive Shave Ci 
Oxydol Detergent, Campbell's Ketchup, Ked's Shoes, Rice Krispies, Valley Forge Beer, C 
Spray Cranberry Sauce 






FILM ASSOCIATES INC 
-"i I'll DIXIE Ml 
DAYTON ' oiiiii 
EDW \ui, LANG w LLN1 



X X Jergens Shaving Cream, Gem Commercial Building & Loan 



FILMACK STUDIOS 

-"I I'll u IB \-ll M K 

I'. II II. 1. 
DON M ICE 11 UUUBOK 



Manor House Coffee, Swift's Ice Cream, Rival Dog Food, Oshko.h B'Gosh Overalls, 
XXX Wip, Toni, Scaly Mattress, Helene Curtis, Deep Magic, Quaker Noodles, Bright P 
Swift's Franks 



FILM CREATIONS. INC 
■ (VEST ■ I'll b r 

m n yobb is. n. i 

IOSEFB M n mini 'rr n DBOI 



FILMWRIGHT PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

BAST : I'll BI 
NEW YOBB N i 
M \ \ OLANBABD ELDOB MX) 5-6038 



FIVE STAR PRODUCTIONS. INC 

91 N'BET I'.I.X |i 
HOLLYWOOD CAL 
H u mmwiw HOLLYWOOD 



DON FLAGG PRODUCTIONS 

B Mtll|NU\ ST 
MN I II LNC18I i) ( M. 
I >< 'N 1 I. \i.r, \ l Mis 



Amoco Gas, Permalube Oil, Roi-Tan Cigar, Amm-i-dent, Electric Auto-Lite, Atlas 
X Luden's Cough Drops, Eskimo Anti-Freeze, Omega Watches, Ronson Lighters, Sa 
Medaglia D'Oro, Sylvania Electric Products, Willys-Overland Motors 



Prell Shampoo, Prell Packets, Ivory Snow, Tide, Log Cabin Syrup, Sure-Jell, Crosley P 
Crosley Refrigerator, Crosley Washer, Crosley Freezer, Better School Campaign, Elna S 
Machines, Maxwell House Coffee, Sugar Crisp, Nucoa, American Association for th 
National Conference of Christians and Jews 



McGlaughlin's Instant Manor House Coffee, Uncle Ben's Rice, Raleigh Cigarettes, 
Scouring Pads, Pet Milk, Kellogg's, Stopette, Parker Pen, Schaefer's Snorkel Pen, Che 
Helene Curtis, Standard Oil, Pacific Coast Borax, Dodge, Ralston, Pabst Blue Ribbon, in 
tion Milk, Budweiscr, Baron Syrup, Old Style Beer 

Belfast Root Beer, Tintair, Cardinet Candy Co., Vano Starch, Bleach & Cleaner, </|ti 
Creamery, Cresta Blanca Wine, Emporium Dept. Store, Ford Motor Co., Kay Jewelr Ct 
Nulaid Eggs, Oral B Co., Lucerne Milk, Lucerne Frozen Juices, Miss Saylor's Choc it« 
White Star Tuna 



FOCAL POINT FILM PRODUCTIONS 

U IDI80N WK 
NEW fOB N 1 

Joliv STRANG Ml lilt w llll. I. 



* * * (Not reported) 



GEORGE F. FOLEY. INC. 

' IDIBON M I 
NKU Ml UK N 1 
I> J \ II. Mini PLAZA 1 I MO 



XXX 



Prudential Life Insurance Co., Mosland Carpets, U. S. Coast Guard Recruiting, Listerinei 



Paste, Phillips "66" Oil & Gas 



GENERAL DISPLAY PRODUCTS CO 

-; hi: i ii -i.\ i \ i ii 

ST I hi In ] Mn 

ROBERT " -i OTT >; Mill! I 



¥ ¥ H- (Specializes in beer commercials) 



GENERAL ENTERTAINMENT CORP 

BAST in - r 
NEW YORK N J 

lliiw vim i. BARNES I I iHiu Mm 



¥ %• ¥ A. S. Beck Shoes, Picturesque Stockings, Lady Hampshire He 



GLOBAL TELEFILMS. INC 

. R 
NEW YORE N ^ 

WILLI \M -si in u . me l.i 



X Block Drug, Nat.onal Shoes, Colgate, General Electric 



M MBOLS X meant company has this facilit) available. — mean* company ■ hate this facility, f- means no report atailable on facilities. 



JAM HANDY ORGANIZATION 

lAST CHAM) BLVD. 

OIT 11, MICH. 

<;i; B FINCH, TRINITY 5-2150 



:OF FIRM. LOCATION AND SALESCONTACT An^t'lon' 7 ' 



ES INCLUDE: 
Color | Shipping 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING I9S2-'S3 8EASON 



Y S. GOODMAN PRODUCTIONS 

ST 58RD ST. 

YORK, N. Y 

3L GOODMAN. PLAZA 5-3520 



X (Open-end commercials for various retail categories.) 



DuPont Cellophane & Nylon, Detroit Firemen's Fund Association, General Electric Fan, Gillette 
X X Safety Razor, Hotpoint Appliances, Krctschmcr Wheat Germ, Narragon:ctt Brewing Co., 

Oldsmobile, Chevrolet, Packard Cars, Pfeiffer Brewing Co., RCA Estate Appliances (Gas & 
Electric Ranges), Schoenling Brewing Co., Trico Windshield Washers & Wipers 



.INSON STUDIO 

:ST 16TH ST. 

YOUK. N. Y. 

HANKINSON, JUDSON G-0133 



X X Wesson 0il ' Je " ' Ar nold. Tide, Nestles, Mcnnen, Silex, Magic Maid Toaster, Kreml Sham- 

poo, Pertussin, Surin, Q-T Snow Whip, Snowdrift 



IS-TUCHMAN PRODUCTIONS 

OKTH HIGHLAND 

YWOOD 38. CAL. 

U TUCHMAN. YORK 7189 



* * 



MD Toilet Tissue, Procter & Gamble, Louis Milani's Foods, Kochlcr's Beer, Shipstads & 
Johnson Ice Follies 



HARRISON PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

EST 89TH ST 

YORK 21. X. Y. 

HARRISON. SUSQUEHANNA 7-1657 



# # 



Phillies Cigars, Cashmere Bouquet Soap, Esquire Boot Polish, Rayco Seat Covers & Convertible 
Tops, "TOT'' 50 Stapler, Old Rabbinical Brand Wine 



LEY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

•:ST 17TH ST. 

YORK 3(5. N. Y. 

HARTLEY, JUDSON 2-3960 



La France Bluing, Sweetheart Soap, Kreisler Watchband, Surf, G. E. Tv Sets and Clock Radios, 
American Red Cross, Dreem Paint, open-end beer commercials 



Y PHOTOGRAPHS 

DSWORTH ST. 
ALO, N. Y. 



ff- %• ¥ Weber's Horseradish Mustard, Old Friar Brand Wine, H. Seeberg, Inc. (Men's Clothing) 



P NHND-WEGLAND PRODUCTIONS 
L>RTH ST. 
ALO, N. Y. 



^ %• # Buffalo Bisons, Pilsener Beer, India Pale Ale 



So 



YWOOD TELEVISION PRODUCTIONS 
IFTH AVE. 
YORK. N. Y. 
MAC GOWAN, MURRAY HILL 2-0326-7- 



X X 



Ship 'n' Shore Blouses, Coty, International Silk, New Jersey Young Democrats Meyner for 
Governor, Hudson County Reg. Democrats Kenny for Mayor, March of Dimes, Colonial Air 
Lines, National Air Lines, Merrimac Hats, A&P Fruits & Veg., Underwood Portable, Kay- 
woodie Merschaum Pipe 



II 

SjYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE. INC. 
CARPENTER ST. 
ike U HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 

ON W. SCOTT. SUNSET 3-8807 



%• y & Quaker Oats, Halo Shampoo, Nescafe, Cavalier Cigarettes 



IES SOUND FILMS 
}ER, COLO. 



%• * Gates Rubber Co. 



he> 



^GE HURRELL PRODUCTIONS 
INVEST ALAMEDA 
ANK. CAL. 



I"u 



0« 



X X Birdseye Products, Band-Aid Plastic Strip, Piel's Beer 



INC. 

D1SON AVE. 
YORK 22. N. T. 
R. BAKER JR., ELDORADO 5-0620 



A&P Fruits & Veg., Campbell Soups, Window Wonder, Lysol, Mennen Baby Products, 
Dunhill Cigarettes, Ipana Toothpaste, Mum, Prince Albert Tobacco, Joy Liquid Soap, Angel 
Skin, Lady Esther Cream, Borden's Instant Coffee, Arrid, Eversharp Pens, Ex-Lax, Lilt, Vitalis 
Knickerbocker Beer, Franco-American Spaghetti Sauce, Rise, Simoniz, Bulova Watch 



RIAL WORLD FILMS, INC. 

VST OAK ST. v 

AGO, ILL. * 

DAVIS OR GENE LUKAS, MICHIGAN 2-6200 



X X Griesedieck Brothers Brewery, Nutrena Foods, Pearl Brewery, Esslinger Beer 



RNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS 
LCORN AVE. 

i'N'TO. ONTARIO, CANADA 
ITY 5-2150 



%■ # # Imperial Tobacco Co., O'Keefe Brewing Co. 



RNATIONAL TELE-FILM PROD. 
IADISOX AVE. 
YORK 28, N. T. 
F. MOSS 



# ¥ * Camden Trust Co., Bank of America, Minneapolis Savings & Trust 



INC. 
iST OAK ST. 
AGO 11, ILL. 
; DAVIS. MICHIGAN 2-6200 



if. # # Perko-Lite, Nutrena Foods, Griesedieck Beer, Pearl Beer 



H AND HERNDON 
BELMONT 
-AS. TEX. 
HERNDON JR.. TAYLOR 5168 



# # # 



Dearborn Stoves, Mrs. Tucker's Shortening, Fritos & Chitos, Gebhardt's Chili, Wichita 
Federal Savings & Loan 



MBOLS X means company has this facility available. - means company does not have this facility. * means no report available on facilities. 

(Please turn to page 80) 









what's up? 




a-\\ 



- 



network television is up. Set circulation is 
up to 28 million . . . viewing time to 132 million hours a day 
...advertising investment to 227 million dollars — each 
with a year's gain of more than 25 per cent! 

cbs television is up. PIB figures, just released, 
confirm that advertisers invested more of their 1953 
budgets on CBS Television than on any network for any 
year of broadcasting history. 

They expressed this confidence in CBS Television because 
its program schedule won the greatest network popularity* 
(with a 19 per cent lead at night and a 29 per cent lead 
during the day) . . . because CBS Television brought this 
popularity into more and more markets (up from 7U to 156 
stations in one year) . . . and because they were enabled to 
sell their products in American homes at the lowest cost 
per thousand in all television. CBS television 



*Trendex: Jan. -Dec, 1953 



















NAME OF FIRM. LOCATION AND SALESCONTACT 


FACILITIES INCLUDE: 
Animation Color S'.lppino 






AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING 1952-53 SEASON 








TOM KELLEV PRODUCTIONS 

■ hi in 8EW Mil' 
BOLL1 WOOD - C U 
TOM Kl I.I 1 * '.11 WI IK 0831 


Carolina 
* * * Blender 


Swim 


Suits, 


North American Airwoys, Regal Pale Beer, 


Bishop's 


Fund, 


Waril 



















LOUIS W KELLMAN PRODUCTIONS 

SANSON 
I'HILADI I. rill \ f\ 

\ Kl l.l M i\ Rl 



HERBFHT KFHKOW. INC 
U LEXINGTON \\ I. 
M» YORE S \ 
llllllil III" l.l RKOW PLAZ \ 



if if if (Not reported) 



X -- Tclcchron Clocks, Conoco, Hires Root Beer, Hills Bros. Coffee 



JERRY KLEIMAN PRODUCTION STUOIO 

■■I |s Mil 



St. Louis Independent Packing Co. 



KLING STUDIOS 

Willi \\K - 

'.ci ILL 
I in i' \ Mil- DELAWARE 



Motorola Radios and Tv Sets, Standard Oil Products, Angel Soft Tissue, Restonic Mattress* 
Rcardon Paint, Hallicrafters Tv Sets, Carnu, Oh Henry, Armour Frankfurters, General Elt 
trie Ranges, Refrigerators, Air Conditioners, Cat's Paw, Serta Mattresses, Sealy Mattress. 
Carlmg's Beer, Raleigh Cigarettes, Sunbeam Products, Admiral Tv Sets, Admiral Refrigi 
ators, Chuckles, Oii Additive, Electrical Information Publications, Post Cornfetti, Godcha 
Sugars, Gunnison Homes, "Chevy" Ale, Ideal Dog Food, O'Cedar Corp., American Fam 
flakes, Schaeffer Pen Co., Story Brewing Co., Toni. Also syndicated spots for bank coi 
mercials, beer, food, bread, potato chips and ice cream 



LALLEV A LOVE. INC. 

EA8T ill BT 
M « rORB N V 
JAMBS \ LOVE ELDORADO 
PITTSBURGH i \ mil in win' 1-0508 



KENT LANE. INC. 

ROl ill 1 BIRD BT 
I HI l-\ II l.l. | KV 
KENT LANE MAGNOLIA 8569 



Gunthcr Beer, Guinness Ale, Scazo Oil, Good & Plenty Candy, Climalene, Riviera Fan (We 
inghouse), Pertus in, Nabisco 100 Bran, Chrysler Autos, Stork Club Show Opening (Chr 
ler), Studio One Show Opening (Westinghouse), Philip Morris Cigarettes, Etiquet Sti 
Soh!o Motor Oil 



XXX More Per Mile for State of Kentucky, Honey Krust Bread, Red Owl Stores, Delmonico Foi 



ROBERT LAWRENCE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

in -- r 
\'i:\v TORE IS. N. 1 
BOBEB1 I. 1 \\\ HENCE rUDSON 



GENE LESTER PRODUCTIONS 

WORTH VTN1 B t 
HOLL1 ' CAL 

R UILLSID 



X X 



Vel, Eastern Air Lines, Superstick, Cut Quick, Cheer, Oxydol, Cavalier Cigarettes, Hide 
Bed, Beautyrest, Shell Gasoline, Plymouth Cars, Betty Crocker Cake Mixes 



if if Chevron Gas, Squirt, Studebaker, Union 76 — Gasoline, Triton Oil, Schlitz Beer 



LEWIS A MARTIN FILMS. INC. 

H M: \ — 1 1 \\ E 
CHIC AGO I II. I. 

BELL C LEW I* WEBS 



JACK LEWIS STUDIOS 
wr MAIN 

OXD \ \ 



Johnston's Candy, Christian Reform Church, Alka-Seltzer, Angel Soft Tissues, Bro-Can- 

X Manor House Coffee, Wrigley's Gum, Shampoo Whip, Florsheim Shoe Co., Grant Kitch 

wares, Robert A. Johnson Toys, Rotosphere, Enterprise Paint, Picture-Craft 



Dow Chemical 



VERNON LEWIS PRODUCTIONS 
:: u EST ISTH BT 
NEW rORB N v 

VERNON LEW 1- LUXEMBURG 



American Heart Association, ASR Ascot Lighters, Viceroy Cigarettes, Chrysler Cars, Po 
olive After Shave, Druggist Supply Co., Bromo-Selfzer, Glamorene Rug Cleaner, Robert I 
Clothes, Hi-V Orange Juice, Hood Rubber Co. (Beach Shoes, "P-F" Canvas Shoes), Kai 
Frazer Corp., Hind's Honey and Almond Cream, Nash Cars, Polaroid Land Camera, Shil 
Creme Shampoo, Schaefer Beer, Irish Cream Ale, Serutan, Geritol, Newsweek Magaz 
Westclox Div. of General Time, Wildroot Shampoo, Zippo Lighters 



LOU LILLY PRODUCTIONS 

-i SSET 1:1 \ 1 1 
HOLLYWOOD CA1 



if Sugar Jets, Camel Cigarettes 



LOTT VIDEO PRODUCTIONS 

linn u>w w a i ' i v i nth st 

mvti MONICA CAL 
li N LOTT EXBROOB 



* Paul Trousdale Homes, Malibu Land Property, Borrego Springs Desert Property 



LOUCKS A NORLING STUDIOS. INC 

\1» rORR II N 1 
\\ll. M IRCI - ' "I UMB - 



X General Electric Refrigerators 



MAC STUDIOS 

Boosen 1 1 t li"' 

HOLLYWOOD CAL 

II QB MM *\ Hull HI I 7111 



Protcct-O-Scal Point Co. 



MPO PRODUCTIONS. INC 

EAR uii BT 
NEW mirk N 1 
JUDD I 'Hi "' K Ml ItUW BILL - 



X Horton's Ice Cream, Ford Cars, Lincoln-Mercury, Borden Co., Remington Arms 



SI WHO/ S X ■ earn company hat thit facility available. - meant company \ hate this facility, if means no report available on facilities. 




the 
thrift 
peddlers 

rely on 

WSM-TV 

CHANNEL 4 • NASHVILLE 



That's the gist of a message from Thad 
Crandell, executive vice president of Fidelity 
Federal Savings and Loan Association of 
Nashville, who says: 



"In the 1^4 years we've used WSM-TV 
our total assets have groivti from 13 mil- 
lion to over 20 million dollars. We inter- 
view every new customer who opens a 
savings account, and we've learned that 
WSM-TV has produced more of our new 
business than any other advertising 
medium we've used." 

For similar success, why not hook your 
product to WSM-TV's selling power? See 
Irving Waugh or any Petry Man for details. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



81 



NAME OF FIRM LOC AT ION AN D SALES CONTACT FACILITIES INCLUDE: 

Animation Color Snipping 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING 1952-53 SEASON 



MARCH OF TIME 
M.u YORK S \ 



CHARLES MICHELSON INC 

! . Ml - 

M U M.ltK ■ N \ 

« II Mil I H Mil IIKLKON II , 



MILNER S PHOTOGRAPHY 
i " .' - I P IIIK V\ I. 
Mli 
EKVIN M Mil. Mil MAGNOI 



MOTION PICTURE ADVERTISING CO 

- I 

NI.U null VN- l.v 



MOTION PICTURE SERVICE CO 

■ 

B \N I IC \\l [81 ii . \|. 

-.1162 



OWEN MURPHY PRODUTIONs INC 

i \ I \ I II 111 
\1 H MUCK • \ \ 
HUI.N Ml ICIIU PLAZA 7 Mil 



NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS 
1001 CONNECTICUT \\ I 
WASHINGTON D I 

. I. FRIEND - ! 



NATIONAL SCREEN SERVICE CORP 

!;ii\!>\\ \Y 
NEW TORE I \ 1 
Ml l.N IN 1 GOLD i III* I.I. ii 5*00 



.v. Nosh-Kelvinator Electrical Equipment 



Opcn-cnd film spots for: used car dealers, retail jewelers, appliance stores, banks, bake 
brewers, weather jingles 



.v. . : '. .". Esskay Meats, Luzianne Coffee, B&O Railroad 



•':'• First National Bank of Atlanta, Orkin Exterminating Co. 



Italian Swiss Colony Wine, Acme Beer, Sick's and Rainier Beer, Fisher Flour Mills, Co 
Dog and Cat Food, Fab-Spray, Craftsmen's Insurance Agency, Pacific Guano Co., Fo 
Wheel Brake Co., California State Fair, Bay Meadows Race Track, Girard French Dressin 
Coffee Vendor 



American Tel & Tel Co., Firestone Tire & Rubber Co., Philco Tv sets, National Biscuit G 
New Holland 



Dictograph Acousticon Hearing Aids, Modern Compact Vacuum, George's Radio & Tv A 
pliances, Bamberger's Department Store, Schultz Wallpaper 



Aeroshave, Autobrite, Prudential, Gemex Watch Bands, Alumaroll Awnings, Croft Ale, 
eral Mills, National Bohemian Beer 



G, 



NATIONWIDE PICTURES 

LI K-nN 
i. u . IE I I \ 



STANLEY NEAL PRODUCTIONS 

0CKEF1 l.l.l It 1-I.AZA 
NEW TORE N I 
DON Ml' i LANE ' <n I Ml-' - 



.v. .";'• •':'■ Fred-Bell Food Products, Vaporette 



X X Armour & Co. 



TED NEMETH STUDIOS 

-i \ I N I II kVE 
\i u TORE It. N. "S 

• Ml I II i [R< II 



NEWS REEL LABORATORY 

w-ii\| ST 
PHILADELPHIA PA 

i W KELLMAN III I 



NICHOLLS ENTERPRISES. INC. 
BI I.MIINT ST 
LND ORE 

< II viu 1^ Mi .1 - \ ERMONT 13*2 



Rise, Schick Electric Shaver, Arrid Spray Deodorant, Coty Cream Powder Compact, Read 
Anthracite Coal, Pan American Airways, Old Dutch Cleanser, Goodyear Tires, Ronson Light 
Sprcd Satin Paints, Noxzema Shave Cream, Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Co., G 
den Paints 



¥ X X (Not reported) 



¥ ¥■ *£ (Not reported) 



JOHN NORMAN PRODUCTIONS 
ru BO 

i i \ 

UHIN MlllM VN l.Y 733« 


X 


X 


X 


(Not reported) 


NORTHWEST MOTION PICTURES 
ill \ \ 1 

u \-ll 
RA1 PAI LSI N ': uuii I D 


X 


X 


X 


Pacific Power & Light Co. 


OLYMPIC FILMS 

1 IN' INN \TI OHIO 


* 


* 


* 


Bisquick, Whcatics 













PACKAGED PROGRAMS. INC 

■' NS \\ I 

PITTSBl BOH . PA 
M E I I ERST i. Ii \N| 



PARAGON PICTURES. INC 

\- rwooD n i 

I \ VN^IIIN ll.l. 

i wn ~ i i mill, DA VI 8 



Johnston Co. (printing), Tcrmito! Rcstonic (mattress), Farm Bureau (insurance), Duwi 
Fryrife, Black Angus Rotisseric, Serta (mattress). Florist Association, Savings & Loan Cou il, 
X Oswald & Hess Meat Products, Regent Bottling, Carlton Hous, Commonwealth Sanitcon 
Co., Insured Savings & Loan Association, King's Men Clothes, Nolla Shops, RCA E«ite 
Appliance Co., Sweet Clean Laundry 



Johnson Outboard Motors, West Bend Aluminum, Hinckley & Schmitt Water, Blue C tr" 
Spark Plugs 



>') WBOLS X means company hat this facility avaUai not haw this facility. ¥ means no report available on facilities. 



Sioux City Sue-land 
--the KVTV Market 




31 farm-rich counties in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota 
with 556,500 population, $653 million in '52 retail sales, 

and approximately 85,000 television sets as of January, 1954. 
Reach Sioux City Sue-land via Channel 9 at minimal rates, maximal 

interest. See our national sales reps, The Katz Agency, 
for complete data. 



:o« 




CBS, NBC, ABC & DuMont 

Represented by The Katz Agency 

SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

KVTV, a Cowles Station, is under the same management 
as WNAX-570, the radio station that tor 30 years has 
successiuHy served one of the world's major agricultural 
regions, the live-state area known as Big Aggie Land. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



83 



NAME OF FIRM LOCATION ANO SALESCONTACT 



FACILITIES INCLUDE: 
Aalmallm C*4ar S.iipmt 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING I952'i3 SEASON 



PARROT FILMS STUOIO 
Kl t>- M ijl \ AT KTII 
|.|.- MOINI - m\\ \ 
EDWARD li OOLDUAK 



X (Not reported) 



PAUL PARRY PRODUCTIONS 

SI N-l I lll.\ li 

BOLLTWOOD ■ I IL 

PA1 I. p miii\ i.lusii • 



%• Colcinotor 



LINDSLEY PARSONS PRODUCTIONS. INC 

:.\ D 
BOLLTWOOD H CAL 

I.IMi-l.i > I'ARHONB 111 D*0> Mil 



* # Dawson's Beer, Crawford's Clothes, Floyd Rice, Ford Dealers, Daw Drug Stores 



PATHCSC0P1 M OF AMERICA INC 

IFTH w> 
\i.\\ miiik N ^ 
h|i\\ LRD I LAMM PLAZA : J300 



Carting's Black Label, Carrier Air Conditioner, Pink Foam, Linit Starch, Kara, East 
Gos Co., Fisher Brothers Food Chain, Flako, Flakhorn, Junket Rennet Powder, No 
Shredded Wheat, Q-T Instant Frosting, Rybutol, Westinghouse Laundromat, Coca- 
G. Washington Coffee, Sno-Whip Frosting 



RAY PATIN 

N-l. I 111 \ D 

BOLL1 WOOD ■ M 



¥ ¥ Bromo Quinine Cold Tablets 



TONY PETRI 

in Westminster st 

PBO\ hum t: K I 



PHOTO ART COMMERCIAL STUDIOS 

| M v\ \sllIM;r<iN 
POBTLAND i 
i LAI DI PALACES UK nil 



* * * Autocrat Coffee Products, Columbia Bicycles 



X Standard Oil of California 



POLARIS PICTURES. INC 

MM WEST TII1KI' sT 

1 1>- vm.i.i BB I CAL 

PBRR1 KIM. WEBSTER MM UUIK S05I 



PREMIER HAROCASTLE TELEVISION PROD 
3033 UX 1ST ST 

ST W>l 1- Mil 

NLW -I I. LD 

THE PRINCETON FILM CENTER. INC 
PRINCETON. N J 
-III !|M \N I'lUi I PBJNI I TON - 
N 1 C PLAI I 



X Holly Ranges, Lucky Lager Beer, Studebaker Dealers, Studebaker, Standard Oil of Te 



Budwciser Beer, Rice Chex, Wheat Chex, Southwestern Bell Telephone Co., Don 
Opener, Old Judge Coffee, Knapp-Monarch Chefster & Cornpopper 



(Public service tv films), duPont Paint Div., Stanley Works, Blue-Cross, Blue-Shield, 
X French Co., RCA (service), Black & Decker 



PRODUCTIONS ON FILM. INC 
Mil Kivi.il> w i. 
CLEVELAND ! OHIO 
Ml lll-m M IIKNIO si 1'UtllHI 



Hood Tires, Cleveland Transit System, Finco Antennas, Brick Industry, Old Dutch 
x UHF Converters (Alliance Mfg.), Ohio Milk Producers, Iron City Beer, P.O.C. Beer, 
ard Oil of Ohio 



PYRAMIO PICTURES 

JPR1NG ST N W 
iTLANl \ OA 



¥■ Holsum Bread, Redfern Sausage Co. 



REIO H RAY FILM INDUSTRIES. INC 
IMS IX>BD PARCH \\ 

SI I'M I. I MINN 

i i - m.i.i .- r CHIC M.n ii.i. 



Studebaker Cars, Robin Hood Flour, Grain Belt Beer, Ballard Biscuits, Anderson W 
X National Safety Council, Cream of Wheat, Land O'Lokes Butter, G. E. Electric B 
Jacob Beer, Hormel, International Harvester 



ROLAND REED PRODUCTIONS 

- 1:1 \ I HI V DB 
BEVERL1 1111. 1> cm 
CREST! [EW 6-1101 



X Bisquick, Gruen Watch Co. 



REELA FILMS. INC 
U Tlllllli ST 
MIAMI II \ 
PRANK BRODERICK 



>f- ¥• * Cities Service Gasoline, Coca-Cola, Fab-Spray, Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer 



REGENCY PRODUCTIONS. INC 
111 WEST i -XII ST 

Nl.u rORR N 1 

081 I'll -. li M I I I u n |.-,,\ . 



X 



J. C. Penney Shoes, Grand Union Stores, Old Briar Tobacco, Chunk-E-Nut Peanut «• 



Cook & Dunn Paint, Olympic Tv 



REPUBLIC PICTURES 
HOI.I.! WOOD I M 



¥ General Electric Major Appliances, Cavalier Cigarettes 



RKOPATHE. INC 
\h\\ XORK U v ^ 

■ 



m P 



Boston Gas Co., Johnson's Pride, Car Plate, Hard Gloss Glo Coat, Beautiflor am 
Monsanto Soap Products, National Education Association, National Foundation for Ifw 
Paralysis, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Scott Paper Products, Super Kemton P« 
Trans World Airlines 



FREDERICK K ROCKETT CO 
«0«3 SI Nsl.T lll.VIi 

BOLLTW04 M 

I Itf |i K Kin UiTTT II 



X X ft Richfield Oil, Ncsbitt Orangeade, Rio Grande Oil, Pabco Paint & Linoleum 



Si YlBOLS * meat I • , ..- . • .-- tkii facility available. -- nu not have this iacilit\. ¥ means no report available on facilities 



66 



Wise public debt management 
with its goal of sound money 
is of prime concern 
to every American. 




MUNDY I. PEALE 

President 

Republic Aviation Corporation 



"Wise public debt management with its goal of sound money is of prime 
concern to every American. Regular purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds con- 
tributes importantly to the achievement of this objective and, at the same 
time, helps assure our future security, individually and as a nation. We at 
Republic Aviation feel a deep sense of pride in the knowledge that 94% °f 
all our employees became investors as a result of our most recent campaign 
and that $631,000 in bonds are purchased each month on our automatic 
Payroll Savings Plan." 



Perhaps the importance of U. S. Savings Bonds and the 
Payroll Savings Plan as factors in wise debt management 
and the achievement of sound money may not have oc- 
curred to you. 

Here are a few facts and figures: 

• For every dollar of public debt held by a commercial 
bank, about five new dollars may be created in the form of 
credit. Obviously, the larger the amount of the public debt 
held by individuals, the greater the check on inflationary 
tendencies. 

• At the end of 1953, the cash value of Series E and H 
Bonds held by individuals was more than 36 billion dollars. 
This total is growing steadily, thanks largely to the month 
after month purchases of Series E Bonds by more than 
8,000,000 Payroll Savers. 

• Sales of E and H Bonds in 1953—23% higher than in 
1952— provided cash for all E and H Bond maturities and 



redemptions and still left over S210.000.00ft net for the 
reduction of bank-held debt. 

• The ownership of more than $36,000,000,000 in Savings 
Bonds by millions of Americans constitutes a reservoir of 
future purchasing power— an asset to industry and business 
as well as to the individuals who built it by their Bond- 
conscious thrift. 

Why not team up with Mr. Peale and other leaders of indus- 
try in their efforts to help America reach its goal of wise 
public debt management and sound money? All you have 
to do is (1) show a personal interest in your Payroll Sav- 
ings Plan. Get the figures on the percentage of employee 
participation and the amount of monthly savings by your 
employees. (2) Wire, phone or write to Savings Bond 
Division, U. S. Treasury Department. Washington, D. C. 
You'll get all the help you need to build up or install a 
Payroll Savings Plan that will reflect your company and its 
interest in America. 



The United States Government does not pay for this advertising. The Treasury Department 
thanks, for their patriotic donation, the Advertising Council and 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS, INC. 




8 FEBRUARY 1954 



85 



NAME OF FIRM LOCATION AND SALESCONTACT 



FACILITIES INCLUDE: 
Anuritlm Celar Shlp»lnt 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING !952-'53 SEASON 



ROCKET PICTURES. INC 

,\1\ MONICA HLVD. 
BOLLTWOOD - ' LL 
I lilt 'It villi VVE8TEN i.inMTE 7131 



ROLAB STUDIOS A PHlll N I IABS 

BAND1 BOOK ' iiw 
II uiMii.it IBD1 



MAX ROTHSTEIN 

N in i\ I 
si w rOBK N \ 

m w ao mi.' - 



LEM.II ROU8H l-HODUCTIONS. INC 
M.u rOBK 11 N V 

JOHN I OX i 01 I Ml'.' - 



GEORGE MILES RYAN STUDIOS 
\II\M viol [g MISS 



X 


X 
X 


X 


Prudential Insurance Co., Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce 


X 


Special effects on subcontract bosis for New York producers 




X 


X 


Ckarasil 



American Telephone & Telegraph, Benrus Watch Co., Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Ply 
X Cars, Eskimo Pie Ice Cream, Goodyear Tires, Nabisco Bisquits and Shredded Wheat, V 
Rose Coffee 



•¥■ Bisquik, Betty Crocker Piecrust Mix 



SARRA. INC .NEW YORK CHICAGO) 

MU rOBE N V 
llUIN III SIH.H-.uS III Ml ■ 
II EAB1 ONTARIO 
CHICAGO 11 II. 1. 

jii-i rii Bl i '.I u u ii 



Lucky Strike, Chesterfield, Encore Cigarettes, Philco, Sylvania Television, Pet Milk, i 
Blue Ribbon Beer, A&P Food Products, Chase National Bank, Sunoco, Virginia Dare > 
Salada Tea, B. C. Headache Tablets & Powders, Cunard Cruises, Jergens Lotion, M 
Rice, Swans Down, Nabisco Sugar Honey Grahams, Ritz Crackers, Northern Tissue, Stop 
Ballantinc Beer & Ale, Palmolive Soap, Dyanshinc Shoe Polish, Dress Parade Shoe P| 
Bromo-Quininc Cold Tablets, Manor House Coffee, Poof, Finesse 



SCREEN GEMS. INC 

♦33 WEST ■ 'I II ST 

Sl.u rOBB N 1 

JOHN II \r n ill I I CIRI ' 



Esso, Ford Motor Cars, Gerber Baby Foods, Coca-Cola, Prudential Insurance Co., 
Beer, Campbell's Pork & Beans, American Tobacco Color Library, Camels, Motorol 
Ford Foundation, Schaefer Beer, Pall Mall Cigarettes, Spring Step, Anacin, General M 
Oldsmobile, BVD Corp., Crosley Tv, National TB Assn., Chevrolet, Hamilton Watches, 
wciser Beer, Lucky Strike, Helena Rubinstein, U. S. Steel, British American Oil, J 
Lotion, Kool Cigarettes, Johnson's Wax 



FLETCHER SMITH STUDIOS. INC. 

ill ST 
M.u rOBK IT, N 1 
FLETCHER SMITH MtllllW llll.I, 5-66S6 



X Esso, Ponds, Westinghouse, Oldsmobile, Lucky Strike 



SOUND MASTERS. INC 

■ i - I ;• I ii 

m:u rOKE • N i 

j i.Kinn i.ir.-uN I'l.izi : ■ 



Atlantic Refining Co., M & M Candies, Chef Boy-Ar-Dee, Bordens' Products, Cotts' 
X ages, Ehlers' Coffee, Plymouth Cars. Bufferin, Public Service Co., Lava Soap, Dunhill 
rettes, De Beers Diamonds (editorial) 



SOUTHWEST FILM PRODUCTIONS. INC. 
POST Ik BO 

inn rton rex 

mils PA1 I. GOODWIN 



¥ (Not reported) 



WILBUR STREECH PRODS. 

lin LBWA1 
M.u rOBB 19. N. 1 
UII.IU B i BTB1 I ' II 'i Ii-iin I 3816 



Cities Service Gas & Oil, Thorn McAn Shoes, Sinclair Gas & Oil, Groves 4-Wa> 
Tablets, Celanese Acetate Rayon 



BILL STURM STUDIOS. INC 

SEVENTH HI. 
M u rOBK N > 
\ i> iii. ii r ' I'-i'S e-icso 



Greenmint Mouthwash, Louis Burk Summer Cold Cuts, Hi-Test Gasoline, Preen Floo 

X Classified Telephone Book (N. Y.), Hydrox Cookies, Hi-Ho Crackers, Krispy Krackers, 

Strike, Saturday Evening Post 



SUN DIAL FILMS. INC. 

si n MiKK IT, S i 

CHAB1 - Ml mill Mil. I. 1 2016 



SWIFT- CHAPLIN PRODUCTIONS 

;-uS 111. Yli 
I ii- is. .1 l l - • \l. 



The Burger Brewing Co., Cincinnati Reds, Loew's Theatres, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer P' 
Paramount Pictures, Philco, Schonbrunn Coffee Co. 



* Drcwry's Ltd. 



TRANSFILM. 1ST 

sin Mink 18. N. 1 

\v I I.I.I IM MIE8I I MOO 



American Cancer Society, Pall Mall Cigarettes, Amazo Instant Dessert, Hellman's)" 
ings, Bulova Watches, Crabbc Clipper, Franco-American Spaghetti, Arrid, Vaselin H 
Tonic, Vaseline Cream Hair Tonic, Cashmere Bouquet, Cue Shompoo, Fab, Florient it» 
Palmolive Soap, Rapid Shave, Veto Spray Deodorant, Cue Magazine, Scratch-Ex, Pos So 
Crisp, Buick, Cadillac, Pontiac, Gilbert Trains & Accessories, Gillette Safety Razor, «e 
Brewing Co., Griffin Shoe Polish, Golden Crescent Watch Bands, Ben-Gay, Rheingol fc 
Lux Flakes, Lux Soap, Frostce Sherbet, Nash Motors, Prestone Anti-Freeze, Nescaf F> 
quin Hand Cream, Silk & Safin Lotion, My-T-Fine, Obay, Heed, Ivory Snow, Cama 2l 
Tide, Ivory Soap, Drcnc Shampoo, Crisco, Camels, Scrvel Refrigerators, Chase & a\t 
Coffee, FFV Cookies & Crackers, Rcelshav 



SI l//»n/.> X meant ompenj hat this vaUable. -- this facility. & means no report available on facilities. 




"Py-Co-Pay, Py-Co-Pay Tooth 
Brush . . . Free-moving pup- 
pets make the commercial a 
feature in itself. 

(Cecil & Presbrey 
Advertising Agency) 



"National Shoes ring the bell 
. . . one of the three dancing 
singing bells that visualize the 
jingle of this active, regional 
advertiser. (Emil Mogul 

Advertising Agency) 



THAT TALK AND ACT LIKE LIFE ITSELF 



• They talk with perfect Up synchronization. 

• Amazing lifelike movements with the 
unequalled appeal of fantasy. 

• Specially created and produced from 

Wo hands, no strings, no gadgets . . . your story 
board comes to life with these new custom made, 
moving and talking puppets. 

These attention-compelling, lifelike figures bring a 
new era of glorious fantasy to TV commercials that 
assures program interest for your selling message. 



your own story board. 

• Successor to the flat animated cartoon at 
a price well within the reach of the local 
or regional advertiser. 

Commercials already produced for prominent ad- 
vertisers are available for demonstration. Created 
in Europe under the experienced supervision of 
Ralph N. Weil, Wm. L. Snyder, Arnold Hartley 
and Richard E. O'Dea. Write, wire or phone 
for details. 



GLOBAL TELEFILMS, Inc. 

35 West 53rd Street, New York Phone: Circle 5-7991 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 87 



NAME OF FIRM. LOCATION AND SALES CONTACT 



TEMPO PRODUCTIONS 

■ -- i irni \\ I 

M w rOBH H N T 

I B1C 1 nMHi iNil. PXAI v 



FACILITIES INCLUDE: 
Amm.llon Color Shipping 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING 1952-W SEASON 



Chiclets, G. Woshington Instant Coffee, Kools, Campbell Soups, V-8 Juice, CBS-Col 
Television Receivers, Plymouth Cars, Cashmere Bouquet, Colgate Shaving Cream, Ci 
Auto-Lite Battery, Flit, Bakers Instant Cocoa Mix, Maxwell House Coffee & Instant C 
Post-Tens, Post Cereals, General Motors Trucks, Household Finance Corp., Quick 
Starch, Esso Gas & Oil, Johnson's Car Plote Wax, Players Cigorettes, Tide, Seabrook 
Vegetables, Old Spice Products, Royal Pudding, Whitman's Candy, Derby Foods 



TELEFILM. INC 

... | ^ \\IM«|l ill.\ 1> 

imi.i x w C LL 

BOLL! WOOD I :3W 



Nash Motors 



TELFMATED CARTOONS 
ro I Lfl I ! Ill sT 
M.n rOBB N Y. 

- \i i. - r.\i n.T mi ilk \ v "in. ■ -■• 



Sincloir Gasoline, Sinclair Fuel Oil, Longines-Wittnauer Watches, Nedicks, Richfiel 
troleum Products, Aeromist 



TELEMOUNT PICTURES. INC 

l.(i- \s..ll.l- .'. I'M. 
Ill NK\ H |.(>Mi\ \N 



# ¥ # (Not reported) 



TELENEWS PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

\ in w i: 
KBw FOBI N, H I 

illUU.KS N 111 Kills. JIl.-ciS I !4M> 



TELEVISION GRAPHICS. INC 

M \\ I BT '.Til ST 

M u rOBB N I 

i.l I BLAIB M DOOM «1K! 



TELEVISION SCREEN PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

i: BAST r.Tii BT 

NBW FOBS ' • s 1 

CHARLES i BABCB IB Ml BBA1 mi I 



TELEVISION SNAPSHOTS, INC. 

M PARK AVK 

\h\\ rOBB U s 1 

BABBTTI i DONIOBB MI' 9 6874 



X X Wheaties, Esso, Jackson Brewing Co. 



TEL RA PRODUCTIONS 

- w W.\l T ST 

riiii.xi'Ki.i'iii \ i-\ 
hi S-41M 



TIMES SQUARE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

... i>r '.tii st 
\K\\ rOBB M, N I 
i II \» v\ i i BRAN, C1RCI.E 6-4443 



TRESSEL STUDIO 
It u III BB \IU> ST. 

i mi- \i;o i" iij. 

GEORGE 1 '. T-l»7 



TV. SPOTS. INC 

SI \-IT lll.\ I> 
HOLIiTWOOD -'• i.U. 



Pepsodent, Philip Morris, General Electric Radios, Tv tubes, Kem-Tone, Spic & Spar 
Mall, Ammens Powder, Kolynos, Universal Appliances, Alcoa aluminum utensils and 
num foil, 1954 Nosh Airflytes, Pure Gas & Oil, U. S. Industrial Chemicals 



XXX 



American Legion Aux., Arthritis & Rheumatism Foundation, Bonified Floor, Flips Dist| 
Filter, Benrus Watches, Pequot Sheets & Pillowcases 



X X 



(Editorial, non-commercial films), Coty, Inc., Ship '■' Shore Blouses, McCall's Magazi 
Council of USA, Douglas Fir Plywood Assn., US Brewers' Foundation, Fragrance Fou> 



.'.•..'.•. .v. Chrysler Corp., Ford Motor Cars, Miller Brewing Co. 



Chevrolet, Nash-Kelvinotor, Servel 



^ Norge 



Mission Bell Wine, Ken-L-Ration Dog Food, Milky Way Candy Bar, Lemon Growers <| 
Board, Lucky Lager Beer, American Trust Co., Thore-Fed Dog Food, Buchan's Bread, 
Oil, Speedway Gasoline, Michigan Bank, Faygo Beverages, Kingan Meats, Wisco C-1 
Johnstons Candy, Kasco Dog Food, Rainier Beer, Pontiac Dealers, Helms Bread, Bel 
Bread, Pacific Telephone, Associated Oil, Western Airlines, White Magic Soap, MissM 
Brew 102, Farmers Insurance, Santa Fe Wine, Mars Candy 



UNIFILMS. INC 

I ;■ SIR ITTB sr 

M.u rOBB n ■* 

CHARLB9 i OALLAOHBB, MiliKW nil. I. I-S 



Chase National Bank, PIO Wines, White Ash Cigar, Stroehmann's Bread, Sun 
Helena Rubinstein 



UNITED FILM A RECORDING STU0I0S 

i.\ST KIIIK ST 
CHICAGO Hi. 
V\M I M.I IN B1 PBRIOB 



* Holsum Bokery, Alka Seltzer, Py-O-My, Cat's Paw, Boke Rite, Studebaker 



UNITED WORLD FILMS. INC. 
H PARI AVK 

m:u TORS N 1 

miiim \s r. i.ii i'K i-i. \/.\ :• " 



VAN PRAAG PRODUCTIONS 
1600 BBOADV) \> 
nkw rOBB N I 

1I-AZ \ 



Pepi-Cola, Coca-Cola, Lustre Creme, De Soto-Plymouth, Bulova Watches, Marlbor 
cttcs, Camels, Motorola Tv, Lux Flakes 



Bank of Manhattan, Bulova Watch Co., Continental Baking Co., Ford Motor Co. 
Sales Co., Kellogg Co., Peppcridgc Farms, Rubel Baking Co., J. B. Williams Co. 



' 



6} MHOLS X means company has this facility available. - means company does not have this facility. •¥ means no report available on facilitieM] 



I 







A la carte 

Think of the range of choice film offers, for with film 
you can select clips from libraries containing millions of feet. And film clips 
wisely inserted, help change pace, set new scenes without expensive 
location shots . . . thereby help spark "live" shows, help cut 

costs everywhere. They are available on nearly every 
conceivable subject through commercial film libraries 
. . . and mode on EASTMAN FILM. 






% S t 






For complete information, write to: 
Motion Picture Film Department 

Eastman Kodak Company 

Rochester 4, N.Y. 

East Coast Division 
342 Madison Avenue 
» New York U. N.Y. 



West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, California 

Midwest Division 

137 North Wabash Avenue 

Chicago 2, Illinois 

Agents for the distribution and sale of 
Eastman Professional Motion Picture 
Films 

W. J. German, Inc. 

Fort Lee, N. J.; Chicago, III.; 
Hollywood, Calif. 



FACILITIES INCLUDE: 
NAME OF MPM LOCATION AND SALES CONTACT Anln ,„ 1(w Ctl „ Shlppln, 



AMONG THEIR ACCOUNTS DURING l»52-'53 SEASON 



VICTOR RADIO AND TELEVISION ENT 
T.(P\ 

PAS8AIC N J 
i EH 



Sunrise Embroidery Co., Variola Herb Tea, Syrena Recording Co., Magnatape, Redmont I 
Co., Pol-Tone Film Corp., Barker Corp., Prebol Drug Mfg. Co., Mountainside Farms Co 
Arntrr Corp., Coldair Corp., Dctmall Corp., Varimex Co., Ltd., Zemal Mfg. Corp. 



VIDEART. INC 

n - r 

Nl u \.iiil> ■ N \ 
I IMS. 



* 



H- Rinso, Spry 



VIDEO FILMS 

I I B80N \\ B 

DBTHOIT : lill n 

i-l.n 1 OBD Mi\\\ WO 



Argus Cameras, The Detroit News, Frankenmuth Beer, Kasco Mills, Mini-Breaker, Vei 
Ginger Ale, Detroit Edison Co., Dodge Dealers of Greater Detroit, Stroh Brewery Co., Mi 
Power, Big Bear Markets, Candy Creme Wine, Lincoln-Mercury, Mel-O-Dry Beer, Chev 
Leader Carpet Cleaning Co., Salito Headache Tablets, Nash Motors, National Va 
Cleaners, Schmidt's Pie Crust, Pfeiffer Beer, Roman Bleach, Republican State Central 
mittee, Rose Jewelers, Shafer's Bakeries, Keyko Margarine, "79" Gasoline & Oil, 
munity Torch Drive 



VIDEO PICTURES. INC. 

l II ST 
M.u rOBK ■ \ 1 

I- Ull.l.l WIv Ml • 



Burnett Products, Armstrong Cork, Benrus Watches, Poslam, Omega Oil, Alkaids, Mi 
Dry Shampoo, Wizard Aerosol, Black Flag Autobrite, Aeroshave, Tintair, Hytron Roi 
Tv Corp., Cliquot Club, Dannon Yogurt, Falstaff Brewing Co., Mrs. Filbert's Oleomarg 
White Owl Cigars, Birdseye Chicken Pie, Griffin Shoe Polish, Vanity Fair Tissue, 
Bleach, E-Z Starch, Moonshine Bleach, Bexel Special Formula, Neo Aqua Drin, Noma L 
Noxzema, Old Reading Beer, Remington Shaver, Simoniz, Conti Shampoo, Aerowax 



VIDICAM PICTURE CORP. 

LST in BT 
M.u TORS N ■> 

AI. Jl si iv Ml lilt \1 1111. 1. 6 3310 



Swansdown Cake Mix, General Electric Major Appliances, Lucky Strike, Hoover Vac 
General Electric Tv Sets, Standard Oil, Halo Shampoo, Atlas Batteries, Cashmere Bo 
Soap, Birdseye Beefpie, Rybutol, Juvenal, R.D.X., Westfield Watches, Philip Morris, 
eye Fish-sticks, Bufferin, Uncle Ben's Rice, Good Humor 



VOGUE-WRIGHT STUDIOS 

ONI villi' 
CHICAGO II. I. 

...I i Bl i EBB uiim.HM.i 



WBAP-TV 

MlNhTT ST 
1 mil WOB1 II II \ 



Do It Shop, Drewry's, Ltd., Hamm's Beer, Casite Mfg., Texize Household Cleaner, V 
mann Brewing Co., Bendix Washers & Dryers, Dari-Rich Chocolate Drink, Kellogg'; 
Flakes 



¥ 3f* H" Magnolia Petroleum Co. 



WPTZ MOTION PICTURE UNIT 

: - lil.l'i; 
PHILADELPHIA PA 
LOCTJB1 • '500 



:{.:•;.:•, Pyrene Mfg. Co.'s Fire Extinguishers 



ROGER WADE PRODUCTIONS 

1 . u K8T '-in 

M u rOBB N ^ 



XXX American Telephone & Telegraph, Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., Sealtest Fla 



WASHINGTON PHOTO 4 SOUND 

B - 1 N. W 
u \-.iiiM.n>N .. D. C 
Jims CONVI li\ 



%- ¥ %• (Not reported) 



WELGOT TRAILER SERVICE 

STH Wl. 
NKH JOBS N \ 

< II \ HI->..-~ I. WELBB i III' LB 6-8450 



XXX 



Hammer Beverages, Inkograph Co., Profocel Plastic Floor Polish, Columbia Tru-Fit D 
Ring, General Driving School 



RUPE WERLING 
llll'I'KN II \V I.N 
i || Ml us I Bl CKfi ' "i NTJ I- \ 

WILDING PICTURE PRODUCTIONS INC 

U M'lsi'N \ 
M.w rOBK N ^ 

I'l.K. 



Write commercials to order 



XXX 



Shelby Bikes, Bendix Washers, Dryers, Ranges, Freezers & Refrigerators, De Sot 
Ford Cars, Alcoa 



WILLARD PICTURES. INC. 

M.u YOBS 19. N. 1 

IOHN \i sq i ; 


X 


X 


X 


Nash-Kclvinator, Peter Paul Mounds, Medico Filterettes, American 


Institute of Accc 


WINIK FILMS CORP 

U LD1SON \\ I 
M.U M'llK N ^ 

W1XIK PLAZA 3 068t 


X 


X 


X 


Mademoiselle, Blue Bell Wranglers Jeans 




RAPHAEL G. WOLFF STUDIOS 

. 1 \ 1 1 
HOLLYWOOD - 1 M. 
QRAN1 1 I 


X 


X 


X 


' Institutional advertising features) 





GORDON YODER 

BOAJD 
DALLAS II \ 



Mercantile Bank 



SI WlldlS X man • -- means com\ not have this facility. * means no report available on jacilities. 



INDIANA BASKETBALL FANS have 
been defined as Hoosiers who see, 
hear and count by twos. They are 
among the first to double-cheer 
Tom Carnegie, WFBM's ubiqui- 
tous sportscaster who is seen and 
heard by double-counting Hoosiers 
every night of the week. His is an 
intense, though demanding, audi- 
ence. When Tom recently broad- 
cast five high school basketball 
games in a single day, his tour de 
force was greeted with a roar of 
silence. Not that his listeners were 
struck dumb: they simply didn't 
want to miss his late sports broad- 
cast. 

People have been hanging on 
Tom Carnegie's words ever since 
he placed 4th in his high school 
oratorical contest. By the time of 
his graduation from William Jewell 
College (where he was silenced mo- 
mentarily when elected President 
of the Student Body) our Tom had 
talked his way into the Collegiate 
Oratorical Championship of Mis- 
souri. Never at a loss for wind, his 
lung power propelled him through 
74 inter-collegiate debates in 18 
states. 

In rapid-fire sports announc- 
ing, Carnegie's leather lungs are 
vital, especially when he finds time 
to breathe. Breathless example : 
Indianapolis Speedway Classic. 
Chief Announcer of the 500-mile 
Memorial Day race since 1946, 
Carnegie has yet to be lapped. Nor 
does he expend his wind talking in 
circles. Leather Lungs Carnegie 
has play-by-played more than 100 
Big Ten and Notre Dame football 
contests, has lost count of the bas- 
ketball games. 

Mass-producing words may be 
Tom's specialty, but his word 




Old Leather Lungs 



quality is what sells listeners. Car- 
negie's oratorical experience is an 
undebatable asset behind the mike. 
Journalistically speaking, the man 
can write : a member of Sigma 
Delta Chi, he held down a sports 
column on the Indianapolis Star 
for four years. 



WFBM WFBM-TV 

INDIANAPOLIS • CBS 

Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 
Affiliated with WEOA, Evansville; WFDF, Flint; WOOD AM & TV, Grand Rapids 



Tom was born in Connecticut 
and attended school and college in 
Missouri. Hoosiers have adopted 
him, however, and his voice has 
been heard on Indiana radios since 
1942. Almost a native son by now, 
Carnegie has been entrusted — for 
the past five years — with the sacro- 
sanct ritual of narrating Indiana's 
official high school track and bas- 
ketball films. 

As one of the most popular 
after-dinner speakers in Indiana, 
Tom personally meets hundreds of 
his listeners every year. Be -peaks 
to thousands more on radio and tv, 
as loyal a group of sportsmen and 
women as ever heard a commercial. 
Tennis, anvone? 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



91 



FILM SERVICES: includes laboratories, treatment and handling servic 



LABORATORIES 



FAST 

BAY STATE FILM PRODUCTIONS INC 
Bo. 129 

Springfield. Mass 
Morton H Rral 

BYRON INC 

1226 Wisconsin Ave 

Washington, D C. 

Byron Roudabuih. Dupont 7-IBOO 

CIRCLE fILM LABORATORIES INC 
33 Wni 60th St 
New York 23. N Y 
H.rbrrt R Pilier. Ce 5-2180 

COLOR SERVICE CO INC 
115 West 45«h St 
New York 19. N. Y 
Robert Crane. Judstm 6 08SJ 

CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 

Main St 

Fort Lee. N |. 

Arthur J. Miller. F» 8 3400 

DE LUXE LABORATORIES INC 

850 Tenth Ave 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Alan E Freedman. Circle 7-3220 

DU ART FILM LABORATORIES. INC AND 

TRI ART COLOR CORP 
245 West 55th St 
New York 19. N. Y. 
Al Young. Plara 7-4580 

FILMLAB. INC. 

130 West 46th St. 

New York 36. N. Y 

Joseph H. Bunch. Judveo 2-2863 

FORDEL FILM LABS 

1 187 University Ave. 

Bronx. N. Y. 

Clifford F. Potta. Ludlow 8-5100 

CUFFANTI FILM LABORATORIES. INC. 

630 Ninth Ave. 

New York 36. N. Y. 

Paul Guffanti. Columbut 5-5530 

MAJOR FILM LABORATORIES 
'Subsid of Consolidated Labs' 
653 Eleventh Ave. 
New York 19. N. Y. 
K-nnrth Colman. Circle 6-6950 

MANHATTAN COLOR LABORATORY. INC. 

254 West 54th St. 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Ray OeRoberts. Judwn 6-6282 

MASTER MOTION PICTURE CO 
50 Piedmont St. 
Boston 16. Mass 
Maurice Master 

McCEARY-SMITH LABORATORIES. INC. 

1905 Fairvicw Ave N. E 

Washington 2. D. C. 

Garland Smith. Lawrence 6-4634 

MECCA FILM LABORATORIES. INC 

630 Ninth Ave 

New York 36. N. Y. 

Harry Gllckman. Circle 6-5289 

MERCURY FILM LABORATORIES. INC. 

723 Seventh Ave. 

New York N Y 

Nat Saland. Circle 5-4930 

MOVIELAB FILM LABORATORIES. INC 

619 West 54th St 

New York 19. N. Y 

Saul Jaflee. Judton 6-0360 

NATIONAL CINE LABORATORIES 
Hyattsvillc. Md 

NEWS REEL LABORATORY 

1733 Sansom St 
Philadelphia 3. Pa 
L W Kellma/i 



PATHE LABORATORIES. INC 

105 East 106th St 

New York 29 N Y 

1 I Wolcott Trafalgar 6- 1 120 

PRECISION FILM LABORATORIES INC 

21 West 46th St 

New York 36. N Y 

Russell C Holilag. Judwn 2 3970 

C LAWRENCE WALSH 
801 Brighton Rd. 
Pittsburgh 12. Pa 
C Lawrence Walsh 

SOUTH 

STRICKLAND FILM CO 
220 Pharr Rd N E 
Atlanta. Ca 
Robert Strickland 

MIDWEST 

THE CALVIN CO 
1105 Truman Rd. 
Kansas City 7, Mo. 

Forrest 0. Calvin 

CEORCE W COLBURN LABORATORY. INC. 

164 N Wackcr Dr. 

Chicago 6. III. 

George W. Coburn State 2-7316 

CRESCENT FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

7510 N. Ashland Ave. 

Chicago 26. III. 

Myron L. Freedman. Am 2-5000 

ESCAR MOTION PICTURE SERVICE. INC. 

7315 Carnegie Ave. 

Cleveland 3. Ohio 

Ernest C Carpenter. Endicott 1-2707 

FILM ASSOCIATES 
440 East Schantz Ave. 
Dayton. Ohio 
E. Raymond Am 

FISCHER PHOTOCRAPHIC LABORATORIES 

1731 N. Mobile Ave. 

Chicago 39. III. 

Eugene J. Fischer. Merrlmac 7-5316 

GENERAL FILM LABS 
66 Sibley St 
Detroit. Mich 
E B. Busley 

CENERAL PICTURES PRODUCTIONS 

Kcmpton Rd. 

Dcs Moines. Iowa 

LAKESIDE LABORATORY 
Dunes Highway 
Gary. Ind. 
Paul Ireland 

SOUTHWEST 

JAMIESON FILM CO 
3825 Bryant St. 
Dallas. Tex. 
Hugh B. Jamlewn 

SOUTHWEST FILM LABORATORY, INC. 

2015 Young St. 

Dallas 2. Texas 

Irvln Ganv Riverside 6782 

TEXAS INDUSTRIAL FILM CO 
919 M M Bldg 
Houston 2. Tex 
N. Don Macon 

ROCKIES 

WESTERN CINE SERVICE 
11 1 East Eighth Ave. 
Denver 3. Colo. 
Herman Urvchcl 

PACIFIC COAST 

ACME FILM LABORATORIES INC 
1161 N Highland Ave 
Hollywood 36. Cal. 

..risen. Ho 4 Wl 

ASSOCIATED FILM LABORATORIES 
5631 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood 28. Cal 

WIIim Leahy Ho 4 8195 



CINEMA RESEARCH CORP 
7000 Romaine St. 
Hollywood 38, Cal. 
Harold A. Schelb. Ho 2-7464-65 

COLOR CORP OF AMERICA 
2800 West Olive Ave. 
Burbank, Cal 

COLOR REPRODUCTION CO 
7936 Santa Monica Blvd 
Hollywood 46, Cal. 
Larry E. Laym. Ho 4-8225 

CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 
959 Seward St. 
Hollywood 38. Cal. 
Sidney P Solow. Ho 9-1441 

EMMETT-VAIL ENTERPRISES. INC. 

6926 Melrose Ave. 

Hollywood 38, Cal. 

T H. Emmetl. We 8-5171 

FILMEFFECTS OF HOLLYWOOD 

1153 N Highland Ave. 

Hollywood 38. Cal. 

Charles S. Leeds. Ho 9-5808-09 

CENERAL FILM LABORATORIES CORP. 

1546 N. Argyle Ave. 

Hollywood 28. Cal. 

G. Carleton Hunt, Ho 9-6391 

HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, INC. 
6060 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood 28. Cal. 
Mickey Kaplan. Ho 4-2181 

FRANK HOLMES LABORATORIES. INC. 
7619 Sunset Blvd. 
Los Angeles 46, Cal. 
Frank Holmes. Ho 7-6333 

HOUSTON COLOR FILM LABS 
230 West Olive St 
Burbank. Cal. 
Robert Burns 

MULTICHROME LABORATORIES 

760 Cough St. 

San Francisco 2, Cal. 

Robert B McKenney. Hemlock 1-6567 

PATHE LABORATORIES. INC. 
6823 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Los Angeles. Cal. 
Charles Amory. Ho 9-3961 

TECHNICOLOR MOTION PICTURE CORP 
6311 Romaine St. 
Los Angeles 38. Cal. 
Dr. Herbert T. Kalmus 

TELEFILM. INC. 
6039 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood. Cal. 
Joseph A. Thomas 

CANADA 

ASSOC SCREEN NEWS. LTD. 
7000 Northcliffe Ave. 
Montreal. Que. 
Maurice Metzger 

CRAWLEY FILMS. LTD 
19 Firmount Ave 
Ottawa Ont. 
F. R. Crawley 

FILM LAB OF CANADA 
310 Lakcshorc Rd. 
Toronto 14. Ont. 
Arthur Gottlieb 

SHELLY FILMS. LTD 
156 King St., W. 
Toronto 14. Ont. 
Leon Shelly 



SOUND RECORDING 



EAST 

RCA FILM RECORDINC STUDIOS 

411 Fifth Ave. 

New York 16. N Y 

Everett Miller. Mu 3-7611 



REEVES SOUND STUDIOS, INC. 

304 East 44th St. 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Chester L. Stewart. Oregon 9-3550 

SOUND MASTERS. INC. 
165 West 46th St. 
New York 36, N. Y. 
Charles Bellante. Plua 7-6600 

EMIL VELAZCO, INC. 
723 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19. N. Y. 
Erail Velueo. Plua 7-8530 

MIDWEST 

SONIC FILM RECORDINC, INC. 

548 Lake Shore Dr. 

Chicago 11, III. 

Jack H Lleb. Whitehall 3- IO40 

PACIFIC COAST 

CINESOUND CO. 
5968 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38. Cal. 
Walter F. Soul. Ho 5-7103 

RCA VICTOR DIVISION, RADIO C 

AMERICA 
1016 North Sycamore Ave. 
Hollywood, Cal. 
I. Watson Jones. Hillside 5171 

SOUND SERVICES, INC. 
1021 Seward St. 
Hollywood 38. Cal. 
R. E. Warn. Hempstead 1136 



OPTICAL EFFECTS 



EAST 

CINEFFECTS, INC. 
115 West 45th St. 
New York 36, N. Y. 

FILM-ART ANIMATION SERVICE 
1587 Broadway 
New York 36, N. Y. 
Nell Sessa. Circle 6-2426 

FRANCIS LEE STUDIOS 
479 Sixth Ave. 
New York 11, N. Y. 
Francis Lae. Chelsea 3-8914 

VIDEART, INC. 

240 East 39th St. 

New York 16, N. Y. 

Albert Zuekerman. Le 2-7378-9 

MIDWEST 

THE CARTOONISTS 
100 East Ohio St. 
Chicago 11. III. 
William Langdon. Su 7-2755 

SPINN & ASSOCIATES 
623 South Wabash 
Chicago, III. 
Mrs. Louis Spinn. We 9-7334 

PACIFIC COAST 

HOLLYWOOD FILM CO. 
946 N. Seward St. 
Hollywood 38. Cal. 
Ben Teitelbaum. Ho 4-7191 

RAY MERCER & CO. 
4241 Normal Ave. 
Hollywood 29. Cal. 
Morton Stein. Olympia 8436 



TITLE SERVICES 



EAST 

KNICHT TITLE SERVICE 

524 West 25th St. 

New York 1. N. Y. 

Robert B. Knight. Watklns 4-6688 



92 



SPONSOR 



TITLE SERVICES 



TITLE SERVICE 
East 47th St. 
York 17, N. Y. 
|«s D. Murray. Plaza 9-3074 

MOTION PICTURE TITLES 
Sixth Ave. 
York 19, N. Y. 
7-2(26 



#)WEST 



INC. 



I'HIC ARTS WORKSHOP, 
tEast Ontario St. 
|igo, III. 

Wirtz. Su 7-2422 



HT STUDIO 
East Chicago Ave. 
igo 11, lit. 

F. Krohn, Superior 7-5069 



MUSIC FOR FILMS 



O-MASTER CORP. 
Madison Ave. 
York 17, N. Y. 
rt Rosen, Murray Hill 3-3881 

vlAS J. VALENTINO, INC. 
Vest 46th St. 
York 36, N. Y. 
a J. Valentino, Circle 6-4673 

; WORTH PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
West 57th St. 
I York 19, N. Y. 

Laughlln Jr., Judson 6-5700 



PACIFIC COAST 

ASSOCIATED MUSIC. 
9032 Burton Way 
Beverly Hills, Cal. 



INC. 



CAIN-SCHUMANN MUSIC SERVICE 
4606 North Radford Ave. 
North Hollywood, Cal. 



STOCK LIBRARIES 



EAST 

ADVANCE FILM LIBRARIES 
729 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Circle 5-6873 

CBS TV FILM LIBRARY 
421 West 54th St. 
New York, N. Y. 
Clay Adams, PI 1-2345 



FILMS OF THE NATIONS DIST 

62 West 45th St. 

New York 36, N. Y. 

Maurice T. Groen, Murray HIM 20040 

FOX MOVIETONE NEWS, INC. 
460 West 54th St. 
New York, N. Y. 
Frank Barry, Co 5-7200 

LLOYDS FILM CO. 
729 Seventh Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 

Columbus 5-5400 



MARCH OF TIME 
1270 Avenue of Americas 
New York 20, N. Y. 
Bill Mead. Ju 6-1212 



INC. 



NBC TV FILM LIBRARY 
105 East 106th St. 
New York, N. Y. 
Ted Markovlc, CI 7-8300 

STOCK SHOTS UNLIMITED 
1600 Broadway 
New York. N. Y. 
Plaza 8-0878 

TELENEWS PRODUCTIONS, INC. 
630 Ninth Ave. 
New York 36, N. Y. 
Virginia Olllard, Judson 6-2450 

PACIFIC COAST 

FILM CLASSIC EXCHANCE 
1611 N. La Brea Ave. 
Hollywood 28, Cal. 
Charles H. Tarbox, Ho 7-4255 



FILM TREATMENT 



VACUUMATE CORP 

446 West 43rd St. 

New York 36, N. Y. 

Lucille H. Fleck. Longacre 4- 1886 

PACIFIC COAST 

PEERLESS FILM PROCESSING CORP 

959 Seward St 

Hollywood. Cal 

Victor C Krupa. Hollywood 7-9223 



DISTRIBUTION 



EAST 

COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE CORP. 
245 West 55th St. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Michael Freedman, Co 5-6767 

PEERLESS FILM PROCESSINC CORP. 

165 West 46th St. 

New York 36, N. Y. 

Louis J. Mikulka. Judson 2-0052 

RAPID FILM TECHNIQUE, INC. 
21 West 46th St. 
New York 36, N. Y. 
Jack Bernard. Judson 2-2446 

STANDARD FILM PROCESSINC CO. 
723 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Albert Beck. Circle 5-4997 



EAST 

BARNETT INTERNATIONAL FORWARDERS. 

INC. 
723 Seventh Ave. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
William Barnett. Circle 5-6080 

BONDED FILM STORACE CO., INC. 
630 Ninth Ave. 
New York 36, N. Y. 
Chester M. Ross. Judson 6-1030 

MODERN TALKINC PICTURE SERVICE 
45 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 
Alex Leslie. Ci 6-0292 



MIDWEST 

MODERN TALKINC PICTURE SERVICE 

140 East Ontario St. 

Chicago, III. 

Peter Markovlch. Delaware 7-3572 



PACIFIC COAST 

MODERN TALKINC PICTURE SERVICE 

612 South Flower St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

John Lipsky. Dunkerque 4-2511 



TOOLS OF YOUR TRADE 




Newly Published— for Everyday Reference 

TV FACTBOOK No. 18 

Semi-annual Edition of January 15, 1954 (374-pp.) 

Contains basic data on all TV stations & networks (including 
rates); complete list of applications & CPs granted, with re- 
ported starting dates; directories of station reps & major ad 
agencies; directories of TV set & tube manufacturers, transmitter 
& studio equipment makers, film & live program suppliers, com- 
munity antenna systems, FCC personnel, legal & engineering 
consultants; plus many other features— some 50 in all. 

$3.00 per copy 



1954 AM-FM STATION DIRECTORY 

Listing all North American stations by states 
and cities, with company names, addresses, 
frequencies, powers, FM antenna heights, net- 
work affiliations. Directory also includes AM 
& FM stations by frequencies, AM & FM ap- 
plications by states & frequencies as of 
Jan. 1; AM & FM stations by call letters. 
Printed in convenient loose-leaf form with 
space for your own notes. $7.50 per copy. 



FCC COLOR DECISION 

Full text of FCC's decision adopted 
Dec. 17, 1953, including Appendix 
describing operation of new system. 
Report (15 printed pages) also 
contains full text of FCC's technical 
standards amended to incorporate 
color. $2.00 per copy. 



TELEVISION MAP 

(43x29-in.) 

Showing all stations in operation as of Jan- 
uary 1, 1954 (U.S., Territories, Canada and 
Mexican border); all cities with TV applications 
pending or CPs granted; all cities over 10,000 
population; present and projected microwave 
and coaxial circuits (accurately drawn byAT&T 
engineers). $1.00 per copy. 



Address orders to.- Television Digest, Wyatt Bldg., Washington 5, D.C. 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



93 




UJVEC-TV 









NORFOLK 
HAMPTON 
PORTSMOUTH^ 
NEWPORT NEWS 



.elling power PLUS in the great 
Norfolk Metropolitan Area where only 
WVEC-TV is NBC . . . beaming your 
soles message right to the core of this 

dynamic multi-city market 



only WVEC-TV 

is a basic 

©o© 

Television Affiliate 



rcprctcntcJ !••> RAMBE II ' 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO 
SAN FRANCISCO • MINNEAPOLIS 
IOS ANGELES " 



FILM OVER-ALL 

■ ( ontinued l><>"i i><iur 1~> I 

.•I ,i. tors are used. I be & reen Vctora 
( ,uii,| in ms have bo in< reaeed the i osl 
,,l using live a< tors on or "If < amera 
thai producers, agencies and advertis 
era til devote a certain part <>f theii 
efforts tn eliminating live a< tors from 
the - op) . \- a result, .1 chosen few 
1 tors gel more monej foi less work. 
while the majoi ii\ gel both less work 
and less money." Ralph Culm, vice 
president, >< reen Gems. 

( me veteran film makei I ransfilm's 
\\ ilh I Lowendahl, executive vice pres- 
ident summed up the trend situation 
u hen he told sponsor: 

■• I he i\ lilni commercial business is 

I ing mm li more solid and stable 

than ii was a few years ago. The little 
guys, both clients and producers, are 
dropping out. There's more agency- 
clienl knowledge, which in turn has led 
to more experimenting, better produc- 
tion quality, fewer 'cheap commei 
rial-." better planning, more emphasis 
..11 visual selling, and a better blend- 
ing id 1 ommercials w iili programs." 

► \««ir developments: \\ ith coloi 
video clue to become increasing!) im- 
portanl in I')") I and 1955, a greal deal 
"I h film thinking i- natural!) taking 
(in rainbow hues. 

So far, however, there have been 
more brainstorms and hull sessions 
than there have been commercial pro- 
duction orders. Bui .1 few major steps 

lia\r lieen taken. 

Last November, Petei Elgar produc- 
tions completed what is general!) con- 
ceded to be the fir-t made-expressly- 
for-t\ color commercial, a minute an- 
nouncement for Pall Mall, via Sulli- 
van, Stauffer, Colwell & Baj les. Some 
5,000 feel of color film (Eastman Neg- 
ative-Positive 5,2 18) were shot, as well 
as some 3,000 feel of black-and-white. 
Cosl guesstimate: Nearlj 115,000 for 
the whole work-. Pall Mall intends to 
use it spai ingl) in black-and-white h . 
meanwhile waiting for (\ color to be- 
come w idespread. 

I Igar, im identall) . i- current!) pre 
paring a color documentar) foi Pabsl 
Beer, rhe big brewer, one of the few 
"national " beers, plans to use footagi 
from this film in future t\ color com- 
mercials. I In- is similar to a step 
taken lasl summer b) American 1 
bat in. w In. h ordered some 47,000 feet 
of Technicoloi t" be shol b) S< reen 
Gems in and around I.mk\ Strike fac- 



tories, also with an eye to future tv use. 
On the program side of the commer- 
cial t\ fence, some producers have ex- 
perimented with >hot-in-color commer- 
cial lead-ins to syndicated tv film 
shows. \ notable example is the color 
experimentation done recently by Ziv 
T\ lor one of its Favorite Story cli- 
ent-. Schaefer Brewing. Tests have 
been made, during the color filming of 
the syndicated drama series, in which 
-tn \dolphe Menjou hoists a stein of 
Schaefer and invites viewers to watch 
another of bis favorite yarns. Schaefer 
ma) ultimate!) use such color footage 
in program telecasts. 1 1 "or a report on 
color film program activity, and a run- 
down on color film problems and costs, 
see sponsor, 25 Januar\ . 1 

•-ime coloi film has been a factor 
in theatrical commercial advertising 
1 1 -nine 28 \ears now. it's no surprise 
that man) advertisers have a sizable 
stockpile of commercial color footage 
-lured away. Such advertisers include: 
I nited Fruit. Pel Milk. S.O.S., Reed's 
Candv. Folger's Coffee. Alka-Seltzer. 

"Production in color serves to build 
up a librar) of material that may be 
useful when color telecasting becomes 
a dail) reality. Meanwhile, color film 
can he used with greater success than 
black-and-white for theatrical screen- 
'111-- «il commercials," pointed out Per- 
w kin^. vice president of Polaris Pic- 
tures. 

Other producers warned, however, 
that shooting a color tv commercial 
toda\ Mill conies under the heading of 
experimentation. \ stockpile of color 
footage is no guarantee that a sponsor 
will be geared-up and rarin' to go when 
a -i/.able percentage of I . S. video 
homes have color receivers, they said. 
"Color i- becoming a factor in our 
tv film planning, but in a reverse sort 
of way. We recommend \erv strongly 
against making t\ spots in color now, 
B\ the time color t\ is in popular use, 
the products now being advertised will 
undoubted!) undergo a great change 
themselves. In addition, packages and 
labels will probably be different, copy 
themes and campaigns will be so differ- 
ent that it i- foolish to think the com- 
mercials being made today will be used 
a year or two or three from now. " said 
the president of a Midwestern commer- 
cial film production firm. 

Bui despite such cautions, main ad- 
vertisers and agencies want to know the 
basic cost facta and production hur- 
dle- fat ing them toda) in making color 
film commercial-. 



94 



SPONSOR 



As gathered by sponsor editors from 
producers, agencies, stations, equip- 
ment makers and film companies, here 
are the facts: 

1. Networks are adding color film 
equipment now, and there will be a 
limited, rotating schedule of colorcasts 
during 1954. Advertisers on this color 
schedule will need a certain amount of 
color film commercials; or they will 
have to do their commercials live. 
NBC TV for example, plans to air all 
of its network shows at least once in 
color during the year. 

2. The average U. S. tv station, ac- 
cording to station and equipment sup- 
plier estimates, won't have local color 
film equipment (for spot use) before 
early 1955, which puts the starting 
date of spot color video a year away. 

3. There's still a lot of work to be 
done in the 16 mm. field to resolve the 
problems of finding a good, stable, 
durable color film print stock for tinted 
tv. The 35 mm. color print stocks look 
much better on color video — but few 
stations have 35 mm. equipment for 
black-and-white: fewer still will have 
it for color. 

4. Color experimentation is expen- 
sive. Just to shoot a minute announce- 
ment in color inste-ad of black-and- 
white, according to Transfilm Execu- 
tive V.P. Walter Lowendahl, will add 
anywhere "from 25 to 40% or more 
to the cost of a finished color nega- 
tive." Thereafter, color prints cost 
about three times as much per foot. 

5. The big question mark is RCA's 
Video Tape Recorder. If this gadget 
conies into widespread use in the next 
two years, it will make present color 
film commercials, on a processing basis, 
over-priced. Color may be cheaper, in 
other words, if you wait. 

► Industry problems: I n recent 
months, the business in tv film com- 
mercials has boomed along — but for 
the most part the boom has benefited 
the larger film producers. 

The smaller independent producers 
— those who do most of their business 
with local and regional accounts — cited 
two financial headaches to sponsor: 

1. A narrowing margin between 
production costs and production profits 
has put the squeeze on the smaller film 
companies. 

2. A general lack of film knowledge 
at the regional and local advertiser 
level makes life tough for small pro- 
ducers. 

As a result, several of the smaller 



16mm Film Achievements 




w 



The Look off Things" 



It is a truism that the most perfect printing and projection in the world can- 
not make up for uninteresting subject matter in a film. But the opposite also 
holds true. The finer the subject, the more it deserves — and needs — perfect 
laboratory duplication to set it forth. 

This is why we feel that the finest combination of every factor won for the 
notable 16mm film subject THE LOOK OF THINGS the first prize in the 
Public Relations Category of the recent Cleveland Film Festival. The compe- 
tition was keen, but this winner was outstanding. Every producer, every film 
man and, indeed, every individual with an interest in viewing a superior 
motion picture should make it his business to see this film. The producer 
would be pleased to arrange for screenings through inquiries directed to us. 

Precision Film Laboratories doffs its hat to this unusual example of a fine 
industrial 16mm color and sound production. 



Precision Film Laboratories — a division 
of J. A. Manrer, Inc., has 16 years of 
specialization in the 16rnm field, con- 
sistently meets the latest demands for 
higher quality and speed. 



PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 
21 West 46th St., 
New York 36, N.Y. . 
JU 2-3970 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



95 




WHBF-TV 



ROCK ISLAND, ILL 

is favored by location 
in a 4-city metropol- 
itan area, surrounded 
by 10 of the most pro- 
ductive rural counties 
in the nation. Over 
95% of all families in 
this area now have TV 
sets. (250,000) 

Les Johnson, V.P. and Gen. Mgr. 




whbf ;: 

TEIC0 BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 

leprmnted by Aver y-Knodel. lie. 



T 



he ONLY 

single medium 
to reach 280,000 

homes in the 

rich Agricultural 

Industrial 

"Heart of the 

Nation" 




Kearney, Nebraska 

CBS-TV DUMONT 

Represented by 

MEEKER TV, Inc. 

Du.ini L. W.itlv Sl.ition Mjnjgcr 



commercial producers told sponsor 
thai the) viewed the near future of tv 
Mm commen ials aa anything bul gold- 
en. I [ere are two t\ pi< al comments : 

"The -iii-ill producer is finding it 
more and more difficult t>> keep his 
head above water in producing t\ com- 
mercials. lie i- being forced into in- 
ilu-tii.il and educational films where 
he finds i onditions more profitable. 
\\ i- have cut wir t\ production down 
considerablj over last year and. while 
not turning an) business away, are not 
activel) seeking tv film commercial 
business." Bet nurd Howard, presi- 
dent, icademj Film Prod., Chicago. 

"Among \\ e-t Coast accounts the 
trend is -till to buj production of film 
< ommercials on a cost basis instead of 
considering the more important fac- 
iei- id ideas, qualit) and effectiveness. 
The outlook locally for 1954 shows 
absolutel) do improvement. Our sell- 
ing and sen ice costs for one or a series 
of t\ commercials, usually obtained at 
ridiculous prices, are as large as those 
involved in selling and servicing con- 
tracts for longer pictures at fair prices. 
Consequently, it is not in our interest 
to solicit tv commercial business." — 
Perry King, v.p., Polaris Pictures, Los 
Angeles. 

In addition to fighting a sometimes 
losing battle with overhead, the smaller 
film firms frequently run into some 
diplomatic problems with sponsors. 

Here's how a regional film producer 
in the South summed up the situation: 

"We have produced nothing but 
routine commercials for the following 
reasons: i 1 i Agencies in this part of 
the country have no conception of tv 
commercials or any other phase of 
motion pictures. (2) The client's bud- 
gel is usually so limited than any devi- 
ation from routine, or anything else 
that would lift up a commercial from 
the routine class increases the cost. I 3 I 
W e seldom work from shooting scripts. 
Ml we get is what might be termed a 
'radio commercial' to which some pic- 
tun- ideas are added in a haphazard 
way.' Jack Lewis, president. Jack 
Lewis Studios, Richmond. 

Similarly, a Midwestern independent 
producer, who asked thai his name be 
withheld, cited the problems that come 
when new t\ markets are created: 

"Station sales -tall- are primarily 
interested in selling air time, which 
the) pursue with great vigor. Since 
most of these people are carry-oven 

from radio, with little or no t\ experi 

ence, the) are complete!) oblivious to 



the need for good visuals. They get 
as man) advertisers on the air as pos- 
sible, in the shortest length of time, 
and as cheaply as possible, usually 
u»ing slides and balops prepared by 
their -taff artist. This condition usually 
exists for 60 to 90 days until some of 
the more aggressive advertisers he- 
roine disgruntled with the handling of 
their pitches and suddenly become con- 
scious of the need for good film." 

Small producers, for the most part, 
saw no immediate solution to such 
problems. Only time, larger local/re- 
gional ad budgets for tv and better 
understanding of film methods by 
-mailer advertisers are likely to ease 
the strain on these film makers. 

At the other end of the scale the 
problems facing the big film producers 
are similar, although not as acute. 

Ben Gradus. president of Interna- 
tional Movie Producers' Service, sum- 
marized them thusl\ : 

"After three or four years of inten 
sive work in making film commercials, 
the big agencies and the leading film 
producers have learned a lot. 

"However, sponsors don't always 
realize what the problems are today 
in budgeting a good film commercial. 
Quality work is available — but it costs 
money, and not all advertisers can see 
the value of top work. And, we still 
have our problems with agencies and 
clients who want commercials made 
on a super-rush basis, which usually 
cost the client more money and which 
reduce the margin of profit for the 
producer. 

"There's still room for more film 
education at advertising agencies, par- 
ticularly at the account executive level. 
Account men will sometimes promise 
a client almost overnight service on 
film commercials: then, we have to 
break our necks to back them up. Or 
else, timebiners will snap up a whole 
series of good time slots in spot tv 
without checking to see if there's a 
supply of film commercials ready to 
be slotted in them. Again, we're caught 
in the rush.'" 

(For a round-up of money-and-time- 
saving tips from producers to adver- 
tisers, see story page 46. ' 



• * * 



96 



52 SHOWS READY FOR YOU 

Sportsman's Club 

15 minutes hunting, fishing and outdoors with 
Dave Newell. High class panel type entertain- 
ment. Write for audition prints. 

SYNDICATED FILMS 

1022 Forbe« Slreer Phone: EXpreij 1-1355 

Pimburon 19, Po. 



SPONSOR 



FILM TIPS 

(Continued from page 47) 

steer an agency away from a commer- 
cial approach which may be an unin- 
tentional carbon copy of a competitor's. 

3. Dont rush producers on job es- 
timates. 

Agencies, producers told sponsor, 
have learned a good deal about the 
time element in the actual production 
of tv film commercials. But they still 
have the habit of asking for rush serv- 
ice on job estimates. 

Producer consensus: It takes a pro- 
ducer anywhere from one to two days 
to prepare an accurate estimate on a 
single film commercial or commercial 
series. And, if the estimate is carried 
through to an actual production bud- 
get, it takes at least another half day. 

A valuable piece of advice regarding 
job estimates was cited by Transfilm's 
Executive V.P. Walter Lowendahl: 

"Agencies should try to have a meet- 
ing with commercial film producers be- 
fore the job estimate is made, at which 
time the agency should give the pro- 
ducer a clear idea of just what the com- 
mercial is supposed to be. If you don't, 
and you want rush estimates, the pro- 
ducer must interpret the storyboarcb 
for himself. Bids can vary all over the 
lot because of different interpretations. 
Later, a low bid might have to be re- 
vised upward, thus doing away with 
any 'saving' the agency may have felt 
it was making for its client." 

4. Plan far enough in advance so 
that the producer has enough time to 
do a good job on film commercials. 

Almost from the beginning of the 
upward surge in film commercial busi- 
ness, the production pace has been hec- 
tic. And this hectic pace is often costly. 

"We feel that the most important 
problem facing the tv film commercial 
producer today is that of accelerating 
his production rate," Robert Gross, ex- 
ecutive producer of American Film 
Producers, told SPONSOR. "Most agen- 
cies and sponsors, after recovering 
from the initial shock of discovery that 
filmed commercials could not be de- 
livered within 24 hours like radio com- 
mercials, have extended their thinking 
to provide 30-, 60- and 90-day sched- 
ules." 

How long should an agency allow 
for the making of a tv film commer- 
cial? 

(Please turn to page 106) 



KcWoxv 

and PROCESSED BY 

MOVIELAB 






FOR THE FINEST FILM PROCESSING IH 
THE EAST -um MEN WHO KNOW 
SAY "IT'S MOVIELAB" 

Here— at MOVIELAB . . . efficiency and perfec- 
tion are the rule. Producers, directors and tech- 
nicians have at their fingertips the very best 
in up-to-the-minute equipment necessary to 
modern FILM PROCESSING techniques. 



ROUND THE CLOCK SERVICES 

Negative Developing • First Print Department 
■ Ultra Violet & Flash Patch Track Printing 
16mm & 35mm Release Printing 
• Quality Control • Title Department 



22 Cutting & Editing Rooms. 



~ V. J 



FOR COLOR 






i&[0 



fe*. 



MOVIELAB FILM LABORATORIES, INC 



619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 6-0360 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 



97 




Top-Rated NBC Show -56.1 <m) Top-Rated CBS Show--50.4 (au> 



We doubt if there's on availability adjacent te these ratings, BUT there 
ARE some adjacent to these TOP-RATED KBTV and ABC-TV features: 



ABC-TV 


DENVER 


ARB 


The Name's the Same 




44.2 


Make Room for Daddy 




41.5 


You Asked for It 




36.6 


Stu Erwin 




33.7 


Kraft Theater 




28.0 


Motorola TV Hour 




24.9 


Ozzie & Harriet 




23.4 


Pepsi-Cola Playhouse 




22.8 


Peter Porter Show 




21.9 


Super Circus 




20.0 


Walter Winchell 




194 



KBTV-DENVER 



Superman 

City Detective 

Amos 'n' Andy 

Liberace 

Johnny Mack Brown 



AR B 
37.7 

32.0 
29.1 
27.4 
25.1 

Abbott & Costello 23.4 

Hopalong Cassidy 22.8 

Kit Carson 21.7 

Rocky Mtn. Barn Dance 20.4 

KBTV Live Wrestling 20.0 

Captain Midnight 19.4 



• KBTV Tops in 10:00 P. M. News • 



ARB 



KBTV— Bill Michelsen 


Mon. thru Fri. 


18.0 


Station "B" 


Mon. thru Fri. 


10.3 


Station "C" 


Mon. thru Fri. 


8.7 



* KBTV Tops in Weather Reporting 10:15 P.M. * 



AR B 



KBTV-Vmce Monforte 


Mon. thru Fri. 


13.7 


Station "B" 


Mon. thru Fri. 


10.3 


Station "C" 


Mon. thru Fri. 


8.7 



Source: 

ARB Denver Television 

Audience 

Reports, 

Nov. 27-Dec. 3 



<o 



BETTER PROGRAMS 



So, 



ATop 



«// 



KBTV 



JOE HEROLD, Manager 
JERRY LEE, Commercial Manager 

STUDIOS AND OFFICES: 1089 BANNOCK STREET 
DENVER, COLORADO 



CHANNEL 

ABC-TV 



DENVER 

ABC-TV 



Contact Your Nearest Free 



32223 



epresenranve 



98 



SPONSOR 




. Ellington: ABC Rll 9 9 

Nlir 



I A \\il,h. 

I ID Hi..- Eaii. Soui 

. EST; Lhe Tint 



>nn<-n & N 



Chry.l.r, BBIlO: CMS, Sit 10 



Congoleu 
Converttd 



Be*1 Food*, Earl. 



, W 1:45- 1 nm 
. Sun 10.30-41 pm 
W 10 10.30 pm; 



., BBDO: CBS, Sun 
; YAK: NBC. W 8- 
, TAB: CBS. 



..._ Mill*. D F S. Kr 
ABC, Th 7:30-8 pro; 
12-12:15 did; CB3. W, F 
General Motor*. Oldtmobil*. D 
M. \V. P 7:35-45 pro: 



s, Mnon: NBC. 

Gold Seal, Ciiiiipipi-M .Mlilmn CBS, Til 7:45-8 
B f Goodrich. HHlm CltM tit M B-Kau i 
Roodyaar: TAR: NBC >H Sun O-IO nm 
Gr»n Glint, Leo 
Greyhound Corp., 



; CBS. Th I 







CunpbeU-Mithun: CBS. Tu 1:49-1 pm 




UMtplRat, mount CHS. M 'V, F 11-11.15 pin 






P. Lorlllard. YAK i'IiS. S„„ 10-10 311 pm; LAN: 






NBC, Tu Id- 10:30 du; ABC. Th 8:30-9 pm 






Luden's. Inc. 1 \l M„M.<.* MIC. FS 30-45 pm 


pm; M-P 315-4 pm : MP 4-4:30 pm; Sun 










Minnesota Mining. CAP CHS, M W 10 10:15 sm 


Prudcnllal Int.. Cilfclm A HolJen. Culock. Me- 




J. Montenler. l.g.klr. CHS Sun 10 30-11 pm 


Cllnton ft Smith CBS. ill Sun 6:30-7 pm 




Philip Morrli, Blow CBS. M 9 30 pin; (It Th 








Quaker Oat*. SAM CM* s,m 1^ 30-1 pm 




Motor Prod*.. Daep'rcaie Appllanta. Roche, Wll- 








RCA, JWT NBC. M 9-9 30 pm 






Real Lemon s. :,,, „„ r\s--,.u \HC, MP 7 13-30 pm 


Johnson 4 fohmon, YAH MIC .-.., in-in.30 pm 




Remington Rand, VAR CBS. all Sun 10:30-11 










Myitlk T«0*. Llaitm.n: CBS. F 1:45-2 pm 












Nat'l Dairy Prodi.. Atoc CBS Sal i;-t nm 
















Kratt Food*. JWT: NBC. W 10 pm; ABC, Th 

;i ,111-iu 30 pm 


Norga, J Wajt« ThoopitHl 1 us li. 1 45-3 pm 
Owe n»- Corn In g. is Ft Cits \l Th 1(1 15-30 


ABC, Sun 7-1:30 pm 


Ui.il.-ri. Fury & Clark. O-vUl A Tlerne y : NBC. 




Irhi.U e'rewlnV LAN*" CBS* VS -s'so 8 *™* * *"" 




Pan-Am. Airway*. J\VT: NBC, alt Sun 0-8:30 pm 


Stotl Paper. JWT NBC. W 630 B pm; CBS. Sun 




Pepil-Cala Co., llltiw ABC. P H 3" 9 pm 






P.t Milk, (l.-.lnrr NBC f.t 8 30 9 pm 










II im: Iver CHS M IV V I SIMS r>m 
Lloflett & Myrr*. itiiinlntl nm A Wihrr CBS. M, 


pm; DTN. Sjn 0-0:30 pro 





(all dul 
i A Hold™ CBS Th 1:45-3 l 
MIC. Sat 7 -" " 

on, Lu.lBln ABC. HI Tu in 30-|| j 
v Co. Mm .ill,. A Ei:.-n ABC, Sun 7 
JWT CBS. W, Tb. 1:3 " 

: CBS. Stl_ 1 
; OII.'T A N: DTN, 

. 10 30-11 pm; Tu, Th 1313:15 pm 
BBDO: ABC. all Tu 
U.S. To6ai«#, Kudnpr' NBC. Th 1 

Vitamin Corp.. KFCAC: ABC. r - 



BIG 



MARKET FACTS. 



WTRFh 




WHEELING 



CHANNEL 



Serving . . . 
and 

SELLING 

■¥■ 1st Market in West Virginia 

* 48th Market in United States 

* i'II cities nl more than 10,000 
population 

* Plus a RICH... buzzing... BOOMING 
primary area 

Primary Market Data 

Population: 1,413.200 

Families: 403,700 

TV Families: 248,123 

Buying Income: : tl.877,921.000 

Relail Sale,: SU12.266.000 

MNTERCONNECTED 

Primary Affiliate IVBC 
Secondary Affiliate ABC 

National Representatives: George P. Hollingbery 

Co. 

New York. Chicago. Atlanta. Los Angeles, San 

Francisco 



WTRF-TV 

WHECIING, W. VA. 



Channe! 




Stettbenville, Ohio . . . Weirton. W. Ya. 
Martins Ferry, Bellnire, Ohio 
Robert W. Ferguson, Vice President & General Man 
II Needhani Smith, Sales Manager 

Phone Wheeling 1177 



FIRST 




Daytime 8 February 1954 

SUNDAY | MONDAY 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PROGRAMS 






IN RADIO! 
NOW 







FIRST 




exas: 



CBS AND DuMONT 
TELEVISION NETWORKS 



wichita c/ai/s cJelevision, SJnc. 



profrtmlnl profrwnlni 



««NT t 










Droir 1111101 


SctlMl 

Ch to-r I. 

l* hi i7« 

H hr SI 1*0 


Brraktas! In 

Hollywood 

By at L 

sos Clnnvr 

McE " "tibOO 


asp 


Three Stept t* 




Aik Washington 




Bride & Groom 
■ii rem, Co 

Orr ' $7500 









pnmmlDt 


F.llh tee Taday Coot«t Carnival 

FelU. (M Today. tluUi-T « ■■ 

City. NJ L 

Shaman A Mar- 
Reakhlll 12008 •""• ""M 




EiraK Oavla 
NT L 




Yteilh Want. 
t* Kno. 








k. ....... »■■: 



H. 

American Cimot; 

Inventory 41NT 



"NT m-f 

Brlghtar Day 



LB N hr SJM8 







TBA 






American Ferum 

of the Air 
VTaib L 


Yaytt. TtkM 

• fttutd 

NT I. 


No network 

proiTamlDl 


PnatdiDt'l 

WMk 

lT« ft JlDl) 

NY T 


Nature ol Thlna* 
Phil i LftT 






Man M the 
Woefc 


Koala, Fru 
Swift A Co.: 

IWT J4000 


Juvenile Jury 
MNt" '" I^ll0, L 






U hr: 111,750 
5 hr: iu.300 


KltHer M50O 





Eitv IHWO 



D'Arer 3:30-45 
Com Prodi Bef 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



D a y t ime 8 February 1954 

SATURDAY 



FCAB 

Wei** & i.-ii. ; 






Sreaklast In 


Arthur G«ttr*y 


sap 


Hawkln* Fall! 
Ch m-f I, 


Thra* Step* to 
NY m-f L 


Colgate 
Eoty 


«t"en 


Tonl Co 
47NT tu.lh L 
LB itir 110.000 


"h 


s 


NY W s'ui* lg,lh" , L. 


mfjEFZri 




jP&iSL 


„■? "' 



Brighter Day 

Com p ton 



C-M Uhr »203* 



Dlion Kit* Smith 



Campbell- yhr 





MmM* 
NT L 




Ch ** zi 






Robert Q 
NT m-f I 






^sksl 




Robert Q 








Benton I Bowlei 
$6500 


Super Clnua 

Ke-lloft Co: OmnlDUa 

B-5J0 Greyhound Corp 


No network 
lirotrratnloi 


Hallmark Hall 
Hill" Bret: ba.ll- 




mM 






MmM 


Pinky Lea 
Hy m-f L 


prcinmlnc 








.... 


Pinky Lee 
Hy m-f I* 


LB 4hr 114.000 ^ -- 


Howdy Doody 


Howdy Ooady 


MNT k """"/.L 




YEAR-END REPORT ON 

BELL SYSTEM NETWORK TELEVISION SERVICE 



In 1953 the Bell System added some 17,000 channel 
miles to radio relay and coaxial cable routes for video 
transmission. About 50,000 channel miles of coast-to-coast and 
border-to-border network now connects some 240 stations 
in 150 cities with a potential audience for a 
single program of 100,000.000 people. 

1953 moved ahead with— 

—a record number of stations added to the Bell System 
television network 

—an international video link with the connection of 
television facilities extending into Canada 

—the first coast-to-coast color television transmission. 



More television "firsts" and new developments 

can be expected in the year to come. The Bell System 

will continue to keep in step with the 

industry's requirements for network service. 





A BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



PROVIDING TRANSMISSION CHANNELS FOR INTERCITY 
RADIO AND TELEVISION TODAY AND TOMORROW 



FILM TIPS 

' iniiril limn 

Here's one large Eastern prodw 1 1 
1 1 1 1 < < • I - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > : 

• li takes about five weeks t.. — I ■ « *« - 1 
iod, typk al film i ommeri ial one 
whi( h might tain lo<- » tion, ani- 
mation and some opti< als from the 
time ili<- finished storyboard is deliv- 
ered. Working at a brisk pace, a- 

man) as tw< e-minute I <>i minute- 

;iiiil-.ili.:lt | commen iala can be turned 
out bj the produce] in tin- five-week 
period f « • r the client. 



• I ,i. I, .uMition.il paii "I i ommer- 
, iaJj i,,[ the same product, and done 
in approximate!) the Bame manner <>f 

prodw ii squires at least another 

week. 

• To deliver 100 prints of the cora- 
men ials, the producer needs another 
couple o! days to allow for laboratory 
|,n>. i Bsirj 

• ( ommercials that require more 
than the usual amounts of animation 
,,i stop motion need up to eight weeks 
ol preparation, Bince the complicated 
pro* esses involved here cannot be has- 
t. ii.-. 1 without getting into great ex- 



HERE COMES THE BONUS! 



(WICHITA AND MORE) 




Windy, the bright spirit of TV in Central Kansas, is 
rushing in with your KTVH BONUS ... that's yours for the 
asking' That is... asking for time on the one TV station 
that not onl) blankets the important Wiehita-Hutchinson 
market but gives you a vast, exclusive Central Kansas 
BONUS CO\ erage . . . BONUS sales . . . BONUS profits! KTVH 
business offices in Wichita and Hutchinson; studios in 
Hutchinson. Howard Peterson. General Manager 



KTVH 

HUTCHINSON -WICHITA 



CBS BASIC -DU MONT -ABC 
REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION, INC. 

COVERS CENTRAL KANSAS 



106 



penae and overtime payments. 

.">. // you must have an occasional 
rush job, don't try to create "new" 
commercials. 

Producers, who have gotten to know 
a lot about agency problems in the 
past four or five \ears, are aware that 
there are times when an agency must 
order commercials on a "disaster" ba- 
sis to meet sudden deadlines. For such 
emergencies, producers recommended 
that the agenc] tr\ first to remake 
some old commercials, salvaging as 
much original footage as possible. This 
is not a money-saver in most cases. 
But it does frequently save on time and 
tempers. 

6. Don't fail to consult your produc- 
er frequently. He usually knows more 
about tv film production and short cuts 
than you do. 

The vice president of a Hollywood 
commercial production firm told spon- 
sor recently: 

"The most important advice that can 
be given to advertising agencies and 
sponsors concerning film commercials 
is to confide in the producers of their 
choice and to regard them as key mem- 
bers of their creative and policy-mak- 
ing groups. Qualified producers know 
the visual medium and have used it 
successfully for more than 40 vears. 
Television is only another means of 
reaching an audience, although it is 
the greatest. With the proper agency- 
sponsor-producer relationship, the ef- 
fectiveness of film commercials will 
multiply/' 

Such cooperation can save money. 
Not long ago, a leading drug firm — 
one that spends sizable amounts of 
money in both tv program and spot 
announcement campaigns — met with a 
| top New York commercial producer. 
The drug firm wanted to order a batch 
of filmed program commercials of min- 
ute-and-a-half length, and some minute 
announcements. 

The producer, after seeing that the 
same product was to be sold in both 
cases, suggested a money-saving pro- 
cedure which the client followed. This 
was how it worked out. 

The program commercials were 
filmed at a cost of about S5.500 apiece. 
Then, for an additional S100 to $150, 
the negatives were trimmed down to 
minute length and announcements of 
standard length prepared. The spon- 
sor, in effect, got two items for the 
price of one. 

SPONSOR 



The point: by working closely with 
the agency, the producer helped plan 
the program commercials from the very 
beginning so that they could be cut 
easily to minute length without sacrific- 
ing any production values or selling 
impact. If the consultation had not 
been made, the two sets of commercials 
would have cost the client twice as 
much as he spent. 

7. Try to keep admen with little 
film experience from tampering with 
commercials during production. 

The inexperienced advertising exec- 
utive or ad manager who "takes over" 
at the last minute has become a grim 
joke in the film commercial business. 

Reason: He usually manages to run 
the costs up before he's through. 

"I've seen account supervisors and 
advertising managers who didn't know 
an 'answer print' from their elbow 
show up on the set during shooting 
and louse up everything," one New 
York producer confided. 

"Few of them are aware of the costs 
involved in making changes at a late 
stage of production," the producer add- 
ed. "For example, 'camera time' costs 
perhaps $500 an hour within the nor- 
mal working day — and this doesn't 
include the charges for talent. If you 
go into overtime — as we have on some 
occasions when admen have held crea- 
tive bull sessions on the set — it will 
cost you $750 an hour; again that is 
plus talent charges. You can see what 
this does to production budgets if noth- 
ing is being accomplished. 

"My advice to tv clients is to work 
out all the details of their tv objective 
before the cameras start to roll, assign 
a supervisor to the job who knows film 
technique and then keep hands off." 

sponsor heard many other com- 
ments on this topic from film execu- 
tives, all of whom seemed to feel about 
the same way. Some producers reiter- 
ated^ the "don't rehearse on camera 
time" warning; others warned against 
letting inexperienced executives see 
processed film in the pre-final stages 
since narration, sound, music or opti- 
cals may be missing and only an expert 
could visualize a good final result. 

As Charles W. Curran of New York's 
Times Square Productions sums it up : 

"The most important advice is to let 
professionals do the job and not the 
amateurs." 

8. Try to learn (or have your ad- 
men learn) as much as possible about 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 



the techniques, problems ami trends of 
tv commercial film production. 

Several producers advised tv spon- 
sors and their staffs to pay close at- 
tention to what's being done today in 
the way of new film commercials. As 
Gerald L. Karski, president of San 
Francisco's Motion Picture Service Co., 
stated : 

"The trend in tv film commercials is 
back to the old proven principle of 
more picture and less talk. Watch the 
ingenious new screen tricks on your 
television screen. Study the commer- 
cials. Producers are lying awake nights 
to dream them up and many of them 



contain valuable pointers foi ou I!' 
member thai t\ i- for the eye" 

9. At the same time, beware lest 
your tv admen get so immersed in tech- 
nique that your film commercials be- 
come "gimmicky." 

This is the othe] side of the coin. 
Film producers frequent!) warned that 
fane) film techniques, like too much 
of any good thing, can spoil a commer- 
cial's effectiveness. 

"As I can see it, the trend todaj i- 
toward a growing complexity of techni- 
cal structure, with agencies placing 
more emphasis on wipes, superimposi- 
tions, and special effects than on actual 



A Message of interest to: 

Motion Picture Producers, 
Distributors, Advertising Agencies, 
Sponsors, Film Libraries, 
TV Film Producers and Distributors 




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Film Rejuvenation 

Shrinkage Reduction 

Scratch Removal 

Rehumidification 

Cleaning and Repairs 

Film Library Servicing 

Shipments, Inspection, 

Cleaning. Repairs. Inventory 

and Booking Records. Storage 

Servicing TV Shows on Film 

Insertion of Commercials. Shipments 

to Stations. Booking Records, 

Follow-up. Inspection on Return. 

Cleaning. Repairs. Replacements, 

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Storage pending orders. 

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Breakdown of rolls into strips, 

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pending orders. Shipments 



Without exception, 
ALL film should be treated, 
if you are to get maximum results 
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Peerless Treatment is the finishing touch and the 
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So when you order prints, don't forget to include 
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ST. PAUL • WASHINGTON 



Into • Mulct City I 



107 



content "I the Bpot, said Hera hell (.. 

I..w i~ ..! Lew i- .in.l Martin Films, < hi- 

"li ia as though we are trying 

to pi ..\<- to ourselves h hat .i degree oi 

ii-< linn .il i\. ellem e we < an poui i nt < > 

■i. h bethei thai spot m ai rants d iz- 

zling treatment "i not. I he question, 

1. 1 com se, is this: I foi - .ill this -iii\ - 

!..i \ isual effei t add an) powei i" 

the i ommeri ial messa 

Similai l\ . \ eteran film exe uth e \l is 
Glandbard, president "I New York's 
I ilmwi ighl Productions, told sponsor: 

" \ question thai Bponsoi - Bhould 
a-k Minn- frequentl) todaj is: \i>- m\ 
tv commercials using the propel tech- 



nique l"i tin- particulai result I want? 

"In tin- > mile— sear< li lor variety 
ami novelty, agencies and clients have 
utilized .1 profusion "I techniques in 
theii commercials, such a- animation. 
live a. 1 1 > > 1 1 . -plii »i in 11. Up -\ nr. off- 
- i, en 11.11 ration, and bo forth. Too 
often though, these an- lumped to- 
pi i< iousl) with a little anima- 
tion Inn', some off-» reen narration 
there and the like. 

"I ake animation, fiw example. Ani- 
mation i- .in eye-catchei ; it always 
evokes high interest. \s .1 visual de- 
\ 1, e it i- probablj unexcelled in its 
ability i" ■ reate humoi and liveliness. 




When Conr\\e Cook Throws a Cookie Contest! 



lo get across certain technical explana- 
tions, and to implant a brand name in 
tin- viewer's mind. If that i^ the pur- 
ine- of your campaign, then you need 
nothing else. But if you want the view- 
er to feel he must go out and bu\ \our 
product, then animation alone cannot 
do the job; it cannot deliver an emo- 
tional impact." 

It). Don't try to beat the costs of ti 
film commercials by constant shopping 

in on ml among the fringe producers. 
) on' II neatly always get poor films. 

Costs adinittedl\ are up in tv film 
commercials. The same commercial 
you made last year will cost you, sev- 
eral producers estimated recently, 
about UV't more. The commercial you 
made two years ago will cost you about 
_'h I more todav. 

But cost-cutting is not a matter of 
kugain-basement tactics. Good pre- 
production planning and frequent hud- 
dles between sponsor, agencj and film 
producer are the secret. 

It - true that one producer may un- 
derbid another just to land a well- 
known account. But. eventually, the 
producer's loss must be made up if he 
wants to stay in husiness and if he 
wants to produce a quality film prod- 
uct. The sponsor, in the end, pays — 
either in extra charges or in poor film- 
in nearlj even case. 
\- one of the largest t\ film produc- 
ers told sponsor: 

'"True professionalism has come to 
the tv film industry. But sponsors must 
remember that professionalism has a 
price." • • • 



HERE'S WHAT HAPPENED! 

October 26th — Connie Cook threw a Christmas Cookie Contest on 
her afternoon Connie s Kitchen program over WOW-TV. Mail piled up 
. . . kept piling . . . 14,000 entries by the November 25th deadline . . . 
and more were still coming in! Entries came from as far away as Florida 
and California! That s a real vote of confidence for Connie, who began 
her Connies Kitchen show on WOW-TV less than 6 months ago. 

You can get this response for your product in the Omaha and Missouri 
Valley Market which yielded 42,000,000* Drug sales and 290,800,000 
Food sales in 1952. 

Ask your Blair TV man about "Connie's Kitchen," or write Fred 
Ebener, Sales Mgr. 



W 



•1953 Sales Management Survey of Buying Power 



W TV 



BLAIR TV... 100,000 WATTS • NBC-DUMONT 

A MEREDITH STATION — NBC-TV AND DUMONT AFFILIATE 



FILM SERVICES 

'Continue,! from page 49) 

that chill can't kill." To make the point 
visually, Caravel needed some action 
-hots of skiing, ice boating and other 
winter sports, which would be blended 
with the Ballantine "sell" through some 
trick optica] wipe-. 

Solution: Caravel got in touch with 
M'>< film Div ision's stock shot library, 
ordered about 60 seconds' worth of 
sports footage 1 enough to make the 
whole Ballantine series when snipped 
up 1 at a cost of about S2.50 per foot. 
plus lab fees of around 15c a foot. 
rhese shots would have cost Carayel 
land Ballantine I many times more if 
thev had to be speciallv shot instead 
of coming from the 157 million feet of 
stock footage available today in the 



108 



SPONSOR 



various stork shot libraries which sell 
to tv. 

I For a complete report on the uses 
and prices of stock film shots in tv, see 
"157 million feet of stock tv film: Are 
you getting the most out of it?", SPON- 
SOR 14 December 1953, page 38.) 

There are other categories of film 
service of interest to admen, such as: 

Laboratories: A number of the larg- 
er producers of tv film commercials 
are equipped with full laboratory fa- 
cilities, and thus handle all the lab 
work in connection with tv film com- 
mercial orders. But most producers 
have limited lab facilities, or no facili- 
ties at all. 

In such cases, the ad agency must 
order prints through the producer 
(who farms the work out I . Or else the 
agency is supplied with a finished nega- 
tive by the producer and must then 
order the work done. 

The laboratories listed in the direc- 
tory on page 92 are all equipped to 
handle virtually all of the routine prob- 
lems of 16 and 35 mm. developing and 
printing, both of picture and sound. 
Some are further equipped to make 
"blowups" 1 16 to 35 mm. ) and "re- 
duction prints" (35 to 16 mm.). A 
few — like Precision Film Laboratories, 



Byron, Color Service Co.. and Tri-Art 
Color Corp. — are equipped to turn out 
color prints when the tv need arises. 

Sound: Producers and agencies 
sometimes need sound recording facili- 
ties when narration is being dubbed 
over filmed action, when "lip synchro- 
nization" is being shot or when music 
is being scored. 

sponsor's directory of service firms 
lists several of the top LI. S. sound 
specialists. Nearly all arc equipped 
with sound recording and dubbing fa- 
cilities for 16 and IT 1 - mm. I mag- 
netic ) film. A lew have facilities for 
complete 35 mm. recording (as main 
as three tracks ) ; transcriptions; sound 
stages; re-recording theatres; sound 
negative development; cutting and edit- 
ing facilities; mobile units. 

Agencies who anticipate special 
sound problems in tv commercials will 
do well to discuss them prior to pro- 
duction with a film service company. 

Opticals, animation: With the SAG 
scales now in effect, live action in film 
commercials is sometimes quite costly. 
One of the best substitutes — and a use- 
ful film commercial tool in its own 
right — is animation. A few big pro- 
ducers have their own animation facili- 
ties, but agencies will find (see 11-page 



cli. ii i ol commercial film produi ei -. 
starting page 50 1 thai mosl produ 
tnusl shop outside foi tin- work. Simi- 
lar!) . fancj opti< als whi< h are pro- 
duced in much the same waj a- anil 
tion arc mosl "lien done b) inde- 
pendenl spi cialtj linn-. 

\ -i in. sen i< e In ma re ommend thai 
agencies planning to use such tech- 
niques extensivel) in film i ommer< ials 
discuss their problems u ith the spa ial 
ists. Most have had years "I experi- 
ence in the field, and can guide agen- 
cies and clients in linn < reative think- 
ing, help save them monej . 

Titles, music: For the ,,io-l pail. 
firms specializing in these item- work 
directly for film producers, function- 
ing more or less a- commercial art con- 
cerns and music libraries. Occasional- 
ly, agencies and sponsors ma\ have a 
special problem in titling — such as a 
particular type lace in which a super- 
imposed slogan is to be printed; or a 
musical headache — such as the type of 
trumpet fanfare needed in a l\ com- 
mercial's sound track to introduce a 
new product. 

Pre-production meetings between 
agencies and these specialh firms ma\ 
solve many minor problems of artwork 
and music backgrounds. * * * 



OPERATION BIG VOICE 

ON THE AIR FEBRUARY 15 




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49TH b MADISON 
( ontinued from page L3) 

RADIOS BIGGEST YEAR 

To '"ii oborate mj ow n opinions on 
s « • i j i editorial in the December 28 is- 
Bue, "1954 < ;m be radio's biggest, 1 
page I 11 " . I consulted with our radio 
program manager. \< eonlingh . I di-- 
i o\ ered he feels vei \ strongl) thai 
nighttime radio is verj far from dead. 

Acting on this belief he recently in- 
Btituted a program entitled This is 
Youi Turn-, a record program whereb) 
people <ill in tin* requests and have 
them played within minutes. 

Tin- program was scheduled for Sat- 
urda) evenings from 8:30 to 11:00 
p.m. So far it has been on two times. 
and. on only one telephone, 177 calls 
urn' recorded on the first program and 
249 calls were recorded on the second 
program. In addition, a lot of favor- 
able commenl and letters have been re- 
i eived in praise of this idea. 

\\ i' feci tins is blatant proof of ra- 
dio"- strength. 

Jay Hoffer 
Promotion Manager 
WJAR, Providence 



1 agree with the opinions expressed 
in \our editorial, "1954 can be radio's 
biggest," that the battle of rating ser- 
vices should end before it ruins radio 
entirely. Everj time someone gets a 
new idea for a survey, radio jumps 
headlong into the trap — and buys it. 
They still want to convince the radio 
"suspect" that Mrs. Jones on Elm St. 
is listening at 10:29 a.m. Let's get 
wise! 

Radio is still the greatest medium 
for reaching the housewife (»the real 
buyer). If we would all just show our 
true coverage area, we could all do a 
better job for clients. 

The year 1954 can be the year to 
separate the men from the l>o\s in ra- 
dio. Those in radio who still don't 
knew the potency of their medium had 
better tr\ a different field. 

1 believe L954 will bring more super 
market food accounts than ever before. 
\\ r have received more inquiries in 
the past month than an\ previous year. 

\ "ii , an'l beat the flexibility of ra- 
>li". I \ < an i. .mil certain!) the news- 
paper can't. Here's a verj good ex- 
ample ol radio al work at it- 1 est. \\ e 

had enjoyed a warm winter uo -now 

temperatures 15 to 55 degrees. Everj 
-hoc Btore and department store was 



loaded with unsold rubbers and over- 
shoes. Snow started coming down at 
a fast pace on Friday, Januarv 14 at 
2:00 p.m. One of our shoe stores (off 
radio for a few months) called for 
help on overshoes, etc At 2:30 p.m. 
bis ad- were on the air. Result: Stock 
a us sold out by 10:30 the following 
morning! Yes, he's back on a regular 
radio schedule. His newspaper ad 
would have taken two days to even be 
placed. 

The only thing wrong with radio is 
radio itself. After almost three decades, 
I believe most everyone thinks it is 
here to stay. Radio only has to fight 
harder for its share of the advertiser's 
dollar sell harder — make more calls 
on the unfriendly accounts. 

Yes, 1954 can, and will be radio- 
biggest \ear. So, if you have been do- 
ing something the same way for the 
last 10 to 15 years it's evident it's being 
done wrong. Let's make the change. 

Pat O'Hallora.n 

Sales Manager 

KPQ 

Wenatch ee, Wash . 



CHOCK FULLO' NUTS 

( Continued from page 37) 

program. On television he combined 
the advantages of frequency with the 
prestige value of program sponsorship 
by scheduling station breaks in addi- 
tion to a weekly comedy show. 
• Since the lady of the house usually 
buys the family coffee Rieff planned 
the radio and tv announcements and 
participations to complement each 
other, at times when each medium has 
the highest potential housewife audi- 
ence. Participations were bought in 
even \\ NBC daytime personality 
show, and one late-evening personality 
show. The tv program. Jerry Lester's 
Late Date, with singer Jean Martin 
i Saturday. 11:15 p.m. to 12:00 mid- 
night i . is scheduled to reach adults. 

I he restaurant chains previous air 
efforts were confined to one 15-minute 
weeklj radio show. The Jean Martin 
Show, which ran o\er \\ M< \. New 
York, for one month and then switched 
o\er to WNBC July through October 
1052. i Jean Martin has more than 
the performer's usual interest in the 
-u < ess ol her sponsor; she"- the spon- 
sor's wife.) 



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SALES RINGER IN nTLflllTn 



BS 



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RADIO DIVISION \ 
Interstate United Newspapers, Inc. \ 

Represented nationally by \ 

joe uioouon 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 



HOTS r 



UJERD 



ATLANTA 



1000 WATTS • 860 ON EVERY ATLANTA DIAL 
J. B. Blnyton, Jr., Gen M gr . 



in 



I he In in s present all a< ti\ ities rep 
resent "iln- ri^hi formula to reach the 
largest numbei ol prospective custom* 
ei g through seta live, >•< onomii .il n-< 
..I radio and teta ision, the %s ;i % 
II. imld Riefi expresses it. 

He explains: "In analyzing listening 
and viewing habits "I housewives we 
■ li- overed that the early-morning t i i ■ ■>- 
.mil I. iir afternoons were best to use 
radio; that television \w.ik- best to 
reach the housewife in the earlj after* 
noons and evenings.* 1 

Vboul iO one-minute annourn ements 
and participations are used week!) on 



\\ \BC. Participations are -u< h shows 
.1- Wake I \> Eos 1 ) (Allyn Edwards), 
the fim C&) Show, the Stan Freeman 
Show, Herb Sheldon Shou Faye Emer- 
son Shou and / Man and II i^ Music 
I ^kii< li I [enderson t . 

\ll are "I the i hatter-and-music, in- 
formal varietj with definite adult ap- 
peal. In addition i" attra i ing the right 
audienci these shows have two char- 
.1- tei isti< - important fur a new prod- 
uct: loyal audiences and personal-type 
salesmanship. 

On i\ the agenc) buys all available 
In. and 20-second station breaks ovei 



WDAY 



(FARGO, N. O.) 

IS ONE OF THE NATION'S 
MOST POPULAR STATIONS! 



Despite local competition from three other 
major network-. \\I)\V consistently gets 
a greater share of Vudience — Morning, 
Afternoon and Evening — than all other 
stations combined, in Fargo-Moorhead! 




NBC • 5000 WATTS 
970 KILOCYCLES 

FREE & PETERS, INC. 

Exclusive National 

Representatives 



\\\HI to shou a film produced by 
Depicto Films. The commercial is 
based around a jingle, also used on 
radio, which goes like this: 
"Now anyone can male thai 

hem enlj coffee, 
Heavenly coffee, heavenly coffee — 
(hoi I. full o'Nuta u that heavenly 

coffee 

At your local chain or grocery 
store." 

The jingle, composed by the agency, 
has a melodious tunc combined with 
repetition of ultra-simple, easy-to-re- 
member words. Its main theme — 
"heavenl) coffee" — is carried out in 
all radio and t\ commercials and print 
advertising and also appears on the 
can itself. 

In addition to the repetition of the 
"heavenl) coffee" idea in all phases of 
il- ad drive the theme of higher price 
for higher quality also is used con- 
stantly. 

Uthough this emphasis on price i- 
patentlj an appeal to the higher-income 
'•iiiMjiner who doesn't worn ahout 
overloading the budget b) adding a 
feu cents here and there. Harold Rieff 
points out that most coffee Lovers re- 
gardless of income, are willing to sacri- 
fice price to flavor. 

At sponsor's presstime the price of 
the Top Three coffees in the New York 
area — Maxwell House, Savarin and 
Ehlers. not necessarily in that order — 
ranged between 99c and $1.04 "> New 
York super markets. Chock full o'Nuta 
coffee was selling at ahout $1.09. 

All coffee- were recently affected In 
the hike in the price of green coffee to 
the roaster from about 58c to 72c a 
pound. Before the rise in green coffee. 
retail prices wen- five to 10c lower on 
all brand-. 

\ second increase of 10c a pound 
was foreseen late last month by coffee 
industrj leaders. The*, predicted that 
the second round ol price increases will 
be felt In the consumer in February. 
The average price for all brands was 
expected to climb to about $1.15. 

In the event of such an additional 
in- rease, Chock full o'Nuts coffee 
would maintain the 5c differential be 
tween itself and most other brands, a 
spokesman for the firm told sponsor 
It- higher price — about S1.20 — would 
remain an important factor in adver- 
tising copy, the spokesman added. 

Chock full o'Nuts' premium price 
has figured in it- advertising from the 
verj beginning. In making a point of 
price, rather than hiding the fact thai 



12 



SPONSOR 



oo O o6°o 0000 
u o^<~>-r> <=> ° C° to So O o00o 
° 00 OoO^ooo o 0o O o o o 6 o w c?o © o oo„ o 

00 .ooo 0n o 6 oOoo^oooo o0 Ooc)oo 0o Vooo °° ' 



00 <?0& '° © ° C>o ° °o W o g °o o o OoO O oo 
00 o^° 



°ooooo°o°o 



O _oo°c oo o . 

'o O o O (-, o h °0 is /■> O n^-O . 



O 



FIRST 



O.v o O -O 



o <?_ o o_ o o- 



,D 




o, 



Oo°ooOqiPoo° 










o o fe o' 



o ' 



IN RATINGS 



o '-'o ooOoo°OoOoo 
ooo A °ooo°o /s oc? o ° 6 °nn 



O O O - O 

6 o o o u o 
O o O o O 



o o 

o o 

ooo 



oo °£ Uo °S 



IN QUARTER-HOUR WINS 



oo 



o o 



o o o oo 



o0 OOo o 



o 



o o 



o o 
o 



o 



o 



°o% 



a <-5 o o o coo 



o 



OOjPo 



0°0,5O0c)O0oO0o n O oO 







'oo 



°^° O °o° o 
oo5°^pSo° 



O o c O0 0ooo ooo^ o°o oo^ o ooo ^° o -< 



O 

-Co <. 
o o o 
° , o o, 




^^^§y 



Boston's biggest attraction ! 

Throughout 1953— again, as always— WEE I led all 
other Boston radio stations, with tlie highest average ratings 

and the biggest average share of audience— 33.3% bigger 

than any other station's . . . and the most quarter-hour wins - 

63.8% more than all other stations' combined. 

Proving once again that more people listen (and listen 

regularly) to WEEI than to any other Boston radio 

station. If you'd like more proof— or availabilities— call 

CBS Radio Spot Sales or \XTT? Tp J 



Source: Pulse, Jan.-Dec. 1953; total week 







ii was more expensive than most othei 
brands, the i offee i- attempting to turn 
.in obvious dram bai k into a Bales argu- 
ment. The firsl radio and h announce- 
ment- asked the < onsumei "to gamble 
m to make the most heai enlj < offee 
you ever drank. . ." The cop) also tied 
in with the restaurettes, with phrases 
like this: '*. . . I In- same luxui j blend 
of the world's fni<~t coffees thai has 
made out restaurettes famous. . ." 

< hi rent ail < op) -till uses i fi»- res- 
taurettes as a peg l"i mention of pi u e 
Here - a sample of the i\ cop) used mi 

the Jei i \ Lestei show. I bis mer- 

cial also indicates \\<<w advertisin 
used to Force disti i] ution oi the brand: 

"The Chock full o'Nuts restaurettes 
serve ever tlm-.- million cups "I coffee 
a month. That's a l"t of coffee in any- 
body's language. Ml these people 
wouldn't keep coming back if the cof- 
fee wasn't something Bpe< ial. I oi 
years, customers have been asking if 
thej couldn't bu) some of tlii- coffee 
to make it at borne, Bui I II VI isn't 
the reason whj Chock full o'Nuts final- 
l\ (In :ided to package their coffee for 
sale in gnx ei j stores. I he) tried all 
the regulai brands ol coffee. \ n< I the) 
found that Horn- of them are in the 



same class with an) good restaurant 
, offee. I be reason is simple. Most 
regulai packaged coffees have to -'-II 
,i ,i fixed price. The) have to compete 
with each other. The) keep <»n chang- 
ing theii blends l>\ mixing in more 01 
less of cheaper coffees, bo the) can hold 
theii lowei price. That's wh) the same 
brand will often taste different to you 
from week to week. Chock full o'Nuts 
can't afford to fool around with their 
coffee like this. The) do not buy and 
do not use ONE GR \l\ of the cheaper 
coffees that ma) cost as much as 20c 
less i pound. The coffee the) j>ut in 
tlii- < an is tin- same a- the coffee the) 
serve in their restaurants — the best 
that mone) can buy. Look for it at 
youi grocer's next week. If you don't 
Bee it. please ask for it. It costs a few 
cents more than regular brands. But 
you never made coffee before that 
tastes bo good!" 

Other commercials incorporate such 
themes as the benefits of coffee drink- 
ing, per se, during the winter months 
and the advantages of regular coffee 
over instant brands. Chock full o'Nuts 
feels it's important to sell the idea of 
drinking regular coffee as well as it- 
own brand. It figures the brand will 




Billie O'Day, our Women's Commentator for six years, and Bill Ross, 

our early A. M. Disc Jockey, combine their talents in a 45-minute 

show — 9:15- 10:00 A. M. Mondays thru Fridays. Though only a few 

months old, the show pulls 2,000 pieces of mail a month and plenty 

of results for its advertisers. Cost of participation is low. Ask 

your Hollingbery Man about putting your minute spots 

on the Billie and Bill Show — in Miami . . . one 

of the Souths whopping Key Markets! 




Jame 

5,000 WATTS-610 KC-NBC Affiliate 

Notional R*p , George P. Hollingbery Co. 



benefit direct!) from institutional sell- 
ing combined with the more hard-sell 
approach. 

In addition to these general themes 
the coffee's air commercials are likely 
to merchandise another special feature 
of the brand: the plastic coffee measure 
included in ever) tin. Commercials 
point out it's important to have exact 
measurements for each cup to make 
reall) good coffee. Directions are giv- 
en to use one level measure of the cof- 
fee for each eight-ounce cup of water. 

The can itself repeats many of the 
same themes used in the advertising, 
such as the reason for the brand's 
higher price. Imprinted on top of the 
can is the message: "You have paid 
a premium for the finest pound of cof- 
fee mone) can buy. If you brew it 
correctly, you will make the same cup 
of coffee that made our chain of eating 
places famous." 

Also on the can is a reproduction of 
the cartoon drawing of a house which 
symbolizes Chock full o'Nuts restau- 
rettes. This "house" also appears in 
all brand print advertising and on res- 
taurette menus. Chock full o'Nuts cof- 
fee deliver) trucks are exact replicas 
of the "houses." An outline of the 
house will also be used in an animated 
electric sign to be located on Broadwav 
and 47th St. The sign will be in the 
form of a one-minute film showing a 
man drinking coffee at a restaurette. 
then going home and getting the same 
coffee there. The sign was due to begin 
operation this month for a year's time. 

Car cards merchandise the coffee's 
weekly television show. These card? 
are a good example of how the firm 
uses repetition to build brand identi- 
fication and consumer demand. Harold 
Kieff signed for a year's schedule on 
New ^ oik subways to achieve continu- 
al impact over that period. All sub- 
wax cards include the house drawing, 
the price factor and the "heavenly cof- 
fee" slogan; all use the same blue and 
orange colors which appear on the 
package itself. In addition to car 
cards the coffee is advertised in all 
New York new-papers and in coffee 
trade publications. 

The firm's air advertising is slated to 
get additional merchandising support 
this month via WNBC's "Chain Light- 
ning" plan. I nder the plan, a WNB( 
advertiser must spend $1,500 a week 
on time on the station. Once eligible, 
the advertiser gets merchandising aid- 
in any or all of 12 chains covered by 
the plan in which it has distribution. 



114 



SPONSOR 



ANNUAL REPORT TO 
OUR ADVERTISERS 



Since we make daily reports to our listeners on the business we 
carry, and the programs we feature, it seems only fair that we 
make an annual report to our advertisers who make possible this 
fine broadcasting fare. 

First, KVOO listeners have continued to increase in number during 
1953. They have made more money than ever before; they have 
spent more money for KVOO advertised products. 

Second, during 1953, every recognized broadcast measurement 
service has again proved KVOO to have more listeners all of 
the time than any other station in Oklahoma's No. 1 market. 
This means your advertising dollars spent on KVOO again bought 
more listeners at lowest cost per listener. 

Third, you'll be interested to know, too, that in 1953 KVOO had 
one of it's greatest dollar volume years in history. 

WHAT'S AHEAD FOR 1954? 

Every indication points to another year of expansion and growth 
in the KVOO market. Construction booms. Population growth 
is on a steady march. New industry builds new payrolls! 

It's a year of opportunity in every field of business in Oklahoma's 
No. 1 Market, blanketed only by KVOO, Oklahoma's Greatest 
Station! 

To get your share of this prime market, call, wire or write KVOO 
or your nearest Edward Petry & Company office for availabilities. 
You'll be glad you did! 




RADIO STATION KVOO 

N8C AFFILIATE 

EDWARD PETRY AND CO., INC. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



50 000 WATTS -^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^~^ TULSA. OKLA. 

' OKLAHOMA'S GREATEST STATION 



8 FEBRUARY 1954 H5 



i bo k full o'Nuts . offee it to I"- 
men handised bj aisle and dump dis- 
plays one week this month. 

\ sponsor, spot < heck of l>r. mi he* 
of 1" large New York < hains and theii 
pun basing agents revealed Bales "I t li<- 
new coffee have been I •! i-k . Managers 
replied "good" and "very good" when 
asked how the brand's sales had been 

running. \ !<-u estimated il »ffec 

currently ranked fourth <<i lilili in i<>- 
tal coffee Bales foi theii stores. \ml 
il mtral buying offices foi three 



large chains reported a large number 
< » f phone inquiries about whether their 
Btores were Btocking the brand. \l! 
said thej were planning to reorder. 

Although the company would not 
release anj Bales figures l"i the prod- 
uct Harold l!i<IT reports the firm i- 
"very pleased with initial Bales re- 
sults. 

However, an executive <>f one of the 
leading New i<>ik coffee brands in 
business over a Long period of time, 
told sponsor: 




"We feel Chock full o'Nuts is wast- 
ing their money . We don't think thev're 
going about it in the ri-iht way. 

"The company thinks it can take a 
certain amount of mone\ and Bet the 
< offee market on fire. That's not the 
way, at all. You have to gel into the 
coffee business s1o\nI\ and huild vour 
way up o\er mam years. 

"In tlic beginning, a few people- tried 
the coffee out of curiosity. Now, it's 
Bleeping on grocers' shelves." 

William Black, owner of the Chock 
full o Nut- chain, is used to tough com- 
petition. He launched his restaurettes 
in the depression years. 

It all started back in 1 ( J2U when he 
noticed a vacant space under a stair 
way on 43rd St. and Broadway, near 
Leblang's Drug Store. Joe Leblang, 
owner of the property, said Black could 
rent the space providing be didn't set 
himself up in competition. 

Black took $200 he had saved and 
stocked the stand with 12 kinds of 
nuts. By 1930 the business had devel- 
oped into a chain of 20 stores. Durin^ 
that same \ear. however, nut sales be- 
gan dropping fast due to the depres- 
sion. Black decided to revamp his nut 
stands into low-priced snack bars to 
fit shrinking purses of New Yorkers. 

Today, the 25 restaurettes gross an 
estimated $10,000,000 annually, serv- 
ing about 125.000 meals daily at an 
average 35<f per meal. Specialties of 
the house: sandwiches, homemade 
breads, pies and doughnuts — and. of 
course, the same coffee that's now be- 
ing marketed bv grocers. • • • 



BOHEMIAN BEER 

'Continued from page 33) 

known as Boh — had a budget of well 
over SI million. 

\\ hen Boh turned to baseball spon- 
sorship last year, it had to go into the 
neighboring city of Washington to find 
a major league team. This was fine for 
Boh since its distribution pattern in- 
cludes the entire Washington Nation- 
als' baseball area. But this year with 
the coming of a major league team to 
Baltimore, the Orioles. Boh will be 
I > u \ i 1 1 u baseball and will be on about 
50 stations, \s it did last \ear. Boh 
will sponsor 4% innings of every game 
over WW DC. Washington, and WCBM, 
Baltimore. 



116 



SPONSOR 




YOU MIGHT CATCH A 24 7 -LB. TARPON*— 



BUT 



CONLAN RADIO REPORT 
METROPOLITAN CRAND RAPIDS— NOVEMBER, 1953 





Share of 
Morning 
Audience 


Share of 
Afternoon 
Audience 


Share of 
Evening 
Audience 


WJEF 


29.6% 


30.8% 


33.1% 


B 


26.3 


22.8 


28.6 


C 


18.8 


24.6 


30.2 


D 


10.6 


9.1 




E 


9.1 


7.3 





F 


2.5 


1.2 


2.7 


Other 


3.1 


4.2 


5.4 




3/ie &*efeet SPtatkmb 
j 

WKZO— KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



YOU NEED WJEF RADIO 
TO LAND SALES 
IN GRAND RAPIDS! 

Morning, afternoon and night, WJEF is the Number 1 
radio station in Western Michigan's Number 1 market — 
Metropolitan Grand Rapids. 

Study the Conlan figures, left. On a quarter-hour, 52-time 
basis, WJEF gets: 

12.6% more morning listeners than the next 

station (but costs 11.1% less) 

25.2% more afternoon listeners (for 31.1% 

less) 

9.6% more evening listeners (for 3.1% less) 

There are 116,870 radio homes within WJEF's Metro- 
politan Grand Rapids Area — yet a daytime quarter-hour 
costs less than 25c per-thousand-radio-homes! 




CBS RADIO FOR GRAND RAPIDS AND KENT COUNTY 

Avery- Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



*In March, 1938, H. W. Sedgwick caught a tarpon this size in Mexico's Panuco River. 



\ good iiuIk .ition of the promotion 
-a\-. j tactics Boh will use tin- yeai can 
be found in it- 1953 ' ampaign. 

The pib bei bad no more than start- 
ed In- wind up f<>r tin- -tart of the '53 
season when Boh tossed up its first 
promotion. 

It was tin- I avoi it>- ri.i- .1 i ontesl 

and it not Onlj gOl h<a\\ 1 »u i l«l- u | •- OD 

tin- baseball broadcasts but Boh also 
bought fuli-page newspaper ad- in 
Washington, I). ('.. dailies, i It's buj ing 
lull-page newspaper ads in Baltimore 
tfii- year to stimulate interest in tin- 
Orioles.) 

The contest, open to everyone oi 
legal beer-drinking age in Washington, 
offered ■"> 1 prizes, four of which were 
I . S -a\ ings bonds. I be I a\ orite 
Player was to gel a new Packard auto- 
mobile. 

Here, in Borne detail, i- a picture ol 
what Boh did to make the promotion 
work : 

1. Boh's df. dci- were given ballots, 
ballot boxes and other point-of-pur- 
chase displays tying in \\itli the con- 
test The brewerj arranged for fre- 
quent collection of the ballots bo dealers 



weren't inconvenienced. 

2. Publi< it\ aids and announcements 
wen- made at the ball park and the 
players, in cooperation with the brew- 
ii \ and Packard dealers, made many 
p. i onal appearances. 

3. Packard auto dealers put up show- 
room displays, bumper cards and other 
publicity, as vsell as donating the car 
itself all in return for the publicity 
tie-in. 

4. Radio and tv announcements em- 
phasized the contest deadline, 6 June, 
and Favorite Player night at Griffith 
Stadium in Washington on 26 June. 

"). Foi Favorite Player night Boh in- 
creased excitement by announcing it 
would double the first four prizes to 
an) winners who either were at Grif- 
fith Stadium or could appear at the ball 
team- office within half an hour after 
the game. The stadium, needless to 
-a\ was jammed to capacity. 

6. Before game time, representatives 
of National Boh drove around the field 
in the new Packard with ("lark Griffith, 
president of the ball club. Then news 
of second, third and fourth place win- 
ners were called out from a specially 



TEXANS 



ARE 



CLANNISH! 




do the trick, tho, if you use our low 
combination rates . . . and get 
more buyers for less money. 




constructed Boh platform on the field. 
As the crowd leaned forward, Clark 
Griffith announced that Jim Busby, 
eenterfielder, had been elected Favorite 
Player and winner of the Packard. 
Busby himself announced the name of 
the fir<-t prize winner. Even the stadium 
band got into the act by playing, as 
the dignitaries left the field, the Na- 
tional Brewing jingle. "Cheerv-Beery- 
Boh." 

So much for the first half of the 
season. 

With -till a lot of baseball to go 
National Brewing and Kenyon & Eck- 
hardt s promotion department decided 
to j^et started on another promotion. 

The brewery was primarily interest- 
ed in getting people to buy more of 
its beer but it al-o wanted to keep 
the interest in baseball at a high level. 

Boh thought, too. that because the 
Nats had a couple of losing streaks it 
was important to keep promoting base- 
ball. 

Packard cars and government sav- 
ings bonds were out of the question 
for prizes, but Boh offered something 
far le.-s costly that real ball fans would 
like about as much: An all-expense 
trip for two to the 1953 World Series 
games. Other prizes were 10 SI 00 
bonds. 

To enter contestants had to get entry 
blanks from their dealers and tell, in 
10 words or less, "W h\ Boh's a hit." 

Then ever) time a hit was made dur- 
ing games, an entry blank would be 
picked from a barrel and the fan would 
be awarded a set of beer glasses. The 
(I aib hit winners were then eligible 
for the grand prizes. 

From past experience. Boh did not 
expect to get a mountain of entries. 
But when the totals for the season were 
added up the company was surprised 
to find more than 40.000 fans had en- 
tered the contest. The contest failed 
to raise Washington from fifth place 
in tho American League, but resulting 
high interest in beer and baseball ac- 
complished Boh's objective. 

In the meantime Boh did every- 
thing possible to enable baseball fans 
throughout its five-State territory to 
hear the games on radio, though it 
could not arrange t\ coverage as well. 

The problem- Boh fated in spread- 
ing coverage were ill cost of tele- 
phone lines for a baseball network, and 
(21 the fact that to buy time outright 



118 



SPONSOR 




V5«p-f •»*«» 



I'D NEVER HEARD OF OAK HILL, W. VAJ 



STATE'S SECOND LARGEST STATION 



SURPRISES MANY TIME BUYERS! 



STATION COVERAGE DETAIL BY NCS AREAS 



Total 

adio Homes 

in Area 


STATE 

NCS Area 

County 


No. of 
Counties 


DAYTIME 


4-Week Cum. 


Weekly 


Averag 


e Day 


NCS Circ. 


%* 


NCS Circ. 


%* 


NCS Circ. 


%* 




WEST VIRGINIA 
















20,370 


FAYETTE 




18,490 


90 


18,220 


89 


10,150 


49 


18,190 


GREENBRIER 
MONROE 
SUMMERS 




15,490 


85 


15,130 


83 


6,720 


36 


66,940 


KANAWHA 




10,310 


15 


7,180 


10 


4,410 


06 


14,570 


LEWIS 
BRAXTON 
DODDRIDGE 
GILMER 




3,110 


21 


2,280 


15 


1,680 


11 


18,260 


LOGAN 




2,780 


15 


1,960 


10 


1,020 


05 


19,440 


MERCER 




8,000 


41 


6,480 


33 


3,990 


20 


14,290 


NICHOLAS 
CLAY 
WEBSTER 




11,450 


80 


11,080 


77 


6,620 


46 


23,930 


RALEIGH 




20,220 


84 


19,610 


81 


8,540 


35 


12,290 


ROANE 
CALHOUN 
JACKSON 
WIRT 




2,720 


22 


1,990 


16 


1,460 


11 


16,750 


WYOMING 
BOONE 




9,630 


57 


8,610 


51 


6,730 


40 


225,030 


10 TOTAL 


21 


102,200 




92,540 




51,320 





Pardon us if we give you a jolt, but li'l ole 
Oak Hill does contain WOAY — the second 
most - powerful radio station in West 
Virginia! Matter of fact, we think you'll 
have a tough time finding another radio 
station, anywhere, that gives you 102,200 
daytime families for a mere S21.60 per 
quarter hour (26-time rate). 

Our national business shows steady gains, 
month after month. How about joining the 
parade? Address Robert R. Thomas, Man- 



age 



r, at: 



'-% of Radio Homes in Area 



WOAY 

OAK HILL, WEST VIRGINIA 

10,000 Watts AM 
20,000 Watts FM 



<ti .ill the radio stations ii wanted 
would take .1 big slice "f it- advertis- 
ing budget in proportion '" sales ex- 
po 1 in. \ . 

Boh oven ame both obsta< les. In- 
stead "i 1 1 - 1 1 1 u- network lines, Boh -im- 
plj .11 1 anged t"i \\ Win . tin- radio 
station h hi< Ii 1 .11 1 ied the game in 
Washington, t" rebroadcasl it ovei it- 
fin outlet : the nearesl station in .1 near- 
1>\ < itj would |>i< k n|> the fin broadcasl 
and simultaneously rebroad 1-1 1 1 1>- 
game on to the station next in line. I m 
was 11 — « - « I bo .in-'- it i- .1 iaii< -free 
transmission method. 



The stations which were delighted 
to gel iIm ;ames \% < >ul<l ji\e Boh 1 ' 2 
i 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 •_ - Foi its commercials. Ihe\ were 
free to Bell th<- othei I ' 2 innings to anj 
non-competitive sponsor. Stations car- 
rying ili>- games lasl season are expect- 
ed i< agree i" th<- same arrangemenl 
tin- \ i-.ii . 

In the meantime, Baltimore parti) 
through the considerable efforts ol 
Boh's president, Jerold Hoffberger — 
has gotten its own major league club. 
Natural!) Boh has Btepped up to spon- 
soi the Baltimore Orioles games tlii- 
season. 




PUZZLE: Find the kitchen eink 

The kitchen sink is in the load of corn . . . 
made possible by today's attractive cash prices. 

In fact, there's a whole new steel cabinet 
kitchen on the way for still another Kansas farm 
home. 

The decision to make this 'and countless 
similar major purchases 1 was stimulated by 
WIBW ... a fact that alert advertisers have 
known for years. 

The reason's simple. WIBW is the station 
listened to most by Kansas farm families/ Use 
WIBW to influence decisions in favor of your 
brand. 

Kansas Radio Audience. 1953. 



W I B W= 

•1 mt Mfa« 

"THE MAGIC CIRCLE" 

!•» Ca»»« hiUutan l~ -UN IUDY Gm Nfr WIIW-ICIN 




Last year's Boh radio coverage of 
Nats games marked the fir-t time there 
had lieen a telecast from even Ameri- 
can League <it\. The u coverage ex- 
truded to 53 games, a selection of 
home and a record 3W awaj names. 

Games lasl year were telecast on 
W I I <- Washington. Radio coverage 
originated from \\ \\ DC, Washington, 
and fed to the 33 Btations carrying the 
broadcasts on the trade basis. 

This season'- baseball coverage "will 
be the most intensive in the bistorj of 
Washington and Baltimore/' says Id 
Manager Umony. 

Because neither one could clear time 
for the complete 1954 schedule, two t\ 
stations are sharing the 26 home and 
30 awaj -ame- of the Orioles to be 
telecast to Baltimoreans. The Btations 
W \W! and WMAR-TV, also will 
share in telecasting to Baltimore 30 
Washington Nationals' games. 

Radio coverage in Baltimore will he 
handled b) \\CB\I. uhi<h will broad- 
casl ever) Oriole game 1 154- in all 1 
live this year. Baily Goss. Ernie Har- 
well and Howie Williams will handle 
the play-by-play, color and commer- 
cials on both am and tv. 

In Washington, WTTG will telecast 

-'1 home and 30 aua\ games of the 

Nat-. \\ WDC, Washington, will broad- 
cast the Nats full schedule on radio. 

Mosl of the 154 radio games will be 
carried live, but there will be a few 
recreations. Sound effects are used w ith 
the recreated games to add realism. 

For the second \ear in a row for 
National Bohemian. Bob Wolff and 

\nh MacDonald will cover the Nats 
games on radio. 

I ho separate networks will be set 
up for the "54 >eason. Almony savs. 

I li«' Orioles 9 radio and t\ network will 
cover Maryland and Central Pennsvl- 
vania. The Nationals" names will be 
on stations in the District. Virginia, 
Wesl Virginia and North Carolina. 

Umonj noted that games again \M»uld 
be telecast from ever) American League 
< it\ during the '54 season. 

Out-of-town coverage is handled en- 
tirelj b\ National Boh. If a city doesn't 
have baseball originations. Boh sets 
up it- own microphones, t\ cameras 
and other equipment. 

Some of the awa) telecast games, al- 
though sponsored 1" National Boh in 
Baltimore and Washington, are spon- 
sored b\ other advertisers in different 
cities, lo let two or more sponsors 
-hare the -ame picture when it's time 



120 



SPONSOR 



VICDIEHM Says: 



fto5 ike Greatest 

j er since?aul Revere! 





Rod MacLeish, News Chief of WVDA would have been a great help 
to Paul Revere. Rod's the kind of reporter who knows the news 
before its news. With a colorful background, from minor news- 
paper jobs to covering a revolution for American and Foreign 
newspapers, WVDA's Rod MacLeish rates with the best in radio 
news reporting. Rod became prominent on the Boston radio news 
scene when sent to Holland to cover the flood disaster of 1953. 
Several of his shows on this disaster were used by ABC on News of 
Tomorrow and Headline Edition. Today Rod averages 2 to 3 
feeds a week to ABC. 

On the scene radio reporting of the USS Leyte explosion by 
MacLeish over WVDA was a national scoop. Shortly thereafter, 
a merchant ship exploded in the harbor. Rod talked the compe- 
tition into leaving the scene before the real news was available, 
thus WVDA-ABC had it exclusively. Rod was radio's outstanding 
news coverage voice at Senator McCarthy's communist hearings 
in Boston. He scooped the "earways" on the CIO convention held 
here recently. Highlights of Rod's interviews with the 'big wheels" 
were used on Taylor Grant's Headline Edition. 

WVDA gives 3 times the news coverage of any other Boston station, 
and the high calibre reporting of Rod MacLeish is 
reflected in all the stations in the Vic Diehm group. 
So, if your client wants a news audience we'll 
deliver the tops in radio. 



WAZL 



HAZLETON, PA. NBC-MBS 

I Represented by Robert Meeker Associates! 

WHOL 

ALLENTOWN, PA. CBS 
I Represented by Robert Meeker Associates) 

WHLN 

BLOOMSBURG, PA. INDEPENDENT 
(Represented by Paul H. Raymer Company) 

WIDE 

BIDDEFORD-SACO, ME. MBS-YANKEE 

(Represented by Paul H. Raymer Company) 

WVDA 

BOSTON, MASS. ABC 

(Represented by Paul H. Raymer Company) 



Cow Centm 

Miaou ti wM 

KFffl 




KFAL 



WIUl OOT01 *.< Ml 

■elllni i. • liv Incll <" tb* 

• Dthei r».|lo 

i • ar-chin- 

nol nation doe< » iiiparb lelllni 

)ob "ii (he til-Important Firm 

• Bl i I - 

jmir product WrlU 

KFAL today ah ml rout marketing 

Villi lliul thai tin 
(ul ni.llun gi - Id. -I I ; 

900 KC • 1000 WATTS 

FULTON, MISSOURI 





W 




Same old story 
in Rochester . . . 

WHEC WAY 
OUT AHEAD! 

Consistent audience rating 
leader since 1943. 

WHEC 



ROCHESTER, N.Y. 
5,000 WATTS 

ff«pr*M«rari<r*t . . . * 

IVMITT-WUKINNIY. tnc. Now Y»r». Ou.»«* 
IN » O'CONMIU CO lM*»nlti,J..»n.<ii« 



fin the ' ommercial, Boh dei bed a 
"< lean feed" s\-tem. When sommercial 
time rolls around the originating sta- 
tion on <in-. feeds a picture without 
commen iala or commentary to the n«*t- 
work Views of the playing field, the 
. rowd in the Btands and othei \ Lstas 
iliu- .in -cut over the cable while the 
originating Btation "inserts" it- com- 
• il ovei it- own Btation, eithei 

from the downtown studios or the 

transmitter. In network cities ihe spon- 
boi eithei can take the pictures and 
icad audio commercials while the ball 
|iaik Bcenes are shown to L'i\e an il- 
lusion of commercials rifdit from the 
Btadium or can insert its own video 
commen ials. 

Huh. incidentally, has separate am 
and tv descriptions of the game. 

Boh's wintertime air advertising is 
extensive. To keep in touch with sports 
fans, Boh sponsors tv wrestling pro- 
grams. They originate from WMAR- 
TV, Baltimore, and are picked up by 
WITC. Washington, WSVA-TV, Har- 
risonburg, \ a.. WCHA-TV, Chambers- 
burg, Pa. and WSBA-TV, York, Pa. 
I ul ike the baseball broadcasts, Boh 
pays the time costs of the wrestling 
programs on each station. 

Betides wrestling, Boh winter pro- 
grams include a varietv of -ports, dra- 
matic and news shows. This winter it 
sponsored a numher of transcribed, 
syndicated programs through January, 
then -witched to other programs. Prin- 
cipal wintertime air activit) is in Bal- 
timore and \\ ashington. 

From 7.") to !!()'; of Boh's million 
dollar-plus budget goes into television 
and radio. The rest of the money is 
divided among point-of-sale, outdoor, 
newspapers and other media. 

Norman Almony says he doesn't 
know of an) brewerj using tv and ra- 
dio as much as Boh. "Of all the media 
Boh has used, none has been more 
outstanding than television," he told 
SPONSOR. "If I had to sa\ what has 
been more important to us than any- 
thing else in our fairly explosive ex- 
pansion of recenl years, it would be 
television. We're always looking for 
good t\ availabilities. W herever there's 
t\ in our marketing ana. we'll be on 
it. 

"Television and radio have per- 
mitted visualization and personal sell- 
ing that no other medium bas offered," 
according to Almoin. "We bought t\ 
a few years ago at a time no one else 
would. It's paid off from the start." 

* • * 



WHY ARE RADIO RATES LOW? 

{Continued from page 31) 

as I uyers of media, usuallv won't ad- 
mit that any space or time is too cheap, 
one of the radio-tv brass at another top 
10 agenc) confided, "Don't use my 
name hut I think radio has always been 
underpriced. The) certainly did lo-e a 
chance to raise rat'- rijdit after the 
war. 

Cost-per-1,000 comparisons among 
media are legion. The BAB figures 
used at the head of this article sum up 
the inter-media picture as well as any. 

The figures show that for $] radio 
\\ill deliver 1,012 people, tv will de- 
liver .391, magazines 337 and newspa- 
pers 213. These figures were derived 
from the CBS Radio sales promotion 
film It's Time for Everybody. The 
peoples-reached figure for CBS Radio 
(1.207l was extended by BAB to cov- 
er all four networks. Here are the 
sources: 

For radio: More than nine out of 10 of 
every sponsored network show whose ratings 
and estimated time and production costs 
were listed by Nielsen in November and 
December 1952. A 1951 ARB nationwide 
study is the source for number of listeners 
per home. 

For tv: More than nine out oj 10 of every 
sponsored network show whose ratings and 
estimated time and production costs were 
listed by Nielsen lor four weeks ending 13 
December 1952. The December 1952 tv re- 
port of ARB is the source for the number of 
listeners per home. 

For magazines: Cost is for the average, 
full-page black-and-white ad in eight lead- 
ing publications. Page costs are one-time 
rate, January 1953. Circulation is ABC as 
of 30 June 1952. Readers per copy from 
"1949 Magazine Audience Group Study." 
Percent ad noters from Starch, 1951 and 
1952. 

For newspapers: Cost is for average 500- 
line ad in largest morning and evening news- 
papers in 50 largest VS. cities. Circulation 
is ABC as of 30 September 1952. Readers 
per copy estimated at 2.5. Percent of ad 
noters from "Continuing Study of Newt- 
paper Readership. Nos. 1-125." Space costs 
are one-time flat line rate in effect January 
1953. 

It's been pointed out that the radio 
figures were compiled before the Niel- 
sen multi-set sample was increased to 
allow the radio medium advantage of 
the larger number of personal sets in 



LOUISE FLETCHER 

SELLS THE 

NEGRO 

HOUSEWIFE 
VIA 

WSOK 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 




122 



SPONSOR 



the home. Moreover the figures do not 
include auto listening and, as one 
broadcaster commented grimly, do not 
take into account under-the-counter 
deals. 

Many broadcasters feel strongly, by 
the way, that deals are one of the most 
potent factors in keeping rates down. 
They regard them as an admission by 
their own side that radio is not worth 
what the card says it is. While they 
may sympathize with the station oper- 
ator hungry for business, a goodly 
number of broadcasters who practice 
strict adherence to card rates will tell 
you that more backbone, more promo- 
tion, more imaginative selling and pro- 
graming are what is often needed. Rate 
cutting, the broadcasters warn, is not 
only dangerous to the station that prac- 
tices it but also tends to affect the rate 
structure of competitive stations. 

While the large agencies contacted 
by SPONSOR generally agree that ra- 
dio's cost-per- 1,000 is lower than the 
other three media mentioned above, 
they tend to be wary of using broad 
comparisons. Many prefer to measure 
specific buys for specific advertisers. 
Some feel that it is impossible to com- 
pare media. Others feel that the cost 
of reaching people is only one of the 
many ways of comparing media — im- 
pact isn't taken into account, for exam- 
ple. Other arguments against cost-per- 
1,000 comparisons are (1) comparing 
a program with a full-page magazine 
ad or a 500-line newspaper ad is ar- 
bitrary, and (2) there is no indication 
that the number of people who hear a 
program is the same as the number 
who hear the commercial. 

However, a research executive said: 
"Of course, there are dangers in com- 
paring apples and oranges. But if a 
client wants some way of knowing how 
much it cost him to reach prospects 
through different media, we must an- 
swer him the best way we can. The ar- 
gument that cost-per-1,000 comparisons 
don't measure impact is no argument 
at all. Such comparisons weren't meant 
to." 

In defense of the BAB figures given 
above, it was held that they bend over 
backward in comparing the impact of 
a complete show with its sponsor iden- 
tification and all its commercials as 
against a black-and-white page and a 
500-line newspaper ad (which is about 
five columns times seven inches). 

As for the argument that the pro- 
gram audience is not the commercial 
audience, radio refers such doubters to 

8 FEBRUARY 1954 



there's a new look in Memphis radio 
to make listening better than ever 

It's WMC's new 
half-wave radio tower 

producing 65% more efficiency 

over the typical quarter-wave 

antennas operated by other stations 

in Memphis 



CAPE GIRARDEAU • 



MO.* 



SIKESTON » 
POPLAR BLUFF 



KY. 



MAYFIELD 



WALNUT RIDGE 1 
JONESBORO * * 

NEWPORT 



• UNION CITY 
CARUTHERSVILU 
DYERSBURG 



• PARIS 



BLYTHEVILLE 



TENN. 



• JACKSON 



BROWNSVILLE 



ARK. 



WMC 

MEMPHIS 



• SAVANNAH 



FORREST 


CITY£ / CORINTH 


LITTLE ROCK 


3 • 


• 


SENATOBIA • NEW ALBANY 


HELENA 


4 . MISS. 

fS CLARKSDAll TUp * lQ 


• 


PINE BLUFF 


\ CLEVELAND • GRENADA 

> * '' 




£ • GREENWOOD 




N« GREENVILLE 



FM day and night. Now 300,000 watts effective power, serving 
exclusively from Memphis over 70,000 FM sets in the Mid- 
South area with clear, high fidelity reception. 



WU if MEMPHIS 
■ wl ^1 NBC - 5000 Watts - 790 K. C. 

National representatives, The Branham Company 

WMCF 260 KW Simultaneously Duplicating AM Schedule 
WMCT First TV Station in Memphis and the Mid-South 

Owned and Operated by The Commercial Appeal 



The station that "sets the standard" for 
finer radio reception in the Mid-South. 



123 




Nielsen, which regularlj measured the 
commercial audience to sponsored pro- 
grams before 1950. (At pre-ent these 
figures are given on special request.) 

\- a matter of faet. one of the reason- 

regulai measurement was abandoned 
was thai the program audience and 
commercial audience ratings were so 
similar. \ stud) of the \iel-en figures 
showed that the si\-ininute audience 
and the commercial audience to a pro- 
gram were \ irtuall) identical. 

Tlie broadcasters do nol rest their 
case on radios ahilitx to roach people 
cheaply. What makes radio also stand 
out, contend the broadcasters, is ra- 
dio- abilit) to reach people — period. 
\ lot of people. Nearly everybody. 

Radio - potential audience is the a< e 
in the hole, the industry feels. No other 
medium offers the opportunity to blan- 
ket everj section of the country, everj 
pari of everj income group, almost 
everj spot where a person might be — 
in the kitchen, in bed, in an auto, on 
the beach, while working, while fishing, 
while doing almost anything, while do- 
in^ nothing. 

The storj that radio-is-everywhere 
is not exactlj new. Radio saturation. 
so far as homes are concerned, has 
her, i pushing close to the 100 I < eil- 
ing for some years now. Last year's 
figure was more than <)',',', . However, 
the continuing heavj sale of radio sets 
i more than 13 million were produced 
last year) has been underscoring the 
spread of new places to listen. These 
new places are in the home outside the 
living room and in autos. 

The mounting number of extra sets 
in the home has brought about an im- 
portant change in the Nielsen radio 
-ample. I mil hist fall. Nielsen mea- 
sured multi-set listening in 28.6$ of 
the NR1 sample. This figure has been 
raised to 43.7%. It is based on the 
large-scale Nielsen coverage study of 
\pri